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1.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(1): 48-51, 2021 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33400809

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted all aspects of health care, including nursing education. Senior nursing students saw the elimination of in-person clinical opportunities in the final months prior to graduation as health care facilities restricted access to essential personnel in an effort to minimize transmission of the virus and conserve personal protective equipment. METHOD: To fulfill course requirements, faculty created a COVID-19 assignment that implored students to research the most current infection control recommendations for COVID-19 and to describe the impacts of the virus on nursing care, patients, families, interdisciplinary collaboration, and public safety. RESULTS: The COVID-19 assignment fostered clinical reasoning and encouraged personal reflection with application to practice. Students reported that the assignment greatly enhanced knowledge and awareness of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: This assignment was beneficial for transition to practice in the midst of a pandemic, and it can be easily replicated for any future emerging health care topic that may affect nursing education. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(1):48-51.].


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Docentes de Enfermería/psicología , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Enseñanza/organización & administración , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería
2.
J Nurs Educ ; 60(1): 52-55, 2021 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33400810

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This article describes one school's process to maintain their undergraduate nursing simulation program during campus closure and clinical placement suspension due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: After the campus closure, faculty replaced clinical hours with simulation using virtual clinical education such as telehealth with standardized patients (SPs), virtual simulations using commercial products, and virtual faculty skills instruction. RESULTS: Using virtual clinical education and SP-based telehealth simulations provided an alternative for 50% of the required direct patient care hours. Virtual simulation accounted for 18,403 clinical hours completed by 244 students. CONCLUSION: Preparation for emergencies that force campus and clinical site closures should include processes to provide virtual simulation and remote simulations with SPs to replace clinical hours. Planning for the impacts of COVID-19 on the operation of this school of nursing highlights the importance of having a detailed plan to address campus closure due to emergencies. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(1):52-55.].


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Docentes de Enfermería/psicología , Entrenamiento Simulado/organización & administración , California/epidemiología , Curriculum , Educación a Distancia , Humanos , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería , Facultades de Enfermería/organización & administración , Telemedicina
3.
Nurs Sci Q ; 34(1): 23-27, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33349193

RESUMEN

As social distancing seems to have become the new normal in the ongoing struggle to prevent the spread of COVID-19, this column focuses on the challenge of presence in the teaching-learning endeavor that often is lived in virtual settings. When presence is defined as being in the same place at the same time as another, suggesting that presence is essential to teaching-learning would certainly run counter to the recommended practice of social distancing. However, the question must be asked if it is essential for the teacher and learner to be in a particular place at the same moment for presence in teaching-learning to be known. Clarity of the meaning of presence in the teaching-learning endeavor is pursued through considering insights gained from the movie Patch Adams. Further, insights from the humanbecoming paradigm are explored to provide new ways of moving onward in teaching-learning.


Asunto(s)
Educación a Distancia , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Enseñanza , /prevención & control , Humanos , Películas Cinematográficas , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería
4.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(9): 518-521, 2020 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32865586

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The integration of telehealth simulation experiences enables nursing students to effectively care for postnatal clients through interactive video technologies. METHOD: Faculty created a telehealth postnatal triage simulation in response to a need for client interaction due to COVID-19 social isolation restrictions. RESULTS: Telehealth triage is an inexpensive, engaging teaching strategy and formative assessment method that can be easily created with existing resources and implemented in a postnatal simulation experience. CONCLUSION: Faculty concluded that this telehealth simulation experience is valuable in meeting student clinical learning outcomes and its continued use after social restrictions are removed is recommended. In the future, effectiveness of the simulation experience should be studied and measured along with incorporation of inter-and intraprofessional collaboration activities. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(9):518-521.].


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Entrenamiento Simulado/organización & administración , Telemedicina/organización & administración , Triaje/métodos , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería , Investigación Metodológica en Enfermería , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología
5.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(9): 522-525, 2020 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32865587

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, university instruction was transitioned online, including an undergraduate nursing clinical course. Charged with developing and executing virtual simulations, an online clinical course was conceived. METHOD: Simulated clinical experiences were crafted using a combination of student preassignments and video-conferencing facilitated by faculty. Each experience included the collective review of a case study and student-developed care plans before viewing and debriefing a series of videos. Students summarized their experience in a weekly written reflection. RESULTS: Student feedback was examined through their reflections and verbal responses. The videos served as catalysts for robust discussion. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive related to an interactive experience, a heightened sense of teamwork, and enhanced comprehension by sharing differing perspectives of common experiences. CONCLUSION: This educational innovation was successful in creating an engaging environment that facilitated student learning and a sense of togetherness during a global pandemic. The use of technology enabled the continuity of a productive teaching-learning experience. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(9):522-525.].


