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1.
Acad Med ; 95(12S Addressing Harmful Bias and Eliminating Discrimination in Health Professions Learning Environments): S163-S168, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33229958

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Faculty from different racial and ethnic backgrounds developed and piloted an antiracism curriculum initially designed to help medical students work more effectively with patients of color. Learning objectives included developing stronger therapeutic relationships, addressing the effects of structural racism in the lives of patients, and mitigating racism in the medical encounter. METHOD: The antiracism curriculum was delivered and evaluated in 2019 through focus groups and written input before and after each module. The process and outcome evaluation used a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Three emergent themes reflect how medical students experienced the antiracism curriculum and inform recommendations for integrating an antiracism curriculum into future medical education. The themes are: 1) the differential needs and experiences of persons of color and Whites, 2) the need to address issues of racism within medical education as well as in medical care, and 3) the need for structures of accountability in medical education. CONCLUSIONS: Medical educators must address racism in medical education before seeking to direct students to address it in medical practice.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/educación , Racismo/prevención & control , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Curriculum/normas , Curriculum/tendencias , Humanos , Racismo/psicología , Racismo/estadística & datos numéricos , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Facultades de Medicina/normas , Facultades de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud/etnología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos
2.
Acad Med ; 95(12S Addressing Harmful Bias and Eliminating Discrimination in Health Professions Learning Environments): S113-S120, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32889922

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To assess graduate nursing students' lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-specific health competencies. METHOD: Using a cross-sectional design, a 13-item multiple response survey, derived from The Joint Commission guidelines and LGBT health competencies proposed by the Association of American Medical Colleges, was administered online to 116 registered nurses enrolled in graduate study. Survey items assessed nurses' knowledge of LGBT health, professionalism, provision of patient care, communication skills, care environment, gaps in learning, and systems-based practice. Descriptive analyses were used to summarize frequencies and proportions of study variables. RESULTS: Respondent nurses' knowledge about health, prevalent conditions, and social factors that influence LGBT health was somewhat limited. Respondents did not rate their knowledge about LGBT health high (µ = 3.11 [1.1], median = 3) and did not feel qualified to educate other colleagues about LGBT health issues (µ = 2.43 [1.26], median = 2). But 58% (n = 65) indicated that they felt comfortable performing prostate exams on transgender female patients (born with male genitalia); 62% (n = 70) felt comfortable doing pap smears for transgender male patients (born with female genitalia). Sixty nurses (52%) stated that they would advocate reforms within existing health care institutions to improve the care of LGBT patients. Cultural competency training was offered in some health care settings and environmental indications of inclusivity were inconsistent. CONCLUSIONS: LGBT health competence among graduate nursing students was limited. There is a need to reevaluate LGBT health-related content in nursing curricula as well as robust assessment of competence in LGBT health.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería/normas , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/psicología , Minorías Sexuales y de Género/educación , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Estudios Transversales , Competencia Cultural/educación , Competencia Cultural/psicología , Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería/métodos , Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería/tendencias , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/estadística & datos numéricos , Minorías Sexuales y de Género/psicología , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Estudiantes de Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
3.
Gac. méd. espirit ; 22(2): 84-100, mayo.-ago. 2020.
Artículo en Español | LILACS | ID: biblio-1124838

RESUMEN

RESUMEN Fundamento: La práctica de la educación intercultural en Cuba es un campo disciplinar que demanda mayor preparación en el modo de actuación profesional de los docentes universitarios. Objetivo: Construir un programa de preparación, centrado en la solución de conflictos, para perfeccionar el modo de actuación profesional de los docentes universitarios para la educación intercultural. Metodología: Se realizó una investigación en la Universidad de Sancti Spíritus José Martí Pérez, en la que se utilizó la metodología cualitativa basada en el estudio de caso del modo de actuación profesional de los docentes para la educación intercultural. Resultados: El diagnóstico pedagógico integral no se tuvo en cuenta para la identificación y solución de los conflictos interculturales, dependiendo del estatus de igualdad grupal alcanzado. La preparación en educación intercultural, centrada en la solución de conflictos, demostró la efectividad de trabajar en correspondencia al sistema de acciones propias de la dirección del proceso pedagógico. Conclusiones: El programa de preparación permitió reconocer la validez de la experiencia pedagógica practicada, así como la pertinencia de otras perspectivas foráneas compatibles y el manejo conceptual de los principios y competencias para la educación intercultural.


