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2.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 262, 2021 May 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33957915

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Competency-based education has been shown to enhance clinical skills, improve patient care, and reduce number of complications resulting in a better return on investments. Residents constitute an important workforce at many hospitals. Yet, the effect of training on residents' contribution to production in patient care is scarcely studied. This study evaluated the effects of early competency-based procedural training on residents' contribution to patient care in central venous catheterization and spinal and epidural anesthesia. METHODS: The design was a non-randomized cohort study of first-year anesthesiology residents. The intervention group received additional early focused skills training while three control groups received traditional competency-based education. The residents' contributions to patient care were compared between the intervention group (n = 20), a historical control group (n = 19), and between a contemporary control group (n = 7) and a historical control group (n = 7) from different departments. The residents' vs specialists' procedural production share was compared between years within each study group. We calculated specialist time saved compared to the time spent providing additional skills training in the intervention group. RESULTS: We found statistically significant increases in residents' vs specialists' share of total production after the intervention for epidural anesthesia: 2015: 0.51 (0.23, 0.70) to 2017: 0.94 (0.78, 1.05), p = 0.011 and central venous catheterization: 2015: 0.30 (0.23, 0.36) to 2016: 0.46 (0.35, 0.55), p = .008; and to 2017: 0.64 (0.50, 0.79), p = 0.008. Comparison between residents and specialists on production of the three procedures before and after the intervention showed a surplus of 21 h of freed specialist time per year. CONCLUSIONS: Early procedural training results in more productive residents and freed specialist time for additional supervision, other clinical tasks or research. This provides empirical support for a positive correlation between early focused training and increased independent production among residents.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiología , Internado y Residencia , Anestesiología/educación , Competencia Clínica , Estudios de Cohortes , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Humanos
3.
MedEdPORTAL ; 17: 11134, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33816795

RESUMEN

Introduction: In a CICO (cannot intubate, cannot oxygenate) situation, anesthesiologists and acute care physicians must be able to perform an emergency surgical cricothyrotomy (front-of-neck airway procedure). CICOs are high-acuity situations with rare opportunities for safe practice. In COVID-19 airway management guidelines, bougie-assisted surgical cricothyrotomy is the recommended emergency strategy for CICO situations. Methods: We designed a 4-hour procedural simulation workshop on surgical cricothyrotomy to train 16 medical residents. We provided prerequisite readings, a lecture, and a videotaped demonstration. Two clinical scenarios introduced deliberate practice on partial-task neck simulators and fresh human cadavers. We segmented an evidence-based procedure and asked participants to verbalize the five steps of the procedure on multiple occasions. Results: Thirty-two residents who participated in the workshops were surveyed, with a 97% response rate (16 of 16 from anesthesiology, 15 of 16 from emergency medicine). Participants commented positively on the workshop's authenticity, its structure, the quality of the feedback provided, and its perceived impact on improving skills in surgical cricothyrotomy. We analyzed narrative comments related to three domains: preparation for the procedure, performing the procedure, and maintaining the skills. Participants highlighted the importance of performing the procedure many times and mentioned the representativeness of fresh cadavers. Discussion: We developed a surgical cricothyrotomy simulation workshop for anesthesiology and emergency medicine residents. Residents in the two specialities uniformly appreciated its format and content. We identified common pitfalls when executing the procedure and provided practical tips and material to facilitate implementation, in particular to face the COVID-19 pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiología/educación , Medicina de Emergencia/educación , Internado y Residencia , Entrenamiento Simulado , Traqueostomía/educación , Adulto , Manejo de la Vía Aérea/métodos , Cadáver , Humanos , Pandemias , Traqueostomía/métodos
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(11): e24836, 2021 Mar 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33725954

