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1.
Can J Kidney Health Dis ; 9: 20543581221080327, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35514878

RESUMEN

Peer review aims to select articles for publication and to improve articles before publication. We believe that this process can be infused by kindness without losing rigor. In 2014, the founding editorial team of the Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease (CJKHD) made an explicit commitment to treat authors as we would wish to be treated ourselves. This broader group of authors reaffirms this principle, for which we suggest the terminology "supportive review."


L'évaluation par les pairs vise à sélectionner les articles à publier et à en améliorer le contenu avant publication. Nous sommes d'avis que ce processus peut être fait avec bienveillance sans perdre en rigueur. En 2014, l'équipe de rédaction fondatrice du Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease (CJKHD) a pris l'engagement ferme de traiter les auteurs comme ses membres souhaiteraient eux-mêmes être traités. Aujourd'hui, notre groupe élargi d'auteur(e)s réaffirme ce principe pour lequel nous proposons la terminologie « évaluation constructive ¼.

2.
Eur J Neurosci ; 55(8): 2003-2023, 2022 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35445451

RESUMEN

From auditory rhythm patterns, listeners extract the underlying steady beat and perceptually group beats to form metres. While previous studies show infants discriminate different auditory metres, it remains unknown whether they can maintain (imagine) a metrical interpretation of an ambiguous rhythm through top-down processes. We investigated this via electroencephalographic mismatch responses. We primed 6-month-old infants (N = 24) to hear a 6-beat ambiguous rhythm either in duple metre (n = 13) or in triple metre (n = 11) through loudness accents either on every second or every third beat. Periods of priming were inserted before sequences of the ambiguous unaccented rhythm. To elicit mismatch responses, occasional pitch deviants occurred on either beat 4 (strong beat in triple metre; weak in duple) or beat 5 (strong in duple; weak in triple) of the unaccented trials. At frontal left sites, we found a significant interaction between beat and priming group in the predicted direction. Post-hoc analyses showed that mismatch response amplitudes were significantly larger for beat 5 in the duple-primed than triple-primed group (p = .047) and were non-significantly larger for beat 4 in the triple-primed than duple-primed group. Further, amplitudes were generally larger in infants with musically experienced parents. At frontal right sites, mismatch responses were generally larger for those in the duple compared with triple group, which may reflect a processing advantage for duple metre. These results indicate that infants can impose a top-down, internally generated metre on ambiguous auditory rhythms, an ability that would aid early language and music learning.


Asunto(s)
Percepción Auditiva , Música , Estimulación Acústica/métodos , Percepción Auditiva/fisiología , Electroencefalografía , Humanos , Lactante , Actividad Motora
3.
Eur J Neurosci ; 55(8): 1972-1985, 2022 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35357048

RESUMEN

The human auditory system excels at detecting patterns needed for processing speech and music. According to predictive coding, the brain predicts incoming sounds, compares predictions to sensory input and generates a prediction error whenever a mismatch between the prediction and sensory input occurs. Predictive coding can be indexed in electroencephalography (EEG) with the mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a, two components of event-related potentials (ERP) that are elicited by infrequent deviant sounds (e.g., differing in pitch, duration and loudness) in a stream of frequent sounds. If these components reflect prediction error, they should also be elicited by omitting an expected sound, but few studies have examined this. We compared ERPs elicited by infrequent randomly occurring omissions (unexpected silences) in tone sequences presented at two tones per second to ERPs elicited by frequent, regularly occurring omissions (expected silences) within a sequence of tones presented at one tone per second. We found that unexpected silences elicited significant MMN and P3a, although the magnitude of these components was quite small and variable. These results provide evidence for hierarchical predictive coding, indicating that the brain predicts silences and sounds.