ABSTRACT Background: The practice of intercultural education in Cuba is a disciplinary field that requires greater preparation in the professional way of acting of university teachers. Objective: To build a preparation program, focused on conflicts resolution, to improve the professional performance of university teachers for intercultural education. Methodology: An investigation was carried out at the University of Sancti Spíritus José Martí Pérez, using the qualitative methodology based on the case study of the professional performance of teachers for intercultural education. Results: The comprehensive pedagogical diagnosis was not taken into account for the identification and solution of intercultural conflicts, depending on the group equality status achieved. The preparation in intercultural education, focused on conflict resolution, demonstrated the effectiveness of working in correspondence with the system of actions proper to the direction of the pedagogical process. Conclusions: The preparation program allowed to recognize the validity of the pedagogical experience practiced, as well as the relevance of other compatible foreign perspectives and the conceptual handling of the principles and competences for intercultural education.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Profesional , Educación Profesional/métodos , Competencia Cultural/educación , Desarrollo de Programa , Educación Superior
5.
J Gerontol Soc Work ; 63(5): 464-477, 2020 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32449479

RESUMEN

Supportive housing later in life tends to be a key concern for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) elders. Most senior care providers are un(der)prepared to meet the needs of older LGBT adults. This study evaluated the efficacy of a 4 hours, face-to-face, research-based, LGBT-diversity training designed to improve senior housing facility staff's cultural competency regarding the needs of LGBT elders. Findings from this study found a significant increase in LGBT content knowledge between pre- and post-intervention assessments and a significant decrease in perceived preparedness when working with LGBT elders. These effects remained significant after controlling for staff designation, religion, educational attainment, and training session. Findings suggest that staff's cultural competence affected their perceived readiness to address LGBT elders' needs. Implications are related to the concept of cultural humility or the lifelong process of understanding others' experiences based on the recognition of lack of un(der)preparedness to create a culturally supportive residential environment.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/educación , Personal de Salud/educación , Instituciones Residenciales , Minorías Sexuales y de Género , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Ohio , Personas Transgénero
6.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(2): Doc14, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32328516

RESUMEN

Aim: The society and consequently also the health system have become increasingly culturally diverse which applies to both - patients and professionals. Studies indicate an influence of the ethnicity on the care context. With regard to this, considerably more knowledge is available regarding diversity among patients than among professionals, for example considering the effect of cultural diversity in teams. The impact of cultural diversity on patient safety has barely been investigated which means that potential effects as well as required measures and competencies cannot currently be specified. As part of the project "Gestaltungskompetenz als Innovator für hochzuverlässige Organisationen im Gesundheitssystem" (abbreviation: GIO, "Gestaltungskompetenz as an Innovator for High Reliability Organisations in the Healthcare System") these questions are investigated in the context of a case study. Therefore, a CIRS data analysis was carried out to identify specific problem areas to derive competencies for the safe handling of cultural diversity between employees. On this basis and adjusted to the target group, an interactive learning management system will be developed for the advanced training of professionals. Method: For the topic of cultural diversity, an analysis of the patient safety cases reported in CIRSmedical (Critical Incident Reporting System) was carried out followed by a qualitative summarising content analysis. The systematic search in CIRS was based on previously defined search terms as well as inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: 45 cases were included in the analysis. The results can be classed into two categories: "(Unsuccessful) communication" and "Unsuccessful adaptation to patient needs". Cultural diversity was not usually named as a primary or explicit cause but usually a combination of several factors was given as the reason for the occurrence of an undesirable event. Conclusion: The analysis of CIRS data identified concrete challenges resulting from the intercultural composition of teams and in the care context. The approaches for improvement should include both, organisational and personnel measures. In case of the latter, it is essential that competency requirements are identified resulting in suited offers for the competence development in the course of initial and professional development training for medical and nursing staff in ethnically diverse teams.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/psicología , Diversidad Cultural , Administración de la Seguridad/normas , Competencia Cultural/educación , Análisis de Datos , Humanos , Profesionalismo , Investigación Cualitativa , Administración de la Seguridad/estadística & datos numéricos
7.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(2): Doc19, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32328521

