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1.
J Affect Disord ; 2024 Apr 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38608763

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Both depression and insomnia are found to be more prevalent in cancer patients compared to the general population. This study compared the network structures of depression and insomnia among cancer patients versus cancer-free participants (controls hereafter). METHOD: The 8-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD-8) and the 4-item Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS-4) were used to measure depressive and insomnia symptoms, respectively. Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to construct the control group using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). In total, a sample consisted of 2216 cancer patients and 2216 controls was constructed. Central (influential) and bridge symptoms were estimated using the expected influence (EI) and bridge expected influence (bridge EI), respectively. Network stability was assessed using the case-dropping bootstrap method. RESULT: The prevalence of depression (CESD-8 total score ≥ 4) in cancer patients was significantly higher compared to the control group (28.56 % vs. 24.73 %; P = 0.004). Cancer patients also had more severe depressive symptoms relative to controls, but there was no significant group difference for insomnia symptoms. The network structures of depressive and insomnia symptoms were comparable between cancer patients and controls. "Felt sadness" (EI: 6.866 in cancer patients; EI: 5.861 in controls), "Felt unhappy" (EI: 6.371 in cancer patients; EI: 5.720 in controls) and "Felt depressed" (EI: 6.003 in cancer patients; EI: 5.880 in controls) emerged as the key central symptoms, and "Felt tired in morning" (bridge EI: 1.870 in cancer patients; EI: 1.266 in controls) and "Everything was an effort" (bridge EI: 1.046 in cancer patients; EI: 0.921 in controls) were the key bridge symptoms across both groups. CONCLUSION: Although cancer patients had more frequent and severe depressive symptoms compared to controls, no significant difference was observed in the network structure or strength of the depressive and insomnia symptoms. Consequently, psychosocial interventions for treating depression and insomnia in the general population could be equally applicable for cancer patients who experience depression and insomnia.

2.
J Affect Disord ; 2024 Apr 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38608767

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Depression and insomnia are common co-occurring psychiatric problems among older adults who have had strokes. Nevertheless, symptom-level relationships between these disorders remain unclear. OBJECTIVES: In this study, we compared inter-relationships of depression and insomnia symptoms with life satisfaction among older stroke patients and stroke-free peers in the United States. METHODS: The study included 1026 older adults with a history of stroke and 3074 matched controls. Data were derived from the US Health and Retirement Study. Depression, insomnia and life satisfaction were assessed. Propensity score matching was employed to identify demographically-similar groups of stroke patients and controls. Central and bridge symptoms were assessed using Expected influence (EI) and bridge EI, respectively. RESULTS: The prevalence of depression in the stroke group (25.0 %) was higher than that of controls (14.3 %, P < 0.001). In stroke group, "Feeling depressed" (CESD1; EI: 5.80), "Feeling sad" (CESD7; EI: 4.67) and "Not enjoying life" (CESD6; EI: 4.51) were the most central symptoms, while "Not feel rested in the morning" (JSS4; BEI: 1.60), "Everything was an effort" (CESD2; BEI: 1.21) and "Waking up during the night" (JSS2; BEI: 0.98) were key bridge symptoms. In controls, the most central symptoms were "Lack of happiness" (CESD4; EI: 6.45), "Feeling depressed" (CESD1; EI: 6.17), and "Feeling sad" (CESD7; EI: 6.12). Furthermore, "Feeling tired in the morning" (JSS4; BEI: 1.93), "Everything was an effort" (CESD2; BEI: 1.30), and "Waking up too early" (JSS3; BEI: 1.12) were key bridge symptoms. Life satisfaction had the most direct associations with "Not enjoying life" (CESD6) and "Feeling lonely" (CESD5) in the two groups, respectively. CONCLUSION: Older adults with stroke exhibited more severe depression and insomnia symptoms. Interventions targeting central and bridge symptoms may help to mitigate the co-occurrence of these symptoms.