Asunto(s)
Potenciales Evocados Auditivos , Potenciales Evocados , Estimulación Acústica/métodos , Adulto , Percepción Auditiva/fisiología , Electroencefalografía/métodos , Potenciales Evocados/fisiología , Potenciales Evocados Auditivos/fisiología , Humanos , Sonido
4.
Curr Biol ; 32(8): 1837-1842.e3, 2022 Apr 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35235766

RESUMEN

Aesthetic experience seems both regular and idiosyncratic. On one hand, there are powerful regularities in what we tend to find attractive versus unattractive (e.g., beaches versus mud puddles).1-4 On the other hand, our tastes also vary dramatically from person to person:5-8 what one of us finds beautiful, another might find distasteful. What is the nature of such differences? They may in part be arbitrary-e.g., reflecting specific past judgments (such as liking red towels over blue ones because they were once cheaper). However, they may also in part be systematic-reflecting deeper differences in perception and/or cognition. We assessed the systematicity of aesthetic taste by exploring its typicality for the first time across seeing and hearing. Observers rated the aesthetic appeal of ordinary scenes and objects (e.g., beaches, buildings, and books) and environmental sounds (e.g., doorbells, dripping, and dialtones). We then measured "taste typicality" (separately for each modality) in terms of the similarity between each individual's aesthetic preferences and the population's average. The data revealed two primary patterns. First, taste typicality was not arbitrary but rather was correlated to a moderate degree across seeing and hearing: people who have typical taste for images also tend to have typical taste for sounds. Second, taste typicality captured most of the explainable variance in people's impressions, showing that it is the primary dimension along which aesthetic tastes systematically vary.


Asunto(s)
Juicio , Gusto , Belleza , Emociones , Estética , Humanos
5.
Pilot Feasibility Stud ; 8(1): 9, 2022 Jan 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35045863

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Dance is a mind-body activity of purposeful rhythmic movement to music. There is growing interest in using dance as a form of cognitive and physical rehabilitation. This manuscript describes the development of GERAS DANcing for Cognition and Exercise (DANCE) and evaluates its feasibility in older adults with cognitive and mobility impairments. METHODS: The progressive dance curricula were delivered for 15 weeks (1-h class; twice weekly). Participants were eligible if they were community-dwelling older adults aged 60+ with early cognitive or mobility impairment able to follow three-step commands and move independently. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment/retention, adherence, participant satisfaction, safety, and adverse events. RESULTS: Twenty-five older adults (mean (standard deviation [SD]) age = 77.55 (6.10) years, range 68-90 years) with early cognitive (Montreal Cognitive Assessment score (SD) = 21.77 (4.05)) and mobility (92% were pre-frail/frail as indicated on the Fried Frailty Phenotype) impairments were recruited from a geriatric out-patient clinic or within the community. A total of 20/25 (80%) participants completed the study. Average class attendance was 72%, and self-reported homework adherence "most-days / every day" was 89%. A stepwise progression in the dance curricula was observed with increases in motor complexity and balance demands, and 95% of participants rated the program as a "just-right" challenge. Ninety percent of participants rated GERAS DANCE as excellent, and 100% would recommend the program to a friend or family member. Over 50% of participants connected outside of class time for a self-initiated coffee club. Adverse events of falls and fractures were reported for 2 participants, which occurred at home unrelated to the dance intervention during the study period. Pre-determined thresholds for feasibility were met for all outcomes. DISCUSSION: GERAS DANCE is a feasible and enjoyable program for older adults with early cognitive or mobility impairments. GERAS DANCE curriculum grading (duration; sequence; instructions) and motor complexity increases in agility, balance, and coordination appear appropriately tailored for this population. Future work will explore the feasibility of GERAS DANCE in new settings (i.e., virtually online, community centers, or retirement homes) and the mind-body-social benefits of dance.

6.
Behav Brain Sci ; 44: e116, 2021 09 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34588065

RESUMEN

The evolutionary origins of complex capacities such as musicality are not simple, and likely involved many interacting steps of musicality-specific adaptations, exaptations, and cultural creation. A full account of the origins of musicality needs to consider the role of ancient adaptations such as credible singing, auditory scene analysis, and prediction-reward circuits in constraining the emergence of musicality.


