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1.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31984668

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Rural black communities bear a disproportionate burden of obesity. To increase reach among underserved groups, community-based weight loss and maintenance interventions are crucial. METHODS: The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was adapted for rural black adults of faith to create The Wholeness, Oneness, Righteousness, Deliverance (WORD) trial, a group-based, community health worker-delivered weight loss intervention. A Weight Loss Only arm (16 sessions) was compared with a Weight Loss + Maintenance arm (16 + 12 sessions) in a cluster randomized controlled trial of 31 churches (n = 440). Weight and related behaviors were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 18 months. RESULTS: The WORD produced weight loss from baseline to 6 months (percentage body weight change -2.47 [-3.13 to -1.80]). Among those who lost 5% of their baseline weight, there was a statistical trend of lower weight regain in the Weight Loss + Maintenance arm compared with control. Maintenance arm participants reported higher activity at 12 months. There were no between-arm differences at 18 months. CONCLUSIONS: The WORD produced weight loss from baseline to 6 months on par with that produced by other DPP adaptations for black communities, including adaptations using health professionals. Weight regain was also consistent with that reported in prior literature. Continuing sessions as part of the church's mission may foster adoption of DPP-based weight loss programs.

2.
Am J Health Promot ; 33(4): 549-557, 2019 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30309257

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: There is minimal information regarding the Reach and Adoption of evidence-based weight loss maintenance interventions for African Americans of faith. DESIGN: The WORD (Wholeness, Oneness, Righteousness, Deliverance) was an 18-month, cluster randomized trial designed to reduce and maintain weight loss in African American adults of faith. Participants received the Diabetes Prevention Program adapted core weight loss program for 6 months, and churches were subsequently randomized to 12-month maintenance treatment or control. All participants underwent body weight and associated behavioral and psychosocial assessments at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. The current article focuses on assessing Reach and Adoption at baseline and 6 months using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance framework. SETTING: Lower Mississippi Delta. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty churches, 61 WORD Leaders (WLs), and 426 participants. INTERVENTION: Group delivered by trained community members (WLs). MEASURES: Body mass index and percentage weight lost from baseline to 6-month follow-up were measured. Reach was assessed at participant, WL, and church levels through calculating participation rates and sociodemographics of each level. Adoption was assessed at church and WL levels. ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics summarized baseline characteristics of each level. Continuous and categorical end point comparisons were made. RESULTS: Participants' participation rate was 0.84 (n = 437 agreed to participate, n = 519 eligible invited to participate); they were predominantly female, employed, and had a mean age of 49.8. Dropouts by 6 months were younger, had differential marital status, and religious attendance compared with retained participants. Church participation rate was 0.63 (n = 30 enrolled, n = 48 eligible approached) and the majority reported ≤100 active members. The WL participation rate was 0.61 (n = 61 implemented intervention, n = 100 eligible approached); they were primarily female and aged 53.9 (mean). CONCLUSION: Recruitment, engagement, and delivery strategies employed by the WORD show promise of sustained engagement and adoption in other faith-based behavioral weight management programs for African Americans.

3.
Public Health Nurs ; 35(4): 353-359, 2018 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29566271

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: A community-academic team implemented a study involving collection of quantitative data using a computer-based audience response system (ARS) whereby community partners led data collection efforts. The team participated in a reflection exercise after the data collection to evaluate and identify best practices and lessons learned about the community partner-led process. DESIGN & SAMPLE: The methods involved a qualitative research consultant who facilitated the reflection exercise that consisted of two focus groups-one academic and one community research team members. The consultant then conducted content analysis. Nine members participated in the focus groups. RESULTS: The reflection identified the following themes: the positive aspects of the ARS; challenges to overcome; and recommendations for the future. CONCLUSION: The lessons learned here can help community-academic research partnerships identify the best circumstances in which to use ARS for data collection and practical steps to aid in its success.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/métodos , Recolección de Datos/métodos , Grupos Focales/métodos , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Procesamiento Automatizado de Datos/métodos , Ejercicio , Humanos , Investigación Cualitativa
4.
J Cancer Educ ; 33(1): 29-36, 2018 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27085550