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Entrenamiento Simulado/organización & administración , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Difusión de Innovaciones , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología
7.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 41(5): 274-279, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32833393

RESUMEN

AIM: This article discusses a regionally located approach to seamless nursing education progression in Ohio. The Ohio Action Coalition supported nursing programs in creating educational pathways involving cooperative efforts of academia and clinical practice to provide access for students to achieve a baccalaureate degree. BACKGROUND: The Ohio Action Coalition was formed in 2011 and received its first State Implementation Program grant in 2013, with a major focus on promoting seamless academic progression models. METHOD: The seamless academic progression models have been fully implemented, demonstrating positive results for the progression of baccalaureate-prepared nurses in Ohio. RESULTS: The efforts in Ohio have demonstrated over a 10 percent increase in baccalaureate-prepared nurses. CONCLUSION: Ohio is moving the needle for higher education of nurses at a faster rate than average across the nation.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Humanos , Ohio
8.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 41(5): 307-308, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32833395

RESUMEN

This article describes an innovative community-based pediatric clinical rotation for undergraduate nursing students. Students were charged with conducting interactive educational sessions on health-related topics of interest to participants in a six-week summer day camp for adolescents of Mexican heritage. At the completion of the experience, students identified social determinants of health that impacted the health of the community and the impact of the experience on their nursing practice. Overall, both the adolescents and the nursing students benefited from the experience. Community-academic partnerships can be used to promote student learning while contributing to the overall health of the community.


Asunto(s)
Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Enfermería Pediátrica/educación , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Adolescente , Difusión de Innovaciones , Humanos , Americanos Mexicanos/psicología , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería
9.
Am J Nurs ; 120(8): 11, 2020 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32732460

RESUMEN

The need for faculty to create opportunities to practice communication skills.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Relaciones Enfermero-Paciente , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Humanos
10.
Br J Community Nurs ; 25(8): 402-406, 2020 Aug 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32757893

RESUMEN

The responsibility of the district nurse (DN), alongside complex case management and leadership, is to ensure Specialist Practitioner Qualification District Nurse (SPQDN) education continues to create practitioners delivering quality evidence-based care. DN leadership and its importance have come to the fore during the COVID-19 crisis, where hospital discharges have increased rapidly to make way for highly complex admissions (HM Government, 2020). This paper examines the importance of the SPQDN qualification, exploring the role of the DN within practice education. Continuation of the vital DN qualification will ensure that the numbers of qualified DNs increase, ultimately protecting community capacity. With a move towards an apprenticeship model to achieve the SPQDN, DNs must engage with and influence curriculum development to confirm courses deliver requirements of the workplace, commissioners and the 2019 NHS Long Term Plan. Expectations of the DN role within practice education have changed, moving away from the practice teacher standards to the new Nursing and Midwifery Council Standards for Student Support and Assessment. This poses new challenges in DN education in practice. The implications of this transition threaten to de-value the quality of the assessment process by removing the high standards of preparation previously demanded; ultimately, this is a risk to the provision of the quality practice education that previously existed.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Enfermería en Salud Comunitaria/educación , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Rol de la Enfermera , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Curriculum , Humanos , Pandemias , Reino Unido
14.
Einstein (Sao Paulo) ; 18: eGS5328, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32578686

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of clinical education models for undergraduate nursing programs. METHODS: A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis. Settings were universities with undergraduate nursing courses. Participants consisted of the decision tree that guided the structure of the model, filled in with effectiveness results from a hypothetical cohort of undergraduate nursing students. Interventions were Clinical Preceptor or Clinical Facilitator or Clinical Education Unit. Main outcome measure was effectiveness, defined as improvement of clinical education. The projected economic outcomes included incremental costs, incremental effectiveness, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis was employed to assess uncertainty in the model and robustness of our results. RESULTS: The model based on Clinical Education Unit could be defined as the best, followed by Clinical Facilitator and Clinical Preceptor. The incremental cost of telephone-support intervention was US$ 59,604.40 higher than the second-best performing intervention (Clinical Facilitator), and US$ 32,661.86 higher than the last best performing intervention (Clinical Preceptor). In addition, Clinical Education Unit model showed 7% and 19% more effectiveness than Clinical Facilitator and Clinical Preceptor, respectively. CONCLUSION: Clinical Education Unit represents the best choice to promote better development of skills, knowledge and socialization in undergraduate nursing programs considering its effectiveness and costs.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/economía , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Análisis Costo-Beneficio , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Humanos , Modelos Educacionales , Socialización
15.
J Clin Nurs ; 29(17-18): 3298-3310, 2020 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32478450

