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1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 404, 2021 May 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33933013

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Our aim was to examine whether the length of stay, hospital charges and in-hospital mortality attributable to healthcare- and community-associated infections due to antimicrobial-resistant bacteria were higher compared with those due to susceptible bacteria in the Lebanese healthcare settings using different methodology of analysis from the payer perspective . METHODS: We performed a multi-centre prospective cohort study in ten hospitals across Lebanon. The sample size consisted of 1289 patients with documented healthcare-associated infection (HAI) or community-associated infection (CAI). We conducted three separate analysis to adjust for confounders and time-dependent bias: (1) Post-HAIs in which we included the excess LOS and hospital charges incurred after infection and (2) Matched cohort, in which we matched the patients based on propensity score estimates (3) The conventional method, in which we considered the entire hospital stay and allocated charges attributable to CAI. The linear regression models accounted for multiple confounders. RESULTS: HAIs and CAIs with resistant versus susceptible bacteria were associated with a significant excess length of hospital stay (2.69 days [95% CI,1.5-3.9]; p < 0.001) and (2.2 days [95% CI,1.2-3.3]; p < 0.001) and resulted in additional hospital charges ($1807 [95% CI, 1046-2569]; p < 0.001) and ($889 [95% CI, 378-1400]; p = 0.001) respectively. Compared with the post-HAIs analysis, the matched cohort method showed a reduction by 26 and 13% in hospital charges and LOS estimates respectively. Infections with resistant bacteria did not decrease the time to in-hospital mortality, for both healthcare- or community-associated infections. Resistant cases in the post-HAIs analysis showed a significantly higher risk of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.517 [95% CI, 0.327-0.820]; p = 0.05). CONCLUSION: This is the first nationwide study that quantifies the healthcare costs of antimicrobial resistance in Lebanon. For cases with HAIs, matched cohort analysis showed more conservative estimates compared with post-HAIs method. The differences in estimates highlight the need for a unified methodology to estimate the burden of antimicrobial resistance in order to accurately advise health policy makers and prioritize resources expenditure.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones Comunitarias Adquiridas/economía , Infección Hospitalaria/economía , Farmacorresistencia Bacteriana , Costos de la Atención en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Antibacterianos/economía , Antibacterianos/uso terapéutico , Infecciones Comunitarias Adquiridas/tratamiento farmacológico , Infecciones Comunitarias Adquiridas/epidemiología , Infecciones Comunitarias Adquiridas/microbiología , Infección Hospitalaria/tratamiento farmacológico , Infección Hospitalaria/epidemiología , Infección Hospitalaria/microbiología , Femenino , Costos de Hospital , Mortalidad Hospitalaria , Humanos , Líbano , Tiempo de Internación/economía , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Prospectivos
2.
Value Health ; 24(5): 632-640, 2021 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33933231

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the overall quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained by averting 1 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection over the duration of the pandemic. METHODS: A cohort-based probabilistic simulation model, informed by the latest epidemiological estimates on COVID-19 in the United States provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and literature review. Heterogeneity of parameter values across age group was accounted for. The main outcome studied was QALYs for the infected patient, patient's family members, and the contagion effect of the infected patient over the duration of the pandemic. RESULTS: Averting a COVID-19 infection in a representative US resident will generate an additional 0.061 (0.016-0.129) QALYs (for the patient: 0.055, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.014-0.115; for the patient's family members: 0.006, 95% CI 0.002-0.015). Accounting for the contagion effect of this infection, and assuming that an effective vaccine will be available in 3 months, the total QALYs gains from averting 1 single infection is 1.51 (95% CI 0.28-4.37) accrued to patients and their family members affected by the index infection and its sequelae. These results were robust to most parameter values and were most influenced by effective reproduction number, probability of death outside the hospital, the time-varying hazard rates of hospitalization, and death in critical care. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the health benefits of averting 1 COVID-19 infection in the United States are substantial. Efforts to curb infections must weigh the costs against these benefits.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Costos de la Atención en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Medicina Preventiva/normas , Años de Vida Ajustados por Calidad de Vida , /epidemiología , Análisis Costo-Beneficio , Costos de la Atención en Salud/tendencias , Humanos , Pandemias/prevención & control , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Medicina Preventiva/economía , Medicina Preventiva/métodos , Estados Unidos
4.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 84, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33889250