RESUMEN

There are marked racial differences in breast cancer, the second leading cause of death among US women. Understanding the causes of these differences is essential to eliminate breast cancer inequities. More prevalent in African American than in Caucasian women, metabolic syndrome has been associated with breast cancer outcomes. Further research is needed to understand metabolic syndrome's role in breast cancer disparities, thus novel strategies to increase minority participation in research are important. We embedded two approaches (comprehensive, focused) to increase African American participation in breast cancer research in a state-wide service program and pilot tested both approaches in rural African American women. We conducted three comprehensive and three focused outreach programs (n = 48) and assessed research participation through consent and actual provision of data for four types of data: survey, anthropometric, blood, and mammography records. The majority of participants provided written consent for all data collection procedures (96 % survey; 92 % anthropometric; 94 %, blood; 100 % mammography). There were no between group differences in consent rates. There was variation in the overall proportion of participants who provided data (96 % survey; 92 % anthropometric; 73 % blood; 40 % mammography). Women in the comprehensive approach were less likely to return for a scheduled mammogram than women in the focused approach (19 % vs 64 %, p = 0.0236). Both outreach programs promoted African American engagement in research. Differences in the provision of data by type may have been due to participant burden (i.e., time required to provide data). Study designs that embed research in service programs have promise to increase minority research participation.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos , Actitud Frente a la Salud/etnología , Neoplasias de la Mama/etnología , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Selección de Paciente , Adulto , Anciano , Investigación Biomédica , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Promoción de la Salud , Humanos , Mamografía/estadística & datos numéricos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Grupos Minoritarios , Población Rural , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
5.
Contemp Clin Trials ; 64: 22-29, 2018 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29170075

RESUMEN

Rural African Americans are disproportionately exposed to numerous stressors such as poverty that place them at risk for experiencing elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Effective treatments for decreasing depressive symptoms exist, but rural African Americans often fail to receive adequate and timely care. Churches have been used to address physical health outcomes in rural African American communities, but few have focused primarily on addressing mental health outcomes. Our partnership, consisting of faith community leaders and academic researchers, adapted an evidence-based behavioral activation intervention for use with rural African American churches. This 8-session intervention was adapted to include faith-based themes, Scripture, and other aspects of the rural African American faith culture (e.g. bible studies) This manuscript describes a Hybrid-II implementation trial that seeks to test the effectiveness of the culturally adapted evidence-based intervention (Renewed and Empowered for the Journey to Overcome in Christ: REJOICE) and gather preliminary data on the strategies necessary to support the successful implementation of this intervention in 24 rural African American churches. This study employs a randomized one-way crossover cluster design to assess effectiveness in reducing depressive symptoms and gather preliminary data regarding implementation outcomes, specifically fidelity, associated with 2 implementation strategies: training only and training+coaching calls. This project has the potential to generate knowledge that will lead to improvements in the provision of mental health interventions within the rural African American community. Further, the use of the Hybrid-II design has the potential to advance our understanding of strategies that will support the implementation of and sustainability of mental health interventions within rural African American faith communities. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02860741. Registered August 5, 2016.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos , Terapia Conductista/métodos , Depresión/terapia , Organizaciones Religiosas/organización & administración , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Población Rural , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/organización & administración , Estudios Cruzados , Competencia Cultural , Depresión/etnología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Proyectos de Investigación , Sudeste de Estados Unidos
6.
Prog Community Health Partnersh ; 11(1): 81-86, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28603154

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Academic partners typically build community capacity for research, but few examples exist whereby community partners build community research capacity. This paper describes the benefits of communities sharing their "best practices" with each other for the purpose of building health research capacity. METHODS: In the context of a grant designed to engage African American communities to address health disparities (Faith Academic Initiatives Transforming Health [FAITH] in the Delta), leaders of two counties exchanged their "best practices" of creating faith-based networks and community health assessment tools to conduct a collective health assessment. LESSONS LEARNED: There were numerous strengths in engaging communities to build each other's capacity to conduct research. Communities identified with each other, perceived genuineness, conveyed legitimacy, and provided insider knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: Engaging communities to build each other's research capacity is a potentially valuable strategy.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos , Creación de Capacidad/organización & administración , Redes Comunitarias/organización & administración , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Arkansas , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Humanos , Población Rural
7.
J Public Health (Oxf) ; 38(3): 502-510, 2016 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26359314