RESUMEN

Background: Diversity issues play a key role in medical practice and have recently been more explicitly integrated into undergraduate medical curricula in Europe and worldwide. However, research on students´ perspectives on the relevance and curricular integration of diversity issues, such as sex/gender and culture-sensitive competencies, is still limited. Methods: The Charité Berlin (Germany) ran in parallel a traditional and a competency-based medical program. Diversity perspectives, especially sex and gender aspects, were systematically integrated into the new curriculum. In 2016, an online questionnaire was sent to all medical students in their final clerkship year of both programs. Students provided diversity-related information (sex/gender, age, number of children, migration background or disability) and rated the relevance of sex/gender and culture-sensitive competencies and the integration into their study program. They also rated their preparedness for the final year clerkships and for working as a physician. Results: The included 184 students considered sex/gender and culture-sensitive competencies to be very relevant or relevant (62%; 73%). The ratings of the relevance are independent of the curriculum and significantly higher in female students. Regarding curricular integration, 69% of the students of the traditional curriculum evaluated the degree of implementation as minor, whereas 83% students of the new curriculum rated the degree of implementation as extensive. Degrees of preparedness for the workplace were significantly higher in students from the new curriculum, with no significant effects by sex/gender. Age group, having a child, migration background or a disability had separate effects on the students' ratings. Conclusions: Medical students in their final clerkship year rated sex/gender and culture-sensitive competencies as relevant; this was independent from their study program. Their ratings provide complementary evidence that our systematic approach to implementation resulted in a successful curricular integration.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/educación , Curriculum/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Berlin , Educación Basada en Competencias/métodos , Educación Basada en Competencias/normas , Educación Basada en Competencias/tendencias , Curriculum/tendencias , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/normas , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/tendencias , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estadísticas no Paramétricas , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
8.
J Acad Nutr Diet ; 120(7): 1198-1209, 2020 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32199863

RESUMEN

Developing cultural competence among credentialed nutrition and dietetics practitioners is critical to move toward eliminating disparities in health care. Despite emphasis put forth on culturally competent care by credentialed nutrition and dietetics practitioners, the types, methods, and outcomes of cultural competency training are lacking or inconsistent. In this narrative review, we evaluated studies detailing cultural competency training for content, modes of delivery, and learner outcomes. Main inclusion criteria were students in dietetics or credentialed nutrition and dietetics practitioners engaging in an educational intervention. Exclusion criteria were studies published before 2000 and not published in the English language. Ten studies were reviewed from four health science databases. Our aims were to quantify the literature on cultural competence training in dietetics education and describe the interventions to identify gaps within the field; thus, a quality assessment tool was not utilized. Data were extracted on learner type, number of participants, curriculum content, intervention type, learning outcomes, and outcome evaluation tool. Most studies employed interprofessional education (n=7) and/or service learning (n=6) as interventions types. Quantitative evaluation of learners in the studies reviewed indicated increased knowledge and skill (statistically significant; n=2), whereas qualitative evaluation of learners indicated themes, including curriculum satisfaction, gains in competence, and comfort working with diverse people. Methods of evaluation and delivery were inconsistent, making it difficult to draw larger conclusions about cultural competency training in dietetics. Cultural competence creates opportunities for growth and development of health professionals to serve diverse communities and work environments; future work should include standardizing evaluations of training, specifically to include both qualitative and quantitative methods.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Competencia Cultural/educación , Dietética/educación , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Humanos
9.
Nurse Educ Today ; 88: 104385, 2020 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32193070