RESUMEN

Methadone maintenance treatment is reported as cost-effective in treatment of opioid use disorder. Estimated cost of providing methadone varies widely in different regions but there is no data regarding cost of methadone treatment in Kenya. The aim of this study was to estimate the cost of methadone maintenance treatment at a methadone maintenance treatment clinic in Nairobi, Kenya from the perspective of the government, implementing partner and the clients. Data was collected for the period of February 2017 to September 2018 for 700 enrolled clients. The cost of providing methadone treatment was estimated as the sum of salaries, laboratory test, methadone and other commodities costs. The outcome was daily cost of methadone per client. The costs are given in Kenya Shillings (Ksh). The cost of treating one client is approximately Ksh. 149 (US$1.49) per day which amounts to Ksh 4500 (US$ 45) per month. This is from the estimated direct costs such as salaries which accounted for 86.4%, methadone 9.6%, tests and other consumables at 4%. The estimated average dose per patient per day is 60mg.This excludes indirect costs such as capital and set up cost, maintenance cost, training, drug import and distribution and other bills. The findings of this study show that the estimate cost of providing methadone at Nairobi, Kenya is comparable to that in other centers. This can help to inform policy makers on continued provision of methadone treatment in the country.


Asunto(s)
Costos de la Atención en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Metadona/economía , Tratamiento de Sustitución de Opiáceos/economía , Trastornos Relacionados con Opioides/rehabilitación , Instituciones de Atención Ambulatoria/economía , Análisis Costo-Beneficio , Costos de los Medicamentos , Humanos , Kenia , Metadona/administración & dosificación , Tratamiento de Sustitución de Opiáceos/métodos , Trastornos Relacionados con Opioides/economía , Salarios y Beneficios/economía
5.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33805375

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This literature review investigates the economic costs of childhood disability analysing methodologies used and summarizing the burden worldwide comparing developed and developing countries. METHODS: Four electronic databases were searched. Studies were categorised according to country, perspective, methods of costing, disability category, and time horizon. Annual costs were converted to 2019 current US dollars then compared to the country's per capita current health expenditure (CHE) and gross domestic product (GDP). RESULTS: Of 2468 references identified, 20 were included in the review. Annual burden of childhood disability ranged ≈$450-69,500 worldwide. Childhood disability imposes a heavy economic burden on families, health systems, and societies. The reason for the wide range of costs is the variability in perspective, costs included, methods, and disability type. CONCLUSION: The annual societal costs for one disabled child could be up to the country's GDP per capita. The burden is heavier on households in developing countries as most of the costs are paid out-of-pocket leading to impoverishment of the whole family. Efforts should be directed to avoid preventable childhood disabilities and to support disabled children and their households to make them more independent and increase their productivity. More studies from developing countries are needed.


Asunto(s)
Costo de Enfermedad , Gastos en Salud , Niño , Costos de la Atención en Salud , Humanos
6.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(4)2021 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33853843