3.
Biochem Genet ; 2024 Apr 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38581475

RESUMEN

Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. Patients with severe symptoms may suffer respiratory failure, leading to death. The homozygous deletion of exon 7 in the SMN1 gene accounts for nearly 95% of all cases. Population carrier screening for SMA and prenatal diagnosis by amniocentesis for high-risk couples can assist in identifying the risk of fetal disease. We provided the SMA carrier screening process to 55,447 pregnant women in Yancheng from October 2020 to December 2022. Among them, 8185 participated in this process, with a participation rate of around 14.76% (95% CI 14.47-15.06%). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to detect deletions of SMN1 exons 7 and 8 (E7, E8) in screened pregnant women. 127 were identified as carriers (111 cases of E7 and E8 heterozygous deletions, 15 cases of E7 heterozygous deletions, and 1 case of E7 heterozygous deletions and E8 homozygous deletions), resulting in a carrying rate of around 1.55% (95% CI 1.30-1.84%). After genetic counseling, 114 spouses of pregnant women who tested positive underwent SMA carrier screening; three of them were screened as SMA carriers. Multiplexed ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was used for the prenatal diagnosis of the fetuses of high-risk couples. Two of them exhibited two copies of SMN1 exon 7 (normal), and the pregnancy was continued; one exhibited no copies of SMN1 exon 7 and exon 8 (SMA patient), and the pregnancy was terminated. Analyzing SMN1 mutations in Yancheng and provide clinical evidence for SMA genetic counseling and birth defect prevention. Interventional prenatal diagnosis for high-risk families can promote informed reproductive selection and prepare for the fetus's early treatment.

4.
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry ; 39(3): e6072, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38488836

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To examine sex differences in the cognitive trajectories of a nationally representative sample of older people living in China and to explore potential determinants of these trajectories. METHODS: The study included 2230 women and 2171 men who were cognitively healthy and aged over 60 at the first observation from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey based on the 2008-2018 cohort. Cognitive function was measured using the Chinese version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Group-based trajectory modeling was used to identify potential heterogeneity of longitudinal changes over the 10 years in each gender. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations between baseline characteristics (age, education, fertility history, sleep length, physical activity, and health status and behaviors) and trajectory classes. RESULTS: Three trajectories (labeled stable, slow decline, and rapid decline) were identified according to the changes in MMSE scores for both women and men. For the women, both the slow and rapid decline groups accounted for a larger proportion (14.7% and 11.0%, respectively) than the male decline groups (8.1% and 6.6%, respectively), and the women had a lower baseline MMSE score with a faster decline. In the multivariable logistic regression analyses, older age, less education, older age at first birth, poorer functional abilities, hearing impairment, and lower baseline MMSE scores were significantly associated with cognitive decline in both the female and male groups compared to the stable group. For the women, sleeping over 9 h was also associated with a rapid cognitive decline trajectory, while current exercise and being overweight/obese were protective factors against cognitive decline. CONCLUSIONS: The women had an overall more serious cognitive decline than men. The potential determinants of cognitive decline identified in this study could be considered for developing specific intervention strategies aimed at promoting a healthy brain and preventing cognitive decline in different sexes, especially in low-income and developing countries.


Asunto(s)
Envejecimiento , Disfunción Cognitiva , Humanos , Femenino , Masculino , Anciano , Persona de Mediana Edad , Envejecimiento/psicología , Caracteres Sexuales , Longevidad , Cognición , Disfunción Cognitiva/epidemiología , Disfunción Cognitiva/diagnóstico , Estudios Longitudinales , Estado de Salud , China/epidemiología
5.
Age Ageing ; 53(3)2024 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38521972

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the associations between pain trajectories and cognitive function in older adults. This study explored the associations between pain trajectories and different cognitive domains in older adults from a network perspective. METHODS: Data on pain trajectories were derived from the Health and Retirement Study between 2010 and 2020 using latent class growth analyses. Measurements of key cognition domains, including memory, attention, calculation, orientation and language, were included. Linear regression and network analysis were performed to evaluate the associations between different pain trajectories and cognition. RESULTS: A total of 9,551 older adults were included in this study and three trajectories of pain were identified. After controlling for the covariates, persistent severe pain trajectory was associated with poorer overall cognition, memory and calculation ability when compared to mild or non-persistent pain trajectory. In the pain and cognition network model, memory (expected influence (EI) = 0.62), language (EI = 0.58) and calculation (EI = 0.41) were the most central domains. CONCLUSIONS: Pain trajectories appeared stable over time among older adults in this study. Severity of persistent pain was an important risk factor for poor cognition, especially in relation to memory and calculation domains. Interventions targeting memory, language and calculation domains might be useful in addressing cognitive decline in older adults with persistent pain.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Conocimiento , Disfunción Cognitiva , Humanos , Anciano , Estudios de Cohortes , Cognición , Disfunción Cognitiva/diagnóstico , Disfunción Cognitiva/epidemiología , Dolor/diagnóstico , Dolor/epidemiología , Estudios Longitudinales
6.
J Affect Disord ; 2024 Mar 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38484881

