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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(21): e19945, 2020 May 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32481258

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Barbed suture has been widely used in some surgical fields, and it has achieved good results, but the application in total knee arthroplasty is still controversial. OBJECTIVE: Literature is collected for statistical analysis so as to provide evidence for the use of barbed suture in Total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: We searched PubMed, the Cochrane library and EMBASE database for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using barbed suture and conventional suture to close incisions after primary total knee arthroplasty, and the retrieval time was from July 2019 to the establishment of the database. Literature was screened according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, quality evaluation and data extraction were conducted for the final included literature, and statistical analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.3 software. RESULTS: A total of six RCTs (826 knees) were included in our meta-analysis. The results showed that the re-negative conversion could shorten the wound closure time (MD -4.41, 95% CI -5.11 to -3.72, P < .00001) and reduce the wound closure total cost (MD -282.61, 95% CI -445.36 to -119.85, P = .0007) and acupuncture injury (RR 0.14, 95% CI 0.03-0.78, P = .02), and did not significantly increasing the incidence of complications (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.05-0.96, P = .38) or suture breakages (RR 4.58, 95% CI 0.16-128.29, P = .37). There were no significant differences in ROM at postoperative 6 weeks and 3 months (MD -0.74, 95% CI -4.19 to 2.71, P = .67; MD -0.30, 95% CI -2.62 to 2.02, P = .80) and no significant differences in KSS at postoperative 6 weeks (MD -0.22, 95% CI -3.10 to 2.66, P = .88). CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that barbed suture is a fast, low-cost, safe and effective suture method in total knee arthroplasty compared with traditional suture, we also need more literature and longer follow-up to confirm this conclusion.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/instrumentación , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Suturas , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/métodos , Diseño de Equipo , Humanos
2.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 36-42, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475263

RESUMEN

AIMS: This study aimed to evaluate the association between the sagittal alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and new Knee Society Score (2011KSS), under the hypothesis that outliers such as the excessive extended or flexed femoral component were related to worse clinical outcomes. METHODS: A group of 156 knees (134 F:22 M) in 133 patients with a mean age 75.8 years (SD 6.4) who underwent TKA with the cruciate-substituting Bi-Surface Knee prosthesis were retrospectively enrolled. On lateral radiographs, γ angle (the angle between the distal femoral axis and the line perpendicular to the distal rear surface of the femoral component) was measured, and the patients were divided into four groups according to the γ angle. The 2011KSSs among groups were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. A secondary regression analysis was used to investigate the association between the 2011KSS and γ angle. RESULTS: According to the mean and SD of γ angle (γ, 4.0 SD 3.0°), four groups (Extended or minor flexed group, -0.5° ≤ γ < 2.5° (n = 54)), Mild flexed group (2.5° ≤ γ < 5.5° (n = 63)), Moderate flexed group (5.5° ≤ γ < 8.5° (n = 26)), and Excessive flexed group (8.5° ≤ γ (n = 13)) were defined. The Excessive flexed group showed worse 2011KSSs in all subdomains (Symptoms, Satisfaction, Expectations, and Functional activities) than the Mild flexed group. Secondary regression showed a convex upward function, and the scores were highest at γ = 3.0°, 4.0°, and 3.0° in Satisfaction, Expectations, and Functional activities, respectively. CONCLUSION: The groups with a sagittal alignment of the femoral component > 8.5° showed inferior clinical outcomes in 2011KSSs. Secondary regression analyses showed that mild flexion of the femoral component was associated with the highest score. When implanting the Bi-Surface Knee prosthesis surgeons should pay careful attention to avoiding flexing the femoral component extensively during TKA. Our findings may be applicable to other implant designs. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):36-42.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Articulación de la Rodilla/fisiopatología , Prótesis de la Rodilla , Rango del Movimiento Articular , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Fémur , Humanos , Masculino , Diseño de Prótesis , Estudios Retrospectivos , Resultado del Tratamiento
3.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 123-128, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475265

RESUMEN

AIMS: Aseptic loosening of the tibial component is a frequent cause of failure in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Management options include an isolated tibial revision or full component revision. A full component revision is frequently selected by surgeons unfamiliar with the existing implant or who simply wish to "start again". This option adds morbidity compared with an isolated tibial revision. While isolated tibial revision has a lower morbidity, it is technically more challenging due to difficulties with exposure and maintaining prosthetic stability. This study was designed to compare these two reconstructive options. METHODS: Patients undergoing revision TKA for isolated aseptic tibial loosening between 2012 and 2017 were identified. Those with revision implants or revised for infection, instability, osteolysis, or femoral component loosening were excluded. A total of 164 patients were included; 88 had an isolated tibial revision and 76 had revision of both components despite only having a loose tibial component. The demographics and clinical and radiological outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: The patient demographics were statistically similar in the two cohorts. The median follow-up was 3.5 years (interquartile range (IQR) 1 to 12.5). Supplementary femoral metaphyseal fixation was required in five patients in the full revision cohort. There was a higher incidence of radiological tibial loosening in the full component revision cohort at the final follow-up (8 (10.5%) vs 5 (5.7%); p = 0.269). Three patients in the full component revision cohort developed instability while only one in the isolated tibial cohort did. Three patients in the full revision cohort developed a flexion contracture greater than 5° while none in the isolated tibial cohort did. CONCLUSION: Isolated tibial revision for aseptic tibial loosening has statistically similar clinical and radiological outcomes at a median follow-up of 3.5 years, when compared with full component revision. Substantial bone loss can occur when removing a well-fixed femoral component necessitating a cone or sleeve. Femoral component revision for isolated tibial loosening can frequently be avoided provided adequate ligamentous stability can be obtained. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):123-128.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Prótesis de la Rodilla , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/diagnóstico , Falla de Prótesis , Reoperación/métodos , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Retrospectivos , Tibia
4.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 43-48, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475266