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: We estimated unit costs for COVID-19 case management for patients with asymptomatic, mild-to-moderate, severe and critical COVID-19 disease in Kenya. METHODS: We estimated per-day unit costs of COVID-19 case management for patients. We used a bottom-up approach to estimate full economic costs and adopted a health system perspective and patient episode of care as our time horizon. We obtained data on inputs and their quantities from data provided by three public COVID-19 treatment hospitals in Kenya and augmented this with guidelines. We obtained input prices from a recent costing survey of 20 hospitals in Kenya and from market prices for Kenya. RESULTS: Per-day, per-patient unit costs for asymptomatic patients and patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 disease under home-based care are 1993.01 Kenyan shilling (KES) (US$18.89) and 1995.17 KES (US$18.991), respectively. When these patients are managed in an isolation centre or hospital, the same unit costs for asymptomatic patients and patients with mild-to-moderate disease are 6717.74 KES (US$63.68) and 6719.90 KES (US$63.70), respectively. Per-day unit costs for patients with severe COVID-19 disease managed in general hospital wards and those with critical COVID-19 disease admitted in intensive care units are 13 137.07 KES (US$124.53) and 63 243.11 KES (US$599.51). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 case management costs are substantial, ranging between two and four times the average claims value reported by Kenya's public health insurer. Kenya will need to mobilise substantial resources and explore service delivery adaptations that will reduce unit costs.


Asunto(s)
/economía , Manejo de Caso , Costos de la Atención en Salud , Humanos , Kenia/epidemiología , Pandemias
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33802180

RESUMEN

Individuals' lifestyles play an important role in healthcare costs. A large part of these costs is derived from hospitalizations. With the aim of determine the relationship between lifestyle and the likelihood of hospitalization and associate costs in older adults, this study used the Survey of Health, Aging, and Retirement in Europe. Generalized regression models for panel data were developed and adjusted hospitalization costs derived from the length of hospital stay were also estimated. The average adjusted cost of hospitalization was I$ 9901.50 and the analyses showed that performing weekly physical activity significantly reduces the probability of hospitalization (OR: 0.624) and its costs (I$ 2594.5 less per person per year than subjects who never performed physical activity). Muscle strength plays an important role in this relationship and eating habits are not of great significance. Furthermore, we found interesting differences in the frequency and costs of hospitalization between subjects by country.


Asunto(s)
Costos de la Atención en Salud , Hospitalización , Anciano , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Factores Socioeconómicos
10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33803298

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Patients with multimorbidity account for ever-increasing healthcare resource usage and are often summarised as big spenders. Comprehensive analysis of health care resource usage in different age groups in patients with at least two non-communicable diseases is still scarce, limiting the quality of health care management decisions, which are often backed by limited, small-scale database analysis. The health care system in Lithuania is based on mandatory social health insurance and is covered by the National Health Insurance Fund. Based on a national Health Insurance database. The study aimed to explore the distribution, change, and interrelationships of health care costs across the age groups of patients with multimorbidity, suggesting different priorities at different age groups. METHOD: The study identified all adults with at least one chronic disease when any health care services were used over a three-year period between 2012 and 2014. Further data analysis excluded patients with single chronic conditions and further analysed patients with multimorbidity, accounting for increasing resource usage. The costs of primary, outpatient health care services; hospitalizations; reimbursed and paid out-of-pocket medications were analysed in eight age groups starting at 18 and up to 85 years and over. RESULTS: The study identified a total of 428,430 adults in Lithuania with at least two different chronic diseases from the 32 chronic disease list. Out of the total expenditure within the group, 51.54% of the expenses were consumed for inpatient treatment, 30.90% for reimbursed medications. Across different age groups of patients with multimorbidity in Lithuania, 60% of the total cost is attributed to the age group of 65-84 years. The share in the total spending was the highest in the 75-84 years age group amounting to 29.53% of the overall expenditure, with an increase in hospitalization and a decrease in outpatient services. A decrease in health care expenses per capita in patients with multimorbidity after 85 years of age was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The highest proportion of health care expenses in patients with multimorbidity relates to hospitalization and reimbursed medications, increasing with age, but varies through different services. The study identifies the need to personalise the care of patients with multimorbidity in the primary-outpatient setting, aiming to reduce hospitalizations with proactive disease management.