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Airline pilots are members of a unique occupational group that is often confronted with sleep routine disruptions, yet relatively few studies have examined their mental health status. This study assessed the prevalence and network structure of internet addiction, depression and sleep quality problems in commercial airline pilots. METHOD: A total of 7055 airline pilots were included in analyses. Internet addiction and depression were measured with the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), respectively. Sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The network model was constructed based on an Ising model and its association with sleep quality were evaluated using a flow procedure. RESULTS: Internet addiction, depression and sleep quality were common among airline pilots. The prevalence of internet addiction was 8.0 % (95 % CI: 7.3-8.6 %), while the rates of depression and poor sleep quality were 23.3 % (95 % CI: 22.3-24.2 %) and 33.0 % (95 % CI: 31.9-34.1 %), respectively. In the depression and internet addiction network model, "Fatigue" (PHQ4; Expected Influence (EI): 2.04) and "Depressed/moody/nervous only while being offline" (IAT20; EI: 1.76) were most central symptoms, while "Fatigue" (PHQ4; Bridge EI: 1.30) was also the most important bridge symptom. The flow network model of sleep quality with internet addiction and depression showed that "Appetite" (PHQ5) had the strongest positive association with poor sleep quality. CONCLUSION: Internet addiction, depression and sleep quality were common among airline pilots and warrant regular screening and timely treatment. Strategies to improve sleep hygiene may be useful in preventing onsets or exacerbations in depression and internet addiction among airline pilots.

7.
Gen Hosp Psychiatry ; 87: 92-102, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38382421

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Poor sleep quality is common in patients with cancer, but the prevalence rates varied widely across studies. This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the pooled prevalence of poor sleep quality among patients with cancer. METHODS: Systematic literature searches were independently conducted in the major databases (Web of Science, PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO). Studies that reported the prevalence of poor sleep quality in patients with cancer were analyzed using a random effects model. Funnel plots and Egger's tests were used to assess publication bias. Statistical analyses were performed using R software. RESULTS: A total of 59 epidemiological studies involving 16,223 patients were included. The pooled prevalence of poor sleep quality in patients with cancer was 57.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 53.3% - 61.6%]. Additionally, three comparative studies with 372 patients and 412 healthy controls were included. Compared to healthy controls, patients with cancer had a significantly higher risk for poor sleep quality [odd ratio (OR) = 3.0; 95%CI: 1.2-7.2; P < 0.05]. Subgroup analyses of the studies revealed that studies from Middle East & North Africa region and low income countries, and on gynecological cancer as well as those with a lower cut-off value of sleep quality (all P < 0.01) reported a higher prevalence of poor sleep quality. Meta-regression analyses showed that higher prevalence of poor sleep quality was associated with higher prevalence of comorbid depression (P < 0.05) and anxiety (P < 0.01), but was associated with a lower education level (P < 0.05) and alcohol use ratio (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Poor sleep quality is common among patients with cancer. Considering the overall high prevalence rate and negative impact of poor sleep quality, appropriate measures to identify and improve poor sleep quality are needed to enhance the clinical outcomes in this group.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias , Calidad del Sueño , Humanos , Prevalencia , Comorbilidad , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas , Neoplasias/epidemiología
8.
Psychiatry Res ; 333: 115744, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38301287

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Depression and loneliness co-occur frequently. This study examined interactive changes between depression and loneliness among older adults prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic from a longitudinal network perspective. METHODS: This network study was based on data from three waves (2016-2017, 2018-2019, and 2020) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). Depression and loneliness were measured with the eight-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD-8) and three item version of the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale, respectively. A network model was constructed using an Ising Model while network differences were assessed using a Network Comparison Test. Central symptoms were identified via Expected Influence (EI). RESULTS: A total of 4,293 older adults were included in this study. The prevalence and network of depression and loneliness did not change significantly between the baseline and pre-pandemic assessments but increased significantly from the pre-pandemic assessment to during COVID-19 assessment. The central symptom with the strongest increase from pre-pandemic to pandemic assessments was "Inability to get going" (CESD8) and the edge with the highest increase across depression-loneliness symptom communities was "Lack companionship" (UCLA1) - "Inability to get going" (CESD8). Finally, "Feeling depressed" (CESD1) and "Everything was an effort" (CESD2) were the most central symptoms over the three assessment periods. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with significant changes in the depression-loneliness network model. The most changed symptoms and edges could be treatment targets for reducing the risk of depression and loneliness in older adults.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Soledad , Humanos , Anciano , COVID-19/epidemiología , Pandemias , Depresión/epidemiología , Estudios Longitudinales
9.
Curr Opin Psychiatry ; 37(3): 147-161, 2024 May 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38415684

