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1.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 609-618, 2021 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34556250

RESUMEN

COVID-19 has created challenges across medicine, including in medical education, with deeply rooted impacts in the dermatology residency experience. Its effects are both acute and chronic, including: shifts to virtual education and conferences, skewed clinical experiences, negatively impacted wellness, and uncertainty in the future. As educators and mentors, it is important to recognize and address these issues so that we may remain transparent, adaptable, and engaged as we continue to build a better tomorrow for our resident trainees.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/epidemiología , Dermatología/educación , Becas/tendencias , Internado y Residencia/tendencias , Manejo de Atención al Paciente/tendencias , Enfermedades de la Piel/terapia , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Humanos , Percepción Social
2.
JSLS ; 25(2)2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34135563

RESUMEN

Background: Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is one of the more recently established surgical fellowships, with many candidates applying due to a perception of inadequate exposure to advanced MIS during residency. The desire for advanced training should be reflected in increased competitiveness for fellowship positions. The aim of this study is to determine the desirability of MIS fellowships over time through review of national application data. Methods: We reviewed the fellowship match statistics obtained from The Fellowship Council, the organizing body behind the MIS fellowship match. Data from January 1, 2008 - December 31, 2019 were included. We compared match rates to other specialties using the National Resident Matching Program, a nonprofit organization established for US residency and some fellowship programs. Results: In the period of 2008 to 2019, the number of certified MIS fellowship programs increased from 124 to 141. While this program expansion was associated with a 19% increase in available positions, the number of applications increased 36%. As a result, the number of positions filled increased from 83% to 97%, but the match rate among US applicants fell from 82% to 71% during this interval. In comparison, the match rates for pediatric surgery, surgical oncology, vascular surgery, and surgical critical care fellowships remained largely unchanged, most recently 50%, 56%, 99%, and 100% respectively. Conclusion: Over the last decade, US residents have shown an increased interest in pursuing MIS fellowship positions. As a consequence, the match process for MIS fellowships is becoming increasingly competitive.


Asunto(s)
Becas/tendencias , Internado y Residencia/economía , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Mínimamente Invasivos/educación , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Especialidades Quirúrgicas/educación
4.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 38(5): 1163-1169, 2021 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33797004

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To assess perceived deficiencies of reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) fellow education due to changes in care secondary to COVID-19. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study performed in an academic setting. A survey was generated and administered to REI fellows and attendings practicing in programs across the United States. Descriptive statistics were used to quantify results regarding clinical volume, academic responsibilities, clinical safety, and fellowship education. RESULTS: The survey response rate was 23%. Eighty-four percent of respondents self-identified as fellows, and 16% identified as program directors or other REI academic instructors. Overall, the survey responses confirmed that the COVID-19 pandemic tremendously affected clinical volume, with 91% of participants reporting their clinical volume decreased by at least half. Although 67% of attendings believed that the changes related to COVID-19 have or will have significantly affected the clinical skills of fellows, 66% of fellows did not believe that their clinical training had been significantly impacted. Sixty-seven percent of fellows and 78% of attendings do not believe that changes related to COVID-19 will affect the ability of fellows to practice independently. CONCLUSION: Even though most attendings surveyed believed that the changes related to COVID-19 would affect the clinical skills of fellows, the cessation of clinical and research activities was short-lived, likely tempering the overall effect on clinical training. Overall, most respondents did not believe that the pandemic significantly affected fellow education.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/epidemiología , Educación Médica/tendencias , Pandemias , COVID-19/virología , Becas/tendencias , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2/patogenicidad
7.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 165(5): 655-661, 2021 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33618575

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To summarize trends in otolaryngology fellowship applications, fellowships selected, and reasons for pursuing a fellowship. STUDY DESIGN: One-page anonymous questionnaire. SETTING: A survey was completed by examinees at the conclusion of their American Board of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery oral examination from 2011 to 2019. METHODS: Data included age, gender, fellowship type, reasons for doing a fellowship, and type of practice that examinees will enter. Spearman correlation and Pearson chi-square tests were completed. RESULTS: Over the 8-year study, 58% of the 2243 responding examinees did fellowships. The most frequently chosen fellowship was facial plastic surgery (25%), followed by pediatric otolaryngology (21%), head and neck surgery (19%), rhinology (13%), laryngology (9%), and neurotology (8%). The 2 most common reasons for doing a fellowship were desire for additional expertise beyond residency training (35%) and intellectual appeal (30%). Over the study period, the number of residents choosing to do a fellowship increased from 45.6% in 2011 to 61.5% in 2019, with a positive correlation between year and number of residents (r = 0.73, P = .036). When the data were stratified by gender, there were statistically significant differences in fellowship selection (P < .001), notably with women selecting pediatric otolaryngology at a higher frequency than men (30.9% vs 15.8%). CONCLUSION: There is a statistically significant increasing trend of otolaryngology residents who choose to undergo further training in fellowship. These data from a large, long-term study will be valuable in planning for training and workforce needs in the future.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/tendencias , Becas/tendencias , Otolaringología/educación , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Internado y Residencia , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
8.
J Assist Reprod Genet ; 38(4): 895-899, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33459965

