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1.
Psychol Health ; : 1-25, 2024 Jul 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38953588

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This research aimed to construct and psychometrically test a measure of multiple sociocultural dimensions (i.e. family, peers, media) theoretically associated with exercise behaviours/attitudes in adolescents; the Sociocultural Influences on Exercise Behaviours in Adolescents Questionnaire (SIEBAQ). METHODS AND MEASUREMENT: Part 1 of this study focused on measure construction and psychometric testing, involving item generation and exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to refine the item pool, with 905 adolescents (Mage 13.66 years (SD = 0.94); girls = 442). Part 2 sought to explore the convergent validity of the SIEBAQ (n = 846; n = 414 girls). RESULTS: EFA resulted in a 47-item measure with a nine-factor structure (including social media modelling, parent exercise expectations, peer co-participation; α = 0.72-0.92). Correlations revealed weak-moderate significant relationships between the SIEBAQ and related constructs (e.g. compulsive exercise, sociocultural attitudes towards appearance). Regression analyses with the SIEBAQ identified social media modelling of exercise as a significant predictor of compulsive exercise in boys and girls. Proving exercise ability to significant others also significantly predicted compulsive exercise outcomes. CONCLUSION: This newly developed measure holds promise. Further psychometric testing and validation of the SIEBAQ is the recommended next step to confirm the measure's nine-factor structure identified through EFA.

2.
Br J Nurs ; 33(13): 622-629, 2024 Jul 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38954441

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Young people receiving cancer treatment in the South Thames Children's, Teenagers' and Young Adults' Cancer Operational Delivery Network usually receive care across two or more NHS trusts, meaning transition into adult services can be challenging. AIM: To develop a planned, co-ordinated approach to transition across the network that meets National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance recommendations for transition and the cancer service specifications. METHODS: A 2-year, nurse-led quality improvement (QI) project, using the principles of experience-based co-design. OUTCOMES: The QI project resulted in the development of six key principles of practice; refining and testing of a benchmarking tool; initiatives to facilitate first transition conversations; and the launch of an information hub. CONCLUSION: Robust QI processes, cross-network collaboration and wide stakeholder involvement required significant resource, but enabled deeper understanding of existing pathways and processes, facilitated the establishment of meaningful objectives, and enabled the testing of interventions to ensure the project outcomes met the needs of all stakeholders.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Medicina Estatal , Transición a la Atención de Adultos , Humanos , Adolescente , Neoplasias/terapia , Neoplasias/enfermería , Adulto Joven , Transición a la Atención de Adultos/organización & administración , Transición a la Atención de Adultos/normas , Medicina Estatal/organización & administración , Reino Unido
4.
Res Involv Engagem ; 10(1): 68, 2024 Jul 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38951878

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Public involvement and engagement (PI&E) is increasingly recognised as an important component of research. It can offer valuable insights from those with experiential knowledge to improve research quality, relevance, and reach. Similarly, schools are ever more common sites for health research and, more recently, PI&E. However, 'gold-standard' practice is yet to be established, and activities/approaches remain underreported. As a result, knowledge can remain localised or lost. Diversity and inclusion also remains a challenge. METHODS: This protocol has been informed by UK national guidance, evidence-based frameworks and available implementation literature. It describes both rationale and approach to conducting PI&E activities within a secondary school context. Activities are designed to be engaging, safe and accessible to young people with diverse experiences, with scope to be iteratively developed in line with public collaborator preference. DISCUSSION: Young people should be architects of their involvement and engagement. Ongoing appraisal and transparency of approaches to PI&E in school settings is crucial. Expected challenges of implementing this protocol include facilitating a safe space for the discussion of sensitive topics, absence and attrition, recruiting students with a diverse range of experiences, and potential knowledge and capacity barriers of both facilitator and contributors. Activities to mitigate these risks are suggested and explored.