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Controversy remains about the difference in mental health status among children and adolescents between one-child and multichild families in China. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies comparing mental health status between both groups and explored their potential moderating factors. RECENT FINDINGS: Totally, 113 eligible studies encompassing 237 899 participants (one-child families: 83 125; multichild families: 154 774) were included. The pooled SMD of SCL-90 total score was -0.115 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): -0.152; -0.078; I2  = 86.9%]. Specifically, children and adolescents from one-child families exhibited lower scores in terms of somatization (SMD = -0.056; 95% CI: -0.087; -0.026), obsessive-compulsive symptoms (SMD = -0.116; 95% CI: -0.154; -0.079), interpersonal sensitivity (SMD = -0.140; 95% CI: -0.171; -0.109), depression (SMD = -0.123; 95% CI: -0.159; -0.088); anxiety (SMD = -0.121; 95% CI: -0.151; -0.092); phobic anxiety (SMD = -0.124; 95% CI: -0.166; -0.081); paranoid ideation (SMD = -0.040; 95% CI: -0.070; -0.009); and psychoticism (SMD = -0.119; 95% CI: -0.148; -0.089). Study publication year was significantly associated with differences in mental health status between both groups ( P  = 0.015). SUMMARY: Children and adolescents from one-child families had better mental health status compared to those from multichild families in China. Future studies should investigate the underlying factors contributing to such mental health differences, and the potential interventions that could address these mental health problems.


Asunto(s)
Terapia Cognitivo-Conductual , Adolescente , Humanos , Trastornos de Ansiedad/psicología , Ansiedad , Salud Mental , Estado de Salud
10.
Schizophr Res ; 264: 407-415, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38241784

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Poor sleep quality is common in patients with schizophrenia but estimated prevalence rates in this population have been mixed. This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the prevalence of poor sleep quality in schizophrenia samples and moderators of prevalence from epidemiological studies as well as the risk of poor sleep quality in schizophrenia patients based on case-control studies. METHODS: Both international (PubMed, Web of Science, PsycINFO, EMBASE) and Chinese databases [Chinese Nation knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and WANFANG] were systematically searched. Studies that estimated the prevalence of poor sleep quality in schizophrenia were analyzed using a random effects model. Funnel plots and Egger's tests were used to assess publication bias. Statistical analyses were performed using R software. RESULTS: In total, 23 epidemiological studies and nine case-control studies were included. Based on the epidemiological studies, the pooled overall prevalence of poor sleep quality was 63.4 % [95 % confidence interval (CI): 57.0 %-69.9 %]. Additionally, based on the nine case-control studies, schizophrenia patients had a significantly higher risk for poor sleep quality compared to healthy controls [odd ratio (OR) = 4.5; 95%CI: 2.4-8.3; P < 0.0001]. CONCLUSION: Poor sleep quality is common among schizophrenia patients. Considering negative outcomes caused by poor sleep quality, regular screening on poor sleep quality should be conducted and effective interventions should be provided to those in need.


Asunto(s)
Esquizofrenia , Humanos , Esquizofrenia/epidemiología , Calidad del Sueño , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Proyectos de Investigación , Prevalencia
11.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2024 Jan 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38238548