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To analyze the content of websites of ACGME-accredited REI fellowship programs in the USA and to determine whether there are differences in content across geographic regions. METHODS: All ACGME-accredited REI fellowship websites active as of September 2020 were evaluated and reviewed using 20 criteria in the following nine domains: program overview, contact information, application information, curriculum, current fellows, research, alumni, faculty, and fellowship benefits. Website content was compared across geographic regions (Northeast, Midwest, South, and West) of the USA. Analyses were completed using chi-squared univariate tests with p < 0.05 considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Out of the 49 accredited REI fellowship programs, 45 (92%) had a dedicated website. The most commonly available information included a program description (88%), clinical sites (84%), and application requirements (78%). Programs less commonly shared information regarding research requirements and didactics (65% for each). Current fellows were featured in 55% of websites with their pictures displayed in 41% and ongoing research in 20%. Salary and alumni information were included in only 14% and 12% of sites, respectively. When comparing content by geographic region, programs in the South had less information regarding application requirements (p < 0.001), interview dates (p = 0.03), and clinical sites (p = 0.04) compared to all other regions. CONCLUSIONS: REI fellowship websites have significant variability in content available to applicants, and many are lacking information about core fellowship requirements. An informative and well-constructed website has the potential to improve perception of a graduate program.


Asunto(s)
Endocrinología/tendencias , Infertilidad/genética , Reproducción/genética , Curriculum/tendencias , Becas/tendencias , Femenino , Humanos , Infertilidad/epidemiología , Internet/tendencias , Masculino , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
9.
Perspect Med Educ ; 10(1): 23-32, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32820414

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: There still remains a gap between those who conduct science and those who engage in educating others about health sciences through various forms of social media. Few empirical studies have sought to define useful practices for engaging in social media for academic use in the health professions. Given the increasing importance of these platforms, we sought to define good practices and potential pitfalls with help of those respected for their work in this new field. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study, guided by constructivist grounded theory principles, of 17 emerging experts in the field of academic social media. We engaged in a snowball sampling technique and conducted a series of semi-structured interviews. The analytic team consisted of a diverse group of researchers with a range of experience in social media. RESULTS: Understanding the strengths of various platforms was deemed to be of critical importance across all the participants. Key to building online engagement were the following: 1) Culture-building strategies; 2) Tailoring the message; 3) Responsiveness; and 4) Heeding rules of online engagement. Several points of caution were noted within our participants' interviews. These were grouped into caveat emptor and the need for critical appraisal, and common pitfalls when broadcasting one's self. DISCUSSION: Our participants were able to share a number of key practices that are central to developing and sharing educational content via social media. The findings from the study may guide future practitioners seeking to enter the space. These good practices support professionals for effective engagement and knowledge translation without being harmed.


Asunto(s)
Becas/métodos , Medios de Comunicación Sociales/instrumentación , /métodos , Becas/tendencias , Teoría Fundamentada , Humanos , Investigación Cualitativa , Medios de Comunicación Sociales/tendencias , /instrumentación
10.
Clin Orthop Relat Res ; 479(1): 60-68, 2021 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32732738

