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1.
Ann Anat ; 245: 151998, 2023 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36183933

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Tooth whitening is currently one of the most requested treatments to change the color of teeth. There are different types of whitening in the dental office and at home. There are also many whitening agents on the market. Nowadays, the public has shown great interest in a new natural compound: activated charcoal. It has an abrasive effect and it is included in toothpastes to whiten teeth quickly and easily. OBJECTIVES: The main objective of the systematic review is to perform a qualitative synthesis of the available literature on the use of activated charcoal-based toothpaste for tooth whitening. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An electronic search was carried out in PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus databases. The search included the terms (charcoal-based OR activated charcoal OR charcoal OR soot) AND (toothpaste OR dentifrices OR bleaching OR oral hygiene OR enamel OR teeth). Inclusion criteria were articles that were published in English, that included activated charcoal toothpastes, that assessed the efficacy of activated charcoal bleaching and/or the safety of using activated charcoal toothpastes, that were conducted on humans or extracted teeth regardless of their origin and the year of publication. RESULTS: Out of 208 articles, 11 met the inclusion criteria, the Risk of Bias of the selected studies was determined as medium-high. Regarding the whitening effect, there is a variety of results depending on the study: in some there are no significant differences between the proposed treatments and in others activated charcoal is not the most whitening agent. Regarding the abrasive effect, most studies agree that activated charcoal toothpaste has a higher abrasive potential. CONCLUSION: Toothpastes based on activated charcoal possess a lower whitening effect than other alternatives and can be considered as less safe due to its high abrasive potential.


Asunto(s)
Blanqueadores , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Diente , Humanos , Pastas de Dientes , Carbón Orgánico , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/efectos adversos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/métodos
2.
Braz. j. oral sci ; 22: e238082, Jan.-Dec. 2023. tab
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS, BBO - Odontología | ID: biblio-1393422

RESUMEN

Aim: To determine if the artificial staining with black tea (BT) influences the enamel microhardness before in-office bleaching and if BT staining is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide Methods: Enamel/dentin blocks were randomized into groups according to the staining protocol (n=5/group): (CO) control ­ maintained in artificial saliva solution (AS); (BT4) immersed in black tea solution for 4 h; (BT24) immersed in black tea solution for 24 h. After the staining protocols, all specimens were kept in AS for one week, followed by bleaching (three sessions of HP application for 40 min). Knoop surface microhardness (kgF/mm2) was determined at baseline (T0), after staining (T1), after 7 days of storage in AS (T2), and after bleaching (T3). The color (∆E00) and coordinate changes (∆L, ∆a, ∆b) were measured using a digital spectrophotometer at T0 and T3. Data were submitted to one-way (∆E00, ∆L, ∆a, ∆b) or two-way ANOVA repeated measures (kgF/mm2) and Tukey's test (a=5%). Results: The staining protocols (BT4 and BT24) promoted significantly lower microhardness (T1 and T2, p<0.05) than CO, whereas CO was the only group to maintain microhardness values over time. Bleaching promoted perceptible ∆E00 without a significant difference among the groups regardless of the staining protocol (p=0.122). CO and BT4 showed no differences in terms of ∆L and ∆a (p>0.05), but BT4 displayed a higher ∆b than CO. Conclusion:The artificial staining with BT negatively affected the enamel surface microhardness and was not essential to evaluate the efficacy of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching


Asunto(s)
Coloración y Etiquetado , Té/efectos adversos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Color , Esmalte Dental , Blanqueadores , Pruebas de Dureza , Peróxido de Hidrógeno
3.
Braz. j. oral sci ; 21: e227878, jan.-dez. 2022. tab
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS, BBO - Odontología | ID: biblio-1384155