Schools are increasingly becoming hubs for health research. However, there is a lack of knowledge about how researchers, schools and students can best work together to shape the studies we do. This is a problem as, in the world of research, involving those with first hand experiences (public collaborators) in the research process is seen as crucial.This protocol outlines our plan for conducting public involvement and engagement activities in secondary schools. It is based on national guidance and existing evidence. The goal is to make these activities interesting, safe, and accessible to young people with diverse experiences. The approach is designed to be flexible, allowing adjustments based on the preferences of the public collaborators.We acknowledge that we may face some difficulties with our approach. This may include challenges in recruitment of public collaborators, dealing with absence and attrition, and creating a safe space for discussing sensitive topics. Collaborators from both academic and lived backgrounds may also experience barriers in knowledge and capacity. This protocol suggests activities to address and overcome these challenges. We emphasise the need for ongoing evaluation and transparency in public involvement and engagement approaches within school settings.

6.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1851, 2024 Jul 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38992669

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Mental health problems disproportionately affect young people in developing countries. However, there is limited research on help-seeking behaviours and the social support systems that improve mental wellbeing among vulnerable youth populations. OBJECTIVE: This mixed-methods study aimed to examine the relationship between social support reciprocity and mental health among young informal construction workers in Nigeria, a population at high-risk for occupational and socioeconomic stressors. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was administered to 686 informal workers to measure reciprocity, mental health-related quality of life, and covariates. In-depth interviews with 32 participants provided qualitative context. RESULTS: Quantitative analyses showed 25% of participants reported poor mental health. Reciprocity positively predicted mental health after controlling for covariates. Qualitative findings revealed reciprocity occurs directly between individuals as well as indirectly through trade unions and religious groups. Indirect exchanges through groups helped address limitations of direct support due to limited resources. CONCLUSIONS: This study fills important gaps in understanding how social relationships impact mental health in developing country contexts. Findings emphasize the role of collective action and community-based support systems in promoting mental wellbeing among vulnerable populations. Insights can inform culturally relevant, systems-level mental health interventions.


Asunto(s)
Países en Desarrollo , Salud Mental , Apoyo Social , Humanos , Nigeria , Masculino , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Adulto Joven , Adulto , Adolescente , Industria de la Construcción , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Investigación Cualitativa , Sector Informal
7.
J Adolesc Health ; 2024 Jul 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39001753

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Adolescent participation in health research studies is critical yet complex given the lack of clarity around issues such as consent. This study aimed to understand how those conducting research in Australia navigate research ethics in health research involving adolescents, through qualitative interviews. METHODS: Purposive sampling was used to recruit 23 researchers involved in adolescent health research using semi-structured in-depth interviews. Interviews were conducted via Zoom and audio-recorded after obtaining informed consent. Thematic analysis was used to construct themes and data were organised using NVivo. RESULTS: Two contrasting positions emerged from the data: (1) framing of adolescents as inherently vulnerable, their participation in research understood in terms of risk and protection and (2) adolescent engagement in research is understood in terms of empowerment, emphasising their capacity to make decisions about research participation. We traced these positions through three key themes, particularly in relation to the role of ethics committees: (1) competing positions as a result of inferior or superior knowledge about adolescent lives, (2) competing positions resulting in a risk averse or an empowerment approach, and (3) reflections on processes of obtaining consent which involves gatekeeping and tokenism. DISCUSSION: Our study highlights the contentious topic of navigating ethics committee requirements for the needs of adolescents. Majority of participants felt the current research ethics establishment is not favourable for researchers or adolescents themselves. While it is imperative that perceptions of ethics committees also be studied in the future, our study provides preliminary understanding of how experiences and perceptions shape how researchers interact with the research ethics establishment.