RESUMEN

AIMS: The extensive variation in axial rotation of tibial components can lead to coronal plane malalignment. We analyzed the change in coronal alignment induced by tray malrotation. METHODS: We constructed a computer model of knee arthroplasty and used a virtual cutting guide to cut the tibia at 90° to the coronal plane. The virtual guide was rotated axially (15° medial to 15° lateral) and with posterior slopes (0° to 7°). To assess the effect of axial malrotation, we measured the coronal plane alignment of a tibial tray that was axially rotated (25° internal to 15° external), as viewed on a standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph. RESULTS: Axial rotation of the cutting guide induced a varus-valgus malalignment up to 1.8° (for 15° of axial rotation combined with 7° of posterior slope). Axial malrotation of tibial tray induced a substantially higher risk of coronal plane malalignment ranging from 1.9° valgus with 15° external rotation, to over 3° varus with 25° of internal rotation. Coronal alignment of the tibial cut changed by 0.07° per degree of axial rotation and 0.22° per degree of posterior slope (linear regression, R2 > 0.99). CONCLUSION: While the effect of axial malalignment has been studied, the impact on coronal alignment is not known. Our results indicate that the direction of the cutting guide and malalignment in axial rotation alter coronal plane alignment and can increase the incidence of outliers. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):43-48.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Simulación por Computador , Tibia/fisiopatología , Desviación Ósea/etiología , Humanos , Medición de Riesgo , Rotación
5.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 176-180, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475267

RESUMEN

AIMS: The integrity of the soft tissue envelope is crucial for successful treatment of infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of limb salvage, infection control, and clinical function following microvascular free flap coverage for salvage of the infected TKA. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 23 microvascular free tissue transfers for management of soft tissue defects in infected TKA. There were 16 men and seven women with a mean age of 61.2 years (39 to 81). The median number of procedures performed prior to soft tissue coverage was five (2 to 9) and all patients had failed at least one two-stage reimplantation procedure. Clinical outcomes were measured using the Knee Society Scoring system for pain and function. RESULTS: In all, one patient was lost to follow-up prior to 12 months. The remaining 22 patients were followed for a mean of 46 months (12 to 92). At latest follow-up, four patients (18%) had undergone amputation for failure of treatment and persistent infection. For the other 18 patients, 11 patients (50%) had maintained a knee prosthesis in place while seven patients had undergone resections for persistent infection but retained their limbs (32%). Reoperations were common following coverage and reimplantation. The median number of additional procedures was two (0 to 6). Clinical function was poor in patients who underwent reimplantation and retained a knee prosthesis following free flap coverage with a mean KSS score for pain and function of 44 (0 to 70) and 30 (0 to 65), respectively. All patients required an assistive device. Extensor mechanism problems and extensor lag requiring bracing were common following limb salvage and prosthesis reimplantation. CONCLUSION: Microvascular tissue transfer for management of infected TKA can be successful in limb salvage (82%) but clinical outcomes in salvaged limbs were poor. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):176-180.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Colgajos Tisulares Libres/irrigación sanguínea , Prótesis de la Rodilla/efectos adversos , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/etiología , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/cirugía , Terapia Recuperativa/métodos , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Microvasos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Retrospectivos
6.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 24-30, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475269