RESUMEN

Aim Assessing the intracoronal bleaching effectiveness of an experimental chlorine dioxide product, based on the walking bleach technique. Methods Extracted bovine incisors were artificially stained with bovine blood and filled with zinc phosphate cement at cementoenamel junction level. Teeth were divided into 3 groups (n=10): (SP) sodium perborate added with distilled water, (CD) chlorine dioxide and (C) control - dry cotton inserted into the pulp chamber. Bleaching agents were used at 0, 7 and 14 days. VITA Easyshadetm (∆Eab) was used to analyze tooth color at the 7th, 14th and 21st days, based on the CIE2000 system. Data were analyzed through ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results There were no statistically significant differences in Δb, ΔE, ΔE00 and ΔWID between CD and the control group. These parameters have shown significant differences between CD and SP, which differed from the control. However, they did not show significant differences either in the control group or in CD at the 7th, 14th and 21st days. Values recorded for SP at the 7th day differed from those recorded at the 14th and 21st days. Δa has shown differences within the same group at the 7th, 14th and 21st days. There was no difference between groups, when they were compared at the same day (7th and 14th). The control group differed from SP at the 21st day. CD did not differ from the other two groups. ΔL did not show differences between groups and times. Conclusion Stabilized chlorine dioxide (0.07%, at pH 3.5) should not be used as intracoronal bleaching agent along with the walking bleach technique.


Asunto(s)
Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Boratos , Compuestos de Cloro , Materiales Dentales , Dióxido de Cloro
4.
Braz. j. oral sci ; 21: e226630, jan.-dez. 2022. ilus
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS, BBO - Odontología | ID: biblio-1393209

RESUMEN

Aim: The present study aimed to asses enamel microhardness after office bleaching with diode laser and LED light compared to the conventional bleaching procedure. Methods: Thirty-nine human premolar teeth were collected and randomly divided into three groups regarding of the bleaching technique. Group 1: Snow O bleaching gel with LED light-curing unit; Group 2: Snow L bleaching gel with diode laser irradiation; and Group 3: Opalescence Boost bleaching gel with no light source in group 3. Enamel surface changes were evaluated in one tooth in each study group and one intact tooth as a reference under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the remaining samples (n=12), enamel microhardness was determined by Vickers microhardness test before and after bleaching. Data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA to compare microhardness changes, followed by post hoc Tukey tests at the 0.05 significance level. Results: Enamel microhardness decreased in all the groups after bleaching, with the maximum decrease in microhardness in the Snow O bleaching group with LED light, which was significantly higher than the other groups (P=0.002). The two other groups did not exhibit any significant difference in microhardness decrease (P>0.05). Conclusion:Based on the limitations of this study, it can be concluded power bleaching with 980nm diode laser was less time-consuming compare to conventional bleaching procedure and yielded better outcomes in terms of enamel surface microhardness compared to the use of an LED light-curing unit


Asunto(s)
Blanqueamiento de Dientes/efectos adversos , Esmalte Dental , Láseres de Semiconductores , Luces de Curación Dental , Dureza
5.
Braz. j. oral sci ; 21: e225232, jan.-dez. 2022. ilus
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS, BBO - Odontología | ID: biblio-1354773

RESUMEN

Aim: The objective of this study was to describe a case series concerning internal bleaching of anterior traumatized teeth that underwent regenerative endodontic procedures (REP). Methods: Seven non-vital maxillary anterior teeth discolored after regenerative endodontic procedures were included and divided into two groups according to the medication protocol used in the REP: (1) Triple antibiotic paste (TAP) group (n=4); (2) Calcium hydroxide and 2% chlorhexidine gel (HC+CHX) (n=3). The bleaching technique used was walking bleach, where sodium perborate associated with distilled water was used. Bleaching agent was replaced weekly until the darkened tooth was slightly lighter than the adjacent tooth. The color was recorded with the aid of a digital spectrophotometer in two moments (T1: prior the first session of bleaching, T2: fourteen days after the last session of bleaching). The change in color after the procedure (ΔE) was calculated and reported in a descriptive analysis. Results: The ΔE for all teeth showed color differences exceeding the perceptibility threshold (ΔE > 3.7). Both groups showed similar ΔE (TAP: 18.3 ± 11.5; HC+CHX: 14 ± 11.2) at the end of the treatment. The average number of sessions needed to achieve satisfactory results was 1.7 ± 0.6 for HC+CHX group and 2.3 ± 0.5 for TAP group. Conclusion: Internal bleaching with sodium perborate associated with distilled water is effective in treating discolored teeth after regenerative endodontic procedures