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Health assessments are used to prioritize community-level health concerns, but the role of individuals' health concerns and experiences is unknown. We sought to understand to what extent community health assessments reflect health concerns of the community-at-large versus a representation of the participants sampled. METHODS: We conducted a health assessment survey in 30 rural African American churches (n = 412). Multivariable logistic regression produced odds ratios examining associations between personal health concern (this health concern is important to me), personal health experience (I have been diagnosed with this health issue) and community health priorities (this health concern is important to the community) for 20 health issues. RESULTS: Respondents reported significant associations for 19/20 health conditions between personal health concern and the ranking of that concern as a community priority (all P < 0.05). Inconsistent associations were seen between personal health experience of a specific health condition and the ranking of that condition as a community priority. CONCLUSIONS: Personal health concerns reported by individuals in a study sample may impact prioritization of community health initiatives. Further research should examine how personal health concerns are formed.


Asunto(s)
Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Salud Pública , Afroamericanos/psicología , Afroamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Femenino , Prioridades en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Estado de Salud , Encuestas Epidemiológicas , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Población Rural/estadística & datos numéricos , Virginia
8.
Contemp Clin Trials ; 40: 63-73, 2015 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25461496

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The positive effects of weight loss on obesity-related risk factors diminish unless weight loss is maintained. Yet little work has focused on the translation of evidence-based weight loss interventions with the aim of sustaining weight loss in underserved populations. Using a community-based participatory approach (CBPR) that engages the strong faith-based social infrastructure characteristic of rural African American communities is a promising way to sustain weight loss in African Americans, who bear a disproportionate burden of the obesity epidemic. OBJECTIVES: Led by a collaborative community-academic partnership, The WORD aims to change dietary and physical activity behaviors to produce and maintain weight loss in rural, African American adults of faith. DESIGN: The WORD is a randomized controlled trial with 450 participants nested within 30 churches. All churches will receive a 16-session core weight loss intervention. Half of the churches will be randomized to receive an additional 12-session maintenance component. METHODS: The WORD is a cultural adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Program, whereby small groups will be led by trained church members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. A detailed cost-effectiveness and process evaluation will be included. SUMMARY: The WORD aims to sustain weight loss in rural African Americans. The utilization of a CBPR approach and the engagement of the faith-based social infrastructure of African American communities will maximize the intervention's sustainability. Unique aspects of this trial include the focus on weight loss maintenance and the use of a faith-based CBPR approach in translating evidence-based obesity interventions.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos , Sobrepeso/terapia , Religión , Población Rural , Pérdida de Peso , Índice de Masa Corporal , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Conducta Cooperativa , Dieta , Ejercicio , Femenino , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Difusión de la Información , Masculino , Obesidad/etnología , Obesidad/prevención & control , Sobrepeso/etnología , Proyectos de Investigación , Factores Socioeconómicos
9.
Genes Nutr ; 9(4): 408, 2014 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24879315

RESUMEN

The discovery of vitamins and clarification of their role in preventing frank essential nutrient deficiencies occurred in the early 1900s. Much vitamin research has understandably focused on public health and the effects of single nutrients to alleviate acute conditions. The physiological processes for maintaining health, however, are complex systems that depend upon interactions between multiple nutrients, environmental factors, and genetic makeup. To analyze the relationship between these factors and nutritional health, data were obtained from an observational, community-based participatory research program of children and teens (age 6-14) enrolled in a summer day camp in the Delta region of Arkansas. Assessments of erythrocyte S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), plasma homocysteine (Hcy) and 6 organic micronutrients (retinol, 25-hydroxy vitamin D3, pyridoxal, thiamin, riboflavin, and vitamin E), and 1,129 plasma proteins were performed at 3 time points in each of 2 years. Genetic makeup was analyzed with 1 M SNP genotyping arrays, and nutrient status was assessed with 24-h dietary intake questionnaires. A pattern of metabolites (met_PC1) that included the ratio of erythrocyte SAM/SAH, Hcy, and 5 vitamins were identified by principal component analysis. Met_PC1 levels were significantly associated with (1) single-nucleotide polymorphisms, (2) levels of plasma proteins, and (3) multilocus genotypes coding for gastrointestinal and immune functions, as identified in a global network of metabolic/protein-protein interactions. Subsequent mining of data from curated pathway, network, and genome-wide association studies identified genetic and functional relationships that may be explained by gene-nutrient interactions. The systems nutrition strategy described here has thus associated a multivariate metabolite pattern in blood with genes involved in immune and gastrointestinal functions.