RESUMEN

AIMS: A significant percentage of patients remain dissatisfied after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of this study was to determine whether the sequential addition of accelerometer-based navigation for femoral component preparation and sensor-guided ligament balancing improved complication rates, radiological alignment, or patient-reported outcomes (PROMs) compared with a historical control group using conventional instrumentation. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included 371 TKAs performed by a single surgeon sequentially. A historical control group, with the use of intramedullary guides for distal femoral resection and surgeon-guided ligament balancing, was compared with a group using accelerometer-based navigation for distal femoral resection and surgeon-guided balancing (group 1), and one using navigated femoral resection and sensor-guided balancing (group 2). Primary outcome measures were Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome (KOOS) scores measured preoperatively and at six weeks and 12 months postoperatively. The position of the components and the mechanical axis of the limb were measured postoperatively. The postoperative range of motion (ROM), haematocrit change, and complications were also recorded. RESULTS: There were 194 patients in the control group, 103 in group 1, and 74 in group 2. There were no significant differences in baseline demographics between the groups. Patients in group 2 had significantly higher baseline mental health subscores than control and group 1 patients (53.2 vs 50.2 vs 50.2, p = 0.041). There were no significant differences in any PROMs at six weeks or 12 months postoperatively (p > 0.05). There was no difference in the rate of manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA), complication rates, postoperative ROM, or blood loss. There were fewer mechanical axis outliers in groups 1 and 2 (25.2%, 14.9% respectively) versus control (28.4%), but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). CONCLUSION: The sequential addition of navigation of the distal femoral cut and sensor-guided ligament balancing did not improve short-term PROMs, radiological outcomes, or complication rates compared with conventional techniques. The costs of these added technologies may not be justified. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):24-30.


Asunto(s)
Acelerometría , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/métodos , Rango del Movimiento Articular , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios de Cohortes , Femenino , Humanos , Ligamentos/fisiología , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Medición de Resultados Informados por el Paciente , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/prevención & control , Estudios Retrospectivos , Resultado del Tratamiento
7.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 96-100, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475271

RESUMEN

AIMS: Enhanced perioperative protocols have significantly improved patient recovery following primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Little has been investigated the effectiveness of these protocols for revision TKA (RTKA). We report on a matched group of aseptic revision and primary TKA patients treated with an identical pain and rehabilitation programmes. METHODS: Overall, 40 aseptic full-component RTKA patients were matched (surgical date, age, sex, and body mass index (BMI)) to a group of primary cemented TKA patients. All RTKAs had new uncemented stemmed femoral and tibial components with metaphyseal sleeves. Both groups were treated with an identical postoperative pain protocol. Patients were followed for at least two years. Knee Society Scores (KSS) at six weeks and at final follow-up were recorded for both groups. RESULTS: There was no difference in mean length of stay between the primary TKA (1.2 days (0.83 to 2.08)) and RTKA patients (1.4 days (0.91 to 2.08). Mean oral morphine milligram (mg) equivalent dosing (MED) during the hospitalization was 42 mg/day for the primary TKA and 38 mg/day for the RTKA groups. There were two readmissions: gastrointestinal disturbance (RTKA) and urinary retention (primary TKA). There no were reoperations, wound problems, thromboembolic events or manipulations in either group. Mean overall KSS for the RTKA group was 87.3 (45 to 99) at six-week follow-up and 89.1 (52 to 100) at final follow-up (mean 3.9 years, (3.9 to 9.0)). Mean overall KSS for the primary group was 89.9 (71 to 100) at six-week follow-up and 93.42 (73 to 100) at final follow-up (mean 3.5 years (2.5 to 9.2)). CONCLUSION: An identical pain and rehabilitation protocol used for primary TKA patients can enable certain full-component aseptic RTKA patients to have a similar early functional outcome. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):96-100.


Asunto(s)
Analgésicos/uso terapéutico , Anestésicos/uso terapéutico , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/métodos , Protocolos Clínicos , Dolor Postoperatorio/tratamiento farmacológico , Reoperación , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Prótesis de la Rodilla , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Diseño de Prótesis , Recuperación de la Función , Estudios Retrospectivos
8.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 107-115, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475272

RESUMEN

AIMS: Metaphyseal fixation during revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is important, but potentially difficult when using historical designs of cone. Material and manufacturing innovations have improved the size and shape of the cones which are available, and simplified the required bone preparation. In a large series, we assessed the implant survivorship, radiological results, and clinical outcomes of new porous 3D-printed titanium metaphyseal cones featuring a reamer-based system. METHODS: We reviewed 142 revision TKAs in 139 patients using 202 cones (134 tibial, 68 femoral) which were undertaken between 2015 and 2016. A total of 60 involved tibial and femoral cones. Most cones (149 of 202; 74%) were used for Type 2B or 3 bone loss. The mean age of the patients was 66 years (44 to 88), and 76 (55 %) were female. The mean body mass index (BMI) was 34 kg/m2 (18 to 60). The patients had a mean of 2.4 (1 to 8) previous operations on the knee, and 68 (48%) had a history of prosthetic infection. The mean follow-up was 2.4 years (2 to 3.6). RESULTS: Survivorship free of cone revision for aseptic loosening was 100% and survivorship free of any cone revision was 98%. Survivorships free of any revision and any reoperation were 90% and 83%, respectively. Five cones were revised: three for infection, one for periprosthetic fracture, and one for aseptic tibial loosening. Radiologically, three unrevised femoral cones appeared loose in the presence of hinged implants, while the remaining cones appeared stable. All cases of cone loosening occurred in patients with Type 2B or 3 defects. The mean Knee Society score (KSS) improved significantly from 50 (0 to 94) preoperatively to 87 (72 to 94) (p < 0.001). Three intraoperative fractures with cone impaction (two femoral, one tibial) healed uneventfully. CONCLUSION: Novel 3D-printed titanium cones, with a reamer-based system, yielded excellent early survivorship and few complications in patients with severe bone loss undergoing difficult revision TKA. The diversity of cone options, relative ease of preparation, and outcomes rivalling those of previous designs of cone support their continued use. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):107-115.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Prótesis de la Rodilla , Impresión Tridimensional , Diseño de Prótesis/métodos , Falla de Prótesis , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Reoperación , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Tiempo , Titanio , Resultado del Tratamiento
9.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 59-65, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475273