Asunto(s)
Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Decoloración de Dientes , Endodoncia Regenerativa
6.
BMC Oral Health ; 22(1): 535, 2022 11 24.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36424627

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the commonly used bleaching agent for teeth. But it is highly corrosive to teeth for the high concentration. The cold atmospheric pressure plasma has been witnessed a novel tooth bleaching technology and could help strengthen the bleaching effect when combined with H2O2. However, the efficacy and safety might highly correlated with processing time. The present study aims to evaluate the time-dependent efficacy and safety of tooth bleaching with cold plasma and H2O2 gel in vitro. METHODS: The H2O2 concentrations of the gel used in the study are 6%, 15%, 25% and 35%, respectively and the treatment time varies from 5 to 20 min. The tooth bleaching effect was evaluated by a Crystaleye Spectrophotometer and the overall change of the colorimetric value based on three independent measurements. Meanwhile, the microhardness, roughness and tooth temperature were evaluated. The surface morphology and the elemental composition were determined by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. RESULTS: 5 min bleaching treatment contributed to 60% of the bleaching effect maximum, the 10 min effect was close to 15 min effect. Meanwhile, the microhardness reduced and roughness increased under a treatment which was longer than 20 min. Tooth pulp chamber temperature was keeping in a safe range within 20 min treatment. CONCLUSION: 5-10 min was the best treatment time from which we can get an ideal tooth bleaching effect and less influence on tooth enamel and pulp tissue when using cold plasma and H2O2 gel.


Asunto(s)
Gases em Plasma , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Diente , Humanos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/efectos adversos , Peróxido de Hidrógeno/efectos adversos , Gases em Plasma/efectos adversos , Gases em Plasma/análisis , Esmalte Dental
7.
Int J Esthet Dent ; 17(4): 448-467, 2022 Nov 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36426616

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to assess the progress and efficiency of at-home bleaching protocols with 10% carbamide peroxide using a new methodology based on dental photography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 4-week overnight at-home bleaching protocol using whitening trays and 10% carbamide peroxide was performed on 52 patients. The tooth color was analyzed using standardized photographs taken every week for 4 weeks and at 4 months posttreatment. The values of the color evolution (ΔE00), L*, a*, and b* were also measured and used to assess the evolution of the chroma, luminosity, and hue using the CIEDE2000 formula. The statistical analyses were conducted at a significance level of P < 0.05 by means of a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: The tooth color changed the most, and thus the highest ΔE00 was observed, after the first week of treatment. The color continued to change but to a lesser degree during the following weeks. After 4 weeks, the treatment proved to be very effective. Four months after the end of treatment, a color relapse was observed, though it was hardly perceptible to the human eye. The luminosity (L') changed significantly between the beginning and the end of treatment, affecting the maxilla to a greater extent. The chroma evolution showed a high variance and a low relapse for both jaws. The hue was not affected significantly during the treatment and the stabilization. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of the present study, the authors were able to assess the progress and efficiency of at-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide in terms of chroma, luminosity, and hue using a new methodology based on dental photography. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This new method is effective and enables a reliable analysis of the evolution of a dental bleaching treatment, turning dental photo-graphy into an even more powerful tool for analysis and communication. It can also be used as a proof-of-concept, paving the way for further research on objective monitoring and evaluation of dental treatments using dental photography.