8.
J Affect Disord ; 2024 Jul 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39025443

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the mental health of human beings since 2020, especially the young people and the pre-existing marginalized groups such as men who have sex with men (MSM). During the COVID-19 pandemic, the multi-country outbreak of mpox in 2022 additionally posed a significant stress on the most-affected communities (i.e., MSM). This study investigated the level of depressive symptoms and its multifaceted associated factors among Chinese young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in this unique period. METHODS: In September 2022, a large-scale cross-sectional survey was conducted among YMSM aged 18-29 years across six representative provinces in China. Hierarchical regression analysis was performed to test the various types of associated factors of depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Among the 2493 participants, 65·6 % (n = 1638) reported mild to severe depressive symptoms. The hierarchical regression analysis identified that depressive symptoms was significantly positively associated with unemployment, having substance use in the past 6 months, a higher level of MSM self-stigma, incompletion of COVID-19 vaccination, greater mpox risk perception, and presence of mpox related-like symptoms. LIMITATIONS: This study used the facility-based sampling method to recruit the participants, which may lead to selection bias. CONCLUSIONS: Chinese YMSM faced significant mental health challenges during the concurrent epidemics of COVID-19 and mpox, which was associated with their socio-economic status, risk behaviors, stigma, and multiple diseases-related variables. Proactive measures may hold promise as effective strategies for mitigating mental distress among marginalized groups during public health crises.

9.
Ann Leis Res ; 27(3): 399-416, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39006997

RESUMEN

Leisure and health are human rights that apply to both children and adults. Leisure can enhance health and enable people to participate fully in leisure activities. One of children's main opportunities for leisure is during school holidays. Little previous research has focused on this time in children's lives. This paper presents a review of the literature surrounding school holidays, providing a critique of educational and public health approaches that focus narrowly on children's future outcomes that may be associated with how they spend their time during these leisure periods. It argues that a more sociological understanding, rooted within child-centred approaches to leisure, provides the opportunity for children's agency, participation and citizenship to be investigated more fully.

10.
Soc Sci Med ; 355: 117099, 2024 Jul 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39018998

RESUMEN

According to popular understandings, children grow from a state of dependence to eventually become independent adults. Interdependence helps to disrupt the in/dependence binary and is a useful concept for making sense of the experiences young people with variations in sex characteristics in relation to healthcare. This study used semi-structured interviews with 32 health professionals, 33 caregivers and 12 young people recruited in the UK and Sweden. The analysis is guided by the questions: (1) how do young people, carers and health professionals position themselves in the adult/young person relationship in the context of healthcare? (2) how is the (in/ter)dependence of young people imagined when young people, carers and health professionals talk about healthcare? Our analysis shows how carers and health professionals might support dominant understandings about young people growing towards independence while providing little opportunity for young people's agency and voice. Interviews with young people gave clear examples of their negotiating relational ways of being, seeking agency in the context of healthcare and not simply becoming independent of adults. This analysis also draws attention to the ways young people might be silenced within healthcare contexts. The present paper is based on secondary analysis of data from the SENS. It works with concepts of relationality and interdependence to draw out the possibilities of voice and agency for young people with variations in sex characteristics in healthcare contexts.

11.
Br J Sociol ; 2024 Jul 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39032024

RESUMEN

This paper contributes new understandings of the dynamics and processes of gentrification that contribute to wider transformations of class relations. We argue that the hospitality sector, specifically the tastes, dispositions and practices of young hospitality workers, are central in how gentrification processes currently function. We extend concepts of elective and selective belonging, and reflexive complicity, to analyse how young hospitality workers understand their own labouring practices as contributing to gentrification in their local areas. We show how their aesthetic and ethical orientations to place, especially their workplaces, make their experience of hospitality work more palatable. At the same time, their tastes are 'put to work' in venues that contribute to the vibes and aesthetics aimed at middle class consumption practices, while creating symbolic boundaries for long-term residents who are being ostracised in the process. In this way, the high cultural capital bar workers possess thus become spatial bouncers for high economic capital property developers, where reflexive complicity is instrumentalised as a process of symbolic violence. We propose that hospitality labour, and the everyday relationalities and working practices of young workers, are crucial for understanding the contemporary processes of gentrification and class formation.