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The cultural competence education programme for health professionals aimed to ensure that all people receive effective health care, particularly those from culturally diverse backgrounds. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a cultural competence educational course on nurses' self-assessment of their cultural competence. DESIGN: A single-blind, randomised control trial design was employed. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS: Eligible nurses were recruited from a northern Taiwan medical centre with 2089 beds. METHODS: A permuted block of four was used to randomly assign participants to the experimental (n = 47) and control groups (n = 50). The educational course comprised four units and was conducted once weekly for four weeks, with each session lasting 3 h. RESULTS: A significant group-time interaction was identified regarding self-learning cultural ability, verifying the education intervention's effect on self-learning cultural ability after a two-month intervention. In addition, a significant main effect over time was discovered for total cultural competence; there was no significant interaction effect. CONCLUSIONS: The study provided evidence that an educational programme effectively improved cultural competence in clinical nurses. The results provide a reference for health care providers to design in-service cultural competence education for improving quality of care.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/educación , Educación Continua en Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Persona de Mediana Edad , Método Simple Ciego , Factores Socioeconómicos , Taiwán
10.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(3): 126-132, 2020 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32130413

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Nurse educators must be equipped to teach diverse students using culturally sensitive and inclusive nursing education (CSINE). The purpose of this study was to explore associate degree nurse educators' perceptions on implementing CSINE. METHOD: This was a descriptive exploratory study. Associate degree nurse educators in a midwestern state completed an open-ended question survey that included dichotomous response questions to help participants self-reflect and respond. Follow-up interviews added further depth to the findings. RESULTS: Four major categories emerged that helped answer the research questions: personalize approaches, consider resources, promote cultural diversity broadly, and use active teaching methods and strategies. In addition, participants provided descriptive comments about beginning benefits and outcomes of CSINE and gaining needed education regarding CSINE. CONCLUSION: Participants indicated that learning about CSINE was an ongoing and necessary process for nurse educators. Categories emerging from the data provide guidance for educators in developing and sharing CSINE educational resources to promote positive outcomes for students and their patients. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(3):126-132.].


Asunto(s)
Actitud , Competencia Cultural/educación , Educación en Enfermería/métodos , Educación en Enfermería/normas , Docentes de Enfermería/psicología , Adulto , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven
12.
Nurse Educ Today ; 87: 104356, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32058884

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Cultural diversity is significant in aged care facilities. Registered nurses play a leading role in the care setting. Nurse-led education interventions to improve the cultural competence of aged care workers are in high demand. AIM: The aims of the study were to evaluate the effect of a nurse-led cross-cultural care program on cultural competence of Australian and overseas-born care workers. DESIGN: A pre- and post-evaluation design and a sub-group analysis. SETTINGS AND PARTICIPANTS: This study was undertaken in four large-sized aged care facilities in Australia. Direct care workers were invited to participate in the study. METHODS: The intervention lasted 12 months. Data were collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months using the Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire and site champion reports. One-way ANOVA was applied to determine the changes of outcomes over time for the whole group. A mixed effect linear regression model was applied in the sub-group analyses to compare the differences of outcomes between the Australian-born and overseas-born groups. RESULTS: One hundred and thirteen staff participated in the study including Australian-born (n = 62) and overseas-born (n = 51). Registered nurses were trained as site champions to lead the program. The results showed a statistically significant increase in participants' scores in Knowledge (p = .000), Skills (p = .000), Comfort Level (p = .000), Importance of awareness (p = .01) and Self-Awareness (p = .000) in a 12-month follow-up. The increased scores in the Skills (p = .02) and Comfort Level (p = .001) were higher in the Australian-born group compared to the overseas-born group. The results also showed a statistically significant increase in participants' overall satisfaction scores with the program at 12 months (p = .009). The overseas-born group demonstrated a higher score in Desire to Learn More (p = .016) and Impact of the Program on Practice (p = .014) compared to the Australian-born group. CONCLUSION: A nurse-led cross-cultural care program can improve aged care workers' cultural competence.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/educación , Asistencia Sanitaria Culturalmente Competente , Personal de Salud/educación , Rol de la Enfermera , Enfermeras Internacionales/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Anciano , Australia , Competencia Clínica/normas , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Personal de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Satisfacción del Paciente , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
13.
J Prof Nurs ; 36(1): 28-33, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32044049

