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1.
Aggress Behav ; 47(3): 332-342, 2021 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33655507

RESUMEN

Adolescents' involvement in cyberbullying has been a growing public health concern for some time. Cybervictimization and cyberaggression are two phenomena that previous research has often shown to be associated. However, longitudinal research into these associations and also into potential risk factors for these phenomena is less common. Anger rumination is a proven risk factor for aggressive behavior, but the relationship between anger rumination and victimization is not clear. The present longitudinal study investigated the associations between cybervictimization, anger rumination and cyberbullying in a sample of 3017 adolescents (MW1 = 13.15; SD = 1.09; 49% girls) from 7th to 9th grade. The European Cyberbullying Intervention Project Questionnaire and the Anger Rumination Scale were administered in four waves with 6 months intervals over a total period of 18 months. The associations between the variables were analyzed with a cross-lagged model. We found that: cybervictimization predicted anger rumination and cyberaggression; anger rumination was associated with later increases in both cybervictimization and cyberaggression: but involvement in cyberaggression predicted neither subsequent involvement in cybervictimization, nor in anger rumination. In addition, cybervictimization was found to mediate the association between anger rumination and cyberaggression. This study expands the understanding of the factors associated with cybervictimization and cyberaggression, and its results indicate that intervention programs should focus on boosting self-control to decrease impulsive behavior and protocols to prevent and intervene in cyberbullying.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Ciberacoso , Adolescente , Ira , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales
2.
J Youth Adolesc ; 50(5): 952-964, 2021 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33745075

RESUMEN

While research addresses neighborhood disorder as leading to conduct problems, the role of individual-level differences in shaping adolescent perceptions of neighborhood has been overlooked. Data on youth, over-selected for childhood conduct problems (N = 744, 58% childhood conduct problems, 47% girls), were used to examine the link between conduct problems (time 1: Mean age = 12.23) and perceived neighborhood disorder (time 3: M = 14.30). The mediating role of delinquent friends, peer victimization, depressive symptoms, and observer-rated neighborhood disorder (time 2: M = 13.23) were also tested. Conduct problems were associated with higher levels of perceived neighborhood disorder, via delinquent peers and peer victimization. These findings offer new insight into the consequences of perceived neighborhood disorder for health and wellbeing.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Problema de Conducta , Adolescente , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Grupo Paritario , Percepción
3.
J Youth Adolesc ; 50(4): 641-662, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33599937

RESUMEN

Although considerable research has examined factors that influence social-cognitive processes related to aggression, few studies have examined the factors that influence adolescents' appraisal of the effectiveness of responses, particularly nonviolent alternatives to aggression. This study addressed that gap by examining patterns of adolescents' perceived effectiveness of nonviolent and aggressive responses to hypothetical problem situations and their relations with aggression, victimization, and individual and contextual risk factors. The participants were a predominantly African American (90%) sample of 1469 students (55% female; mean age = 12.7 years; age range = 11-16) from three middle schools who completed measures of perceived effectiveness, self-efficacy, aggression and victimization, and contextual factors. Ratings of adolescents' physical, relational, and verbal aggression and victimization, nonviolent and prosocial behavior were also obtained from their teachers. Latent class analysis identified four subgroups of adolescents including distinguishes effective, mixed support, everything works, and nothing works. Subgroups differed on measures of aggression, victimization, prosocial and nonviolent behavior, self-efficacy for nonviolence, witnessing community violence, and parents' and peers' support for nonviolence and aggression. The findings underscore the importance of designing violence prevention programs to target the unique needs of subgroups of adolescents.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente , Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Adolescente , Agresión , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Instituciones Académicas , Violencia
4.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33572529

RESUMEN

This study aimed to evaluate which aspects of moral disengagement (MD), empathy, and representations of the victim's experience (VER) could be predictors of cyberbullying (CB). One hundred and eight-nine students (11-17 years old) completed 3 self-report questionnaires: An MD scale, an empathy scale, and a CB questionnaire. In relation to the personal experience of CB, four groups were identified: Victim, bully, bully/victim, and no experience with CB. The linear bivariate correlation analysis shows correlations between empathy and VER, between empathy and MD, and between MD and VER. A multinomial logistic regression identified which predictors could increase a subject's probability of belonging to one of the four groups regarding the personal experience of CB (victim, bully, bully/victim, no experience). Findings highlighted that low cognitive empathy might increase the probability for a student to belong to the bullies' group, rather than the victims' group. Furthermore, low perception of the consequences of CB on the victim might increase the probability of belonging to the bully, bully/victim, and no experience groups. Then, a high score in the diffusion of responsibility was a significant predictor of belonging to the victim group rather than the no experience group. Results from this study confirm the need for preventive measures against CB, including the empowerment of cognitive empathy, decreasing the diffusion of responsibility, and increasing the awareness of the consequences of CB on the victim.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Ciberacoso , Adolescente , Niño , Empatía , Humanos , Italia , Principios Morales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
5.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33572756