Asunto(s)
Blanqueadores Dentales , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Humanos , Peróxido de Carbamida , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/métodos , Peróxidos/uso terapéutico , Urea/uso terapéutico , Color
8.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277346, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36395262

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This clinical trial evaluated the effect of 1.5% potassium oxalate (PO) in controlling sensitivity and color change after at-home tooth whitening. It also evaluated the influence of PO on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the degree of patient satisfaction after bleaching treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty volunteers were randomized into two groups (n = 25): At-home bleaching gel with 22% carbamide peroxide for 45 min + placebo gel (GP) or 1.5% PO (GPO) for 10 min. The intensity of tooth sensitivity was assessed daily through the visual analog scale. The color analysis was performed three times: baseline, 21 days, and 1 month after the last application of the whitening gel. The impact of the oral condition on the patient's quality of life (OIDP) was used to measure the impact caused by the whitening treatment in relation to the individuals' ability to carry out their daily activities and its influence on HRQOL. RESULTS: No difference in tooth sensitivity was observed (p > 0.05). In addition, there was no difference in color change between groups (p > 0.05). However, there was an intragroup statistical difference throughout the evaluation period (p <0.05). The OIDP analysis showed a statistical difference between the groups (p > 0.05) and there was no difference between the groups regarding the degree of satisfaction with the bleaching (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The 1.5% PO was effective in preventing sensitivity and did not interfere with tooth whitening. Desensitizing therapy had a positive impact on quality of life and patient satisfaction.


Asunto(s)
Sensibilidad de la Dentina , Blanqueadores Dentales , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Humanos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/efectos adversos , Calidad de Vida , Sensibilidad de la Dentina/tratamiento farmacológico , Blanqueadores Dentales/uso terapéutico , Ácido Oxálico , Peróxido de Hidrógeno
9.
Dental Press J Orthod ; 27(5): e2220325, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36350943

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Many patients wearing orthodontic appliances request alterations in the shade of their teeth during orthodontic treatment. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of different products for bleaching and whitening under orthodontic brackets. METHODS: Seventy bovine incisors were randomly divided into five groups (n = 14): C) non-whitening toothpaste (control); WTsi) hydrated silica whitening toothpaste; WThp) 2% hydrogen peroxide whitening toothpaste; OB) in-office bleaching; and HB) at-home bleaching. Two buccal surface areas were evaluated using the Easyshade spectrophotometer: under the metal bracket (experimental) and around the bracket (control). The paired t-test, ANOVA, and Tukey tests were applied for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Intragroup comparisons showed that in groups C, WThp and HB, there were statistically significant differences in the enamel color changes (ΔEab) between under and around the bracket areas (C - under bracket = 7.97 ± 2.35, around bracket = 2.86 ± 0.81, p< 0.01; WThp - under bracket = 4.69 ± 2.98, around bracket = 2.05 ± 1.41, p< 0.01; HB - under bracket = 7.41 ± 2.89, around bracket: 9.86 ± 3.32, p= 0.02). Groups WTsi, OB and HB presented similar perception of tooth whiteness (ΔWID) between the tested areas. Intergroup comparisons demonstrated that under the bracket area, the color change (ΔEab) was similar for all groups, except WThp (C = 7.97 ± 2.35; WTsi = 8.54 ± 3.63; WThp = 4.69 ± 2.98; OB = 9.31 ± 4.32; HB = 7.41 ± 2.89; p< 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The dental color changes were effective for the products tested in groups WTsi, OB and HB in the presence of metallic orthodontic brackets.


Asunto(s)
Soportes Ortodóncicos , Blanqueadores Dentales , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Animales , Bovinos , Humanos , Color , Esmalte Dental , Peróxido de Hidrógeno , Blanqueadores Dentales/uso terapéutico , Pastas de Dientes
10.
Oper Dent ; 47(6): 648-657, 2022 Nov 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36251542

