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1.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc16, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33659621

RESUMEN

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic hit the German education system unexpectedly and forced its universities to shift to Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT). The Data Integration Center (DIC) of the University Hospital Magdeburg and the Institute of Biometry and Medical Informatics (IBMI) has developed a concept based on existing structures that can be quickly implemented and used by the Medical Faculty at Otto von Guericke University. This manuscript focuses on the IT support for lecturers, which allows them to concentrate on teaching their lessons, although the authors are aware that this is only a small part of the entire subject. Additionally, there is a great awareness that ERT can never replace well-structured in-person classes. Concept: The key feature of the concept uses the well-working management system for all physical rooms of the university by designing a virtual video conference room for every physical room. This allows high interactivity for lectures and seminars while applying proven teaching methods. Additionally, a collaboration software system to document all lessons learned and a technical support team have been available for the teaching staff. Courses with a hands-on approach require more personal interaction than lectures. Therefore, the issues of practical trainings have not been solved with this concept, but been tackled by using questionnaires and minimizing contacts during attestations. Applied IT tools: The concept's requirements were met by Zoom Meetings, Confluence, HIS/LSF and Moodle. Discussion and Conclusion: The concept helped the lecturers to provide high-quality teaching for students at universities. Additionally, it allows for a dynamic response to new needs and problems. The concept will be reviewed as part of a higher Universal Design for Learning concept and may support lecturers in the following semesters in hybrid meetings with real and virtual attendees.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación Médica/organización & administración , Docentes Médicos/organización & administración , /normas , Humanos , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Pandemias
3.
Lancet Glob Health ; 9(3): e320-e330, 2021 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33607030

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The rate of diagnostic testing for malaria is still very low in Nigeria despite the scale-up of malaria rapid diagnostic test (MRDT) availability, following WHO's recommendation of universal diagnostic testing in 2010. We investigated whether a social group sensitisation and education intervention (social group intervention) and a social group intervention plus health-care provider training intervention would increase the demand (use or request, or both) for MRDTs among community members in Ebonyi state, Nigeria. METHODS: We did a three-arm, parallel, open-label, stratified cluster-randomised controlled trial in Ebonyi state, Nigeria, to evaluate the effects of two interventions compared with a control. We randomly assigned geographical clusters that were accessible (close to a road that was drivable even during the rainy seasons) and had at least one eligible public primary health facility and patent medicine vendor (those that offered MRDT services) in a 1:1:1 allocation to the control arm (receiving no intervention), social group arm (receiving sensitisation and education about MRDT), or social group plus provider arm (receiving the social group intervention plus provider training in health communication about MRDT). Investigators, participants (social groups, providers, respondents), and interviewers could not be masked to group assignments. The primary outcome was the proportion of children younger than 5 years with fever or malaria-like illness, in the 2 weeks preceding a household survey, who received an MRDT, and the coprimary outcome was the same outcome but among children aged 5 years and older (ie, up to and including 17 years) and adults (excluding pregnant women). The outcomes were measured at an individual level via household surveys before the interventions and 3 months after the end of the interventions. All analyses were done using a cluster-level method on an intention-to-treat basis. This trial is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN14046444. FINDINGS: We carried out eligibility screening and recruitment of participants (clusters, social groups, and providers) between July 2 and Sept 27, 2018. 34 clusters met the eligibility criteria and 18 were randomly selected to participate and randomly assigned to arms (six clusters per arm). A mean proportion of 40·6% (SD 14·5) of eligible children younger than 5 years in the control arm received an MRDT, versus 66·7% (11·7) in the social group arm (adjusted risk difference [aRD] 28·8%, 95% CI 21·9-35·7, p<0·0001) and 71·7% (19·8) in the social group plus provider arm (aRD 32·7%, 24·9-40·5, p<0·0001), with no significant difference between the social group arm and the social group plus provider arm. A mean proportion of 36·3% (18·5) of eligible children aged 5 years and older in the control arm received an MRDT, versus 60·7% (14·0) in the social group arm (aRD 25·6%, 16·8-34·4, p=0·0004), and 59·5% (18·3) in the social group plus provider arm (aRD 28·0%, 19·5-36·5, p=0·0002), with no significant difference between the social group arm and the social group plus provider arm. INTERPRETATION: The sensitisation and education of social groups about MRDTs can significantly increase the demand for MRDTs. This intervention is pragmatic and could be applied within malaria control or elimination programmes, in Nigeria and in other high-burden countries, to enhance diagnostic testing for patients suspected of having malaria. FUNDING: There was no funding source for this study.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Salud/organización & administración , Personal de Salud/educación , Necesidades y Demandas de Servicios de Salud/organización & administración , Malaria/diagnóstico , Pruebas en el Punto de Atención , Adolescente , Adulto , Antimaláricos , Niño , Preescolar , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Masculino , Técnicas Microbiológicas , Nigeria , Factores de Tiempo , Adulto Joven
4.
Soc Work Health Care ; 60(1): 49-61, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33557718