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: Anesthesiologists and surgeons have demonstrated a lack of familiarity with professional guidelines when providing care for surgical patients with a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order. This substantially infringes on patient's self-autonomy; therefore, leading to substandard care particularly for palliative surgical procedures. The interventional nature of surgical procedures may create a different mentality of surgical "buy-in," that may unintentionally prioritize survivability over maintaining patient self-autonomy. While previous literature has demonstrated gains in communication skills with simulation training, no specific educational curriculum has been proposed to specifically address perioperative code status discussions. We designed a simulated standardized patient actor (SPA) encounter at the beginning of post-graduate year (PGY) 2, corresponding to the initiation of anesthesiology specific training, allowing residents to focus on the perioperative discussion in relation to the SPA's DNR order.Forty four anesthesiology residents volunteered to participate in the study. PGY-2 group (n = 17) completed an immediate post-intervention assessment, while PGY-3 group (n = 13) completed the assessment approximately 1 year after the educational initiative to ascertain retention. PGY-4 residents (n = 14) did not undergo any specific educational intervention on the topic, but were given the same assessment. The assessment consisted of an anonymized survey that examined familiarity with professional guidelines and hospital policies in relation to perioperative DNR orders. Subsequently, survey responses were compared between classes.Study participants that had not participated in the educational intervention reported a lack of prior formalized instruction on caring for intraoperative DNR patients. Second and third year residents outperformed senior residents in being aware of the professional guidelines that detail perioperative code status decision-making (47%, 62% vs 21%, P = .004). PGY-3 residents outperformed PGY-4 residents in correctly identifying a commonly held misconception that institutional policies allow for automatic perioperative DNR suspensions (85% vs 43%; P = .02). Residents from the PGY-3 class, who were 1 year removed the educational intervention while gaining 1 additional year of clinical anesthesiology training, consistently outperformed more senior residents who never received the intervention.Our training model for code-status training with anesthesiology residents showed significant gains. The best results were achieved when combining clinical experience with focused educational training.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Atención Perioperativa/psicología , Medicina Perioperatoria/educación , Órdenes de Resucitación/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Anestesiología/educación , Femenino , Adhesión a Directriz/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Conocimiento , Masculino , Simulación de Paciente , Autonomía Personal , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
5.
J Clin Anesth ; 70: 110192, 2021 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33556792

RESUMEN

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Anesthesiologists have a high prevalence of burnout with adverse effects on professionalism and safety. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of an interactive anesthesiology educational program on the wellness of anesthesia providers and their children, as assessed by a modified Professional Fulfillment Index. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Perioperative area. PATIENTS: Thirty clinicians participated in the program. Twenty respondents, representing 67% of participants and each corresponding to a parent and their child or children, completed the post-event survey. INTERVENTIONS: An interactive anesthesiology educational program incorporating children, between the ages of five and eighteen years old, of anesthesia providers was held in the perioperative area. The program was held over four hours and was comprised of four sessions including pediatric anesthesia, neuroanesthesia, airway, and ultrasound stations. MEASUREMENTS: Anesthesia providers and their children were administered a post-event assessment, including a modified Professional Fulfillment Index and satisfaction survey. MAIN RESULTS: All twenty (100%) of respondents indicated it was "very true" or "completely true" that their child was happy with the program, and that it was worthwhile and satisfying to both the anesthesia provider and their child. Nineteen (95%) of reporting participants indicated it was "very true" or "completely true" that it was meaningful to have the department host such a program and 17 (85%) respondents felt their child now better understands the anesthesia work of the parent. All clinician volunteers indicated it was "very true" or "completely true" that they were contributing professionally during the program in ways that they valued most. CONCLUSION: An interactive educational wellness initiative provides an effective and feasible method for increasing professional fulfillment and satisfaction among anesthesia providers while educating our youngest generation of learners. Implementation of such a program may also occur with modifications such as televideo to maintain COVID-19 precautions.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiólogos/psicología , Anestesiología/educación , Agotamiento Profesional/prevención & control , Adolescente , Niño , Preescolar , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Satisfacción Personal , Estudios Prospectivos
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(6): e24690, 2021 Feb 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33578603

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: Pediatric procedural sedation (PPS) is often performed outside of the operating room, and by various sub-specialty providers. There is no consistency in how pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows are trained in PPS. The objective of this study was to survey PEM program directors (PDs) and PEM fellows about their current sedation teaching practices via a direct survey. While many fellowship programs train PEM fellows in PPS, we hypothesize that there is no consistent method of developing and measuring this skill.A 12-question survey was sent to PEM PDs directly via email. A separate 17-question survey was sent to current PEM fellows via their program coordinators by email. Each survey had multiple choice, yes-no and select-all program questions. Responses were collected in an online (REDCap) database and summarized as frequencies and percentages.Based on identifiable email, 67 programs were contacted, with a PD response rate of 46 (59%). Sixty-two program coordinators were contacted based on identifiable email with 78 fellow responses. We noted that 11/46 PD respondents offer a formal PPS rotation. Thirty programs report using propofol in the emergency department and 93% of PD respondents (28/30) actively train fellows in the use of propofol. Approximately 62% of PEM fellow respondents (48/78) report sedating without any attending oversight. Twenty-eight percent of PEM fellow respondents report using simulation as a component of their sedation training.PPS is a critical skill. However, there is a lack of consistency in both education and evaluation of competency in this area. An organized PPS rotation would improve PPS case exposure and PPS skills.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiología/educación , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Becas/estadística & datos numéricos , Medicina de Urgencia Pediátrica/educación , Anestésicos Intravenosos/administración & dosificación , Anestésicos Intravenosos/uso terapéutico , Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Manejo de Datos , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Escolaridad , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/normas , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Propofol/administración & dosificación , Propofol/uso terapéutico , Entrenamiento Simulado/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
7.
Anaesthesia ; 76 Suppl 1: 53-64, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33426656

