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1.
Psicothema (Oviedo) ; 33(1): 111-117, feb. 2021. tab, graf
Artículo en Inglés | IBECS | ID: ibc-196952

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, the Spanish government established an official lockdown across the country in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and confined the population to their homes, restricting their mobility. The objectives of the study are twofold: a) to examine dose-response relationships between physical activity (PA) components (volume, intensity, frequency, duration) and depressive symptoms of the population during confinement, and b) to identify the optimal levels of PA to mitigate notable depressive symptoms (NDS). METHODS: 4,811 (2,952 women) Spanish citizens, age range 16-92 years, completed an online questionnaire (snowball sampling) to measure their levels of depressive symptoms, PA, and various anthropometric and sociometric variables. Volume (METs-min/week), frequency (days/week), and duration (hours) were examined using logistic regressions with restricted cubic splines. RESULTS: The PA components were inversely associated with NDS. Performing at least 477 METs-min/week was associated with a 33% decrease in probability of NDS, and reaching 3,000 METs-min/week was associated with the lowest risk of NDS (47%). As for frequency, with 10 times/week the probability of NDS was 56% lower. At 10 hours of weekly practice, the probability of NDS was 39% lower. CONCLUSIONS: A range and optimal amount of PA is suggested to reduce the appearance of SDN during confinement


ANTECEDENTES: en marzo de 2020 el gobierno español decretó el estado de alarma debido a la pandemia por COVID-19 y confinó a la población. Los objetivos son dos: a) examinar las relaciones dosis-respuesta entre los componentes de actividad física (AF: volumen, intensidad, frecuencia y duración) y los síntomas depresivos de la población durante el confinamiento, y b) identificar los niveles óptimos de AF para mitigar los síntomas depresivos notables (SDN). MÉTODO: 4.811 (2.952 mujeres) ciudadanos de España, de 16 a 92 años respondieron a un cuestionario on line (muestreo de bola de nieve) para medir sus niveles de síntomas depresivos, AF, y variables antropométricas y sociométricas. El volumen (METs-min/sem), la frecuencia (días/sem) y la duración (horas) se examinaron mediante regresiones logísticas con splines cúbicas restringidas. RESULTADOS: los componentes de AF se asociaron inversamente con las probabilidades de SDN. La realización de 477 METs-min/sem se asoció con una disminución del 33% en las probabilidades de SDN, y alcanzar 3.000 METs-min/sem se asoció con el menor riesgo de SDN (47%). En cuanto a frecuencia, con 10 días/sem las probabilidades de SDN fueron un 56% más bajas. A las 10 horas de práctica semanal, las probabilidades de SDN fueron un 39% más bajas. CONCLUSIONES: se sugiere un rango y cantidad óptima de AF para reducir la aparición de SDN en confinamiento


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Adolescente , Adulto Joven , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Pandemias , Cuarentena/psicología , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Actividad Motora , Depresión/prevención & control , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , España
2.
Lancet HIV ; 8(2): e106-e113, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33539757

RESUMEN

Ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 will require addressing stigma more systematically and at a larger scale than current efforts. Existing global evidence shows that stigma is a barrier to achieving each of the 90-90-90 targets; it undermines HIV testing, linkage to care, treatment adherence, and viral load suppression. However, findings from both research studies and programmatic experience have helped to inform the growing body of knowledge regarding how to reduce stigma, leading to key principles for HIV stigma reduction. These principles include immediately addressing actionable drivers of stigma, centring groups affected by stigma at the core of the response, and engaging opinion leaders and building partnerships between affected groups and opinion leaders. Although there is still room to strengthen research on stigma measurement and reduction, in particular for intersectional stigma, the proliferation of evidence over the past several decades on how to measure and address stigma provides a solid foundation for immediate and comprehensive action.