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the systemic inequities in our health care system and society has called for actions to meet the clinical, psychosocial and educational needs in health care settings and communities. In this paper we describe how an organized Department of Health Social Work in a medical school played a unique role in responding to the challenges of a pandemic with community, clinical, and educational initiatives that were integral to our community's health.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Liderazgo , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Servicio Social/organización & administración , Desgaste por Empatía/epidemiología , Abastecimiento de Alimentos/métodos , Estado de Salud , Líneas Directas/organización & administración , Humanos , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Salud Mental , Cuidados Paliativos/organización & administración , Pandemias , Telemedicina/organización & administración , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
5.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(2): 95-100, 2021 Feb 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33449599

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The nursing professional development department purchased technology to create an innovative structure to engage nurses in educational offerings. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of incorporating gamification on knowledge acquisition. BACKGROUND: Nursing administrators should support the use of gamification to improve the nurses' acquisition of knowledge. The clinical educators traditionally utilize lecture-based educational offerings preventing students from active participation. Gamification promotes learner engagement, critical thinking, and enjoyment. METHODS: A quasi-experimental study design with a 230-person convenience sample compared the knowledge acquisition of nurses before and after new hire orientation and basic electrocardiogram course. Technology purchased included iPad, GoPro, mobile apps, and websites. RESULTS: Incorporating gamification technology resulted in an increase in knowledge acquisition and engagement of learners. CONCLUSION: Findings demonstrate gamification as an effective way to increase knowledge acquisition when compared with traditional methods.


Asunto(s)
Juegos Experimentales , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/educación , Entrenamiento Simulado/organización & administración , Competencia Clínica , Electrocardiografía/enfermería , Humanos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Pensamiento
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(2): e23670, 2021 Jan 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33466122

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: Patient safety is a fundamental aspect of a healthcare system. The aim of this study was to assess the perception and determinants of the patient safety culture of pharmacists in hospitals, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.A survey was conducted with pharmacists in the pharmacies of governmental, /military and private hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The pharmacy survey on patient safety culture questionnaire developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Qualtity, a hard copy was distriuted to the pharmacists. The positive response rate (RR) was calculated and compared across hospitals using a chi-square test. The predictors of patient safety grades were identified using the generalized estimating equation. The data was analyzed using SAS.A total of 538 questionnaires were distributed, of which 411 responded (RR 76.4%). Of the participants, 229 (56%) were females. The majority 255 (62%) were in the 18 to 34 years age range, and 361 (88%) had a bachelor's degree. The majority of the sample 376 (92%) was a pharmacist. The Positive RR (PRR) ranged between (25.6%-74%). The highest PRR was observed in teamwork (74.4%), followed by 'staff, training and skills' (68%), and 'organizational learning continuous improvement' (66%). The lowest PRR was observed in 'staffing, work pressure, and pace' (25.5%). Comparing the PPR of the various healthcare sectors, the governmental hospitals scored the highest in all patient safety domains. Generalized Estimating Equation analysis showed that with increase in scores of all patient safety culture domains increased the likelihood of reporting a better patient safety grade, whereas respondents' demographic characteristics had no effect except the working experience years 6 years and above had odds of poor reporting of the patient safety grade (odds ratio = 2.54, 95% confience interval (1.543, 4.194), (P = .0003).The grades achieved in the various domains of patient safety culture by pharmacists in Riyadh are below the expected standard. The highest scores were achieved in teamwork, with the lowest scores in staffing, work pressure and pace. Overall, pharmacists in government hospital settings have a better perception of patient safety than their peers in other settings. These results provide the baseline evidence for developing future interventional studies aiming at improving patient safety culture in hospital pharmacy settings.