RESUMEN

As the demographics in the United States continue to change, nurses must deliver care to patients from diverse cultural backgrounds. Cultural humility is a lifelong process of self-reflection which is also defined by that individual. It allows an individual to be open to other people's identities, which is core to the nursing standard of providing holistic care. Embracing and incorporating cultural humility is essential for creating a comprehensive and individualized plan of care. One of the ways to achieve cultural humility in nursing is to train future faculty to become agents of cultural humility. This also helps to create a pipeline of nurses who have respect and empathy for the patients they serve. The aims of this paper include: 1) define cultural humility and its importance to healthcare professionals; 2) explore the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and system levels of cultural humility; 3) provide insight on how to promote cultural humility; 4) reflect on best practices across a variety of healthcare disciplines; and 5) provide suggestions for practice.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/educación , Prestación de Atención de Salud , Empatía , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Humanos , Relaciones Enfermero-Paciente , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Estados Unidos
14.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(2): 88-92, 2020 Feb 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32003848

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Simulation can extend ethics education in undergraduate nursing programs beyond the cognitive domain. However, the degree to which nursing students recognize and respond to microethical dilemmas in simulation is unknown. METHOD: Using a mixed-methods convergent parallel design, 68 third- and fourth-year undergraduate nursing students completed a sensitivity questionnaire. Twelve students also participated in an interview. Data were compared to create meaning. RESULTS: Many students reported having a high level of ethical sensitivity toward microethical dilemmas during simulation. However, some students expressed uncertainty in their ability to identify microethical dilemmas during nurse-patient interactions. Students also reported limited confidence in being able to transfer their ethical knowledge to the practice setting. CONCLUSION: Nurse educators must be moral agents during simulated learning experiences by helping students learn what microethical dilemmas are and strategies to manage them. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(2):88-92.].


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/educación , Bachillerato en Enfermería/métodos , Ética en Enfermería/educación , Simulación de Paciente , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Principios Morales , Rol de la Enfermera/psicología , Investigación Cualitativa
15.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 20(1): 118, 2020 Feb 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32075593

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In Denmark, 13% of all children are born by non-Western immigrant women. The public antenatal care has not adapted to this increased diversity of women. Compared to women coming from Western countries, non-Western immigrant women have an increased prevalence of severe maternal morbidity and higher risks of maternal death, stillbirth and infant death. Suboptimal care is a contributing factor to these ethnic disparities, and thus the provision of appropriate antenatal care services is pivotal to reducing these disparities and challenges to public health. Yet, little is known about the targeted interventions which have been developed to reduce these inequities in reproductive health. The MAMAACT intervention, which included a training course for midwives, a leaflet and a mobile application, as well as additional visit time, was developed and tested at a maternity ward to increase responses to pregnancy warning signs among midwives and non-Western immigrant women. AIM: To explore the feasibility and acceptability of the MAMAACT intervention among midwives and identify factors affecting midwives' delivery of the intervention. METHODS: Eight mini-group interviews with midwives (n = 18) were undertaken. Systematic text condensation was used to analyse data. RESULTS: Three main categories were identified, which were 'Challenges of working with non-Western immigrant women', 'Attitudes towards and use of the leaflet and mobile application', and 'Organisational factors affecting the use of the MAMAACT intervention'. CONCLUSIONS: The MAMAACT intervention was found to be feasible as well as acceptable among midwives. Women turning to relatives for pregnancy-related advice, time constraints during midwifery visits, incomplete clinical records and lack of professional interpreter assistance impacted midwives' delivery of the MAMAACT intervention. Midwives displayed a readiness for the MAMAACT intervention; however, there is a need to further examine how contextual factors may impact the use of the intervention in antenatal care. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, Retrospective Registration (07/2/2020), registration number NCT04261400.