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There has been a considerable rise in the number of musculoskeletal/orthopaedic oncology fellowships and subsequently, orthopaedic oncologists, in the nation. National societies have been concerned that the increasing number of orthopaedic oncologists, coupled with a limited number of patients with bone and soft-tissue sarcomas in the country, may have led to an unintended impact on the training spectrum and/or exposure of orthopaedic oncology fellows-in-training over time. Fellows who are unable to gain exposure by operating on varied cancer presentations during training may be less confident in dealing with a wide array of patients in their practice. Despite these concerns, the volume and variability of procedures performed by fellows-in-training remains unknown. Understanding these parameters will be helpful in establishing policies for standardizing training of prospective fellows to ensure they are well-equipped to care for patients with bone and/or soft-tissue sarcomas in the beginning of their career. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Has the median surgical procedure volume per fellow changed over time? (2) How much variability in procedural volume exists between fellows, based on the most recent (2017) Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) procedure log data? (3) What proportion of fellows are meeting the minimum procedure volume thresholds, as recommended by the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS)? METHODS: The 2010 to 2017 ACGME fellowship procedure logs for musculoskeletal oncology fellowships were retrieved from the council's official website. All fellows enrolled in ACGME-accredited fellowships are mandated to complete case logs before graduation. This study did not include operative procedures performed by fellows in nonACGME-approved fellowship programs. The 2010 to 2016 anatomic site-based procedure log data were used to evaluate fellows' overall and location-specific median operative or patient volume, using descriptive statistics. Linear regression analyses were used to assess changes in the median procedure volume over time. The 2017 categorized procedure log data were used to assess variability in procedure volume between the lowest (10th percentile) and highest (90th percentile) of all fellows. Using 2017 procedure logs, we compared the minimum procedure volume standards, as defined by the MSTS, against the number of procedures performed by fellows across the 10th, 30th, 50th (median), 70th, and 90th percentiles. RESULTS: There was no change in the median (range) procedural volume per fellow from 2010 (292 procedures [131 to 634]) to 2017 (312 procedures [174 to 479]; p = 0.58). Based on 2017 categorized procedure log data, there was considerable variability in procedural volume between the lowest (10th) percentile and highest (90th) percentile of fellows across programs: pediatric oncologic procedures (10-fold difference), surgical management of complications from limb-salvage surgery (sevenfold difference), soft-tissue resections or reconstructions (fourfold difference), bone sarcoma resections or limb-salvage surgery (fourfold difference), and spine, sacrum, and pelvis procedures (threefold difference). A fair proportion of fellows did not meet the minimum procedure volume standards, as recommended by the MSTS across certain categories. For the spine and pelvis (minimum = 10 procedures), fellows in the lowest 10th percentile performed only six procedures. For patients with bone sarcomas or limb salvage (minimum = 20 procedures), fellows in the lowest 10th percentile performed only 14 procedures. For pediatric patients with oncologic conditions (minimum = 15 procedures), fellows in the 50th percentile (13 procedures) and below failed to meet the thresholds. For surgical management of complications from limb-salvage procedures (minimum = five procedures), fellows in the lowest 10th percentile performed only three procedures. CONCLUSION: Although we were encouraged to observe that the median number of procedures performed by musculoskeletal oncology fellows over this time has not changed, we observed wide variability in the procedure volume among fellows for pediatric sarcomas, soft-tissue resection and reconstruction, limb salvage procedures, and spine procedures. We do not know how this compares with fellows trained in nonaccredited fellowship programs. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Although we recognize that the education of fellows entails much more than performing operations, national societies have recognized a need to bring about more uniformity or standardization of training in musculoskeletal oncology. Limiting the number of orthopaedic oncology fellowships to high-volume institutions, expanding the training time period, and/or introducing subspecialty certification may be possible avenues through which standardization of training can be defined.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias Óseas/cirugía , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Becas/tendencias , Oncología Médica/tendencias , Oncólogos/educación , Cirujanos Ortopédicos/educación , Ortopedia/educación , Neoplasias de los Tejidos Blandos/cirugía , Carga de Trabajo , Competencia Clínica , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/tendencias , Humanos , Curva de Aprendizaje , Oncólogos/tendencias , Cirujanos Ortopédicos/tendencias , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores de Tiempo
11.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(1): 82-86, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33075035

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is an international crisis placing tremendous strain on medical systems around the world. Like other specialties, neuroanesthesiology has been adversely affected and training programs have had to quickly adapt to the constantly changing environment. METHODS: An email-based survey was used to evaluate the effects of the pandemic on clinical workflow, clinical training, education, and trainee well-being. The impact of the International Council on Perioperative Neuroscience Training (ICPNT) accreditation was also assessed. RESULTS: Responses were received from 14 program directors (88% response rate) in 10 countries and from 36 fellows in these programs. Clinical training was adversely affected because of the cancellation of elective neurosurgery and other changes in case workflow, the introduction of modified airway and other protocols, and redeployment of trainees to other sites. To address educational demands, most programs utilized online platforms to organize clinical discussions, journal clubs, and provide safety training modules. Several initiatives were introduced to support trainee well-being during the pandemic. Feelings of isolation and despair among trainees varied from 2 to 8 (on a scale of 1 to 10). Fellows all reported concerns that their clinical training had been adversely affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic because of decreased exposure to elective subspecialty cases and limited opportunities to complete workplace-based assessments and training portfolio requirements. Cancellation of examination preparation courses and delayed examinations were cited as common sources of stress. Programs accredited by the ICPNT reported that international networking and collaboration was beneficial to reduce feelings of isolation during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Neuroanesthesia fellowship training program directors introduced innovative ways to maintain clinical training, educational activity and trainee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Acreditación/tendencias , Anestesiología/educación , Anestesiología/tendencias , COVID-19 , Becas/tendencias , Neurología/educación , Neurología/tendencias , Pandemias , Competencia Clínica , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Electivos , Humanos , Neurocirugia/estadística & datos numéricos , Neurocirugia/tendencias
12.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(1): 8-11, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33047812