RESUMEN

(1) Background: This study examines the associations between risk behaviours and adolescent emotional and physical dating and relationship violence (DRV) victimisation and perpetration, and how these vary by gender. The risk behaviours explored include bullying, cyberbullying, sexting, alcohol, and cannabis use; (2) Methods: Cross-sectional self-report data from the School Health Research Network (SHRN) 2019 Student Health Wellbeing (SHW) survey of 48,397 students aged 11-16 from 149 schools across Wales were analysed using single and multiple-behaviour logistic regression models to explore the associations between each risk behaviour and emotional and physical DRV victimisation and perpetration; (3) Results: Bivariate analyses revealed a statistically significant association between DRV and all risk behaviours. In multivariate analyses, students who reported bullying, cyberbullying, sexting, and substance use, compared to those that had not, had significantly higher odds of experiencing and perpetrating emotional and physical DRV; and (4) Conclusions: Future studies on DRV should consider a mixed-methods approach to explore the context in which DRV and risk behaviours interrelate. Results from this study indicate the possibility that prevention and intervention programmes in school settings that seek to develop healthy school environments and peer-to-peer relationships, could inadvertently reduce the occurrence of future DRV and associated risk behaviours.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente , Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Adolescente , Niño , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Asunción de Riesgos , Instituciones Académicas , Estudiantes , Violencia , Gales/epidemiología
6.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33525687

RESUMEN

School violence is a serious social and public health problem prevalent worldwide. Although the relevance of teacher and classroom factors is well established in the literature, few studies have focused on the role of teacher perceptions in school violence and victimisation and the potential mediational role of classroom climate in this relationship. A total of 2399 adolescents (50% girls), aged between 11 and 18 years (M = 14.65, SD = 1.78) and enrolled in five Spanish Secondary Compulsory Education schools completed measures of classroom climate, school violence towards peers and perception of peer victimisation, and their teachers informed about their academic competence and the teacher-student relationship. Correlational analyses revealed that whereas academic competence perceived by the teacher was negatively related to overt violence and victimisation, its relationship with pure relational violence was positive. Structural equation modelling analyses showed that variables of classroom climate (involvement, affiliation, and teacher support) perceived by the students functioned as partial mediators between teacher perceptions of academic competence and of teacher-student relationship and violence and victimisation. In the mediational model, teacher perception of academic competence acted as a direct protective factor against violence and victimisation, and teacher perception of teacher-student relationship acted as a direct risk for violence, as well as an indirect protective factor through classroom climate for victimisation. The interpretation of these results points to the importance of the teacher's subjective perceptions in the prevention of violence and victimisation problems and their practical implications for the classroom climate perceived by students.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Adolescente , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Instituciones Académicas , Estudiantes , Violencia
7.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33530481

RESUMEN

Although research has given ample consideration to the association between peer victimization and internalizing problems, little is known about the mediating and moderating influences on this relationship. This study investigated whether peer victimization at age 9 indirectly related to internalizing problems at age 15 via school connectedness and whether the direct and indirect associations between peer victimization and internalizing problems were moderated by race. Data were drawn from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, which included 2467 adolescents. The sample was equally divided between male and female and 82% identified as Black and Hispanic. Results indicated that the predictive effect of peer victimization over a 6-year period on teen depression and anxiety was explained by increased school connectedness. Furthermore, there was a moderating effect of race on the direct effect of school connectedness and teen depression and anxiety. For both White and ethnic minority youth, increased school connectedness was associated with less teen depression and anxiety. However, this effect was weaker for ethnic minority students in comparison to White students in both moderated mediation models. The moderated mediation results for teen anxiety showed a greater differential effect among race. The findings have important implications, which are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Adolescente , Niño , Grupos Étnicos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupos Minoritarios , Grupo Paritario , Instituciones Académicas
8.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(2): 135-141, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33570881

RESUMEN

During the 2020 global pandemic crisis, some health care teams pulled together while others fell apart. The teams who pulled together put aside their differences and became stronger, putting their patients first and then each other. Those teams grew stronger, but some teams completely fell apart. They spent their days nitpicking, complaining, and arguing-making decisions based on what was best for themselves, not patients or their coworkers. The common denominator in determining how well teams performed was the leader. Employees looked to their leaders to successfully lead them through crisis, whether it was on a small or global scale. Depending on leader behaviors, the leader strengthened or weakened the team; trust was built or broken. That is a heavy burden to carry knowing that employees were so dependent on them and how they showed up every day. What lessons can leaders learn from the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that can help them strengthen and sustain a healthy, professional, and supportive workforce culture during a crisis and beyond?