Asunto(s)
Música , Adaptación Fisiológica , Evolución Biológica , Humanos , Recompensa
7.
Clin Neurophysiol ; 132(10): 2384-2390, 2021 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34454265

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Developmental dyslexia is a reading disorder that features difficulties in perceiving and tracking rhythmic regularities in auditory streams, such as speech and music. Studies on typical healthy participants have shown that power fluctuations of neural oscillations in beta band (15-25 Hz) reflect an essential mechanism for tracking rhythm or entrainment and relate to predictive timing and attentional processes. Here we investigated whether adults with dyslexia have atypical beta power fluctuation. METHODS: The electroencephalographic activities of individuals with dyslexia (n = 13) and typical control participants (n = 13) were measured while they passively listened to an isochronous tone sequence (2 Hz presentation rate). The time-frequency neural activities generated from auditory cortices were analyzed. RESULTS: The phase of beta power fluctuation at the 2 Hz stimulus presentation rate differed and appeared opposite between individuals with dyslexia and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Atypical beta power fluctuation might reflect deficits in perceiving and tracking auditory rhythm in dyslexia. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings extend our understanding of atypical neural activities for tracking rhythm in dyslexia and could inspire novel methods to objectively measure the benefits of training, and predict potential benefit of auditory rhythmic rehabilitation programs on an individual basis.


Asunto(s)
Estimulación Acústica/métodos , Corteza Auditiva/fisiología , Percepción Auditiva/fisiología , Ritmo beta/fisiología , Dislexia/fisiopatología , Adulto , Dislexia/diagnóstico , Electroencefalografía/métodos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven
8.
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci ; 376(1835): 20200333, 2021 10 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34420377

RESUMEN

Rhythms are important for understanding coordinated behaviours in ecological systems. The repetitive nature of rhythms affords prediction, planning of movements and coordination of processes within and between individuals. A major challenge is to understand complex forms of coordination when they differ from complete synchronization. By expressing phase as ratio of a cycle, we adapted levels of the Farey tree as a metric of complexity mapped to the range between in-phase and anti-phase synchronization. In a bimanual tapping task, this revealed an increase of variability with ratio complexity, a range of hidden and unstable yet measurable modes, and a rank-frequency scaling law across these modes. We use the phase-attractive circle map to propose an interpretation of these findings in terms of hierarchical cross-frequency coupling (CFC). We also consider the tendency for small-integer attractors in the single-hand repeated tapping of three-interval rhythms reported in the literature. The phase-attractive circle map has wider basins of attractions for such ratios. This work motivates the question whether CFC intrinsic to neural dynamics implements low-level priors for timing and coordination and thus becomes involved in phenomena as diverse as attractor states in bimanual coordination and the cross-cultural tendency for musical rhythms to have simple interval ratios. This article is part of the theme issue 'Synchrony and rhythm interaction: from the brain to behavioural ecology'.


Asunto(s)
Mano , Movimiento , Desempeño Psicomotor , Humanos , Periodicidad
9.
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci ; 376(1835): 20200337, 2021 10 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34420383

RESUMEN

This review paper discusses rhythmic interactions and distinguishes them from non-rhythmic interactions. We report on communicative behaviours in social and sexual contexts, as found in dyads of humans, non-human primates, non-primate mammals, birds, anurans and insects. We discuss observed instances of rhythm in dyadic interactions, identify knowledge gaps and propose suggestions for future research. We find that most studies on rhythmicity in interactive signals mainly focus on one modality (acoustic or visual) and we suggest more work should be performed on multimodal signals. Although the social functions of interactive rhythms have been fairly well described, developmental research on rhythms used to regulate social interactions is still lacking. Future work should also focus on identifying the exact timing mechanisms involved. Rhythmic signalling behaviours are widespread and critical in regulating social interactions across taxa, but many questions remain unexplored. A multidisciplinary, comparative cross-species approach may help provide answers. This article is part of the theme issue 'Synchrony and rhythm interaction: from the brain to behavioural ecology'.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación Animal , Anuros/fisiología , Aves/fisiología , Comunicación , Insectos/fisiología , Mamíferos/psicología , Periodicidad , Animales , Humanos , Primates/psicología
10.
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci ; 376(1835): 20200327, 2021 10 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34420385