RESUMEN

Fellows and junior faculty conducting aging research have encountered substantial new challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. They report that they have been uncertain how and whether to modify existing research studies, have faced difficulties with job searches, and have struggled to balance competing pressures including greater clinical obligations and increased responsibilities at home. Many have also wondered if they should shift gears and make COVID-19 the focus of their research. We asked a group of accomplished scientists and mentors to grapple with these concerns and to share their thoughts with readers of this journal.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Docentes Médicos/tendencias , Becas/tendencias , Geriatría/tendencias , Cuerpo Médico de Hospitales/tendencias , Investigadores/tendencias , Movilidad Laboral , Docentes Médicos/educación , Geriatría/educación , Humanos , Cuerpo Médico de Hospitales/educación , Investigadores/educación , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(2): 202-211, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33158560

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Quality Scholars (VAQS) program, an interprofessional fellowship that includes pre- and postdoctoral nurses, aims to inspire practice change leaders. Fellows participate in a national curriculum, lead improvement/research teams, and establish professional development plans with expert mentor guidance. PURPOSE: To describe the distinctive elements of the VAQS program, nurse fellow outcomes, and accomplishments of nurse alumni as leaders, researchers, and educators. METHODS: Data were reviewed and aggregated from past and current fellow surveys. FINDINGS: Nurse fellows completed research and improvement projects that benefitted both the VA and the local health systems. Scholarly outcomes include publications, conference presentations, grant submissions, teaching/leading quality improvement, and research initiatives. Graduates transition to positions as nurse scientists, academic faculty, and operational leaders. DISCUSSION: Fellows contribute to the strategic priorities of local and national VA and external health care organizations providing a pipeline of health system expert leaders, educators, and researchers. CONCLUSION: Doctoral nursing fellowship experiences build human capital for enhancing the science of improvement and implementation, interprofessional collaboration, and leadership.


Asunto(s)
Escolaridad , Becas/métodos , United States Department of Veterans Affairs/estadística & datos numéricos , Empleo/métodos , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Becas/tendencias , Humanos , Liderazgo , Desarrollo de Programa/métodos , Mejoramiento de la Calidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos , United States Department of Veterans Affairs/organización & administración
16.
BMJ Mil Health ; 167(3): 204-205, 2021 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32220966

RESUMEN

The Fellowship in Immediate Medical Care (FIMC) is the highest level of formal qualification available for pre-hospital practitioners, aiming to test the knowledge, technical and non-technical skills of those providing specialist Pre-Hospital Emergency Care (PHEC). The FIMC is a multiprofessional examination with the potential to support continuous quality improvement of the PHEC that the Defence Medical Services (DMS) can offer to our patients now and in the future. The aim of this article is to inform the readership about the evolution of the FIMC examination and its applicability to military clinicians (and their civilian counterparts). A secondary aim is to inform those who are preparing for the examination.


Asunto(s)
Becas/métodos , Medicina Militar/educación , Examen Físico/métodos , Competencia Clínica/normas , Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Becas/tendencias , Humanos , Medicina Militar/métodos , Medicina Militar/tendencias , Mejoramiento de la Calidad
17.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 28(2): 259-268, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32439413