12.
Can J Nurs Res ; : 8445621241263459, 2024 Jul 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39033428

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Refugees escaping political unrest and war are an especially vulnerable group. Arrival in high-income countries (HICs) is associated with a 'new type of war', as war refugees experience elevated rates of psycho-social and daily stressors. PURPOSE: The purpose of this scoping review is to examine literature on psycho-social stressors amongst young war refugees in HICs and impact of stressors on intergenerational transmission of trauma within parent-child dyads. The secondary objectives are to identify the pre-migration versus post-migration stressors and provide a basis to inform future research projects that aim to lessen the burden of stress and inform evidence-based improvements in this population. METHODS: Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Scoping Review Extension (PRISMA-ScR) guided the reporting of this review that was performed using a prescribed scoping review method. Extracted from five databases, 23 manuscripts published in 2010 or later met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Three themes emerged: pre-migration stressors, migration journey stressors and uncertainty, and post-migration stressors. While post-migration environments can mitigate the health and well-being of war refugees, socio-cultural barriers that refugees often experience at the host country prevent or worsen their psycho-social recovery. CONCLUSION: To assist the success of war refugees in HICs, therapeutic interventions must follow an intersectional approach and there needs to be a wider application of trauma informed models of care. Findings of this review may help inform future intervention studies aiming to improve the psycho-social health of this population.

13.
Sex Reprod Healthc ; 41: 101007, 2024 Jul 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39029134

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore young people's perceptions and experiences on access to voluntary termination of pregnancy (VTP) in northern Mozambique. METHODS: A qualitative study of twelve focus group discussions was conducted from June to September 2021 in Nampula province, northern Mozambique. A total of 94 purposively selected 15-24-year-old males and females participated in the study. Data was inductively coded and reflexive thematic analysis inspired by Braun and Clarke was applied. Socio-Ecological theory was used to frame the discussion. RESULTS: Despite VTP being decriminalized and by law to be provided free of charge, unsafe abortion remains a common choice among young people towards unintended pregnancy. Barriers to help-seeking access to safe VTP include: 1) fear, 2) sociocultural gendered norms and power dynamics, 3) lack of VTP service provision at nearest health facilities, and 4) unaffordable services where available. Fear associated with early forced marriage, a parental corrective action towards premarital pregnancy coupled with lack of male financial autonomy to afford illicit charges, remain the most important factors preventing young people seeking for help at family and safe VTP services at facility level. CONCLUSIONS: Amidst multiple barriers in accessing health services, unsafe abortion is viewed by young people as a better option than facing a lifetime punishment of early forced marriage, a common parental corrective action towards premarital pregnancy.

14.
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry ; : 13591045241264861, 2024 Jul 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39030660

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), including South Africa, there is a paucity of psychosocial support services. Therefore, services are often provided in schools by non-government organisations like Community Keepers (CK). The COVID-19 pandemic and resultant restrictions meant that children and young people's (CYP) lives changed, negatively affecting their mental health. Further, organisations like CK had to change their working processes. METHOD: This project compared routinely collected data from CK from 2019 (pre-pandemic) to 2020 (pandemic) to describe the changes that occurred in referral patterns to, and service provision by, CK. RESULTS: Both pre-pandemic and during the pandemic, most referrals of CYP were for emotional/psychological support and behavioural difficulties. In 2020, referrals for general guidance increased, whilst referrals for peer group issues and sexuality decreased. Further, CK completed more brief check-ins, provided wellbeing workshops to increased numbers of teachers, parents and CYP, and had more consultation sessions with other service providers during the pandemic. DISCUSSION: Routinely collected data from this community-based service in a LMIC context shows differences in the way that support was provided, and to whom, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Clinical implications, including the importance of increasing access to psychosocial support via technology, are included.


The COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately impacted children, young people and families who are most vulnerable, including those in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Within LMICs, the lack of trained psychological professionals and investment in mental healthcare interventions means access to help is limited. School-based provision, which may increase access to mental health support was curtailed during school closures when face-to face service provision was prohibited. It is well-documented that the COVID-19 pandemic impacted CYP's mental and emotional well-being. However, it is less well understood how the need and service provision of third sector non-government organisations changed during this time. Thus, we partnered with a non-government organisation, Community Keepers (CK) who are based in Western Cape, South Africa to understand how referral patterns changed from 2019 (pre-pandemic) to 2020 (peri-pandemic) and explore the specific adaptations that CK made to service provision. CK aims to provide free mental health care services to CYP, their parents (legal guardians / primary caregivers; henceforth referred to as parents) and teachers, on-site at schools (www.communitykeepers.org). Results suggest that both pre-pandemic and during the pandemic, most referrals of CYP were for emotional/psychological support and behavioural difficulties. In 2020, referrals for general guidance and chronic/serious illness increased, whilst referrals for peer group issues and sexuality decreased. Further, CK completed wellbeing workshops to increased numbers of teachers, parents and CYP, and had more consultation sessions with other service providers during the pandemic. In addition, COVID-19 restrictions necessitated a reduction in face-to-face sessions and a move towards more systemic support as well as telephonic and/or online support to individuals. This paper demonstrates that should another global crisis like the Covid-19 pandemic occur, necessitating school closures and/or restrictions to in-person interaction, it will be important for organisations working in schools, particularly with CYP who are particularly vulnerable, to pivot their provision to enable continued support. Further, specific recommendations for CK were given regarding data collection, that can be used to support growth and understanding service provision patterns across similar settings.

15.
Br J Clin Psychol ; 2024 Jul 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39012021

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Rates of PTSD are up to 12 times higher in care-experienced young people (CEYP) compared to their peers. Trauma-focused CBTs (tf-CBT) are the best-evidenced treatment for youth with PTSD, yet, in practice, CEYP often struggle to access this treatment. We worked alongside services to understand barriers and facilitators of the implementation of cognitive therapy for PTSD (a type of tf-CBT) to CEYP. DESIGN: This was an active, open implementation trial. METHODS: We recruited 28 mental health teams across England, including general CAMHS, targeted CAMHS for CEYP and social care-based teams. From these teams, participants were 243 mental health professionals, from a wide variety of professional backgrounds. Following recruitment/intervention training, teams participated in rolling three monthly focus groups and individual interviews, to understand what helped and hindered implementation. Data were analysed using a framework analysis conducted using CFIR 2.0. RESULTS: Almost half of the teams were able to implement, but only approximately one quarter with CEYP, specifically. Universal barriers that were discussed by almost all teams particularly highlighted service structures and poor resourcing as major barriers to delivery to CEYP, as well as the complexities of the young person and their network. Unique factors that differentiated teams who did and did not implement included commissioning practices, the culture of the team, leadership engagement and style, and the development of supervision structures. CONCLUSIONS: Findings offer key considerations for mental health teams, service leads, commissioners and policy-makers to enhance delivery of best-evidenced mental health treatments like CT-PTSD, for CEYP.

16.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1869, 2024 Jul 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38997688

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The climate crisis is a significant risk to the health and wellbeing of children, young people, and future generations. While there are calls for children and young people's engagement in climate decision making, current power structures limit their participation. This paper aimed to understand children's perspectives about the impact of the climate crisis on their futures, their ability to influence climate decisions, and strategies and mechanisms to facilitate their greater engagement in decisions made about the climate crisis. METHODS: Online in-depth interviews were conducted with n = 28 children (aged 12-16 years) across Australia. Photo elicitation techniques were used to prompt discussion about how the climate crisis impacted their futures, their ability to influence climate decisions, and strategies and mechanisms to engage them in climate decision making. A reflexive approach to thematic analysis was used to construct three themes from data. Images were analysed for ascribed meanings. RESULTS: First, participants stated that they and future generations will inherit the climate crisis from older generations, specifically decision makers. Second, they described a need to address a range of age-related barriers that limit children and young people's engagement in climate decision making, including perceptions about their capabilities. Finally, they discussed strategies and mechanisms to embed children and young people's perspectives within climate decision making, including at civic and political levels. CONCLUSIONS: Children and young people have the right to be involved in decisions made about the climate crisis which significantly impact their futures, including their health and wellbeing. They argue for structural changes to embed their views in climate decision making, and describe a range of engagement strategies and mechanisms to structure their perspectives and knowledge with decision making processes. Furthermore, genuine involvement of children and young people in climate discussions must avoid youthwashing and tokenistic participation. The public health community can help address barriers to youth participation in climate action and should actively engage and collaborate with children and young people to facilitate their political and democratic influence over the climate crisis. This involves making room and creating an accessible seat at the decision making table to ensure their perspectives are embedded in climate decisions.