Asunto(s)
Costos de la Atención en Salud , Multimorbilidad , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Enfermedad Crónica , Gastos en Salud , Hospitalización , Humanos , Lituania , Persona de Mediana Edad
11.
Wiad Lek ; 74(3 cz 2): 678-683, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33843634

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The aim: To study the difference in health care expenditures in groups of countries with different GNI per capita. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and methods: In 4 groups of countries with different GNI per capita were analyzed indicators of Current health expenditure per capita ($) (СHE), Domestic general government health expenditure per capita, PPP ($) (GGHE $) and GGHE%, Domestic private health expenditure per capita, PPP ($) (PHE) and PHE%, Out-of-pocket expenditure (%) (OOP), Current health expenditure (% of GDP) (CHE% GDP). RESULTS: Results: The group of high-income countries differs by CHE, GGHE $, GGHE%, PHE $, PHE%, OOP, CHE% GDP (p <0.001), the group with incomes above the average - by CHE, GGHE $, PHE $, PHE%, CHE%GDP (p <0.001). Groups with lower average income and low income do not differ in CHE, GGHE$, PHE$, PHE%, OOP (p> 0.05). GNI per capita has a positive effect on GDP%GDP, CHE, GGHE, PHE in the high-income group and negatively affects the OOP (p <0.05), GNI per capita has a positive effect on CHE, GGHE in the above-average income group, GNI per capita has a positive effect on CHE, GGHE, GGHE%, PHE and negatively affects OOP (p <0.05) in the income group below average. GNI per capita has a positive effect on the OOP and negatively affects the CHE%GDP (p <0.05) in the low-income group. CONCLUSION: Conclusions: Each group of countries, depending on per capita income, has its own health care costs.


Asunto(s)
Costos de la Atención en Salud , Gastos en Salud , Humanos , Pobreza
13.
J Ment Health Policy Econ ; 24(1): 31-41, 2021 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33739934

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Unemployment is associated with a high risk of experiencing mental illness. This can lead to stigmatisation, reduced quality of life, and long-term costs like increased healthcare expenditure and productivity losses for society as a whole. Previous research indicates evidence for an association between unemployment and higher mental health service costs, but there is insufficient information available for the German healthcare system. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study aims to identify costs and cost drivers for health and social service use among unemployed people with mental health problems in Germany. METHODS: A sample of 270 persons participated at baseline and six-month-follow-up. Healthcare and social service use was assessed using the Client Socio-Demographic and Service Receipt Inventory. Descriptive cost analysis was performed. Associations between costs and potential cost drivers were tested using structural equation modelling. RESULTS: Direct mean costs for 12 months range from EUR 1265.13 (somatic costs) to EUR 2206.38 (psychiatric costs) to EUR 3020.70 (total costs) per person. Path coefficients indicate direct positive effects from the latent variable mental health burden (MHB) on stigma stress, somatic symptoms, and sick leave. DISCUSSION: The hypothesis that unemployed people with mental health problems seek help for somatic symptoms rather than psychiatric symptoms was not supported. Associations between MHB and costs strongly mediated by sick leave indicate a central function of healthcare provision as being confirmation of the inability to work. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH POLICIES: Targeted interventions to ensure early help-seeking and reduce stigma remain of key importance in reducing long-term societal costs. IMPLICATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH: Future research should explore attitudes regarding effective treatment for the target group.


Asunto(s)
Costos de la Atención en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Mentales/economía , Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Servicios de Salud Mental/economía , Ausencia por Enfermedad/economía , Desempleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Femenino , Alemania/epidemiología , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Salud Mental , Servicios de Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Calidad de Vida , Estigma Social , Desempleo/psicología , Adulto Joven
14.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(3): 208-217, 2021 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33645267