RESUMEN

Over the past two decades, regional anaesthesia and medical education as a whole have undergone a renaissance. Significant changes in our teaching methods and clinical practice have been influenced by improvements in our theoretical understanding as well as by technological innovations. More recently, there has been a focus on using foundational education principles to teach regional anaesthesia, and the evidence on how to best teach and assess trainees is growing. This narrative review will discuss fundamentals and innovations in regional anaesthesia training. We present the fundamentals in regional anaesthesia training, specifically the current state of simulation-based education, deliberate practice and curriculum design based on competency-based progression. Moving into the future, we present the latest innovations in web-based learning, emerging technologies for teaching and assessment and new developments in alternate reality learning systems.


Asunto(s)
Anestesia de Conducción/métodos , Anestesia de Conducción/tendencias , Anestesiología/educación , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/tendencias , Anestesiología/tendencias , Competencia Clínica , Educación Basada en Competencias , Curriculum , Humanos , Entrenamiento Simulado
8.
Anesth Analg ; 132(4): 1120-1128, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33438965

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Anesthesiology residents' experiences and perspectives about their programs may be helpful in improving training. The goals of this repeated cross-sectional survey study are to determine: (1) the most important factors residents consider in choosing an anesthesiology residency, (2) the aspects of the clinical base year that best prepare residents for anesthesia clinical training, and what could be improved, (3) whether residents are satisfied with their anesthesiology residency and what their primary struggles are, and (4) whether residents believe their residency prepares them for proficiency in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Core Competencies and for independent practice. METHODS: Anesthesiologists beginning their US residency training from 2013 to 2016 were invited to participate in anonymous, confidential, and voluntary self-administered online surveys. Resident cohort was defined by clinical anesthesia year 1, such that 9 survey administrations were included in this study-3 surveys for the 2013 and 2014 cohorts (clinical anesthesia years 1-3), 2 surveys for the 2015 cohort (clinical anesthesia years 1-2), and 1 survey for the 2016 cohort (clinical anesthesia year 1). RESULTS: The overall response rate was 36% (4707 responses to 12,929 invitations). On a 5-point Likert scale with 1 as "very unimportant" and 5 as "very important," quality of clinical experience (4.7-4.8 among the cohorts) and departmental commitment to education (4.3-4.5) were rated as the most important factors in anesthesiologists' choice of residency. Approximately 70% of first- and second-year residents agreed that their clinical base year prepared them well for anesthesiology residency, particularly clinical training experiences in critical care rotations, anesthesiology rotations, and surgery rotations/perioperative procedure management. Overall, residents were satisfied with their choice of anesthesiology specialty (4.4-4.5 on a 5-point scale among cohort-training levels) and their residency programs (4.0-4.1). The residency training experiences mostly met their expectations (3.8-4.0). Senior residents who reported any struggles highlighted academic more than interpersonal or technical difficulties. Senior residents generally agreed that the residency adequately prepared them for independent practice (4.1-4.4). Of the 6 ACGME Core Competencies, residents had the highest confidence in professionalism (4.7-4.9) and interpersonal and communication skills (4.6-4.8). Areas in residency that could be improved include the provision of an appropriate balance between education and service and allowance for sufficient time off to search and interview for a postresidency position. CONCLUSIONS: Anesthesiology residents in the United States indicated they most value quality of clinical training experiences and are generally satisfied with their choice of specialty and residency program.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiólogos/educación , Anestesiología/educación , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Internado y Residencia , Adulto , Anestesiólogos/psicología , Selección de Profesión , Competencia Clínica , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Satisfacción en el Trabajo , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 60, 2021 Jan 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33461550