RESUMEN

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To present updated information regarding compensation patterns for Fellowship in Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery (FMIGS)-graduated physicians in the United States beginning practice during the last 10 years, focusing on the variables that have an impact on differences in salary, including gender, fellowship duration, geographic region, practice setting, and practice mix. DESIGN: An online survey was sent to FMIGS graduates between March 15, 2019 and April 12, 2019. Information on physicians' demographics, compensation (on the basis of location, practice model, productivity benchmarks, academic rank, and years in practice), and attitudes toward fairness in compensation was collected. SETTING: Online survey. PARTICIPANTS: FMIGS graduates practicing in the United States. INTERVENTION: E-mail survey. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We surveyed 298 US FMIGS surgeons who had graduated during the last 10 years (2009-2018). The response rate was 48.7%. Most of the respondents were women (69%). Most of the graduates (84.8%) completed 2- or 3-year fellowship programs. After adjustment for inflation, the median starting salary for the first postfellowship job was $252 074 ($223 986-$279 983) (Table 1). The median time spent in the first job was 2.6 years, and the median total salary at the current year rose to $278 379.4 ($241 437-$350 976). The median salary for respondents entering a second postfellowship job started at $280 945 ($261 409-$329 603). Significantly lower compensation was reported for female FMIGS graduates in their initial postfellowship jobs and was consistently lower than for that of men over time. Most FMIGS graduates (59.7%) reported feeling inadequately compensated for their level of specialization. CONCLUSION: A trend toward higher self-reported salaries is noted for FMIGS graduates in recent years, with significant differences in compensation between men and women. Among obstetrics and gynecology subspecialists, FMIGS graduates earn significantly less than other fellowship-trained physicians, with median salaries that are lower than those of generalist obstetrics and gynecology physicians.


Asunto(s)
Becas/tendencias , Ginecología/tendencias , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Mínimamente Invasivos , Salarios y Beneficios/tendencias , Adulto , Becas/economía , Becas/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Ginecológicos/economía , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Ginecológicos/educación , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Ginecológicos/tendencias , Ginecología/economía , Ginecología/educación , Humanos , Masculino , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Mínimamente Invasivos/economía , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Mínimamente Invasivos/educación , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Mínimamente Invasivos/estadística & datos numéricos , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Mínimamente Invasivos/tendencias , Obstetricia/economía , Obstetricia/educación , Obstetricia/estadística & datos numéricos , Obstetricia/tendencias , Salarios y Beneficios/estadística & datos numéricos , Factores Sexuales , Cirujanos/economía , Cirujanos/educación , Cirujanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Cirujanos/tendencias , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
20.
Pain Physician ; 23(4S): S367-S380, 2020 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32942794

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The unexpected COVID-19 crisis has disrupted medical education and patient care in unprecedented ways. Despite the challenges, the health-care system and patients have been both creative and resilient in finding robust "temporary" solutions to these challenges. It is not clear if some of these COVID-era transitional steps will be preserved in the future of medical education and telemedicine. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this commentary is to address the sometimes substantial changes in medical education, continuing medical education (CME) activities, residency and fellowship programs, specialty society meetings, and telemedicine, and to consider the value of some of these profound shifts to "business as usual" in the health-care sector. METHODS: This is a commentary is based on the limited available literature, online information, and the front-line experiences of the authors. RESULTS: COVID-19 has clearly changed residency and fellowship programs by limiting the amount of hands-on time physicians could spend with patients. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medicine Education has endorsed certain policy changes to promote greater flexibility in programs but still rigorously upholds specific standards. Technological interventions such as telemedicine visits with patients, virtual meetings with colleagues, and online interviews have been introduced, and many trainees are "techno-omnivores" who are comfortable using a variety of technology platforms and techniques. Webinars and e-learning are gaining traction now, and their use, practicality, and cost-effectiveness may make them important in the post-COVID era. CME activities have migrated increasingly to virtual events and online programs, a trend that may also continue due to its practicality and cost-effectiveness. While many medical meetings of specialty societies have been postponed or cancelled altogether, technology allows for virtual meetings that may offer versatility and time-saving opportunities for busy clinicians. It may be that future medical meetings embrace a hybrid approach of blending digital with face-to-face experience. Telemedicine was already in place prior to the COVID-19 crisis but barriers are rapidly coming down to its widespread use and patients seem to embrace this, even as health-care systems navigate the complicated issues of cybersecurity and patient privacy. Regulatory guidance may be needed to develop safe, secure, and patient-friendly telehealth applications. Telemedicine has affected the prescribing of controlled substances in which online counseling, informed consent, and follow-up must be done in a virtual setting. For example, pill counts can be done in a video call and patients can still get questions answered about their pain therapy, although it is likely that after the crisis, prescribing controlled substances may revert to face-to-face visits. LIMITATIONS: The health-care system finds itself in a very fluid situation at the time this was written and changes are still occurring and being assessed. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the technological changes imposed so abruptly on the health-care system by the COVID-19 pandemic may be positive and it may be beneficial that some of these transitions be preserved or modified as we move forward. Clinicians must be objective in assessing these changes and retaining those changes that clearly improve health-care education and patient care as we enter the COVID era.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Atención a la Salud/tendencias , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/tendencias , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Telemedicina/tendencias , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Atención a la Salud/métodos , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Becas/métodos , Becas/tendencias , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Internado y Residencia/tendencias , Masculino , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicina/métodos
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