RESUMEN

AIMS: The removal of the cruciate ligaments in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been suggested as a potential contributing factor to patient dissatisfaction, due to alteration of the in vivo biomechanics of the knee. Bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA allows the preservation of the cruciate ligaments, thus offering the potential to reproduce healthy kinematics. The aim of this study was to compare in vivo kinematics between the operated and contralateral knee in patients who have undergone TKA with a contemporary BCR design. METHODS: A total of 29 patients who underwent unilateral BCR TKA were evaluated during single-leg deep lunges and sit-to-stand tests using a validated computer tomography and fluoroscopic imaging system. In vivo six-degrees of freedom (6DOF) kinematics were compared between the BCR TKA and the contralateral knee. RESULTS: During single-leg deep lunge, BCR TKAs showed significantly less mean posterior femoral translation (13 mm; standard deviation (SD) 4) during terminal flexion, compared with the contralateral knee (16.6 mm, SD 3.7; p = 0.001). Similarly, BCR TKAs showed significantly less mean femoral rollback (11.6 mm (SD 4.5) vs 14.4 mm (SD 4.6); p < 0.043) during sit-to-stand. BCR TKAs showed significantly reduced internal rotation during many parts of the strenuous flexion activities particularly during high-flexion lunge (4° (SD 5.6°) vs 6.5° (SD 6.1°); p = 0.051) and during sit-to-stand (4.5° (SD 6°) vs 6.9° (SD 6.3°); p = 0.048). CONCLUSION: The contemporary design of BCR TKA showed asymmetrical flexion-extension and internal-external rotation, suggesting that the kinematics are not entirely reproduced during strenuous activities. Future studies are required to establish the importance of patient factors, component orientation and design, in optimizing kinematics in patients who undergo BCR TKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):59-65.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/métodos , Articulación de la Rodilla/cirugía , Ligamentos Articulares , Tratamientos Conservadores del Órgano , Rango del Movimiento Articular , Anciano , Fenómenos Biomecánicos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Movimiento , Resultado del Tratamiento
10.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 10-18, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475274

RESUMEN

AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of perioperative essential amino acid (EAA) supplementation to prevent rectus femoris muscle atrophy and facilitate early recovery of function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: The study involved 60 patients who underwent unilateral TKA for primary knee osteo-arthritis (OA). This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized control trial with patients randomly allocated to two groups, 30 patients each: the essential amino acid supplementation (9 g daily) and placebo (lactose powder, 9 g daily) groups. Supplementation and placebo were provided from one week before to two weeks after surgery. The area of the rectus femoris muscle were measured by ultrasound imaging one month before surgery and one, two, three, and four weeks postoperatively. The serum albumin level, a visual analogue knee pain score, and mobility were also measured at each time point. The time to recovery of activities of daily living (ADLs) was recorded. Postoperative nutrition and physiotherapy were identical in both groups. RESULTS: The mean relative change from baseline was as follows for the amino acid group: 116% in rectus femoris muscle area (71% to 206%); 95% in serum albumin (80% to 115%) and 39% in VAS pain (0% to 100%) at four weeks after surgery. These values in the placebo group were: 97% in muscle area (68 to 155); 89% in serum albumin (71% to 100%) and 56% in VAS pain four weeks after surgery (0% to 100%). All changes were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The mean time to recovery of ADLs was shorter in the amino acid group compared with the placebo group (p = 0.005). CONCLUSION: Perioperative essential amino acid supplementation prevents rectus femoris muscle atrophy and accelerates early functional recovery after TKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):10-18.