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Tonsillectomy is a common surgical procedure performed chiefly for recurrent tonsillitis. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidance Network (SIGN) introduced guidelines in 1998 to improve patient selection for tonsillectomy and reduce the potential harm to patients from surgical complications such as haemorrhage. Since the introduction of the guidance, the number of admissions for tonsillitis and its complications has increased. National Hospital Episode Statistics over a 20-year period were analysed to assess the trends in tonsillectomy, post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage, tonsillitis and its complications with reference to the guidance, procedures of limited clinical value and the associated costs and benefits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A literature search was conducted via PubMed and the Cochrane Library to identify relevant research. Hospital Episode Statistics data were interrogated and relevant data compared over time to assess trends related to the implementation of national guidance. RESULTS: Over the period analysed, the incidence of deep neck space infections has increased almost five-fold, mediastinitis ten-fold and peritonsillar abscess by 1.7-fold compared with prior to SIGN guidance. Following procedures of limited clinical value implementation, the incidence of deep neck space infections has increased 2.4-fold, mediastinitis 4.1-fold and peritonsillar abscess 1.4-fold compared with immediately prior to clinical commissioning group rationing. The rate of tonsillectomy and associated haemorrhage (1-2%) has remained relatively constant at 46,299 (1999) compared with 49,447 (2009) and 49,141 (2016), despite an increase in the population of England by seven million over the 20-year period. DISCUSSION: The rise in admissions for tonsillitis and its complications appears to correspond closely to the date of SIGN guidance and clinical commissioning group rationing of tonsillectomy and is on the background of a rise in the population of the UK. The move towards daycase tonsillectomy has reduced bed occupancy after surgery but this has been counteracted by an increase in admissions for tonsillitis and deep neck space infections, sometimes requiring lengthy intensive care stays and a protracted course of rehabilitation. The total cost of treating the complications of tonsillitis in England in 2017 is estimated to be around £73 million. The cost of tonsillectomy and treating post-tonsillectomy haemorrhage is £56 million by comparison. The total cost per annum for tonsillectomy prior to the introduction of SIGN guidance was estimated at £71 million with tonsillitis and its complications accounting for a further £8 million.


Asunto(s)
Hospitalización/tendencias , Mediastinitis/epidemiología , Absceso Peritonsilar/epidemiología , Hemorragia Posoperatoria/epidemiología , Absceso Retrofaríngeo/epidemiología , Tonsilectomía/tendencias , Tonsilitis/epidemiología , Adenoidectomía/tendencias , Adolescente , Adulto , Distribución por Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Niño , Preescolar , Inglaterra/epidemiología , Femenino , Costos de la Atención en Salud/tendencias , Humanos , Incidencia , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos , Tiempo de Internación/tendencias , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Medicina Estatal , Tonsilitis/cirugía , Adulto Joven
16.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 45(2): 138-142, 2021 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33683766

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This study sought to understand the impact of out-of-pocket healthcare expenditure (OOPHE) on Aboriginal families of children with acute burns injury. METHODS: Families participating in a larger Australia-wide study on burns injuries in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were approached to participate. Decolonising methodology and yarning were employed with participants to scope OOPHE for burns care. Thematic analyses were used with transcripts and data organised using qualitative analysis software (NVivo, Version 12). RESULTS: Six families agreed to participate. Four yarning sessions were undertaken across South Australia, New South Wales and Queensland. The range of OOPHE identified included: costs (transport, pain medication, bandages), loss (employment capacity, social and community) and support (family, service support). The need to cover OOPHE significantly impacted on participants, from restricting social interactions to paying household bills. Close family connections and networks were protective in alleviating financial burden. CONCLUSION: OOPHE for burns care financially impacted Aboriginal families. Economic hardship was reported in families residing rurally or with reduced employment capacity. Family and network connections were mitigating factors for financial burden. Implications for public health: Targeted support strategies are required to address OOPHE in burns-related injuries for Aboriginal communities.