RESUMEN

This study aimed to evaluate the influence of different dye substances on the effectiveness of bleaching and hydrogen peroxide diffusion (HO). From 300 central bovine incisors, 160 enamel/dentin disks with similar E* values were selected. The specimens were distributed according to the pigment treatment. Aiming to standardize the chromatic change provided by the different pigments, the specimens from each group remained immersed in the pigment solutions for different times (32 specimens per group): DW - distilled water (Control group); BT - black tea; CO - coffee; SD - cola-based soft drink; and RW - red wine. After pigmentation and chromatic change value analysis, only 10 specimens from each group (n=10) were selected, so the chromatic alteration of all groups was similar (ΔE=8.36±0.5). The samples were subjected to bleaching treatment and diffused peroxide was quantified in a visible ultraviolet light spectrophotometer. Two more bleaching sessions were conducted to evaluate ΔE and the Whiteness Index for Dentistry (ΔWID). Concurrently, solutions were prepared with dye agents, and the same ΔE value was obtained in the teeth (ΔE=8.49±0.5). The solutions received a standardized amount of H2O2, being analyzed by a visible ultraviolet light spectrophotometer. Data analysis comprised variance and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Higher H2O2 diffusion was observed in pigmented groups when compared with DW (p<0.05). The CO and RW groups had the highest ΔE values (p>0.05), meaning greater difficulty in responding to treatment. In relation to ΔWID, RW bleached less than the other groups after the third bleaching session (p<0.05), resembling only the SD group (p=0.467). However, 21 days after ending the bleaching treatment, only RW and CO had the lowest values (p=0.481). Analysis of the solutions revealed that only RW was altered by the peroxide (p<0.05). In conclusion, teeth pigmented with coffee and, mainly, red wine were more resistant to bleaching treatment, although all pigmentations favored increases in transenamel and transdentinal H2O2 penetration.


Asunto(s)
Blanqueadores Dentales , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Bovinos , Animales , Peróxido de Hidrógeno , Blanqueadores Dentales/farmacología , Café , Peróxidos
11.
J Dent ; 127: 104347, 2022 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36280005

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the effects of priming to consider tooth appearance (i.e. exposure to a 'tooth whitening television advert') versus control (a 'non-dental' television advert) on social judgements of tooth colour in a group of Caucasians. METHODS: Two groups of Caucasians randomly assigned to watch either a tooth-whitening advert (experimental, N = 67) or a bread advert (control, N = 62). All rated the measures of social perceptions: friendliness, popularity, social life, success, intelligence, graduation, introversion/extroversion, happiness, self-confidence, attractiveness, age-estimation and satisfaction, after watching either of the adverts and viewing three digitally modified photographs (Darkened, natural and whitened teeth) of different Caucasian adults (males and females) separately. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences for all the measures of social perception between the groups. Nevertheless, the questions that inquired about popularity, friendliness, success, intelligence, happiness, self-confidence, attractiveness and satisfaction were consistently rated higher for all three tooth shades in the experimental than the control groups. Further, within the experimental and control groups, higher ratings were given to the faces with whitened teeth than the natural and darkened teeth. CONCLUSIONS: Priming has little impact on dentally induced social judgements as this study failed to demonstrate statistically significant differences. Nevertheless, both groups gave the highest subjective ratings for the faces with whitened teeth and the tooth-whitening advert group associated the faces in the photographs with higher subjective ratings than the non-dental advert group irrespective of the tooth shade. One reason for this could be the way media affects the psychological well-being. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: The almost universal exposure to idealised tooth appearance in the media may increase demand for aesthetic treatments. Standardising the colour of the tooth plays a huge impact and making individuals to view a tooth whitening advert just prior to a procedure might influence patient choices.


Asunto(s)
Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Decoloración de Dientes , Diente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estética Dental , Juicio , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/métodos , Decoloración de Dientes/psicología
12.
Indian J Dent Res ; 33(2): 188-192, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36254958

RESUMEN

Aim: To investigate the effects of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide on the structure of tooth enamel and the role of two remineralizing agents for their potential to remineralize any damaged regions of enamel. Materials and Methods: Freshly extracted 32 mature permanent central incisors were selected and sectioned at the level of the cemento-enamel junction. The teeth were divided into four groups consisting of eight teeth each: No bleaching (control) [Group 1], bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide [Group 2], bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide followed by application of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride paste [Group 3], and bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide followed by application of xylitol-coated calcium phosphate fluoride varnish [Group 4]. The enamel surfaces were analyzed under the scanning electron microscope and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Results: Results were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's posthoc test. Group 2 revealed changes in enamel surface morphology and a statistically significant decrease in mineral content. Groups 3 and 4 showed statistically significant remineralization potential. Intergroup comparison showed that samples in Group 4 had a higher mineral content compared to Group 3. Conclusions: The application of the tested remineralizing agents following bleaching was effective in repairing the enamel surface morphology with higher efficacy for the fluoride varnish product. Since bleaching regimes with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide adversely affect the enamel surface, these findings can translate to clinical practice to reduce the long-term damaging effects of tooth bleaching.