Asunto(s)
Cambio Climático , Toma de Decisiones , Salud Pública , Humanos , Niño , Adolescente , Femenino , Masculino , Australia , Investigación Cualitativa , Entrevistas como Asunto
17.
Res Involv Engagem ; 10(1): 67, 2024 Jun 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38926798

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Clustering and co-occurring of family adversities, including mental health problems, substance use, domestic violence and abuse, as well as poverty can increase health and behavioural risks for children, which persist throughout the life course. Yet, interventions that acknowledge and account for the complex interactive nature of such risks are limited. This study aimed to develop intervention principles based on reflections from mothers, fathers, and young people who experience multiple and interacting adversities. These principles will show how family members perceive an intervention may bring about positive change and highlight key insights into design and delivery. METHODS: A series of six co-design workshops with mothers, fathers, and young people who experienced multiple and interacting adversities (n = 41) were iteratively conducted across two regions in England (London and North-East) by four researchers. Workshop content and co-design activities were informed by advisory groups. Data from facilitator notes and activities were analysed thematically, resulting in a set of intervention principles. RESULTS: The intervention principles highlighted that: (1) to reduce isolation and loneliness parents and young people wanted to be connected to services, resources, and peer support networks within their local community, particularly by a knowledgeable and friendly community worker; (2) to address feelings of being misunderstood, parents and young people wanted the development of specialised trauma informed training for practitioners and to have the space to build trusting, gradual, and non-stigmatising relationships with practitioners; and (3) to address the needs and strengths of individual family members, mothers, fathers, and young people wanted separate, tailored, and confidential support. CONCLUSIONS: The current study has important implications for practice in supporting families that experience multiple and interacting adversities. The intervention principles from this study share common characteristics with other intervention models currently on offer in the United Kingdom, including social prescribing, but go beyond these to holistically consider the whole families' needs, environments, and circumstances. There should be particular focus on the child's as well as the mothers' and fathers' needs, independently of the family unit. Further refinement and piloting of the developing intervention are needed.


Families can experience multiple difficulties. These difficulties include parental mental health problems, alcohol and drug use, domestic violence, and poverty. These difficulties can impact the wellbeing of both parents and children. Currently, support that is provided to families rarely accounts for these complex and multiple difficulties. This study aimed to gather insights from mothers, fathers, and young people about how to best support families who experience multiple difficulties at the same time. We ran six workshops with community groups of mothers, fathers, and young people from London and North East England. We learned that: (1) Parents and young people wanted to be connected to services, resources and peer support networks within their local community. (2) Parents and young people wanted to build trusting, gradual, and non-stigmatising relationships with practitioners. (3) Parents and young people wanted support that was personalised to their own needs and that focused on their strengths. This research contributes key ideas for supporting families, which will be used alongside other studies to develop new ways of supporting families. The next steps will be to complete and test the developing support model, by delivering it to families and measuring how well it works.