Asunto(s)
Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida/prevención & control , Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida/psicología , Epidemias/prevención & control , Miedo/psicología , Estigma Social , Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida/diagnóstico , Síndrome de Inmunodeficiencia Adquirida/virología , Fármacos Anti-VIH/uso terapéutico , Femenino , VIH/efectos de los fármacos , VIH/crecimiento & desarrollo , VIH/patogenicidad , Humanos , Masculino , Cooperación del Paciente/psicología , Cooperación del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Cumplimiento y Adherencia al Tratamiento/psicología , Cumplimiento y Adherencia al Tratamiento/estadística & datos numéricos , Carga Viral/efectos de los fármacos
3.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 299, 2021 02 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33546659

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: With the indiscriminate spread of COVID-19 globally, many populations are experiencing negative consequences such as job loss, food insecurity, and inability to manage existing medical conditions and maintain preventive measures such as social distancing and personal preventative equipment. Some of the most disadvantaged in the COVID-19 era are people living with HIV/AIDS and other autoimmune diseases. DISCUSSION: As the number of new HIV infections decrease globally, many subpopulations remain at high risk of infection due to lack of or limited access to prevention services, as well as clinical care and treatment. For persons living with HIV or at higher risk of contracting HIV, including persons who inject drugs or men that have sex with men, the risk of COVID-19 infection increases if they have certain comorbidities, are older than 60 years of age, and are homeless, orphaned, or vulnerable children. The risk of COVID-19 is also more significant for those that live in Low- and Middle-Income Countries, rural, and/or poverty-stricken areas. An additional concern for those living the HIV is the double stigma that may arise if they also test positive for COVID-19. As public health and health care workers try to tackle the needs of the populations that they serve, they are beginning to realize the need for a change in the infrastructure that will include more efficient partnerships between public health, health care, and HIV programs. CONCLUSION: Persons living with HIV that also have other underlying comorbidities are a great disadvantage from the negative consequences of COVID-19. For those that may test positive for both HIV and COVID-19, the increased psychosocial burdens stemming from stress and isolation, as well as, experiencing additional barriers that inhibit access to care, may cause them to become more disenfranchised. Thus, it becomes very important during the current pandemic for these challenges and barriers to be addressed so that these persons living with HIV can maintain continuity of care, as well as, their social and mental support systems.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Infecciones por VIH/epidemiología , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud , Comorbilidad , Infecciones por VIH/terapia , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Poblaciones Vulnerables
6.
Psychiatry Res ; 296: 113676, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33385782

RESUMEN

To determine whether the past half-year of COVID-19-related lockdowns, stay-at-home orders, and social isolation were associated with changes in high-risk alcohol use, a total of 5,931 individuals completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) at one of six time points from April through September 2020. Over the 6-month period, hazardous alcohol use and likely dependence increased month-by-month for those under lockdowns compared to those not under restrictions. This increase in harmful alcohol use and related behaviors is likely to have prolonged adverse psychosocial, interpersonal, occupational, and health impacts as the world attempts to recover from the pandemic crisis.


Asunto(s)
Alcoholismo/epidemiología , Aislamiento Social , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Alcoholismo/psicología , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Factores de Riesgo , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Responsabilidad Social
7.
J Psychiatr Res ; 134: 215-222, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33444930

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Beyond the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on the public's health, the length of lockdown and its possible psychological impacts on populations is heavily debated. However, the consequences of lockdown on psychotic symptoms have been poorly investigated. METHODS: An online survey was run from April 13 to May 11, 2020; a total of 728 French subjects from the general population were included in the study. We assessed the perceived impact of the COVID-19 outbreak, length of isolation, diagnosis/symptoms/hospitalisation related to the COVID-19 (oneself and family). Paranoid ideations and hallucination-like experiences were assessed via the Paranoia Scale and the Cardiff Anomalous Perceptions Scale, respectively. Self-reported measures of negative affect, loneliness, sleep difficulties, jumping to conclusion bias, repetitive thoughts, among others, were also included. RESULTS: Final regression model for paranoia indicated that socio-demographic variables (age, sex and education), loneliness, cognitive bias, anxiety, experiential avoidance, repetitive thoughts and hallucinations were associated with paranoia (R2 = 0.43). For hallucinations, clinical variables as well as the quality of sleep, behavioural activation, repetitive thoughts, anxiety and paranoia were associated with hallucinations in our sample (R2 = 0.27). Neither length of isolation nor the perceived impact of the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with psychotic experiences in the final models. CONCLUSIONS: No evidence was found for the impact of isolation on psychotic symptoms in the general population in France one month after the lockdown. It nevertheless confirms the preeminent role of several factors previously described in the maintenance and development of psychotic symptoms in the context of a pandemic and lockdown measures.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Alucinaciones/psicología , Trastornos Paranoides/psicología , Cuarentena/psicología , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Francia , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias
8.
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci ; 30: e16, 2021 Jan 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33461639