RESUMEN

Millions of children are impacted by neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), which unfold early in life, have varying genetic etiologies and can involve a variety of specific or generalized impairments in social, cognitive and motor functioning requiring potentially lifelong specialized supports. While specific disorders vary in their domain of primary deficit (e.g. autism spectrum disorder (social), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (attention), developmental coordination disorder (motor) and developmental language disorder (language)), comorbidities between NDDs are common. Intriguingly, many NDDs are associated with difficulties in skills related to rhythm, timing and synchrony though specific profiles of rhythm/timing impairments vary across disorders. Impairments in rhythm/timing may instantiate vulnerabilities for a variety of NDDs and may contribute to both the primary symptoms of each disorder as well as the high levels of comorbidities across disorders. Drawing upon genetic, neural, behavioural and interpersonal constructs across disorders, we consider how disrupted rhythm and timing skills early in life may contribute to atypical developmental cascades that involve overlapping symptoms within the context of a disorder's primary deficits. Consideration of the developmental context, as well as common and unique aspects of the phenotypes of different NDDs, will inform experimental designs to test this hypothesis including via potential mechanistic intervention approaches. This article is part of the theme issue 'Synchrony and rhythm interaction: from the brain to behavioural ecology'.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Neurodesarrollo/psicología , Periodicidad , Tiempo , Comorbilidad , Humanos , Factores de Tiempo
11.
Psychol Sci ; 32(9): 1416-1425, 2021 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34409898

RESUMEN

Anticipating the future is essential for efficient perception and action planning. Yet the role of anticipation in event segmentation is understudied because empirical research has focused on retrospective cues such as surprise. We address this concern in the context of perception of musical-phrase boundaries. A computational model of cognitive sequence processing was used to control the information-dynamic properties of tone sequences. In an implicit, self-paced listening task (N = 38), undergraduates dwelled longer on tones generating high entropy (i.e., high uncertainty) than on those generating low entropy (i.e., low uncertainty). Similarly, sequences that ended on tones generating high entropy were rated as sounding more complete (N = 31 undergraduates). These entropy effects were independent of both the surprise (i.e., information content) and phrase position of target tones in the original musical stimuli. Our results indicate that events generating high entropy prospectively contribute to segmentation processes in auditory sequence perception, independently of the properties of the subsequent event.


Asunto(s)
Música , Percepción Auditiva , Señales (Psicología) , Humanos , Estudios Retrospectivos , Incertidumbre
12.
Front Psychol ; 12: 647402, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34262502

RESUMEN

Participation in extra-curricular activities has been found to associate with increased well-being. Here we investigated in a survey (n = 786) what activities university students at a Canadian university engaged in during the stressful COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in April, 2020, which coincided with a novel online exam period, and how these activities related to perceived well-being, anxiety (STAI-S), social aspects of activities, and personality. Sixty-five percentage of students scored in the high anxiety category of the STAI-S, an alarming statistic given that only 24% had reached out for professional supports. This is consistent with reports that current supports on university campuses are inadequate. Listening to music (92%) and watching movies/series (92%) were engaged in most frequently, followed by socializing virtually (89%) and engaging in social media (85%). The activities students rated as most helpful to their well-being were somewhat different, with outdoor exercise rated highest, followed by socializing virtually and listening to music. While all activities were rated as beneficial, those with a social component tended to have high ratings, consistent with students attempting to replace lost social interactions. Linear regression models found few associations between STAI-S scores and other measures, likely because of large individual differences and lack of a pre-pandemic baseline needed to assess changes in anxiety. The importance of individual differences was evident in that those higher in conscientiousness or extraversion or emotional stability were more likely to engage in exercise, while those higher in openness to experience were more likely to engage in journaling, playing a musical instrument, or singing, with a trend for higher engagement in song writing. Individual differences were also evident in that equal numbers of students gave positive and negative comments related to their well-being during the pandemic. The individual differences uncovered here suggest that having a variety of proactive interventions would likely reach more students. Indeed, 52% indicated an interest in online group music therapy, 48% in art therapy and 40% in verbal therapy, despite music and art therapies being virtually non-existent on campuses. In sum, the findings highlight the importance of choice in extra-curricular activities and therapies that support well-being.