RESUMEN

AIMS: To explore student nurses' and nurse mentors' perceptions and experiences of raising concerns on clinical placement and the influence (if any) of their relationship on this process. A secondary aim is to consider the above, from a regulatory perspective in light of current literature and policy developments. BACKGROUND: Raising concerns whilst on clinical placement has been shown to be challenging for student nurses internationally. Registered nurses in the UK (in this case called "nurse mentors") facilitate learning and assessment in practice. However, limited research exists on the influence of the relationship between the nurse mentor and student nurse on the raising concerns process. DESIGN: A qualitative approach was used to undertake secondary thematic analysis of interview data. The primary data set was generated during a PhD study, focusing on the mentor-student dynamic and the possible influence of this relationship on students' raising concerns. METHODS: 30 individual semi-structured interviews were subjected to concurrent and thematic analysis. Interviews were undertaken with student nurses (n = 16) and nurse mentors (n = 14) between April 2016-January 2018. The COREQ 32-item checklist was used during the preparation of this article. FINDINGS: The following three interrelated analytical themes were generated from the data, "developing a mentor-student relationship," "keeping your mentor sweet" and "the mentor role in the raising concerns process." CONCLUSION: Our analysis of participants' experiences and perceptions offers an original contribution to understanding the factors associated with student nurses raising concerns in practice. Student nurses and most mentors believed that students should be encouraged and supported to raise concerns, but students' decisions were strongly influenced by their perceptions of the immediate interpersonal and educational context. Similar barriers to raising concerns have been shown to exist regardless of geographical boundaries, therefore the findings of this study are nationally and internationally relevant. Relevance to clinical practice This study provides new insight into the role of the nurse mentor in supporting students who raise concerns on clinical placements. The majority of the mentor participants believed that students should be encouraged and supported to speak up if they witness poor care or unprofessional behaviour. Focusing on the compexities around raising concerns in mentorship training and updates would rovide a forum for open discussion amongst mentors and educators.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Mentores , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación Cualitativa
17.
Br J Nurs ; 29(10): 566-569, 2020 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401265

RESUMEN

During the current coronavirus pandemic, undergraduate nurse teaching is facing many challenges. Universities have had to close their campuses, which means that academics are working from home and may be coping with unfamiliar technology to deliver the theoretical part of the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Emergency standards from the Nursing and Midwifery Council have allowed theoretical instruction to be replaced with distance learning, requiring nursing academics to adapt to providing a completely virtual approach to their teaching. This article provides examples of tools that can be used to deliver the theoretical component of the undergraduate nursing curriculum and ways of supporting students and colleagues in these unprecedented times.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Tecnología Educacional , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Humanos , Reino Unido/epidemiología
18.
Br J Nurs ; 29(10): 566-569, 2020 May 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32463742

RESUMEN

During the current coronavirus pandemic, undergraduate nurse teaching is facing many challenges. Universities have had to close their campuses, which means that academics are working from home and may be coping with unfamiliar technology to deliver the theoretical part of the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Emergency standards from the Nursing and Midwifery Council have allowed theoretical instruction to be replaced with distance learning, requiring nursing academics to adapt to providing a completely virtual approach to their teaching. This article provides examples of tools that can be used to deliver the theoretical component of the undergraduate nursing curriculum and ways of supporting students and colleagues in these unprecedented times.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Tecnología Educacional , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Humanos , Reino Unido/epidemiología
20.
Nurse Educ Today ; 90: 104444, 2020 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32445985

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: While much is known about nursing students' clinical placement experiences in general, less has been reported about their specific encounters with poor care delivery. A few small-scale qualitative studies have been undertaken, which suggest that nursing students do witness poor care but often decide not to act on what they see. This study sought to explore a wider international perspective on this issue. AIMS: To explore nursing students' experiences of the care delivery practices witnessed during clinical placements and to provide descriptions of poor care. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Nursing students from undergraduate pre-registration nursing programmes across three universities, two in the United Kingdom (UK) and one in Australia. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: A qualitative/quantitative survey design was utilised, and data were descriptively analysed. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixty-five students participated in the study. Overall the results were positive. Nevertheless, the participants did provide multiple and recurring examples of poor nursing care which related to a lack of compassion, poor communication, unkind and indifferent provision of personal care, and patient safety. Reporting of poor care was viewed as difficult and many participants highlighted potential repercussions should they take this course of action. CONCLUSION: This research provides contemporary international insights into care delivery practices from the perspective of a large number of nursing students. The results, although mainly positive, outline multiple examples of poor and ineffective practice. While the precise prevalence of these remains unknown, educators, practitioners and students should consider how best to address them when they occur.


Asunto(s)
Prácticas Clínicas , Prestación de Atención de Salud/normas , Revelación , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Empatía , Inglaterra , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Nueva Gales del Sur , Relaciones Enfermero-Paciente , Investigación Cualitativa , Escocia , Autoinforme , Adulto Joven
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