Asunto(s)
Cultura Organizacional , Seguridad del Paciente/normas , Farmacéuticos/psicología , Administración de la Seguridad/organización & administración , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Comunicación , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Masculino , Errores de Medicación/prevención & control , Persona de Mediana Edad , Admisión y Programación de Personal/organización & administración , Mejoramiento de la Calidad/organización & administración , Administración de la Seguridad/normas , Arabia Saudita , Carga de Trabajo , Adulto Joven
8.
Public Health Rep ; 136(1): 39-46, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33216679

RESUMEN

Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) at the University of New Mexico is a telementoring program that uses videoconferencing technology to connect health care providers in underserved communities with subject matter experts. In March 2020, Project ECHO created 10 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) telementoring programs to meet the public health needs of clinicians and teachers living in underserved rural and urban regions of New Mexico. The newly created COVID-19 programs include 7 weekly sessions (Community Health Worker [in English and Spanish], Critical Care, Education, First-Responder Resiliency, Infectious Disease Office Hours, and Multi-specialty) and 3 one-day special sessions. We calculated the total number of attendees, along with the range and standard deviation, per session by program. Certain programs (Critical Care, Infectious Disease Office Hours, Multi-specialty) recorded the profession of attendees when available. The Project ECHO research team collected COVID-19 infection data by county from March 11 through May 31, 2020. During that same period, 9765 health care and general education professionals participated in the COVID-19 programs, and participants from 31 of 35 (89%) counties in New Mexico attended the sessions. Our initial evaluation of these programs demonstrates that an interprofessional clinician group and teachers used the Project ECHO network to build a community of practice and social network while meeting their educational and professional needs. Because of Project ECHO's large reach, the results of the New Mexico COVID-19 response suggest that the rapid use of ECHO telementoring could be used for other urgent national public health problems.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/organización & administración , Personal de Salud/educación , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Tutoría/organización & administración , Población Rural , Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/normas , Agentes Comunitarios de Salud/educación , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Personal de Salud/psicología , Humanos , Área sin Atención Médica , Servicios de Salud Mental/organización & administración , New Mexico/epidemiología , Pandemias , Resiliencia Psicológica , Telemedicina , Población Urbana , Comunicación por Videocoferencia
10.
Pediatrics ; 146(Suppl 2): S218-S222, 2020 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33004643

RESUMEN

Data from the past decade have revealed that neonatal mortality represents a growing burden of the under-5 mortality rate. To further reduce these deaths, the focus must expand to include building capacity of the workforce to provide high-quality obstetric and intrapartum care. Obstetric complications, such as hypertensive disorders and obstructed labor, are significant contributors to neonatal morbidity and mortality. A well-prepared workforce with the necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes, and motivation is required to rapidly detect and manage these complications to save both maternal and newborn lives. Traditional off-site, didactic, and lengthy training approaches have not always yielded the desired results. Helping Mothers Survive training was modeled after Helping Babies Breathe and incorporates further evidence-based methodology to deliver training on-site to the entire team of providers, who continue to practice after training with their peers. Research has revealed that significant gains in health outcomes can be reached by using this approach. In the coronavirus disease 2019 era, we must look to translate the best practices of these training programs into a flexible and sustainable model that can be delivered remotely to maintain quality services to women and their newborns.


Asunto(s)
Personal de Salud/educación , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Atención Perinatal/organización & administración , Creación de Capacidad , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Mortalidad Infantil , Recién Nacido , Servicios de Salud Materno-Infantil/organización & administración , Atención Perinatal/normas , Embarazo , Complicaciones del Embarazo/prevención & control , Complicaciones del Embarazo/terapia
12.
Simul Healthc ; 15(5): 303-309, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32910106

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Working under extreme stress can cause medical professionals to deviate from clinical guidelines even if they know of their existence, let alone in situations such as COVID-19 where guidelines are unclear, fluid, and resources limited. In situ simulation has been proven an effective tool for training medical professionals during previous healthcare crises, eg, Ebola, influenza, as well as for assessing the preparedness of centers by identifying potential latent safety threats. In this article, we describe our ongoing simulation activities to ensure that our staff is best prepared to adapt to the challenges of COVID-19. METHODS: This is a prospective preparedness assessment and training intervention at a tertiary care academic center in Lebanon during the COVID-19 pandemic. In situ simulations followed by debriefing with good judgment occur daily involving native teams of 3 to 5 professionals in the newly established COVID intensive care unit and wards, the adult and pediatric intensive care unit and wards, and the emergency department. The simulations are assessed by the instructor using the Simulation Team Assessment Tool and by the participants using the Simulation Effectiveness Tool. Transcripts of recorded simulation debriefings are analyzed for content for latent safety threats using the SHELL Framework (Software-Hardware-Equipment-Liveware). RESULTS: In 2 weeks, we conducted 15 simulations with 106 participants and 47 observers. Simulation Team Assessment Tool scores show an overall improvement across the hospital over time [101.5 ± 13 (80-134)]. Participants' feedback on the Simulation Effectiveness Tool has been predominantly positive on the educational and practical benefits of the simulation activity. Data from debriefings and observations demonstrated the following categories of latent safety threats: inadequate preparedness on infection control, uncertainty of guidelines on oxygen supplementation and intubation protocols, lack of leadership and communication, overall panic, and others. CONCLUSIONS: Our single-center preparedness intervention demonstrated multiple latent safety threats in relation to COVID-19, which can be recognized through simulation before translating into actual patient care.