13.
Child Dev ; 92(5): e907-e923, 2021 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33506491

RESUMEN

Accurate time perception is crucial for hearing (speech, music) and action (walking, catching). Motor brain regions are recruited during auditory time perception. Therefore, the hypothesis was tested that children (age 6-7) at risk for developmental coordination disorder (rDCD), a neurodevelopmental disorder involving motor difficulties, would show nonmotor auditory time perception deficits. Psychophysical tasks confirmed that children with rDCD have poorer duration and rhythm perception than typically developing children (N = 47, d = 0.95-1.01). Electroencephalography showed delayed mismatch negativity or P3a event-related potential latency in response to duration or rhythm deviants, reflecting inefficient brain processing (N = 54, d = 0.71-0.95). These findings are among the first to characterize perceptual timing deficits in DCD, suggesting important theoretical and clinical implications.


Asunto(s)
Música , Percepción del Habla , Percepción del Tiempo , Estimulación Acústica , Percepción Auditiva , Niño , Electroencefalografía , Humanos , Habla
14.
Q J Exp Psychol (Hove) ; 74(6): 1037-1053, 2021 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33448253

RESUMEN

The regularity of musical beat makes it a powerful stimulus promoting movement synchrony among people. Synchrony can increase interpersonal trust, affiliation, and cooperation. Musical pieces can be classified according to the quality of groove; the higher the groove, the more it induces the desire to move. We investigated questions related to collective music-listening among 33 participants in an experiment conducted in a naturalistic yet acoustically controlled setting of a research concert hall with motion tracking. First, does higher groove music induce (1) movement with more energy and (2) higher interpersonal movement coordination? Second, does visual social information manipulated by having eyes open or eyes closed also affect energy and coordination? Participants listened to pieces from four categories formed by crossing groove (high, low) with tempo (higher, lower). Their upper body movement was recorded via head markers. Self-reported ratings of grooviness, emotional valence, emotional intensity, and familiarity were collected after each song. A biomechanically motivated measure of movement energy increased with high-groove songs and was positively correlated with grooviness ratings, confirming the theoretically implied but less tested motor response to groove. Participants' ratings of emotional valence and emotional intensity correlated positively with movement energy, suggesting that movement energy relates to emotional engagement with music. Movement energy was higher in eyes-open trials, suggesting that seeing each other enhanced participants' responses, consistent with social facilitation or contagion. Furthermore, interpersonal coordination was higher both for the high-groove and eyes-open conditions, indicating that the social situation of collective music listening affects how music is experienced.


Asunto(s)
Música , Percepción Auditiva , Señales (Psicología) , Humanos , Movimiento , Reconocimiento en Psicología
15.
Dev Sci ; 24(1): e12982, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32358988

RESUMEN

Accurate perception and production of emotional states is important for successful social interactions across the lifespan. Previous research has shown that when identifying emotion in faces, preschool children are more likely to confuse emotions that share valence, but differ in arousal (e.g. sadness and anger) than emotions that share arousal, but differ on valence (e.g. anger and joy). Here, we examined the influence of valence and arousal on children's production of emotion in music. Three-, 5- and 7-year-old children recruited from the greater Hamilton area (N = 74) 'performed' music to produce emotions using a self-pacing paradigm, in which participants controlled the onset and offset of each chord in a musical sequence by repeatedly pressing and lifting the same key on a MIDI piano. Key press velocity controlled the loudness of each chord. Results showed that (a) differentiation of emotions by 5-year-old children was mainly driven by arousal of the target emotion, with differentiation based on both valence and arousal at 7 years and (b) tempo and loudness were used to differentiate emotions earlier in development than articulation. The results indicate that the developmental trajectory of emotion understanding in music may differ from the developmental trajectory in other domains.