RESUMEN

AIMS: It remains unclear whether the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is having an impact on suicide rates (SR). Economic insecurity and mental disorders are risk factors for suicide, which may increase during the pandemic. METHODS: Data on suicide events in a major city in Germany, and the corresponding life years (LY) were provided by the local authorities. For the year 2020, periods without restrictions on freedom of movement and social contact were compared with periods of moderate and severe COVID-19 restrictions. To avoid distortions due to seasonal fluctuations and linear time trends, suicide risk during the COVID-19 pandemic was compared with data from 2010 to 2019 using an interrupted time series analysis. RESULTS: A total of 643 suicides were registered and 6 032 690 LY were spent between 2010 and 2020. Of these, 53 suicides and 450 429 LY accounted for the year 2020.In 2020, SR (suicides per 100 000 LY) were lower in periods with severe COVID-19 restrictions (SR = 7.2, χ2 = 4.033, p = 0.045) compared with periods without restrictions (SR = 16.8). A comparison with previous years showed that this difference was caused by unusually high SR before the imposition of restrictions, while SR during the pandemic were within the trend corridor of previous years (expected suicides = 32.3, observed suicides = 35; IRR = 1.084, p = 0.682). CONCLUSIONS: SR during COVID-19 pandemic are in line with the trend in previous years. Careful monitoring of SR in the further course of the COVID-19 crisis is urgently needed. The findings have regional reference and should not be over-generalised.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Pandemias , Cuarentena/psicología , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Suicidio/psicología , Suicidio/tendencias , /epidemiología , Femenino , Alemania/epidemiología , Humanos , Soledad/psicología , Suicidio/estadística & datos numéricos , Intento de Suicidio/psicología
10.
Stroke ; 52(2): 735-747, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33445957

RESUMEN

The current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic represents a severe, life-changing event for people across the world. Life changes may involve job loss, income reduction due to furlough, death of a beloved one, or social stress due to life habit changes. Many people suffer from social isolation due to lockdown or physical distancing, especially those living alone and without family. This article reviews the association of life events and social isolation with cardiovascular disease, assembling the current state of knowledge for stroke and coronary heart disease. Possible mechanisms underlying the links between life events, social isolation, and cardiovascular disease are outlined. Furthermore, groups with increased vulnerability for cardiovascular disease following life events and social isolation are identified, and clinical implications of results are presented.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Enfermedad Coronaria/psicología , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Accidente Cerebrovascular/psicología , Ansiedad/psicología , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/métodos , Enfermedad Coronaria/virología , Humanos
11.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244873, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33400700