Asunto(s)
Aminoácidos Esenciales/uso terapéutico , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Suplementos Dietéticos , Atrofia Muscular/prevención & control , Osteoartritis de la Rodilla/cirugía , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/prevención & control , Músculo Cuádriceps , Recuperación de la Función , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Método Doble Ciego , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Periodo Preoperatorio , Estudios Prospectivos , Factores de Tiempo , Resultado del Tratamiento
11.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 19-23, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475276

RESUMEN

AIMS: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the removal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) from the Medicare Inpatient Only (IPO) list on our Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) Initiative in 2018. METHODS: We examined our institutional database to identify all Medicare patients who underwent primary TKA from 2017 to 2018. Hospital inpatient or outpatient status was cross-referenced with Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) claims data. Demographics, comorbidities, and outcomes were compared between patients classified as 'outpatient' and 'inpatient' TKA. Episode-of-care BPCI costs were then compared from 2017 to 2018. RESULTS: Of the 2,135 primary TKA patients in 2018, 908 (43%) were classified as an outpatient and were excluded from BPCI. Inpatient classified patients had longer mean length of stay (1.9 (SD 1.4) vs 1.4 (SD 1.7) days, p < 0.001) and higher rates of discharge to rehabilitation (17% vs 3%, p < 0.001). Post-acute care costs increased when comparing the BPCI patients from 2017 to 2018, ($5,037 (SD $7,792) vs $5793 (SD $8,311), p = 0.010). The removal of TKA from the IPO list turned a net savings of $53,805 in 2017 into a loss of $219,747 in 2018 for our BPCI programme. CONCLUSIONS: Following the removal of TKA from the IPO list, nearly half of the patients at our institution were inappropriately classified as an outpatient. Our target price was increased and our institution realized a substantial loss in 2018 BPCI despite strong quality metrics. CMS should address its negative implications on bundled payment programmes. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):19-23.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/economía , Remoción de Dispositivos/economía , Mecanismo de Reembolso , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Hospitalización , Humanos , Masculino , Medicare , Estudios Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos
12.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 73-78, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475277

RESUMEN

AIMS: The purpose of this study was to use pharmacogenetics to determine the frequency of genetic variants in our total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients that could affect postoperative pain medications. Pharmacogenetic testing evaluates patient DNA to determine if a drug is expected to have a normal clinical effect, heightened effect, or no effect at all on the patient. It also predicts whether patients are likely to experience side effects from medicine. We further sought to determine if changing the multimodal programme based on these results would improve pain control or reduce side effects. METHODS: In this pilot study, buccal samples were collected from 31 primary TKA patients. Pharmacogenetics testing examined genetic variants in genes OPRM1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP2D6. These genes affect the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids. We examined the frequency of genetic variants to any of the medications we prescribed including celecoxib, hydrocodone, and tramadol. Patients were randomized to one of two groups: the control group received the standard postoperative pain regimen, and the study group received a customized regimen based on the pharmacogenetic results. For the first ten postoperative days, patients recorded pain scores, medication, and side effects. RESULTS: Genetic variants involving one or more medications in the multimodal pain protocol occurred in 13 of the 31 patients (42%). In total, eight patients (26%) had variants affecting more than one of the medications. For the 25 patients who recorded pain and medication logs, the mean pain levels and morphine equivalents (MEQs) consumed in the first ten days were higher in the control group than in the custom-guided group (p = 0.019 for pain and p = 0.655 for MEQ). CONCLUSION: Overall, 42% of patients had a variant involving one of the pain medications prescribed in our perioperative pain program for TKA. Ongoing research will help determine if using these data to modify a patient's medication will improve outcomes. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):73-78.


Asunto(s)
Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapéutico , Antiinflamatorios no Esteroideos/uso terapéutico , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Manejo del Dolor/métodos , Dolor Postoperatorio/tratamiento farmacológico , Dolor Postoperatorio/genética , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pruebas de Farmacogenómica , Proyectos Piloto , Estudios Prospectivos , Método Simple Ciego
13.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 3-9, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475278

RESUMEN

AIMS: The aim of this study was to determine if a three-month course of microorganism-directed oral antibiotics reduces the rate of failure due to further infection following two-stage revision for chronic prosthetic joint infection (PJI) of the hip and knee. METHODS: A total of 185 patients undergoing a two-stage revision in seven different centres were prospectively enrolled. Of these patients, 93 were randomized to receive microorganism-directed oral antibiotics for three months following reimplantation; 88 were randomized to receive no antibiotics, and four were withdrawn before randomization. Of the 181 randomized patients, 28 were lost to follow-up, six died before two years follow-up, and five with culture negative infections were excluded. The remaining 142 patients were followed for a mean of 3.3 years (2.0 to 7.6) with failure due to a further infection as the primary endpoint. Patients who were treated with antibiotics were also assessed for their adherence to the medication regime and for side effects to antibiotics. RESULTS: Nine of 72 patients (12.5%) who received antibiotics failed due to further infection compared with 20 of 70 patients (28.6%) who did not receive antibiotics (p = 0.012). Five patients (6.9%) in the treatment group experienced adverse effects related to the administered antibiotics severe enough to warrant discontinuation. CONCLUSION: This multicentre randomized controlled trial showed that a three-month course of microorganism-directed, oral antibiotics significantly reduced the rate of failure due to further infection following a two-stage revision of total hip or knee arthroplasty for chronic PJI. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):3-9.