Asunto(s)
Música , Ira , Nivel de Alerta , Niño , Preescolar , Emociones , Humanos
16.
Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci ; 16(1-2): 185-192, 2021 01 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32685965

RESUMEN

Social bonding is fundamental to human society, and romantic interest involves an important type of bonding. Speed dating research paradigms offer both high external validity and experimental control for studying romantic interest in real-world settings. While previous studies focused on the effect of social and personality factors on romantic interest, the role of non-verbal interaction has been little studied in initial romantic interest, despite being commonly viewed as a crucial factor. The present study investigated whether romantic interest can be predicted by non-verbal dyadic interactive body sway, and enhanced by movement-promoting ('groovy') background music. Participants' body sway trajectories were recorded during speed dating. Directional (predictive) body sway coupling, but not body sway similarity, predicted interest in a long-term relationship above and beyond rated physical attractiveness. In addition, presence of groovy background music promoted interest in meeting a dating partner again. Overall, we demonstrate that romantic interest is reflected by non-verbal body sway in dyads in a real-world dating setting. This novel approach could potentially be applied to investigate non-verbal aspects of social bonding in other dynamic interpersonal interactions such as between infants and parents and in non-verbal populations including those with communication disorders.


Asunto(s)
Cortejo/psicología , Relaciones Interpersonales , Música , Postura/fisiología , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino
17.
Neuropsychologia ; 138: 107324, 2020 02 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31877312

RESUMEN

Regular musical rhythms orient attention over time and facilitate processing. Previous research has shown that regular rhythmic stimulation benefits subsequent syntax processing in children with dyslexia and specific language impairment. The present EEG study examined the influence of a rhythmic musical prime on the P600 late evoked-potential, associated with grammatical error detection for dyslexic adults and matched controls. Participants listened to regular or irregular rhythmic prime sequences followed by grammatically correct and incorrect sentences. They were required to perform grammaticality judgments for each auditorily presented sentence while EEG was recorded. In addition, tasks on syntax violation detection as well as rhythm perception and production were administered. For both participant groups, ungrammatical sentences evoked a P600 in comparison to grammatical sentences and its mean amplitude was larger after regular than irregular primes. Peak analyses of the P600 difference wave confirmed larger peak amplitudes after regular primes for both groups. They also revealed overall a later peak for dyslexic participants, particularly at posterior sites, compared to controls. Results extend rhythmic priming effects on language processing to underlying electrophysiological correlates of morpho-syntactic violation detection in dyslexic adults and matched controls. These findings are interpreted in the theoretical framework of the Dynamic Attending Theory (Jones, 1976, 2019) and the Temporal Sampling Framework for developmental disorders (Goswami, 2011).


Asunto(s)
Percepción Auditiva/fisiología , Corteza Cerebral/fisiopatología , Dislexia/fisiopatología , Potenciales Evocados/fisiología , Música , Psicolingüística , Adulto , Electroencefalografía , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Percepción del Habla/fisiología , Adulto Joven
18.
Cereb Cortex Commun ; 1(1): tgaa043, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34296112