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Multiple studies have highlighted the negative impact of COVID-19 and its particular effects on vulnerable sub-populations. Complementing this work, here, we report on the social patterning of self-reported positive changes experienced during COVID-19 national lockdown in Scotland. METHODS: The CATALYST study collected data from 3342 adults in Scotland during weeks 9-12 of a national lockdown. Using a cross-sectional design, participants completed an online questionnaire providing data on key sociodemographic and health variables, and completed a measure of positive change. The positive change measure spanned diverse domains (e.g., more quality time with family, developing new hobbies, more physical activity, and better quality of sleep). We used univariate analysis and stepwise regression to examine the contribution of a range of sociodemographic factors (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, educational attainment, and employment status) in explaining positive change. RESULTS: There were clear sociodemographic differences across positive change scores. Those reporting higher levels of positive change were female, from younger age groups, married or living with their partner, employed, and in better health. CONCLUSION: Overall our results highlight the social patterning of positive changes during lockdown in Scotland. These findings begin to illuminate the complexity of the unanticipated effects of national lockdown and will be used to support future intervention development work sharing lessons learned from lockdown to increase positive health change amongst those who may benefit.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Cuarentena/psicología , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/prevención & control , /prevención & control , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/métodos , Estudios Transversales , Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Familia/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Escocia/epidemiología , Sueño/fisiología , Higiene del Sueño , Estrés Psicológico/prevención & control , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
12.
J Relig Health ; 60(1): 99-111, 2021 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33405093

RESUMEN

Coping with the COVID-19 pandemic has required measures to contain the contagion, including social isolation. However, this and other factors have caused mental health problems, both in patients and health professionals and in family members or asymptomatic population. Religious support can be an ally for this type of confrontation. In the case of the COVID-19 pandemic, spiritual/religious care has been restricted and insufficient. When accessible to patients and frontline professionals, they are offered by virtual means, almost always by recorded media and made available in bulk. This essay argues, based on references in the areas of psychology, psychoneuroimmunology, biosafety, and military, that the face-to-face and personalized relationship between religious leaders, patients, health professionals, family members, and faith communities is as essential as possible for the dignified treatment victims, referral to spiritual needs and resilience of society, in addition to contributing to the improvement of the immune response of all. Practical examples are cited in the areas of military chaplaincy and hospital civilian chaplaincy. The essay also proposes the adoption of protocols already published by WHO and other safety measures such as the use of robotics and the recruitment/training of mass chaplains. In addition to contributing to the improvement of COVID-19 pandemic coping processes, the study also contributes to improving the delivery of spiritual/religious care as an ally to physical and mental, individual, and collective health.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos Mentales , Religión y Psicología , Aislamiento Social , /psicología , Humanos , Trastornos Mentales/prevención & control , Aislamiento Social/psicología
13.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e042871, 2021 01 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33436472

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: In the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, social isolation, school/child care closures and employment instability have created unprecedented conditions for families raising children at home. This study describes the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on families with children in Canada. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This descriptive study used a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey of adults living in Canada (n=3000) to examine the mental health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Outcomes among parents with children <18 years old living at home (n=618) were compared with the rest of the sample. Data were collected via an online survey between 14 May to 29 May 2020. OUTCOME MEASURES: Participants reported on changes to their mental health since the onset of the pandemic and sources of stress, emotional responses, substance use patterns and suicidality/self-harm. Additionally, parents identified changes in their interactions with their children, impacts on their children's mental health and sources of support accessed. RESULTS: 44.3% of parents with children <18 years living at home reported worse mental health as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic compared with 35.6% of respondents without children <18 living at home, χ2 (1, n=3000)=16.2, p<0.001. More parents compared with the rest of the sample reported increased alcohol consumption (27.7% vs 16.1%, χ2 (1, n=3000)=43.8, p<0.001), suicidal thoughts/feelings (8.3% vs 5.2%, χ2 (1, n=3000)=8.0, p=0.005) and stress about being safe from physical/emotional domestic violence (11.5% vs 7.9%, χ2 (1, n=3000)=8.1, p=0.005). 24.8% (95% CI 21.4 to 28.4) of parents reported their children's mental health had worsened since the pandemic. Parents also reported more frequent negative as well as positive interactions with their children due to the pandemic (eg, more conflicts, 22.2% (95% CI 19.0 to 25.7); increased feelings of closeness, 49.7% (95% CI 45.7 to 53.7)). CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies that families with children <18 at home have experienced deteriorated mental health due to the pandemic. Population-level responses are required to adequately respond to families' diverse needs and mitigate the potential for widening health and social inequities for parents and children.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Salud de la Familia/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas Epidemiológicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Canadá/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Encuestas Epidemiológicas/métodos , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Cuarentena/psicología , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Adulto Joven
15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33419194