18.
SAGE Open Med ; 12: 20503121241261002, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38911442

RESUMEN

Objectives: Health hazards such as adverse drug reactions and prolonged morbidity are fallouts of self-medication among young people in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, practice, determinants, and adverse effects of self-medication among young people living in a suburban community of Ekiti, Nigeria. Methods: This survey was a descriptive, cross-sectional study of 602 young people aged 16-24 years., who were randomly selected in the community. A predesigned self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. The study was conducted from 1st March to 31st May 2023. The independent variables measured include the sociodemographic characteristics, while the dependent variables are the practice of self-medication and factors that predisposes to self-medication. The general characteristics of the participants were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The categorical variables were reported as frequency distribution and proportions with 95% confidence intervals and were compared using the Chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Over 30% (31.7%) of the participants engage in self-medication. A larger proportion of the people who practiced self-medication lived a trekking distance of less than 1 km from the nearest health facility with a doctor (p = 0.044). The practice of self-medication was statistically related with being a student when compared with gainfully employed and unemployed people (p = 0.006). Fever (39.8%), abdominal pain (17.3%) and headaches (16.2%) were the topmost three ailments that necessitated self-medication. Antimalarials (44.0%), antibiotics (25.1%), and antipyretics (16.8%) were high on the list of drugs used for self-medication. Headache (34.0%) was the most common adverse reaction from self-medication among the participants studied. Conclusion: Adverse reactions and drug addiction were negative fallouts of self-medication, which can affect the health of young people as they grow into adulthood. Therefore, monitoring of drug outlets must be taken seriously by government agencies to prevent the worsening of the negative effects of self-medication.

19.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 83(1): 2369349, 2024 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38912845

RESUMEN

An international research collaboration with researchers from northern Sweden, Finland, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland and developed the ChatPal chatbot to explore the possibility of a multilingual chatbot to promote mental wellbeing in people of all ages. In Sweden the end users were young people. The aim of the current study was to explore and discuss Swedish young peoples' experiences of using a chatbot designed to promote their mental wellbeing. Young people aged 15-19 filled out an open-ended survey giving feedback on the ChatPal chatbot and their suggestions on improvements. A total of 122 survey responses were analysed. The qualitative content analysis of the survey responses resulted in three themes each containing two to three sub-themes. Theme 1, feeling as if someone is there when needed, which highlighted positive aspects regarding availability and accessibility. Theme 2, human-robot interaction has its limitations, which included aspects such as unnatural and impersonal conversations and limited content availability. Theme 3, usability can be improved, given technical errors due to lack of internet connection and difficulty navigating the chatbot were brought up as issues. The findings are discussed, and potential implications are offered for those designing and developing digital mental health technologies for young people.


Asunto(s)
Salud Mental , Investigación Cualitativa , Humanos , Adolescente , Masculino , Femenino , Adulto Joven , Regiones Árticas , Suecia , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Internet
20.
J Epidemiol Popul Health ; 72(3): 202751, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38852463

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Pass'Santé Jeunes (PSJ), initiated in 2013, addresses high-risk behaviors among young people in Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France. The program, supported by the Agence Régionale de Santé and Promotion Santé Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, combines digital resources with local partnerships to promote healthy choices among youth. OBJECTIVES: This article reviews the comprehensive health promotion approach of PSJ, aiming to identify key deployment strategies that could serve as a model for other regions or health promotion organizations. RESULTS: PSJ offers validated health resources through a website tailored to different age groups and includes content for parents. The program employs a robust digital marketing strategy, enhancing visibility and engagement through social media. Collaborations with regional athletes have significantly increased outreach, with website traffic growing from 1,000 to 31,000 monthly visitors and social media reach exceeding 450,000 in 2023. Over 20,000 professionals have been trained or sensitized, fostering a network of local actors dedicated to youth health. The program's participatory and community-led strategies effectively mobilize various life environments to support health promotion. CONCLUSIONS: PSJ exemplifies a successful regional health promotion model. Its comprehensive approach, integrating digital tools and local partnerships, addresses the complex determinants of youth health behaviors. Ongoing evaluation and adaptation are crucial to maintaining the program's relevance and effectiveness. Future efforts should focus on bridging regional disparities, enhancing youth engagement, and ensuring long-term support for local actors to sustain health promotion activities.


Asunto(s)
Promoción de la Salud , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Adolescente , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven , Francia , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Internet , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud
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