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although network analysis studies of psychiatric syndromes have increased in recent years, most have emphasized centrality symptoms and robust edges. Broadening the focus to include bridge symptoms within a systematic review could help to elucidate symptoms having the strongest links in network models of psychiatric syndromes. We conducted this systematic review and statistical evaluation of network analyses on depressive and anxiety symptoms to identify the most central symptoms and bridge symptoms, as well as the most robust edge indices of networks. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and EMBASE databases from their inception to May 25, 2022. To determine the most influential symptoms and connections, we analyzed centrality and bridge centrality rankings and aggregated the most robust symptom connections into a summary network. After determining the most central symptoms and bridge symptoms across network models, heterogeneity across studies was examined using linear logistic regression. RESULTS: Thirty-three studies with 78,721 participants were included in this systematic review. Seventeen studies with 23 cross-sectional networks based on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) assessments of clinical and community samples were examined using centrality scores. Twelve cross-sectional networks based on the PHQ and GAD-7 assessments were examined using bridge centrality scores. We found substantial variability between study samples and network features. 'Sad mood', 'Uncontrollable worry', and 'Worrying too much' were the most central symptoms, while 'Sad mood', 'Restlessness', and 'Motor disturbance' were the most frequent bridge centrality symptoms. In addition, the connection between 'Sleep' and 'Fatigue' was the most frequent edge for the depressive and anxiety symptoms network model. CONCLUSION: Central symptoms, bridge symptoms and robust edges identified in this systematic review can be viewed as potential intervention targets. We also identified gaps in the literature and future directions for network analysis of comorbid depression and anxiety.

12.
Transl Psychiatry ; 14(1): 12, 2024 Jan 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38191533

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing widespread lockdown measures have had a negative impact on the mental health of children and adolescents. We thus conducted a meta-analysis of the worldwide prevalence of sleep disturbances in children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic. We performed a systematic literature search of the major international (PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science) and Chinese (Chinese Nation Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and WANFANG) databases from their commencement dates to 27 December 2022. Altogether, 57 articles covering 206,601 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The overall prevalence of sleep disturbances was 34.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 28-41%). The prevalence of parent-reported sleep disturbances during the COVID-19 pandemic was significantly higher than that of self-reported (p = 0.005) sleep disturbances. Epidemiological studies jointly conducted across Asia and Europe had a higher prevalence of sleep disturbances compared to those conducted in Asia, Europe, America, Oceania, or South America alone (p < 0.001). Children had a significantly higher prevalence of sleep disturbances compared to adolescents alone or a mixed cohort of children and adolescents (p = 0.022). Meta-regression analyses revealed that mean age (p < 0.001), quality evaluation score (p < 0.001), and percentage of men (p < 0.001) showed negative associations, while time of survey (B = 1.82, z = 34.02, p < 0.001) showed a positive association with the prevalence of sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbances were common in children and adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia , Adolescente , Niño , Humanos , Masculino , COVID-19/epidemiología , Pandemias , Prevalencia , Autoinforme , Trastornos del Sueño-Vigilia/epidemiología
13.
Mol Genet Genomic Med ; 12(1): e2319, 2024 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38013226

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cenani-Lenzsyndactyly syndrome (CLSS; OMIM 212780) is a rare autosomal recessive acral deformity, which is mainly manifested in the fusion of fingers or toes, disordered phalangeal structure, shortening or fusion of the radius and ulna, and renal hypoplasia. CASE PRESENTATION: Our report described an individual with mild phenotypes from China. His parents were not consanguineous. The affected individual was non-dysmorphic. Standard X-ray showed that the both hands have only four metacarpal bones. The distal end of the first metacarpal bone on the right was relatively slender, and the distal phalanx was absent. Multiple phalanges and some soft tissues of both hands were fused. Exome sequencing revealed a novel biallelic c.282C⟩Avariant in low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4; OMIM604270; NM_002334.4) causing p. (Asn94Lys) change in the encoded protein. This variant is predicted to be potentially pathogenic, affecting protein structure and function. CONCLUSION: We report a novel missense variant present in homozygosity in LRP4 to broaden the pathogenic spectrum of LRP4 in syndactyly, and exome sequencing technology is a powerful tool for genetic analysis in prenatal diagnosis and medical research, as a preferred method for the diagnosis of syndactyly and related phenotypes.