Asunto(s)
/enfermería , Liderazgo , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/psicología , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Acoso Escolar/psicología , Agotamiento Profesional/psicología , Humanos , Errores Médicos/enfermería , Errores Médicos/psicología , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/organización & administración , Pandemias
9.
Aggress Behav ; 47(3): 364-374, 2021 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33624339

RESUMEN

The current study examined and compared the relative influence of ecological factors on youth antisocial behaviors (i.e., aggression and rule-breaking) using longitudinal data while assessing the moderating effect of youth attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis. The study used the fifth and sixth wave of data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (n = 2595; mean age = 9.26 at wave five) for the analysis. Multivariate models show that youth ADHD, physically and psychologically abusive parenting, peer victimization, and community cohesion were important predictors of youth antisocial behaviors. Furthermore, youth ADHD diagnosis moderated some associations between the ecological factors and antisocial behaviors, suggesting that youth with and without ADHD may respond to some ecological contexts differently regarding the concerning behaviors. The findings imply that interventions targeting youth antisocial behaviors should involve collaboration across systems and coordination across programs to tackle a multilayered ecological context, especially when youth with ADHD are involved.


Asunto(s)
Trastorno por Déficit de Atención con Hiperactividad , Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Adolescente , Agresión , Trastorno de Personalidad Antisocial/epidemiología , Niño , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales
10.
Res Nurs Health ; 44(2): 319-328, 2021 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33634480

RESUMEN

Efforts to decrease nurse-reported workplace bullying (WPB) is an interest among researchers, nursing leaders, and healthcare organizations. Varying conceptual definitions and measurement approaches of WPB, however, have created barriers for researchers to provide reliable and consistent information regarding WPB. In this paper, the authors aim to (1) evaluate the reliability and construct validity of the Short Negative Acts Questionnaire (SNAQ) in a sample of U.S. nurses working in hospitals located throughout Alabama, (2) determine targets and non-targets of WPB, and (3) evaluate the criterion validity of the SNAQ based on WPB classification. The internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the SNAQ in 943 Alabama registered nurses was evaluated using Cronbach's α and confirmatory factor analysis. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted to explore the underlying structure of the SNAQ. Targets and non-targets of WPB were identified using latent class analysis of the SNAQ and by the self-labeling item. Agreement between the two methods was evaluated with Cohen's κ. Using both methods, the association between WPB classification and outcomes empirically associated with nurse-reported WPB was evaluated with random effects multiple logistic regression to determine criterion validity. The results indicate that the SNAQ is a reliable and valid instrument to explore WPB in a sample of U.S. registered nurses working in hospitals throughout Alabama.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar/estadística & datos numéricos , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
11.
J Youth Adolesc ; 50(4): 753-766, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33428080

RESUMEN

Bullying experiences play an important role in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). However, little is known about how and in what conditions different bullying experiences (i.e., experiences of being pure bullies, pure victims, and bully-victims) may influence NSSI. Guided by the transactional model of development and the integrated model of NSSI, the current study investigated two potential mediators (i.e., peer acceptance and depressive symptoms) and one potential moderator (i.e., psychological resilience) of the relations between different bullying experiences and NSSI. Participants were 812 Chinese adolescents (43% female; Mage at Wave 1 = 13.15 years) from a two-wave longitudinal study with data spanning 1 year. The results show that all three types of bullying experiences can relate to a higher likelihood of NSSI through two indirect pathways: (a) lower peer acceptance to more depressive symptoms, or (b) more depressive symptoms. These indirect effects were weaker for adolescents with higher (versus lower) levels of psychological resilience. Moreover, when bully-victims were distinguished from pure bullies and pure victims and the unique effects for all three groups were tested, the direct and indirect effects were most evident among bully-victims. These findings imply that it is necessary to distinguish bully-victims from pure bullies and pure victims. The results indicate that NSSI may be effectively reduced if interventions focus on promoting peer acceptance and reducing adolescent depressive symptoms, particularly for bully-victims with lower levels of psychological resilience.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Conducta Autodestructiva , Adolescente , China , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Grupo Paritario
12.
J Youth Adolesc ; 50(4): 739-752, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33428081