Asunto(s)
Quemaduras/etnología , Quemaduras/terapia , Prestación de Atención de Salud , Costos de la Atención en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Gastos en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicios de Salud del Indígena , Adulto , Australia , Quemaduras/economía , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupo de Ascendencia Oceánica , Población Rural , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33652730

RESUMEN

Evidence shows that inadequate or low health literacy (LHL) levels are significantly associated with economic ramifications at the individual, employer, and health care system levels. Therefore, this study aims to estimate the economic burden of LHL among a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) community in Blacktown: a local government area (LGA) in Sydney, Australia. This study is a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from publicly available datasets, including 2011 and 2016 census data and National Health Survey (NHS) data (2017-2018) from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), and figures on Disease Expenditure in Australia for 2015-2016 provided by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). This study found that 20% of Blacktown residents reported low levels of active engagement with health care providers (Domain 6 of the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ)), with 14% reporting a limited understanding of the health information required to take action towards improving health or making health care decisions (Domain 9 of the HLQ). The overall extra/delta cost (direct and indirect health care costs) associated with LHL in the Blacktown LGA was estimated to be between $11,785,528 and $15,432,239 in 2020. This is projected to increase to between $18,922,844 and $24,191,911 in 2030. Additionally, the extra disability-adjusted life year (DALY) value in 2020, for all chronic diseases and age-groups-comprising the extra costs incurred due to years of life lost (YLL) and years lived with disability (YLD)-was estimated at $414,231,335. The findings of our study may enable policymakers to have a deeper understanding of the economic burden of LHL in terms of its impact on the health care system and the production economy.


Asunto(s)
Alfabetización en Salud , Australia , Costo de Enfermedad , Estudios Transversales , Costos de la Atención en Salud
19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6848, 2021 03 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33767222

RESUMEN

The rapid spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) confronts policy makers with the problem of measuring the effectiveness of containment strategies, balancing public health considerations with the economic costs of social distancing measures. We introduce a modified epidemic model that we name the controlled-SIR model, in which the disease reproduction rate evolves dynamically in response to political and societal reactions. An analytic solution is presented. The model reproduces official COVID-19 cases counts of a large number of regions and countries that surpassed the first peak of the outbreak. A single unbiased feedback parameter is extracted from field data and used to formulate an index that measures the efficiency of containment strategies (the CEI index). CEI values for a range of countries are given. For two variants of the controlled-SIR model, detailed estimates of the total medical and socio-economic costs are evaluated over the entire course of the epidemic. Costs comprise medical care cost, the economic cost of social distancing, as well as the economic value of lives saved. Under plausible parameters, strict measures fare better than a hands-off policy. Strategies based on current case numbers lead to substantially higher total costs than strategies based on the overall history of the epidemic.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Control de Costos , Costos de la Atención en Salud , Pandemias/economía , /aislamiento & purificación , Número Básico de Reproducción , /transmisión , Brotes de Enfermedades , Humanos , Modelos Estadísticos
20.
J Hosp Med ; 16(4): 223-226, 2021 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33734985

RESUMEN

Children's hospitals responded to COVID-19 by limiting nonurgent healthcare encounters, conserving personal protective equipment, and restructuring care processes to mitigate viral spread. We assessed year-over-year trends in healthcare encounters and hospital charges across US children's hospitals before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. We performed a retrospective analysis, comparing healthcare encounters and inflation-adjusted charges from 26 tertiary children's hospitals reporting to the PROSPECT database from February 1 to June 30 in 2019 (before the COVID-19 pandemic) and 2020 (during the COVID-19 pandemic). All children's hospitals experienced similar trends in healthcare encounters and charges during the study period. Inpatient bed-days, emergency department visits, and surgeries were lower by a median 36%, 65%, and 77%, respectively, per hospital by the week of April 15 (the nadir) in 2020 compared with 2019. Across the study period in 2020, children's hospitals experienced a median decrease of $276 million in charges.


Asunto(s)
/economía , Prestación de Atención de Salud , Costos de la Atención en Salud , Hospitales Pediátricos/economía , Pacientes Internos/estadística & datos numéricos , Niño , Prestación de Atención de Salud/economía , Prestación de Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/economía , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Estudios Retrospectivos
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