RESUMEN

Loneliness is a pervasive problem recognised as a serious social issue, and the prevailing COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated loneliness to greater prominence and concern. We expect a rise of a massive group of 'lonely' consumers who are deeply entrenched in the social isolation caused by COVID-19. There is an urgent need to revisit the phenomenon of lonely consumers to better prepare academic researchers, public policy makers and commercial managers in the post-COVID-19 era. Thus, this study conducts a synthesised review on past studies of lonely consumers. Based on an inductive analysis of 56 articles, 74 key themes are identified. These key themes are further categorised into five major clusters by way of a co-occurrence network analysis. Respectively, the five clusters address the psychological implications related to the dynamics between nonhuman attachment and consumers' loneliness, the commercial implications related to the paradoxical motivations of affiliation and self-affirmation in product selection and the dual information processing mechanism in response to advertisement appeals, and the social implications related to consumers' well-being in an ageing society and the anthropomorphic companionship in a virtual world. A list of research questions is proposed that concludes the review study.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Soledad , Pandemias , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Humanos
17.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e040649, 2021 01 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33455927

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen unprecedented restrictions on face-to-face healthcare encounters. This has led to an increase in the use of online healthcare resources by service users. Pregnant women have always been a group particularly motivated to seek out information online. The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of mothers who were using an existing National Health Service social media based antenatal support service during the early stages of the UK COVID-19 lockdown. DESIGN: A short online survey with four closed questions (scale response) and one open-ended free-text question was given to pregnant women who were using the online service 3 weeks after the start of the UK lockdown. Descriptive statistics are used to present the closed question data. Thematic analysis was applied to the free-text responses. RESULTS: 320 women were sent the survey. 156 completed it (49% response rate). Participants provided information relating to frequency of use, information access, relative level of antenatal care and ease of contact. 105 (66%) participants completed the open-ended free-text question. Key themes to emerge related to: (1) information provision and verification; (2) managing and reducing feelings of isolation; (3) service specific issues, including crisis adaptations; and (4) impact on routine care. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that that pregnant mothers found a social media based approach well positioned to provide antenatal care and support during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Mujeres Embarazadas/psicología , Atención Prenatal/métodos , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Medios de Comunicación Sociales/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Motivación , Embarazo , Investigación Cualitativa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Reino Unido
18.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e043590, 2021 01 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33468529

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a national lockdown in India from midnight on 25 March 2020, with conditional relaxation by phases and zones from 20 April. We evaluated the impact of the lockdown in terms of healthcare provisions, physical health, mental health and social well-being within a multicentre cross-sectional study in India. METHODS: The SMART India study is an ongoing house-to-house survey conducted across 20 regions including 11 states and 1 union territory in India to study diabetes and its complications in the community. During the lockdown, we developed an online questionnaire and delivered it in English and seven popular Indian languages (Hindi, Tamil, Marathi, Telegu, Kannada, Bengali, Malayalam) to random samples of SMART-India participants in two rounds from 5 May 2020 to 24 May 2020. We used multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the overall impact on health and healthcare provision in phases 3 and 4 of lockdown in red and non-red zones and their interactions. RESULTS: A total of 2003 participants completed this multicentre survey. The bivariate relationships between the outcomes and lockdown showed significant negative associations. In the multivariable analyses, the interactions between the red zones and lockdown showed that all five dimensions of healthcare provision were negatively affected (non-affordability: OR 1.917 (95% CI 1.126 to 3.264), non-accessibility: OR 2.458 (95% CI 1.549 to 3.902), inadequacy: OR 3.015 (95% CI 1.616 to 5.625), inappropriateness: OR 2.225 (95% CI 1.200 to 4.126) and discontinuity of care: OR 6.756 (95% CI 3.79 to 12.042)) and associated depression and social loneliness. CONCLUSION: The impact of COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown on health and healthcare was negative. The exaggeration of income inequality during lockdown can be expected to extend the negative impacts beyond the lockdown.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Prestación de Atención de Salud/normas , Diabetes Mellitus/psicología , Salud Mental , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Adulto , Anciano , Estudios Transversales , Diabetes Mellitus/tratamiento farmacológico , Femenino , Servicios de Salud , Humanos , India , Modelos Logísticos , Soledad , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Análisis Multivariante , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
19.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e042824, 2021 01 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33472787