Asunto(s)
Antibacterianos/administración & dosificación , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Cadera , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Prótesis de Cadera/efectos adversos , Prótesis de la Rodilla/efectos adversos , Falla de Prótesis , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/etiología , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/prevención & control , Reoperación , Administración Oral , Anciano , Enfermedad Crónica , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Falla de Prótesis/etiología , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/cirugía , Factores de Tiempo
14.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 66-72, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475279

RESUMEN

AIMS: Postoperative range of movement (ROM) is an important measure of successful and satisfying total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Reduced postoperative ROM may be evident in up to 20% of all TKAs and negatively affects satisfaction. To improve ROM, manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) may be performed. Historically, a limited ROM preoperatively was used as the key harbinger of the postoperative ROM. However, comorbidities may also be useful in predicting postoperative stiffness. The goal was to assess preoperative comorbidities in patients undergoing TKA relative to incidence of postoperative MUA. The hope is to forecast those who may be at increased risk and determine if MUA is an effective form of treatment. METHODS: Prospectively collected data of TKAs performed at our institution's two hospitals from August 2014 to August 2018 were evaluated for incidence of MUA. Comorbid conditions, risk factors, implant component design and fixation method (cemented vs cementless), and discharge disposition were analyzed. Overall, 3,556 TKAs met the inclusion criteria. Of those, 164 underwent MUA. RESULTS: Patients with increased age and body mass index (BMI) had decreased likelihood of MUA. For every one-year increase in age, the likelihood of MUA decreased by 4%. Similarly, for every one-unit increase in BMI the likelihood of MUA decreased by 6%. There were no differences in incidence of MUA between component type/design or fixation method. Current or former smokers were more likely to have no MUA. Surprisingly, patients discharged to home health service or skilled nursing facility were approximately 40% and 70% less likely than those discharged home with outpatient therapy to be in the MUA group. MUA was effective, with a mean increased ROM of 32.81° (SD 19.85°; -15° to 90°). CONCLUSION: Younger, thinner patients had highest incidence of MUA. Effect of discharge disposition on rate of MUA was an important finding and may influence surgeons' decisions. Interestingly, use of cement and component design (constraint) did not impact incidence of MUA. Level of Evidence II: Prospective cohort study. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):66-72.


Asunto(s)
Anestesia , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Manipulación Ortopédica , Cuidados Posoperatorios/métodos , Rango del Movimiento Articular , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Manipulación Ortopédica/métodos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Prospectivos , Factores de Riesgo
15.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 163-169, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475280

RESUMEN

AIMS: The aim of this study was to determine if the local delivery of vancomycin and tobramycin in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can achieve intra-articular concentrations exceeding the minimum inhibitory concentration thresholds for bacteria causing acute prosthetic joint infection (PJI). METHODS: Using a retrospective single-institution database of all primary TKAs performed between January 1 2014 and May 7 2019, we identified patients with acute PJI that were managed surgically within 90 days of the initial procedure. The organisms from positive cultures obtained at the time of revision were tested for susceptibility to gentamicin, tobramycin, and vancomycin. A prospective study was then performed to determine the intra-articular antibiotic concentration on postoperative day one after primary TKA using one of five local antibiotic delivery strategies with tobramycin and/or vancomycin mixed into the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or vancomycin powder. RESULTS: A total of 19 patients with acute PJI after TKA were identified and 29 unique bacterial isolates were recovered. The mean time to revision was 37 days (6 to 84). Nine isolates (31%) were resistant to gentamicin, ten (34%) were resistant to tobramycin, and seven (24%) were resistant to vancomycin. Excluding one Fusobacterium nucleatum, which was resistant to all three antibiotics, all isolates resistant to tobramycin or gentamicin were susceptible to vancomycin and vice versa. Overall, 2.4 g of tobramycin hand-mixed into 80 g of PMMA and 1 g of intra-articular vancomycin powder consistently achieved concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentrations of susceptible organisms. CONCLUSION: One-third of bacteria causing acute PJI after primary TKA were resistant to the aminoglycosides commonly mixed into PMMA, and one-quarter were resistant to vancomycin. With one exception, all bacteria resistant to tobramycin were susceptible to vancomycin and vice versa. Based on these results, the optimal cover for organisms causing most cases of acute PJI after TKA can be achieved with a combination of tobramycin mixed in antibiotic cement, and vancomycin powder. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):163-169.