Asunto(s)
Centros Médicos Académicos/organización & administración , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Personal de Salud/educación , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Entrenamiento Simulado/organización & administración , Manejo de la Vía Aérea/métodos , Betacoronavirus , Comunicación , Humanos , Control de Infecciones , Liderazgo , Líbano/epidemiología , Pandemias , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Estudios Prospectivos
14.
15.
Public Health Rep ; 135(1_suppl): 50S-56S, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32735197

RESUMEN

In 2014, California passed Assembly Bill 966, which required condom access for persons incarcerated in all 35 California state prisons (33 men's and 2 women's prisons). The California Correctional Health Care Services and the Sexually Transmitted Disease Control Branch and the Office of AIDS of the California Department of Public Health collaborated in a prison administration-led multidisciplinary implementation workgroup. Our workgroup, representing public health, correctional health, legal and legislative affairs, labor relations, and prison staff members, participated in 4 planning meetings during May-September 2015. We surveyed prison staff members and incarcerated men to identify and address potential challenges; conceptualized a tamper-resistant condom dispenser; developed educational materials, frequently asked questions for staff members, and fact sheets for the public; and conducted forums for custody and medical staff members at each prison. Key lessons learned included the need for high-level custody support, engagement of labor unions early in the decision-making process, and flexibility within defined parameters for sites to determine best practices given their unique institutional population, culture, and physical layout. Condom access was initiated at 4 prisons in July 2015 and expanded incrementally to the remaining 29 men's prisons through July 2016. A total of 243 563 condoms were accessed in the men's prisons, for an average of 354 condoms per 1000 population per month. The start-up dispenser cost was $69 825 (735 dispensers at $95 each). We estimated an annual condom cost of $0.60 per person. Although staff members and incarcerated men expressed concern that this legislation would condone sex and provide repositories for contraband, no serious adverse incidents involving condoms were reported. California demonstrated that condom access is a safe, low-cost intervention with high uptake for a large correctional system and provided a replicable implementation model for other states. Prison condom programs have the potential to decrease transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among incarcerated persons and their communities, which are often disproportionately affected by STIs, HIV, and other chronic diseases.


Asunto(s)
Condones/provisión & distribución , Prisiones/organización & administración , Salud Pública , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual/prevención & control , California/epidemiología , Técnicas de Apoyo para la Decisión , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/epidemiología , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Educación en Salud/organización & administración , Humanos , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Sindicatos/organización & administración , Masculino , Prisiones/economía , Prisiones/normas , Desarrollo de Programa , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual/epidemiología
16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32806769

RESUMEN

We aimed to investigate the management of urgent dental care, the perception of risk and workplace preparedness among dental staff in Norway during the COVID-19 pandemic. An electronic questionnaire regarding the strictest confinement period in Norway (13 March-17 April 2020) was distributed to dental staff. Among the 1237 respondents, 727 (59%) treated patients, of whom 170 (14%) worked in clinics designated to treat patients suspected or confirmed to have COVID-19. Out of them 88% (143) received training and 64% (103) simulation in additional infection prevention procedures, while 27 (24%) respondents reported deviation. In total, 1051 (85%) respondents perceived that dental staff had a high risk of being infected, 1039 (84%) that their workplace handled the current situation well, 767 (62%) that their workplace had adequate infection control equipment and 507 (41%) agreed that their workplace is well equipped to handle an escalation. Before an appointment, 1182 (96%) respondents always/often inquired per phone information if a patient experienced symptoms of COVID-19, and 1104 (89%) asked about a history of travel to affected areas. Twice as many patients on average per week were treated by phone than in a clinic. A lower proportion of dental staff in high incidence counties applied additional infection prevention measures compared to low and medium incidence counties. To conclude, urgent dental health care was managed relatively well in Norway. Additional training of the dental staff in adequate infection prevention and step-by-step procedures may be needed. These results may be used to improve the dental health service's response to future outbreaks.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Servicios de Salud Dental/organización & administración , Control de Infecciones/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Estudios Transversales , Servicios de Salud Dental/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Control de Infecciones/normas , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Noruega/epidemiología , Pandemias , Medición de Riesgo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Telemedicina/organización & administración , Teléfono , Lugar de Trabajo/organización & administración
17.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 43(4): 428-450, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32833779