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Simulation training is an essential criterion for medical staff. The majority of residents are trained in operating room crisis management (ORCM), but only a few pre-clinical anesthesia undergraduate students are trained. Anesthesia methodology and technology were studied by the anesthesia undergraduate students in theory, but they were not able to practically resolve all clinical problems scientifically and reasonably. Consequently, there is a need to apply their competencies and bring together their technology knowledge practically. The crisis management of operating room emergencies was a method of choice applied and used over time. Here, we designed the scenarios for comprehensive crisis management to train anesthesia undergraduate students. We tried to establish or identify the problems which occurred during attempts to implement these scenarios. METHODS: Anesthesia undergraduate students initially examined the basic theory, fundamental practice techniques, and case studies before the simulation training program. Subsequently, they participated in comprehensive ORCM training. Training outcomes were evaluated through different viewpoints: understanding the subject, crisis management, nontechnical skills, and a user experience evaluation. RESULTS: Anesthesia undergraduate students performed significantly better with completion of ORCM, indicated by higher scores in all four tests (P < 0.001), as well as clinical crisis management (P = 0.0016) and nontechnical skills (P = 0.0002). Following the simulation, the students described the experience as helpful in "combining theoretical knowledge with clinical practice", helpful with memorization, and in "promoting understanding of the subject," while "learning clinical logic authentically" and "inspiring learning interests." CONCLUSIONS: This research indicates that ORCM could be implemented as a useful learning tool for pre-clinical anesthesia undergraduate students. The ORCM could be an excellent training method to help improve students' professional competence in crisis management and nontechnical skills, integrating the knowledge and technology of the field of anesthesiology.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiología , Hipotensión , Entrenamiento Simulado , Anestesiología/educación , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Quirófanos , Estudiantes
12.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 31(3): 268-274, 2021 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33341983

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused state-wide shutdowns of elective surgical activities in March and April of 2020 forcing graduate medical education program directors and their trainees in the United States to quickly adapt to new rules and circumstances. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the current pandemic on pediatric anesthesiology fellow education and wellness nationally in order to guide creation of optimal support systems for fellows during the ongoing pandemic. METHODS: In July 2020, an electronically distributed survey was sent to all United States-based pediatric anesthesiology fellowship program directors who were asked to distribute the survey to all current/graduating fellows. RESULTS: A total of 75 out of 184 pediatric anesthesiology fellows (41%) responded to the survey. Major domains identified include reduction of clinical time, financial impact, mental health/wellness effects, and concerns about the overall quality of the fellowship educational experience. Respondents indicated that the pandemic has led to personal quarantine (and/or illness) leave time (21.3%), changes in finances (42.7%) and career opportunities (37.3%), decreased clinical education/experience (28%), and a dissatisfaction with the modified didactic experience (22.7%). In addition, a majority of respondents (97.3%) experienced increased stressors during this pandemic, including worry for family members (80%), stress due to changes in certifying examinations (76%), and fear of contracting COVID-19 from a patient (72%). CONCLUSION: While the results of this survey are only one snapshot in time during an evolving pandemic, these results highlight important domains where program directors and other departmental leaders might focus limited resources to maximize the educational experiences and overall wellness for pediatric anesthesiology fellows.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiología/educación , Becas/métodos , Estado de Salud , Salud Mental , Pediatría/educación , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Encuestas Epidemiológicas/métodos , Encuestas Epidemiológicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Pandemias , Estados Unidos
14.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(1): 82-86, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33075035

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is an international crisis placing tremendous strain on medical systems around the world. Like other specialties, neuroanesthesiology has been adversely affected and training programs have had to quickly adapt to the constantly changing environment. METHODS: An email-based survey was used to evaluate the effects of the pandemic on clinical workflow, clinical training, education, and trainee well-being. The impact of the International Council on Perioperative Neuroscience Training (ICPNT) accreditation was also assessed. RESULTS: Responses were received from 14 program directors (88% response rate) in 10 countries and from 36 fellows in these programs. Clinical training was adversely affected because of the cancellation of elective neurosurgery and other changes in case workflow, the introduction of modified airway and other protocols, and redeployment of trainees to other sites. To address educational demands, most programs utilized online platforms to organize clinical discussions, journal clubs, and provide safety training modules. Several initiatives were introduced to support trainee well-being during the pandemic. Feelings of isolation and despair among trainees varied from 2 to 8 (on a scale of 1 to 10). Fellows all reported concerns that their clinical training had been adversely affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic because of decreased exposure to elective subspecialty cases and limited opportunities to complete workplace-based assessments and training portfolio requirements. Cancellation of examination preparation courses and delayed examinations were cited as common sources of stress. Programs accredited by the ICPNT reported that international networking and collaboration was beneficial to reduce feelings of isolation during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Neuroanesthesia fellowship training program directors introduced innovative ways to maintain clinical training, educational activity and trainee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Acreditación/tendencias , Anestesiología/educación , Anestesiología/tendencias , Becas/tendencias , Neurología/educación , Neurología/tendencias , Pandemias , Competencia Clínica , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Electivos , Humanos , Neurocirugia/estadística & datos numéricos , Neurocirugia/tendencias
15.
Ann Surg ; 273(4): e125-e126, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33351468