Asunto(s)
Antibacterianos/administración & dosificación , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Bacterias/efectos de los fármacos , Prótesis de la Rodilla/efectos adversos , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/tratamiento farmacológico , Infecciones Relacionadas con Prótesis/etiología , Tobramicina/administración & dosificación , Vancomicina/administración & dosificación , Administración Tópica , Cementos para Huesos , Combinación de Medicamentos , Humanos , Pruebas de Sensibilidad Microbiana , Polimetil Metacrilato , Estudios Retrospectivos , Tobramicina/farmacología , Vancomicina/farmacología
16.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 31-35, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475281

RESUMEN

AIMS: Rates of readmission and reoperation following primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are under scrutiny due to new payment models, which penalize these negative outcomes. Some risk factors are more modifiable than others, and some conditions considered modifiable such as obesity may not be as modifiable in the setting of advanced arthritis as many propose. We sought to determine whether controlling for hypoalbuminaemia would mitigate the effect that prior authors had identified in patients with obesity. METHODS: We reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database for the period of January 2008 to December 2016 to evaluate the rates of reoperation and readmission within 30 days following primary TKA. Multivariate logistic regression modelling controlled for preoperative albumin, age, sex, and comorbidity status. RESULTS: Readmission rates only differed significantly between patients with Normal Weight and Obesity Class II, with a decreased rate of readmission in this group (odds ratio (OR) 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.71 to 0.96; p = 0.010). The only group demonstrating association with increased risk of reoperation within 30 days was the Obesity Class III group (OR 1.38; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.82; p = 0.022). Hypoalbuminaemia (preoperative albumin < 35 g/L) was significantly associated with readmission (OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.41 to 1.86; p < 0.001) and reoperation (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.18 to 1.96; p = 0.001) within 30 days. CONCLUSION: In this study, hypoalbuminaemia appears to be a more significant risk factor for readmission and reoperation than even the highest obesity categories. Future studies may assess whether preoperative albumin restoration or weight loss may improve outcomes for patients with hypoalbuminaemia. The implications of this study may allow surgeons to discuss risk of surgery with obese patients planning to undergo primary TKA procedures if other comorbidities are adequately controlled. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):31-35.


Asunto(s)
Hipoalbuminemia/complicaciones , Obesidad/complicaciones , Readmisión del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Reoperación/estadística & datos numéricos , Anciano , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Femenino , Humanos , Hipoalbuminemia/terapia , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Obesidad/terapia , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/epidemiología , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/etiología , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/prevención & control , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Riesgo
17.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 79-84, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475282

RESUMEN

AIMS: The aim of this study was to analyze the true costs associated with preoperative CT scans performed for robotic-assisted total knee arthroplasty (RATKA) planning and to determine the value of a formal radiologist's report of these studies. METHODS: We reviewed 194 CT reports of 176 sequential patients who underwent primary RATKA by a single surgeon at a suburban teaching hospital. CT radiology reports were reviewed for the presence of incidental findings that might change the management of the patient. Payments for the scans, including the technical and professional components, for 330 patients at two hospitals were also recorded and compared. RESULTS: There were 82 incidental findings in 61 CT studies, one of which led to a recommendation for additional testing. Across both institutions, the mean total payment for a preoperative scan was $446 ($8 to $3,870). The mean patient payment was $71 ($0 to $2,690). There was wide variation in payments between the institutions. In Institution A, the mean total payment was $258 ($168 to $264), with a mean patient payment of $57 ($0 to $100). The mean technical payment in this institution was $211 ($8 to $856), while the mean professional payment was $48 ($0 to $66). In Institution B, the mean total payment was $636 ($37 to $3,870), with a mean patient payment of $85 ($0 to $2,690). CONCLUSION: The total cost of a CT scan is low and a minimal part of the overall cost of the RATKA. No incidental findings identified on imaging led to a change in management, suggesting that the professional component could be eliminated to reduce costs. Further studies need to take into account the patient perspective and the wide variation in total costs and patient payments across institutions and insurances. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):79-84.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/economía , Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla/métodos , Costos de la Atención en Salud , Planificación de Atención al Paciente/economía , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Robotizados/economía , Tomografía Computarizada por Rayos X/economía , Humanos , Mecanismo de Reembolso , Estudios Retrospectivos
18.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 116-122, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475283

RESUMEN

AIMS: Metaphyseal cones with cemented stems are frequently used in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, if the diaphysis has been previously violated, the resultant sclerotic canal can impair cemented stem fixation, which is vital for bone ingrowth into the cone, and long-term fixation. We report the outcomes of our solution to this problem, in which impaction grafting and a cemented stem in the diaphysis is combined with an uncemented metaphyseal cone, for revision TKA in patients with severely compromised bone. METHODS: A metaphyseal cone was combined with diaphyseal impaction grafting and cemented stems for 35 revision TKAs. There were two patients with follow-up of less than two years who were excluded, leaving 33 procedures in 32 patients in the study. The mean age of the patients at the time of revision TKA was 67 years (32 to 87); 20 (60%) were male. Patients had undergone a mean of four (1 to 13) previous knee arthroplasty procedures. The indications for revision were aseptic loosening (80%) and two-stage reimplantation for prosthetic joint infection (PJI; 20%). The mean follow-up was four years (2 to 11). RESULTS: Survival free from revision of the cone/impaction grafting construct due to aseptic loosening was 100% at five years. Survival free from any revision of the construct and free from any reoperation were 92% and 73% at five years, respectively. A total of six patients (six TKAs, 17%) required a further revision, four for infection or wound issues, and two for periprosthetic fracture. Radiologically, one unrevised TKA had evidence of loosening which was asymptomatic. In all unrevised TKAs the impacted diaphyseal bone graft appeared to be incorporated radiologically. CONCLUSION: When presented with a sclerotic diaphysis and substantial metaphyseal bone loss, this technique combining diaphyseal impaction grafting with a metaphyseal cone provided near universal success in relation to implant fixation. Moreover, radiographs revealed incorporation of the bone graft and biological fixation of the cone. While long-term follow-up will be important, this technique provides an excellent option for the management of complex revision TKAs. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):116-122.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Resorción Ósea/cirugía , Trasplante Óseo , Prótesis de la Rodilla , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/cirugía , Reoperación , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Terapia Combinada , Diáfisis/trasplante , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Diseño de Prótesis , Estudios Retrospectivos , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Resultado del Tratamiento
19.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 129-137, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475284