Asunto(s)
Blanqueadores Dentales , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Fosfatos de Calcio/farmacología , Caseínas/farmacología , Esmalte Dental , Fluoruros/farmacología , Fluoruros Tópicos/farmacología , Peróxido de Hidrógeno/farmacología , Minerales , Fosfopéptidos/farmacología , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/métodos , Blanqueadores Dentales/farmacología , Remineralización Dental/métodos , Xilitol/farmacología
14.
Compend Contin Educ Dent ; 43(9): 612-615, 2022 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36227134

RESUMEN

With society trending toward the avoidance of artificial components, so-called "natural" products have been gaining space and people's attention in recent years. Activated charcoal-based dental products are a prominent example of this movement because of their promise of removal of extrinsic stains or whitening of teeth by a natural means. Such products have gained popularity among patients, and companies have explored this market, launching charcoal-based and activated charcoal-based dentifrices, mouthrinses, toothbrushes, and whitening products that can be easily found at nearby stores and on the internet.1.


Asunto(s)
Dentífricos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Decoloración de Dientes , Carbón Orgánico/uso terapéutico , Humanos , Cepillado Dental/efectos adversos
15.
J Esthet Restor Dent ; 34(8): 1290-1299, 2022 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36205242

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assessed in vitro the effect of nanohydroxyapatite (n-HA) to improve the aesthetic appearance and microhardness of white spot lesions (WSL) when associated with a low-concentration bleaching agent (carbamide peroxide-CP10%). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Enamel/dentin specimens (n = 60) of 5 × 5 × 2.2 mm were prepared, of these, 48 were submitted to pH-cycling to create artificial WSL. Subsequently, these were allocated into five groups (n = 12): n-HA; n-HA + CP10%; CP10%; WSL control (WSLC ); sound control (Sound). The color was assessed at baseline, pre-treatment, and post-treatment using a spectrophotometer, and the color (ΔE/ΔE00 ) and whiteness index (ΔWID) alterations were determined. The enamel cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH) was evaluated (post-treatment) with a Knoop indenter, 25gf/5 s, 20-200 µm. The data was analyzed through generalized linear models (α = 5%). RESULTS: ΔE and ΔE00 were significantly higher for the bleached groups (n-HA + CP10% and CP10%), and the n-HA was higher than the WSLC group (p < 0.05). ΔWID was significantly higher for the bleached groups (p < 0.05). The CSMH values were significantly higher in the sound group than in the n-HA, CP10%, and WSLC groups (p < 0.05). The WSLC had lower microhardness than the n-HA + CP10% and sound groups (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: n-HA is suitable to remineralize and recover the color of the WSL. However, its association with CP10% maintains the esthetical outcome while increasing its in-depth remineralizing effect. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Considering the aesthetic and functional repercussions of the WSL persistence, treatments that tend to improve its physical appearance and reinforce its weakened substructure in a non-invasive way are ideal. For this associating low-concentration, bleaching agents to the remineralizing treatments is promising to treat this type of lesions.