RESUMEN

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has highlighted existing systemic inequities that adversely affect a variety of communities in the United States. These inequities have a direct and adverse impact on the healthcare of our patient population. While civic engagement has not been cultivated in surgical and anesthesia training, we maintain that it is inherent to the core role of the role of a physician. This is supported by moral imperative, professional responsibility, and a legal obligation. We propose that such civic engagement and social justice activism is a neglected, but necessary aspect of physician training. We propose the implementation of a civic advocacy education agenda across department, community and national platforms. Surgical and anesthesiology residency training needs to evolve to the meet these increasing demands.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiología/educación , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Rol del Médico , Justicia Social/educación , Especialidades Quirúrgicas/educación , Anestesiología/ética , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/ética , Política de Salud , Disparidades en Atención de Salud/ética , Humanos , Defensa del Paciente/educación , Defensa del Paciente/ética , Justicia Social/ética , Especialidades Quirúrgicas/ética , Estados Unidos
16.
Anesth Analg ; 132(2): 545-555, 2021 02 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33323789

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: High-quality and high-utility feedback allows for the development of improvement plans for trainees. The current manual assessment of the quality of this feedback is time consuming and subjective. We propose the use of machine learning to rapidly distinguish the quality of attending feedback on resident performance. METHODS: Using a preexisting databank of 1925 manually reviewed feedback comments from 4 anesthesiology residency programs, we trained machine learning models to predict whether comments contained 6 predefined feedback traits (actionable, behavior focused, detailed, negative feedback, professionalism/communication, and specific) and predict the utility score of the comment on a scale of 1-5. Comments with ≥4 feedback traits were classified as high-quality and comments with ≥4 utility scores were classified as high-utility; otherwise comments were considered low-quality or low-utility, respectively. We used RapidMiner Studio (RapidMiner, Inc, Boston, MA), a data science platform, to train, validate, and score performance of models. RESULTS: Models for predicting the presence of feedback traits had accuracies of 74.4%-82.2%. Predictions on utility category were 82.1% accurate, with 89.2% sensitivity, and 89.8% class precision for low-utility predictions. Predictions on quality category were 78.5% accurate, with 86.1% sensitivity, and 85.0% class precision for low-quality predictions. Fifteen to 20 hours were spent by a research assistant with no prior experience in machine learning to become familiar with software, create models, and review performance on predictions made. The program read data, applied models, and generated predictions within minutes. In contrast, a recent manual feedback scoring effort by an author took 15 hours to manually collate and score 200 comments during the course of 2 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Harnessing the potential of machine learning allows for rapid assessment of attending feedback on resident performance. Using predictive models to rapidly screen for low-quality and low-utility feedback can aid programs in improving feedback provision, both globally and by individual faculty.


Asunto(s)
Anestesiólogos/educación , Anestesiología/educación , Competencia Clínica , Minería de Datos , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Retroalimentación Formativa , Internado y Residencia , Aprendizaje Automático , Cuerpo Médico de Hospitales , Bases de Datos Factuales , Evaluación del Rendimiento de Empleados , Humanos , Análisis y Desempeño de Tareas , Estados Unidos
20.
Curr Opin Anaesthesiol ; 33(6): 800-807, 2020 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33060385

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The landscape of medical education continues to evolve. Educators and learners must stay informed on current medical literature, in addition to focusing efforts on current educational trends and evidence-based methods. The present review summarizes recent advancements in anesthesiology education, specifically highlighting trends in e-learning and telesimulation, and identifies possible future directions for the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Websites and online platforms continue to be a primary source of educational content; top websites are more likely to utilize standardized editorial processes. Podcasts and videocasts are important tools desired by learners for asynchronous education. Social media has been utilized to enhance the reach and visibility of journal articles, and less often as a primary educational venue; its efficacy in comparison with other e-learning platforms has not been adequately evaluated. Telesimulation can effectively disseminate practical techniques and clinical knowledge sharing, extending the capabilities of simulation beyond previous restrictions in geography, space, and available expertise. SUMMARY: E-learning has changed the way anesthesiology learners acquire knowledge, expanding content and curricula available and promoting international collaboration. More work should be done to expand the principles of accessible and collaborative education to psychomotor and cognitive learning via telesimulation.


Asunto(s)
Anestesia , Anestesiología/educación , Instrucción por Computador , Educación Médica/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Anestesiología/tendencias , Curriculum , Humanos , Aprendizaje
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