Asunto(s)
Proteínas Relacionadas con Receptor de LDL , Sindactilia , Humanos , Mutación , Proteínas Relacionadas con Receptor de LDL/genética , Proteínas Relacionadas con Receptor de LDL/metabolismo , Sindactilia/genética , Sindactilia/diagnóstico , Mutación Missense
14.
Transl Psychiatry ; 13(1): 395, 2023 Dec 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38102131

RESUMEN

Studies on post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) among mental health professionals (MHPs) are limited, particularly since restrictions due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have been lifted such as the recent termination of China's Dynamic Zero-COVID Policy. The current study filled this gap by exploring the prevalence, correlates, and network structure of PTSS as well as its association with suicidality from a network analysis perspective. A cross-sectional, national survey was conducted using a convenience sampling method on MHPs between January 22 and February 10, 2023. PTSS were assessed using the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian version, while suicidality was assessed using standardized questions related to ideation, plans, and attempts. Univariate and multivariate analyses examined correlates of PTSS. Network analysis explored the structure of PTSS and suicidality. The centrality index of "Expected influence" was used to identify the most central symptoms in the network, reflecting the relative importance of each node in the network. The "flow" function was adopted to identify specific symptoms that were directly associated with suicidality. A total of 10,647 MHPs were included. The overall rates of PTSS and suicidality were 6.7% (n = 715; 95% CI = 6.2-7.2%) and 7.7% (n = 821; 95% CI = 7.2-8.2%), respectively. Being married (OR = 1.523; P < 0.001), quarantine experience (OR = 1.288; P < 0.001), suicidality (OR = 3.750; P < 0.001) and more severe depressive symptoms (OR = 1.229; P < 0.001) were correlates of more PTSS. Additionally, higher economic status (e.g., good vs. poor: OR = 0.324; P = 0.001) and health status (e.g., good vs. poor: OR = 0.456; P < 0.001) were correlates of reduced PTSS. PCL6 ("Avoiding thoughts"; EI = 1.189), PCL7 ("Avoiding reminders"; EI = 1.157), and PCL11 ("Feeling emotionally numb"; EI = 1.074) had the highest centrality, while PCL12 ("Negative belief"), PCL 16 ("Hypervigilance") and PCL 14 ("Irritability") had the strongest direct, positive associations with suicidality. A high prevalence of lingering PTSS was found among MHPs immediately after China's "Dynamic Zero-COVID Policy" was terminated. Avoidance and hyper-arousal symptoms should be monitored among at-risk MHPs after the COVID-19 pandemic and serve as potential targets for the prevention and treatment of PTSS in this population.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Trastornos por Estrés Postraumático , Suicidio , Humanos , Trastornos por Estrés Postraumático/epidemiología , Trastornos por Estrés Postraumático/psicología , Salud Mental , Prevalencia , Estudios Transversales , Pandemias , COVID-19/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , China/epidemiología
15.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1280688, 2023.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37965522

RESUMEN

Background: China recorded a massive COVID-19 pandemic wave after ending its Dynamic Zero-COVID Policy on January 8, 2023. As a result, mental health professionals (MHPs) experienced negative mental health consequences, including an increased level of fear related to COVID-19. This study aimed to explore the prevalence and correlates of COVID-19 fear among MHPs following the end of the Policy, and its association with quality of life (QoL) from a network analysis perspective. Methods: A cross-sectional national study was conducted across China. The correlates of COVID-19 fear were examined using both univariate and multivariate analyses. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted to determine the relationship between fear of COVID-19 and QoL. Central symptoms were identified using network analysis through the "Expected Influence" of the network model while specific symptoms directly correlated with QoL were identified through the "flow function." Results: A total of 10,647 Chinese MHPs were included. The overall prevalence of COVID-19 fear (FCV-19S total score ≥ 16) was 60.8% (95% CI = 59.9-61.8%). The binary logistic regression analysis found that MHPs with fear of COVID-19 were more likely to be married (OR = 1.198; p < 0.001) and having COVID-19 infection (OR = 1.235; p = 0.005) and quarantine experience (OR = 1.189; p < 0.001). Having better economic status (good vs. poor: OR = 0.479; p < 0.001; fair vs. poor: OR = 0.646; p < 0.001) and health status (good vs. poor: OR = 0.410; p < 0.001; fair vs. poor: OR = 0.617; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with a lower risk of COVID-19 fear. The ANCOVA showed that MHPs with fear of COVID-19 had lower QoL [F = 228.0, p < 0.001]. "Palpitation when thinking about COVID-19" was the most central symptom in the COVID-19 fear network model, while "Uncomfortable thinking about COVID-19" had the strongest negative association with QoL (average edge weight = -0.048). Conclusion: This study found a high prevalence of COVID-19 fear among Chinese MHPs following the end of China's Dynamic Zero-COVID Policy. Developing effective prevention and intervention measures that target the central symptoms as well as symptoms correlated with QoL in our network structure would be important to address COVID-19 fear and improve QoL.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Calidad de Vida , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Pueblos del Este de Asia , Salud Mental , Pandemias , Prevalencia , COVID-19/epidemiología , China/epidemiología , Miedo , Políticas
16.
BMC Psychiatry ; 23(1): 837, 2023 11 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37964197