Asunto(s)
Caries Dental , Blanqueadores Dentales , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Humanos , Peróxido de Carbamida , Durapatita , Peróxidos , Urea , Peróxido de Hidrógeno/farmacología
16.
Eur J Med Res ; 27(1): 194, 2022 Oct 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36195927

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bioactive glass (BAG) 45S5 paste on colour change and tooth sensitivity (TS) when used in combination with 20% carbamide peroxide (CP) during at-home vital tooth bleaching. METHODS: Twenty-four patients were selected and assigned into two experimental groups (n = 12) in a double-blind study design. Each patient received 20% CP followed by the application of either BAG paste or non-active placebo paste. The shade evaluation was performed using a digital spectrophotometer based on the CIE L*a*b* colour space system at different time points and the overall colour changes ΔE were calculated. TS was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). The values of ΔE and TS were statistically analysed using paired t-test. The level of statistical significance was established at p = 0.05. RESULTS: The overall colour changes (ΔE) between baseline and each time point showed no significant differences between BAG and placebo groups (p > 0.05). The use of BAG paste significantly decreased TS reported by the participants. CONCLUSIONS: The association of BAG paste with at-home bleaching treatment presents a promising method as it decreased TS and did not deteriorate bleaching efficacy. Trial registration This study was approved and registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) under Registration number: ACTRN12621001334897.


Asunto(s)
Sensibilidad de la Dentina , Blanqueadores Dentales , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Australia , Peróxido de Carbamida , Humanos , Peróxidos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/efectos adversos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/métodos , Resultado del Tratamiento , Urea
17.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(17)2022 Sep 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36081093

RESUMEN

Titanium(IV) solutions are known to detect hydrogen peroxide in solutions by a colorimetric method. Xplosafe's XploSens PS commercial titanium(IV)-based peroxide detection test strips are used to detect hydrogen peroxide in liquids. The use of these test strips as gas-phase detectors for peroxides was tested using low-cost hardware. The exposure of these strips to hydrogen peroxide liquid or gas leads to the development of an intense yellow color. For liquids, a digital single-lens reflex camera was used to quantify the color change using standardized solutions containing between 50 and 500 ppm peroxide by mass. Analysis of the images with color separation can provide a more quantitative determination than visual comparison to a color chart. For hydrogen peroxide gas, an inexpensive web camera and a tungsten lamp were used to measure the reflected light intensity as a function of exposure from a test strip held in a custom cell. First-order behavior in the color change with time was observed during the exposure to peroxide vapor over a range of peroxide concentrations from 2 and 30 ppm by volume. For a 1-min measurement, the gas-phase detection limit is estimated to be 1 ppm. A 0.01 ppm detection limit can be obtained with a 1-h exposure time. Titanium(IV)-based peroxide detection test strips are sensitive enough to work as a gas-phase hydrogen peroxide detector.


Asunto(s)
Peróxido de Hidrógeno , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Gases , Peróxido de Hidrógeno/análisis , Oxidantes , Peróxidos , Titanio , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/métodos
18.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 2805343, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36065254

RESUMEN

Objective: This study is aimed at determining two main points. First, if the Canary System™ (CS), initially used to assess caries, can measure a decalcification depth of bleached enamel quantitatively, and second, whether or not whitening has a harmful effect on enamel. This device can be considered a useful tool in the clinical assessment of the progression of demineralization after bleaching. Materials and Methods: This study collected sixty human premolars that are in a good state recently extracted for orthodontic reason. To properly disinfect and preserve the premolars, they were stored in a saline solution and later in distilled water for a period of two weeks to allow the premolars to rehydrate. Later, 24 hours before the experiment, the premolars were introduced into a solution of artificial saliva to acquire back their minerals. The mineral content of the teeth was measured by the Canary System™ before bleaching. The teeth were bleached with 30% hydrogen peroxide (fläsh HP 30%), 30 min per week and for 3 consecutive weeks to simulate the conditions of strong bleaching in the clinic. The extent of demineralized enamel was measured by the Canary System™ at three points on the enamel surface of each tooth. The data were averaged for each application of the bleaching product. The demineralization extent of the teeth was measured by the Canary System™ before and after bleaching. The significance level was set at 0.05, and SPSS version 26 was used. The data were analyzed by using Wilcoxon's and Student's tests. Results: Mineral loss occurred after the first bleaching session; the Canary System™ detected a decalcification in the first bleaching session (532 ± 322 µm) compared to the other sessions (p ≤ 0.05), while no significant change was detected between the second and the third sessions (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, under in vitro conditions, it was possible to measure the demineralization extent of bleached enamel with the Canary System™.