Asunto(s)
Emigrantes e Inmigrantes , Grupos Étnicos , Disparidades en Atención de Salud/etnología , Enfermeras Obstetrices/educación , Atención Prenatal/métodos , Adulto , Competencia Cultural/educación , Dinamarca , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Partería/educación , Embarazo , Investigación Cualitativa
16.
Acad Med ; 95(1): 22-31, 2020 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31365394

RESUMEN

Medical Spanish (MS) education is in growing demand from U.S. medical students, providers, and health systems, but there are no standard recommendations for how to structure the curricula, evaluate programs, or assess provider performance or linguistic competence. This gap in medical education and assessment jeopardizes health care communication with Hispanic/Latino patients and poses significant quality and safety risks. The National Hispanic Health Foundation and University of Illinois College of Medicine convened a multidisciplinary expert panel in March 2018 to define national standards for the teaching and application of MS skills in patient-physician communication, establish curricular and competency guidelines for MS courses in medical schools, propose best practices for MS skill assessment and certification, and identify next steps needed for the implementation of the proposed national standards. Experts agreed on the following consensus recommendations: (1) create a Medical Spanish Taskforce to, among other things, define educational standards; (2) integrate MS educational initiatives with government-funded research and training efforts as a strategy to improve Hispanic/Latino health; (3) standardize core MS learner competencies; (4) propose a consensus core curricular structure for MS courses in medical schools; (5) assess MS learner skills through standardized patient encounters and develop a national certification exam; and (6) develop standardized evaluation and data collection processes for MS programs. MS education and assessment should be standardized and evaluated with a robust interinstitutional medical education research strategy that includes collaboration with multidisciplinary stakeholders to ensure linguistically appropriate care for the growing Spanish-speaking U.S. population.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Educación Médica/normas , Facultades de Medicina/normas , Consenso , Competencia Cultural/educación , Curriculum/normas , Educación Médica/tendencias , Hispanoamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Estudios Interdisciplinarios , Aprendizaje/fisiología , Relaciones Médico-Paciente/ética , Estudiantes de Medicina/clasificación , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
17.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 2-7, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920944

RESUMEN

Cultural humility, with its concomitant understanding of the importance of the influences of diversity and inclusion, improves health outcomes in the human medical field. Recent changes to the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requirements in veterinary medicine include teaching the impact of implicit bias on the delivery of veterinary medical services. Because overt enhancement of self-awareness is not fodder for traditional veterinary medical education delivery systems, in this article we review existing literature on the impact of recognition of implicit bias on health care and offer insights on ways to help veterinary students learn this skill, drawing on evidence from an inter-professional intervention called WisCARES (Wisconsin Companion Animal Resources, Education, and Social Services).


Asunto(s)
Sesgo , Competencia Cultural , Diversidad Cultural , Educación Médica , Educación en Veterinaria , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Concienciación , Competencia Cultural/educación , Curriculum , Educación en Veterinaria/normas , Humanos , Wisconsin
18.
Acad Med ; 95(2): 310-319, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31599755

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To examine the ways in which culture is conceptualized in faculty development (FD) in the health professions. METHOD: The authors searched PubMed, Web of Science, ERIC, and CINAHL, as well as the reference lists of identified publications, for articles on culture and FD published between 2006 and 2018. Based on inclusion criteria developed iteratively, they screened all articles. A total of 955 articles were identified, 100 were included in the full-text screen, and 70 met the inclusion criteria. Descriptive and thematic analyses of data extracted from the included articles were conducted. RESULTS: The articles emanated from 20 countries; primarily focused on teaching and learning, cultural competence, and career development; and frequently included multidisciplinary groups of health professionals. Only 1 article evaluated the cultural relevance of an FD program. The thematic analysis yielded 3 main themes: culture was frequently mentioned but not explicated; culture centered on issues of diversity, aiming to promote institutional change; and cultural consideration was not routinely described in international FD. CONCLUSIONS: Culture was frequently mentioned but rarely defined in the FD literature. In programs focused on cultural competence and career development, addressing culture was understood as a way of accounting for racial and socioeconomic disparities. In international FD programs, accommodations for cultural differences were infrequently described, despite authors acknowledging the importance of national norms, values, beliefs, and practices. In a time of increasing international collaboration, an awareness of, and sensitivity to, cultural contexts is needed.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/educación , Personal de Salud/educación , Desarrollo de Personal/organización & administración , Competencia Clínica , Diversidad Cultural , Educación Médica , Humanos
19.
Cancer ; 126(1): 112-120, 2020 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31524952