RESUMEN

Bullying experiences in adolescents could cause maladjusted developments like low self-esteem, which in turn could increase the likelihood of having bullying experiences. Examining these longitudinal reciprocal relationships by considering the co-occurrence of bullying experience is critical, but under-examined. The current study clarifies the longitudinal reciprocal relationship between adolescents' bullying perpetration, victimization, and low self-esteem. An autoregressive cross-lagged model was analyzed with data collected from 3658 Korean secondary students (47.2% were females, Mean age = 12.07, standard deviation = 0.27, range = 11-14) from the Seoul Education Longitudinal study in three waves (seventh to ninth grades). After controlling prior bullying perpetration, victimization, and low self-esteem, low self-esteem positively predicted subsequent victimization, and victimization also positively predicted subsequent low self-esteem longitudinally. However, low self-esteem failed to predict subsequent bullying perpetration, which in turn, failed to predict subsequent low self-esteem. After the prior bullying experiences and low self-esteem are controlled, their longitudinal association becomes clearly distinct. Victims of bullying may fall into a vicious circle, where after being victimized, they themselves feel unlovable or incompetent, and their increased low self-esteem is linked to subsequent victimization. To break out of this vicious circle and temporal stability of victimization, interventions focusing on victims' self-esteem would be effective.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente , Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Adolescente , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Estudiantes
13.
Value Health ; 24(1): 129-135, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33431147

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Bullying and aggression among children and young people are key public mental health priorities. In this study, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a complex school-based intervention to address these outcomes within a large-cluster randomized trial (Inclusive). METHODS: Forty state secondary schools were randomly allocated (1:1) to receive the intervention or continue with current practice as controls. Data were collected using paper questionnaires completed in classrooms including measures of their health-related quality of life using the Childhood Utility Index and police and National Health Service resource use. Further detailed data were collected on the cost of delivering the intervention. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios following the intention-to-treat principle using multilevel linear regression models that allowed for clustering of pupils at the school level. RESULTS: Overall, we found that the intervention was highly cost-effective, with cost-per quality-adjusted life year thresholds of £13 284 and £1875 at 2 years and 3 years, respectively. Analysis of uncertainty in the result at 2 years revealed a 65% chance of being cost-effective, but after 3 years there was a 90% chance that it was cost-effective. CONCLUSION: This study provides strong evidence collected prospectively from a randomized study that this school-based intervention is highly cost-effective. Education- and health-sector policy makers should consider investment in scaling up this intervention.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar/prevención & control , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Servicios de Salud Escolar/organización & administración , Adolescente , Conducta del Adolescente , Análisis Costo-Beneficio , Femenino , Promoción de la Salud/economía , Humanos , Masculino , Estudios Prospectivos , Calidad de Vida , Años de Vida Ajustados por Calidad de Vida , Servicios de Salud Escolar/economía , Reino Unido
14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33430281

RESUMEN

During middle childhood and adolescence, victimisation appears to be a group process involving different participant roles. However, peer reports with younger children (four to six years old) have failed to identify the participant roles of assistant (to the bully) reinforcers or defenders with much reliability. This may be because peer victimisation is a more dyadic process among younger children (behavioural reality), or because of limitations in young children's cognitive capacity to identify these behaviours (cognitive limitations). The findings of an observational study which examined the group nature of peer victimisation among young children are presented. Observations were made of 56 children aged four and five years using time sampling during free play at school (totalling 43.5 h of observation). Records were made of their behaviour when an onlooker witnessed aggression by others, and also of others' behaviour when they were being aggressive or being victimised. Although children other than the aggressor and target were present in nearly two thirds of the episodes of peer victimisation observed, few exhibited behavioural responses in line with the assistant, reinforcer or defender roles. This supports the behavioural reality rather than the cognitive limitations explanation. Sex differences were observed in types of aggression displayed by children, with boys more likely than girls to be physically aggressive. Children were less likely to be aggressive to other-sex peers and were most likely to be victimised by children of the same sex as them. There were also sex differences in children's onlooker behaviour. The implications for our understanding of the development of peer victimisation and bullying in children are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Adolescente , Agresión , Niño , Preescolar , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Caracteres Sexuales
15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33430345