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Studies on sleep problems among caregivers of psychiatric patients, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, are limited. This study examined the prevalence and correlates of insomnia symptoms (insomnia hereafter) among caregivers of psychiatric inpatients during the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the association with quality of life (QoL) from a network analysis perspective. METHODS: A multi-center cross-sectional study was conducted on caregivers of inpatients across seven tertiary psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric units of general hospitals. Network analysis explored the structure of insomnia using the R program. The centrality index of "Expected influence" was used to identify central symptoms in the network, and the "flow" function was adopted to identify specific symptoms that were directly associated with QoL. RESULTS: A total of 1,101 caregivers were included. The overall prevalence of insomnia was 18.9% (n = 208; 95% CI = 16.7-21.3%). Severe depressive (OR = 1.185; P < 0.001) and anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.099; P = 0.003), and severe fatigue (OR = 1.320; P < 0.001) were associated with more severe insomnia. The most central nodes included ISI2 ("Sleep maintenance"), ISI7 ("Distress caused by the sleep difficulties") and ISI1 ("Severity of sleep onset"), while "Sleep dissatisfaction" (ISI4), "Distress caused by the sleep difficulties" (ISI7) and "Interference with daytime functioning" (ISI5) had the strongest negative associations with QoL. CONCLUSION: The insomnia prevalence was high among caregivers of psychiatric inpatients during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in those with depression, anxiety and fatigue. Considering the negative impact of insomnia on QoL, effective interventions that address insomnia and alteration of sleep dissatisfaction should be developed.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Humanos , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , COVID-19/epidemiología , Calidad de Vida , Cuidadores , Prevalencia , Pacientes Internos , Estudios Transversales , Pandemias , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Fatiga/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología
17.
Neuromodulation ; 2023 Oct 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37831019

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Theta burst stimulation (TBS) is more energy- and time-efficient than is standard repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). However, further studies are needed to analyze TBS therapy for its efficacy and safety compared with standard rTMS in treating depression. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare TBS therapy with standard rTMS treatment regarding their safety and therapeutic effect on individuals with depression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six data bases (Wanfang, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO) were searched from inception till December 20, 2022. Two independent reviewers selected potentially relevant studies on the basis of the inclusion criteria, extracted data, and evaluated the methodologic quality of the eligible trials using the modified ten-item Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale per Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. Finally, ten comparable pairs of nine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included for meta-analysis. Summary odds ratios (ORs) of the rates of response, remission, and adverse events were simultaneously calculated using quality-effects (QE) and random-effects (RE) models. Changes in depression scores associated with antidepressant effects were expressed using standardized mean differences simultaneously. This study was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (CRD42022376790). RESULTS: Nine of the 602 RCTs, covering 1124 patients (616 who had TBS protocols applied vs 508 treated using standard rTMS), were included. Differences in response rates between the above two treatment modalities were not significant (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.88-1.16, p = 0.44, I2 = 0%, RE model; OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.87-1.32, p = 0.44, I2 = 0%, QE model). Differences in adverse event rates between TBS and standard rTMS groups were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: TBS has similar efficacy and safety to standard rTMS for treating depression. Considering the short duration of daily stimulation sessions, this meta-analysis supports the continued development of TBS for treating depression.

18.
Sleep Med Rev ; 71: 101840, 2023 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37647751

RESUMEN

Poor sleep quality is prevalent among members of the military but rates of poor sleep quality vary between studies. This study examined the global prevalence of poor sleep quality in military personnel and veterans as well as possible moderators of prevalence differences between studies. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and PsycINFO were systematically searched from their inception dates to September 1, 2022. Studies were included if they were conducted on military personnel and/or veterans and prevalence estimates of poor sleep quality could be generated from assessments with standardized tools. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled prevalence and its 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Fifty-nine studies (N = 28,100) were included for analysis with sample sizes ranging from 14 to 8481. Two studies were rated as "high quality" (3.39%), while 57 were rated as "moderate quality" (96.61%). The overall pooled prevalence of poor sleep quality in military personnel and veterans was 69.00% (95% CI: 62.33-75.30%); pooled rates were 57.79% (95% CI: 49.88-65.50%) and 82.88% (95% CI: 74.08-90.21%) for active duty personnel and veterans, respectively. Subgroup analyses indicated study region, study design, sampling method, Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index cut-off values, and service type moderated prevalence of poor sleep quality. Meta-regression analyses indicated sample size, mean age, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were associated with prevalence differences between studies. Poor sleep quality was more common in both active duty military personnel and veterans who were older and those who reported PTSD or depression. Regular monitoring of sleep quality and sleep hygiene should be promoted in this population. More relevant studies in middle- and low-income countries should also be conducted.