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19-related social isolation and stress may have significant mental health effects, including post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression. These factors are thought to disproportionately affect populations at risk of psychopathology, such as adolescents with a history of childhood adversity (CA). Therefore, examining which factors may buffer the impact of COVID-19-related stress and isolation in vulnerable adolescents is critical. The Resilience After the COVID-19 Threat (REACT) study assesses whether emotion regulation capacity, inflammation and neuroimmune responses to stress induced in the laboratory prior to the pandemic predict responses to COVID-19-related social isolation and stress in adolescents with CA. We aim to elucidate the mechanisms that enable vulnerable adolescents to maintain or regain good mental health when confronted with COVID-19. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We recruited 79 adolescents aged 16-26 with CA experiences from the Resilience After Individual Stress Exposure study in which we assessed emotion regulation, neural and immune stress responses to an acute stress task. Our sample completed questionnaires at the start of the UK lockdown ('baseline'; April 2020) and three (July 2020) and 6 months later (October 2020) providing crucial longitudinal information across phases of the pandemic progression and government response. The questionnaires assess (1) mental health, (2) number and severity of life events, (3) physical health, (4) stress perception and (5) loneliness and friendship support. We will use multilevel modelling to examine whether individual differences at baseline are associated with responses to COVID-19-related social isolation and stress. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has been approved by the Cambridge Psychology Research Ethics Committee (PRE.2020.037). Results of the REACT study will be disseminated in publications in scientific peer-reviewed journals, presentations at scientific conferences and meetings, publications and presentations for the general public, and through social media.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Salud Mental , Resiliencia Psicológica , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Estrés Psicológico , Adolescente , Humanos , Soledad , Proyectos de Investigación , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 22(2): 228-237.e25, 2021 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33347846

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Good social connection is associated with better health and wellbeing. However, social connection has distinct considerations for people living in long-term care (LTC) homes. The objective of this scoping review was to summarize research literature linking social connection to mental health outcomes, specifically among LTC residents, as well as research to identify strategies to help build and maintain social connection in this population during COVID-19. DESIGN: Scoping review. SETTINGS AND PARTICIPANTS: Residents of LTC homes, care homes, and nursing homes. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE(R) ALL (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO), PsycINFO (Ovid), Scopus, Sociological Abstracts (ProQuest), Embase and Embase Classic (Ovid), Emcare Nursing (Ovid), and AgeLine (EBSCO) for research that quantified an aspect of social connection among LTC residents; we limited searches to English-language articles published from database inception to search date (July 2019). For the current analysis, we included studies that reported (1) the association between social connection and a mental health outcome, (2) the association between a modifiable risk factor and social connection, or (3) intervention studies with social connection as an outcome. From studies in (2) and (3), we identified strategies that could be implemented and adapted by LTC residents, families and staff during COVID-19 and included the articles that informed these strategies. RESULTS: We included 133 studies in our review. We found 61 studies that tested the association between social connection and a mental health outcome. We highlighted 12 strategies, informed by 72 observational and intervention studies, that might help LTC residents, families, and staff build and maintain social connection for LTC residents. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Published research conducted among LTC residents has linked good social connection to better mental health outcomes. Observational and intervention studies provide some evidence on approaches to address social connection in this population. Although further research is needed, it does not obviate the need to act given the sudden and severe impact of COVID-19 on social connection in LTC residents.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Cuidados a Largo Plazo , Salud Mental , Casas de Salud , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Humanos , Pandemias
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