RESUMEN

AIMS: A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted to compare directly volumetric wear of retrieved polyethylene inserts to predicted volumetric wear modelled from individual gait mechanics of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients. METHODS: In total, 11 retrieved polyethylene tibial inserts were matched with gait analysis testing performed on those patients. Volumetric wear on the articular surfaces was measured using a laser coordinate measure machine and autonomous reconstruction. Knee kinematics and kinetics from individual gait trials drove computational models to calculate medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact paths and forces. Sliding distance along the contact path, normal forces and implantation time were used as inputs to Archard's equation of wear to predict volumetric wear from gait mechanics. Measured and modelled wear were compared for each component. RESULTS: Volumetric wear rates on eight non-delaminated components measured 15.9 mm3/year (standard error (SE) ± 7.7) on the total part, 11.4 mm3/year (SE ± 6.4) on the medial side and 4.4 (SE ± 2.6) mm3/year on the lateral side. Volumetric wear rates modelled from patient gait mechanics predicted 16.4 mm3/year (SE 2.4) on the total part, 11.7 mm3/year (SE 2.1) on the medial side and 4.7 mm3/year (SE 0.4) on the lateral side. Measured and modelled wear volumes correlated significantly on the total part (p = 0.017) and the medial side (p = 0.012) but not on the lateral side (p = 0.154). CONCLUSION: In the absence of delamination, patient-specific knee mechanics during gait directly affect wear of the tibial component in TKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):129-137.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Remoción de Dispositivos , Marcha , Prótesis de la Rodilla , Modelos Teóricos , Falla de Prótesis , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Fenómenos Biomecánicos , Femenino , Predicción , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Polietileno , Estudios Retrospectivos
20.
Bone Joint J ; 102-B(6_Supple_A): 85-90, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475285

RESUMEN

AIMS: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between height, weight, and sex with implant size in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using a multivariate linear regression model and a Bayesian model. METHODS: A retrospective review of an institutional registry was performed of primary TKAs performed between January 2005 and December 2016. Patient demographics including patient age, sex, height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were obtained from registry and medical record review. In total, 8,100 primary TKAs were included. The mean age was 67.3 years (SD 9.5) with a mean BMI of 30.4 kg/m2 (SD 6.3). The TKAs were randomly split into a training cohort (n = 4,022) and a testing cohort (n = 4,078). A multivariate linear regression model was created on the training cohort and then applied to the testing cohort . A Bayesian model was created based on the frequencies of implant sizes in the training cohort. The model was then applied to the testing cohort to determine the accuracy of the model at 1%, 5%, and 10% tolerance of inaccuracy. RESULTS: Height had a relatively strong correlation with implant size (femoral component anteroposterior (AP) Pearson correlation coefficient (ρ) = 0.73, p < 0.001; tibial component mediolateral (ML) ρ = 0.77, p < 0.001). Weight had a moderately strong correlation with implant size, (femoral component AP ρ = 0.46, p < 0.001; tibial ML ρ = 0.48, p < 0.001). There was a significant linear correlation with height, weight, and sex with implant size (femoral component R2 = 0.607, p < 0.001; tibial R2 = 0.695, p < 0.001). The Bayesian model showed high accuracy in predicting the range of required implant sizes (94.4% for the femur and 96.6% for the tibia) accepting a 5% risk of inaccuracy. CONCLUSION: Implant size was correlated with basic demographic variables including height, weight, and sex. The linear regression and Bayesian models accurately predicted required implant sizes across multiple manufacturers based on height, weight, and sex alone. These types of predictive models may help improve operating room and implant supply chain efficiency. Level of Evidence: Level IV Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2020;102-B(6 Supple A):85-90.


Asunto(s)
Artroplastia de Reemplazo de Rodilla , Prótesis de la Rodilla , Ajuste de Prótesis , Anciano , Teorema de Bayes , Estatura , Índice de Masa Corporal , Peso Corporal , Femenino , Predicción , Humanos , Modelos Lineales , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Diseño de Prótesis , Estudios Retrospectivos , Caracteres Sexuales
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