RESUMEN

COVID-19 created an environment that required rapid implementation of procedures and processes to minimize transmission. This led to an urgent response from the Department of Professional Practice and Education to implement education to a large number of personnel. This article describes strategies and methods employed to meet the training demands at a time when resources and supplies were limited. This study aims at developing and implementing education on infection prevention and management of patients with suspected or known COVID-19 for the nursing staff providing care. Following guidelines from the hospital's COVID-19 oversight committee, the Department of Professional Practice and Education rapidly initiated education on several key topics. This was accomplished by teamwork within the department to quickly identify priorities and suspend noncritical programs. Multiple training methods were deployed while a smaller group of educators developed additional training. Sixty to seventy percent of 1015 staff were trained within 6 days. Soon after, several additional educational topics were identified and training was concluded over a 3-week period. Training can be provided on an urgent basis with the use of multiple educational methods, suspension of noncritical programs, and teamwork. A smaller committee within the department allows for concentrated efforts in the design of additional training.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/enfermería , Educación en Enfermería/organización & administración , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Evaluación de Necesidades , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/educación , Neumonía Viral/enfermería , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Humanos , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología
18.
J Aging Soc Policy ; 32(4-5): 471-476, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32436446

RESUMEN

The rapid spread of COVID-19 has left many workers around the world - workers in food distribution, truckers, janitors, and home and personal health care workers - deeply concerned about contracting the virus from exposure at work. In particular, older workers in frontline occupations are vulnerable to illness and to the deadly and debilitating effects of COVID-19, especially with inadequate protective gear and inadequate sick leave. In the absence of strong unions, which ensure that employers provide workers with accurate information, robust training, adequate equipment, and paid leave in the event of quarantines or illness, the COVID-19 pandemic highlights the need for additional legislation to shore up worker protections and provide paid sick leave.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Ausencia por Enfermedad/estadística & datos numéricos , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Humanos , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Equipos de Seguridad/provisión & distribución
19.
Emerg Med J ; 37(7): 407-410, 2020 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32467156

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 outbreak has posed unique challenges to the emergency department rostering. Additional infection control, the possibility of quarantine of staff and minimising contact among staff have significant impact on the work of doctors in the emergency department. Infection of a single healthcare worker may require quarantine of close contacts at work. This may thus affect a potentially large number of staff. As such, we developed an Outbreak Response Roster. This Outbreak Response Roster had fixed teams of doctors working in rotation, each team that staff the emergency department in turn. Members within teams remained constant and were near equally balanced in terms of manpower and seniority of doctors. Each team worked fixed 12 hours shifts with as no overlapping of staff or staggering of shifts. Handovers between shifts were kept as brief as possible. All these were measures to limit interactions among healthcare workers. With the implementation of the roster, measures were also taken to bolster the psychological wellness of healthcare workers. With face-to-face contact limited, we also had to maintain clear, open channels for communication through technology and continue educating residents through innovative means.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/terapia , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/organización & administración , Transmisión de Enfermedad Infecciosa de Paciente a Profesional/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/terapia , Betacoronavirus , Agotamiento Profesional/prevención & control , Comunicación , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Brotes de Enfermedades , Personal de Salud/organización & administración , Personal de Salud/psicología , Humanos , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Pandemias/prevención & control , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Pase de Guardia/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Singapur , Factores de Tiempo , Flujo de Trabajo
20.
J Nurs Adm ; 50(4): 185-186, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32195910

RESUMEN

Despite increased onboarding and training for new graduate RNs, it is taking longer for nurses to develop clinical competence in today's complex care environment. At the same time, hospitals and health systems are facing a shortage of experienced nurses. If left unaddressed, patient quality and safety could be at risk.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Capacitación en Servicio/organización & administración , Mentores , Rol de la Enfermera , Bachillerato en Enfermería , Humanos
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