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This study offers the design and validation of a scale for measuring violence in adolescent couples from the perspective of victimisation and perpetration for young Spanish speakers. METHOD: Validation study using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis with online self-selected sampling and the participation of 422 subjects who met the requirements of being between 13 and 21 years old and currently or recently having a partner. RESULTS: A scale of victimisation in adolescent partner relationships was obtained with 25 items and a scale of violence perpetration with 22 items. Both scales presented five factors: psychological violence, verbal violence, control, jealousy, and sexual violence. Significant differences were found between men and women in victimisation and perpetration of sexual violence. CONCLUSIONS: The Teen Dating Violence-Victimisation and Perpetration (TDV)-VP complies with the reliability and validity indices, constituting a very useful instrument for the detection and measurement of violence in Spanish-speaking adolescent couples in health-promotion work.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente , Acoso Escolar , Víctimas de Crimen , Violencia de Pareja , Delitos Sexuales , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Adulto Joven
16.
J Adolesc ; 87: 15-27, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33450464

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Cancer may cause significant disruptions in normal adolescent development particularly in social domains. Both treatment and survivorship pose challenges to fostering social connections. To better understand these challenges, we conducted a systematic literature review of the experience of social isolation and connectedness in adolescents with cancer and adolescent survivors of childhood cancer. METHODS: A systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted following PRISMA Guidelines. Eligible articles included original peer-reviewed research published in English between January 2000 and April 2020 that reported on social domains of patients and survivors of cancer between the ages of 10-21. Initial database search identified 4606 articles with 43 studies meeting inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Results were synthesized into four domains: (1) the prevalence of connectedness/isolation; (2) risk factors associated with social isolation; (3) protective factors against social isolation; (4) the impact of social isolation on psychological health. Overall, adolescent patients and survivors of cancer have satisfactory social connectedness. However, certain subgroups including those with central nervous system tumors are at higher risk of social isolation. CONCLUSIONS: In general, adolescent cancer patients and survivors report levels of social connectedness consistent with healthy adolescent population norms. The risk and protective factors identified in this review may help serve as important indicators for psychosocial screening and interventions. These findings are particularly relevant in the COVID-19 era as all adolescents face challenges to social connections and psychosocial development.


Asunto(s)
Supervivientes de Cáncer , Relaciones Interpersonales , Aislamiento Social , Adolescente , Acoso Escolar , Amigos , Humanos , Salud Mental , Calidad de Vida , Factores de Riesgo , Apoyo Social
17.
Aggress Behav ; 47(3): 320-331, 2021 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33469955

RESUMEN

Adolescents' involvement in bullying situations is-at least partially-personality trait-activated. Although some studies investigated personality correlates of bullying and being victimized, little is known about personality correlates of bystander responses (i.e., reinforcing, outsider behavior, indirect defending, and direct defending). The present study investigated whether Dutch adolescents' self-reported HEXACO personality traits could explain their peer-reported involvement in bullying (N = 552; Mage = 13.4 years, SD = 0.8 years). The results show that bullying was negatively related to honesty-humility, emotionality, agreeableness (for boys specifically), and openness, whereas reinforcing was only negatively related to honesty-humility and openness. Conversely, direct defending and outsider behavior were positively related to honesty-humility, emotionality, and openness, whereas indirect defending was only positively related to emotionality and openness. Furthermore, reinforcing was positively related to extraversion (for boys only), whereas outsider behavior was negatively related extraversion and positively to conscientiousness. Finally, being victimized was positively related to emotionality and negatively to extraversion. These findings contribute to our understanding of the heterogeneity in adolescents' involvement in bullying and fit the view of bullying and defending as strategic and goal-directed behavior. Implications for bullying prevention programs are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar , Extraversión Psicológica , Adolescente , Humanos , Masculino , Personalidad , Trastornos de la Personalidad , Inventario de Personalidad
18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33466314

RESUMEN

Most studies on workplace bullying have been conducted in high-income countries and on Caucasian samples. Little is known about workplace bullying in Asian countries despite its recognition as a serious public health issue in the workplace. We examined the annual and lifetime prevalence of workplace bullying and its risk factors among Chinese employees in Hong Kong. The study was part of a larger project consisting of two waves. Respondents were recruited from a convenience sampling technique and completed a self-reported survey. Respondents reported whether they had been bullied at work for the past 12 months and during their lifetime. A multivariate logistic regression was conducted to explore the sociodemographic risk factors for workplace bullying. There were a total of 2657 respondents (54.6% male), with a mean age of 41.53 years. The annual and lifetime prevalence of workplace bullying were 39.1% and 58.9%, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that workplace bullying in the past 12 months was associated with a high monthly income, and the combination of a high monthly income and higher educational attainment was associated with bullying at some point in the participants' career. Suitable policies and interventions to reduce the extent of workplace bullying in Hong Kong are warranted.


Asunto(s)
Acoso Escolar , Estrés Laboral/epidemiología , Lugar de Trabajo , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Hong Kong/epidemiología , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Prevalencia , Factores de Riesgo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
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