19.
Psychiatry Clin Neurosci ; 77(10): 541-549, 2023 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37350640

RESUMEN

AIMS: Hikikomori is a common phenomenon reported in Japan and many other countries. However, the broad trends of the research publications on hikikomori are unclear. Therefore, this study examined the patterns of research on hikikomori using bibliometric analysis. METHODS: Relevant publications were searched in Web of Science. Bibliometric analyses were performed with CiteSpace, R and VOSviewer. RESULTS: In total, 297 publications on hikikomori met the eligibility criteria. The International Journal of Social Psychiatry (IF = 10.461) published the most papers (K = 17, or 5.7%) on hikikomori. Takahiro A. Kato from Kyushu University (41; 13.8%; H-index = 18) was the most influential author, while Takahiro A. Kato (total link strength [TLS]: 235), Alan R. Teo (TLS: 157), and Masaru Tateno (TLS: 153) separately had the strongest research collaboration with other researchers. Of all countries that published on hikikomori, Japan had the highest number of publications (K = 91). The keywords "United States" and "psychiatric diagnosis" received the most attention between 2013 and 2015, whereas "health" and "autism spectrum disorder" received the most attention in 2021 and 2022. CONCLUSIONS: Peer-reviewed research publications on hikikomori are growing rapidly and the research trends in this field are also changing.


Asunto(s)
Trastorno del Espectro Autista , Fobia Social , Humanos , Bibliometría , Japón
20.
J Clin Sleep Med ; 19(7): 1271-1279, 2023 07 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36988299

RESUMEN

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Insomnia and depression are common mental health problems reported by mental health professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. Network analysis is a fine-grained approach used to examine associations between psychiatric syndromes at a symptom level. This study was designed to elucidate central symptoms and bridge symptoms of a depression-insomnia network among psychiatric practitioners in China. The identification of particularly important symptoms via network analysis provides an empirical foundation for targeting specific symptoms when developing treatments for comorbid insomnia and depression within this population. METHODS: A total of 10,516 psychiatric practitioners were included in this study. The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) were used to estimate prevalence rates of insomnia and depressive symptoms, respectively. Analyses also generated a network model of insomnia and depression symptoms in the sample. RESULTS: Prevalence rates of insomnia (ISI total score ≥8), depression (PHQ-9 total score ≥5) and comorbid insomnia and depression were 22.2% (95% confidence interval: 21.4-22.9%), 28.5% (95% confidence interval: 27.6-29.4%), and 16.0% (95% confidence interval: 15.3-16.7%), respectively. Network analysis revealed that "Distress caused by sleep difficulties" (ISI7) and "Sleep maintenance" (ISI2) had the highest strength centrality, followed by "Motor dysfunction" (PHQ8) and "Sad mood" (PHQ2). Furthermore, the nodes "Sleep dissatisfaction" (ISI4), "Fatigue" (PHQ4), and "Motor dysfunction" (PHQ8) had the highest bridge strengths in linking depression and insomnia communities. CONCLUSIONS: Both central and bridge symptoms (ie, Distress caused by sleep difficulties, Sleep maintenance, Motor dysfunction, Sad mood, Sleep dissatisfaction, and Fatigue) should be prioritized when testing preventive measures and specific treatments to address comorbid insomnia and depression among psychiatric practitioners during the COVID-19 pandemic. CITATION: Zhao N, Zhao Y-J, An F, et al. Network analysis of comorbid insomnia and depressive symptoms among psychiatric practitioners during the COVID-19 pandemic. J Clin Sleep Med. 2023;19(7):1271-1279.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Humanos , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Depresión/psicología , COVID-19/complicaciones , COVID-19/epidemiología , Pandemias , Comorbilidad , Ansiedad/epidemiología
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