10.
Genes Nutr ; 9(3): 403, 2014 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24760553

RESUMEN

Micronutrient research typically focuses on analyzing the effects of single or a few nutrients on health by analyzing a limited number of biomarkers. The observational study described here analyzed micronutrients, plasma proteins, dietary intakes, and genotype using a systems approach. Participants attended a community-based summer day program for 6-14 year old in 2 years. Genetic makeup, blood metabolite and protein levels, and dietary differences were measured in each individual. Twenty-four-hour dietary intakes, eight micronutrients (vitamins A, D, E, thiamin, folic acid, riboflavin, pyridoxal, and pyridoxine) and 3 one-carbon metabolites [homocysteine (Hcy), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH)], and 1,129 plasma proteins were analyzed as a function of diet at metabolite level, plasma protein level, age, and sex. Cluster analysis identified two groups differing in SAM/SAH and differing in dietary intake patterns indicating that SAM/SAH was a potential marker of nutritional status. The approach used to analyze genetic association with the SAM/SAH metabolites is called middle-out: SNPs in 275 genes involved in the one-carbon pathway (folate, pyridoxal/pyridoxine, thiamin) or were correlated with SAM/SAH (vitamin A, E, Hcy) were analyzed instead of the entire 1M SNP data set. This procedure identified 46 SNPs in 25 genes associated with SAM/SAH demonstrating a genetic contribution to the methylation potential. Individual plasma metabolites correlated with 99 plasma proteins. Fourteen proteins correlated with body mass index, 49 with group age, and 30 with sex. The analytical strategy described here identified subgroups for targeted nutritional interventions.

11.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 8(6): A146, 2011 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22005639

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: African Americans and rural residents are disproportionately affected by obesity. Innovative approaches to address obesity that are sensitive to the issues of rural African Americans are needed. Faith-based and community-based participatory approaches show promise for engaging racial/ethnic minorities to change health outcomes, but few faith-based weight loss interventions have used a community-based participatory approach. COMMUNITY CONTEXT: A faith-based weight loss intervention in the Lower Mississippi Delta arose from a 5-year partnership between academic and community partners representing more than 30 churches and community organizations. METHODS: Community and academic partners translated the 16 core sessions of the Diabetes Prevention Program for rural, church-going African American adults. The feasibility of the lay health advisor-led delivery of the 16-week (January-May 2010), 16-session, adapted intervention was assessed in 26 participants from 3 churches by measuring recruitment, program retention, implementation ease, participant outcomes, and program satisfaction. OUTCOME: Twenty-two of 26 participants (85%) provided 16-week follow-up data. Lay health advisors reported that all program components were easy to implement except the self-monitoring component. Participants lost an average of 2.34 kg from baseline to 16-week follow-up, for a mean weight change of -2.7%. Participants reported enjoying the spiritual and group-based aspects of the program and having difficulties with keeping track of foods consumed. The intervention engaged community partners in research, strengthened community-academic partnerships, and built community capacity. INTERPRETATION: This study demonstrates the feasibility of delivering this adapted intervention by lay leaders through rural churches.


Asunto(s)
Terapia Conductista/métodos , Medicina Basada en la Evidencia/métodos , Educación en Salud , Estilo de Vida , Curación Mental , Obesidad/rehabilitación , Población Rural , Adulto , Afroamericanos , Estudios de Factibilidad , Estudios de Seguimiento , Humanos , Morbilidad/tendencias , Obesidad/etnología , Resultado del Tratamiento , Estados Unidos , Pérdida de Peso
12.
Transl Behav Med ; 1(2): 224-33, 2011 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24073047

RESUMEN

Disparities in breast cancer survival rates suggest that biological processes contribute. Translational research addressing health disparities would benefit from using a community-based participatory approach (CBPR) to examine biological processes commonly seen as the proximal causes of illness as well as behavioral and social-ecological "causes of the causes" within an integrated conceptual framework. This paper describes a CBPR study that explored perceptions regarding breast cancer relevant behaviors, and the application of the study's results to develop translational research. Data from eight focus groups of African American (n = 29) and Caucasian women (n = 27) were analyzed, using the framework of the social-ecological model. Nutrition and physical activity were valued over screening and research participation. Treatment of illness was emphasized over prevention. Women's perspectives are presented within a framework that facilitated the collaborative development of translational research to examine associations among biological, behavioral, and societal processes contributing to disparities.

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