RESUMEN

Human movements often spontaneously fall into synchrony with auditory and visual environmental rhythms. Related behavioral studies have shown that motor responses are automatically and unintentionally coupled with external rhythmic stimuli. However, the neurophysiological processes underlying such motor entrainment remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated with electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) the modulation of neural and muscular activity induced by periodic audio and/or visual sequences. The sequences were presented at either 1 or 2 Hz, while participants maintained constant finger pressure on a force sensor. The results revealed that although there was no change of amplitude in participants' EMG in response to the sequences, the synchronization between EMG and EEG recorded over motor areas in the beta (12-40 Hz) frequency band was dynamically modulated, with maximal coherence occurring about 100 ms before each stimulus. These modulations in beta EEG-EMG motor coherence were found for the 2-Hz audio-visual sequences, confirming at a neurophysiological level the enhancement of motor entrainment with multimodal rhythms that fall within preferred perceptual and movement frequency ranges. Our findings identify beta band cortico-muscular coupling as a potential underlying mechanism of motor entrainment, further elucidating the nature of the link between sensory and motor systems in humans.

19.
Neuroimage ; 198: 31-43, 2019 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31059798

RESUMEN

Previous studies indicate that temporal predictability can enhance timing and intensity perception, but it is not known whether it also enhances pitch perception, despite pitch being a fundamental perceptual attribute of sound. Here we investigate this in the context of rhythmic regularity, a form of predictable temporal structure common in sound streams, including music and speech. It is known that neural oscillations in low (delta: 1-3 Hz) and high (beta: 15-25 Hz) frequency bands entrain to rhythms in phase and power, respectively, but it is not clear why both low and high frequency bands entrain to external rhythms, and whether they and their coupling serve different perceptual functions. Participants discriminated near-threshold pitch deviations (targets) embedded in either rhythmic (regular/isochronous) or arrhythmic (irregular/non-isochronous) tone sequences. Psychophysically, we found superior pitch discrimination performance for target tones in rhythmic compared to arrhythmic sequences. Electroencephalography recordings from auditory cortex showed that delta phase, beta power modulation, and delta-beta coupling were all modulated by rhythmic regularity. Importantly, trial-by-trial neural-behavioural correlational analyses showed that, prior to a target, the depth of U-shaped beta power modulation predicted pitch discrimination sensitivity whereas cross-frequency coupling strength predicted reaction time. These novel findings suggest that delta phase might reflect rhythmic temporal expectation, beta power temporal attention, and delta-beta coupling auditory-motor communication. Together, low and high frequency auditory neural oscillations reflect different perceptual functions that work in concert for tracking rhythmic regularity and proactively facilitate pitch perception.


Asunto(s)
Corteza Auditiva/fisiología , Ritmo beta , Ritmo Delta , Discriminación de la Altura Tonal/fisiología , Estimulación Acústica , Adolescente , Adulto , Sincronización Cortical , Potenciales Evocados Auditivos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Psicoacústica , Adulto Joven
20.
Sci Rep ; 9(1): 205, 2019 01 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30659220

RESUMEN

Joint action is essential in daily life, as humans often must coordinate with others to accomplish shared goals. Previous studies have mainly focused on sensorimotor aspects of joint action, with measurements reflecting event-to-event precision of interpersonal sensorimotor coordination (e.g., tapping). However, while emotional factors are often closely tied to joint actions, they are rarely studied, as event-to-event measurements are insufficient to capture higher-order aspects of joint action such as emotional expression. To quantify joint emotional expression, we used motion capture to simultaneously measure the body sway of each musician in a trio (piano, violin, cello) during performances. Excerpts were performed with or without emotional expression. Granger causality was used to analyze body sway movement time series amongst musicians, which reflects information flow. Results showed that the total Granger-coupling of body sway in the ensemble was higher when performing pieces with emotional expression than without. Granger-coupling further correlated with the emotional intensity as rated by both the ensemble members themselves and by musician judges, based on the audio recordings alone. Together, our findings suggest that Granger-coupling of co-actors' body sways reflects joint emotional expression in a music ensemble, and thus provide a novel approach to studying joint emotional expression.


Asunto(s)
Emociones/fisiología , Desempeño Psicomotor/fisiología , Fenómenos Biomecánicos , Conducta Cooperativa , Femenino , Humanos , Cinésica , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Movimiento/fisiología , Música/psicología
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