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cancer patients experience substantial health disparities, including poorer overall health and lower satisfaction with their cancer care than their heterosexual and cisgender counterparts, which may be due in part to a lack of culturally competent providers. To address these disparities, a web-based LGBT cultural competency training tailored to oncologists was developed by an interdisciplinary team of scientists, LGBT cancer survivors, cultural competency experts, oncologists, a web designer, and an instructional designer. METHODS: Oncologists (n = 44) were recruited from 3 academic cancer centers in Florida. Participants were administered the LGBT cultural competency training Curriculum for Oncologists on LGBT populations to Optimize Relevance and Skills (COLORS) and completed pre- and posttraining measures regarding LGBT-related knowledge, attitudes (including general negative attitudes and health care-related attitudes), and clinical practices. After the training, participants completed training acceptability measures. RESULTS: Of the 44 participants, 33 (75%) completed the COLORS training. Participants were 55% non-Hispanic white, 63% male, and had a mean age of 47 years. Participants demonstrated significant improvements in LGBT-related knowledge (t = -4.9, P < .001), attitudes (Z = -3.0, P = .002; t = -2.5, P = .019), and clinical practices (Z = -3.5, P < .001) after completing the COLORS training (Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used for nonnormally distributed variables). Moreover, training acceptability was high, with 82% of participants rating the training as high quality, and 97% being willing to recommend the training to a colleague. CONCLUSION: The COLORS training is both feasible to administer and acceptable for use with oncologists, and may improve oncologists' LGBT-related knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practices. Larger trials are needed to examine the training's effectiveness in reducing LGBT cancer disparities, as well as its applicability to other types of care providers.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Competencia Cultural/educación , Oncólogos/educación , Conducta Sexual/psicología , Bisexualidad/psicología , Competencia Cultural/psicología , Femenino , Florida/epidemiología , Homosexualidad Femenina/psicología , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Oncólogos/psicología , Minorías Sexuales y de Género/psicología , Personas Transgénero/psicología
20.
Patient Educ Couns ; 103(5): 978-987, 2020 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31866197

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex (LGBTI) people experience health inequalities and barriers to accessing healthcare at a greater rate than the general population. This paper aims to present the Health4LGBTI training course for healthcare workers and the results of its pilot implementation. METHODS: Funded by the European Parliament, the training course was developed by a multidisciplinary team including LGBTI organisations as part of the Health4LGBTI Project. 110 healthcare professionals from diverse medical fields attended the pilot training in six European Member States. Knowledge and attitudes were compared on the basis of a pre-post evaluation design utilising an ad hoc questionnaire. RESULTS: Knowledge scores increased after the training, irrespective of age and sexual orientation of participants. Attitudes scores generally improved, particularly in terms of inclusivity and a greater acknowledgement of LGBTI health needs and self-competence. CONCLUSION: The Health4LGBTI training course is both feasible and effective in training healthcare professionals and support staff to improve cultural competence and thereby promoting inclusive healthcare practice. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The Health4LGBTI training course can be implemented in different healthcare contexts. Piloting of the course provided an opportunity for healthcare professionals and for support staff to improve their knowledge of, and attitudes towards, LGBTI people.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Competencia Cultural/educación , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Personal de Salud/educación , Sexualidad/psicología , Sexualidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Discriminación en Psicología , Femenino , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Proyectos Piloto , Minorías Sexuales y de Género , Estigma Social
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