Asunto(s)
Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Esmalte Dental , Humanos , Peróxido de Hidrógeno , Ácido Hipocloroso , Minerales , Saliva Artificial , Compuestos de Sodio , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/efectos adversos
19.
Oper Dent ; 47(5): 492-502, 2022 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36121729

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To compare the risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity (TS) as well the effectiveness of at-home bleaching using two carbamide peroxide bleaching gels, specifically a novel polymeric nanoparticle gel (experimental) and a commercial gel (Opalescence PF, Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah, USA), applied at two application times. METHODS: This multicenter, triple-blind, and split-mouth randomized controlled trial was conducted on 80 healthy adults with canine teeth that were shade A2 or darker. The participants all used the experimental and the control gels on one side of a tray, depending on the group to which they were allocated, for 30 or 60 minutes per day over four weeks. The absolute risk and intensity of TS were assessed daily using the five-point Numeric Rating Scale and the 0-10 Visual Analogue Scale. Color change was evaluated with shade guide units (ΔSGU) and a digital spectrophotometer (ΔEab, ΔE00, and ΔWid) at baseline and 30 days postbleaching. The risk and intensity of TS was evaluated by the McNemar and the Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, respectively. Color change (ΔSGU, ΔEab, ΔE00, and ΔWid) was evaluated by Mann-Whitney and paired t-tests (α=0.05). RESULTS: No differences in the risk and intensity of TS were observed based on the bleaching gels used and the times of application (p>0.05). Thirty days after bleaching, there was no significant difference in color change, in terms of the bleaching gels used or the application times (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: The novel carbamide peroxide polymeric nanoparticles gel, when applied for 30 or 60 minutes, produced effective color change and a low rate of tooth sensitivity, as compared to the control group.


Asunto(s)
Sensibilidad de la Dentina , Nanopartículas , Blanqueadores Dentales , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Peróxido de Carbamida , Geles , Humanos , Peróxido de Hidrógeno , Blanqueadores Dentales/uso terapéutico , Resultado del Tratamiento
20.
J Esthet Restor Dent ; 34(8): 1263-1271, 2022 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36125103

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Our randomized, parallel and single-blinded clinical trial evaluated patient level of discomfort during at-home bleaching testing the equivalence between two different protocols for the use of bleaching trays (simultaneous vs. single arch), as well as tooth sensitivity (TS), gingival irritation, (GI) and bleaching efficacy (BE). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We randomized 100 patients into: simultaneous (n = 50) and single arch (n = 50). At-home bleaching was performed with 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP) for 2 weeks for simultaneous group and 4 weeks for single arch group. We assessed patient level of discomfort using 9-item questionnaire. The TS and GI, as well as BE using spectrophotometer and color guide were assessed using the visual analog scale (0-10). Data from level of discomfort and BE were evaluated by Student's t test. The TS and GI were compared using the relative risk and confidence interval (α = 0.05). RESULTS: Only tray adaptation showed a significant effect after the second week (p < 0.002). There was equivalence between groups for level of discomfort (p < 0.01). We found no significant intergroup differences for the risk of TS or GI, nor for intensity. We observed no significant differences between them regarding bleaching efficacy (p > 0.21). CONCLUSIONS: A simultaneous-use protocol for customized at-home dental bleaching trays proved to be equivalent to using single arch for patient level of discomfort and bleaching efficacy, with no significant increase in adverse effects. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Clinicians may decide whether to use a simultaneous or single arch protocol for tray usage; however, bleaching was achieved more quickly when the trays were worn simultaneously.


Asunto(s)
Sensibilidad de la Dentina , Blanqueadores Dentales , Blanqueamiento de Dientes , Humanos , Blanqueadores Dentales/efectos adversos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/efectos adversos , Blanqueamiento de Dientes/métodos , Satisfacción del Paciente , Sensibilidad de la Dentina/inducido químicamente , Peróxido de Hidrógeno
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