Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 20.246
Filtrar
1.
BMC Psychol ; 12(1): 195, 2024 Apr 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38589902

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Work environment is rapidly evolving, unfortunately, it is also becoming increasingly hostile for workers due mostly to common psychosocial hazards. This situation is posing significant challenges for organisations to protect the psychological well-being of their workers. Hence, this review aims to map studies to understand the influence of psychosocial safety climate (PSC) on workplace mistreatment and mental health of workers. METHODS: The guidelines outlined by Arksey and O'Malley were adopted for this review. PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, JSTOR, Google and Google Scholar were searched for relevant papers. Only peer-reviewed studies that measured PSC using PSC-12, PSC-8 or PSC-4 were included in this review. RESULTS: Thirty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria. This review found that PSC has a negative association with workplace mistreatment such as bullying, harassment, violence, discrimination and abuse. Further, PSC has a positive association with psychological well-being, personal resilience and hope. Low level organisational PSC also promotes psychological distress, stress, depression, cognitive weariness and emotional exhaustion. The buffering effect of PSC is well-established. Moreover, PSC mediates the association between health-centric leadership and workers' psychological health problems. The inverse relationship between PSC and depressive symptoms was stronger for females than males. CONCLUSION: Organisations should prioritise training and development of supervisors to enhance their supportive skills, encourage respectful behaviour, encourage the use of resources promote open and bottom-up communication and provide guidance on conflict resolution. By promoting a high PSC context, organisations can create a culture that discourages mistreatment, leading to increased employee well-being, job satisfaction, and productivity.


Asunto(s)
Salud Mental , Salud Laboral , Masculino , Femenino , Humanos , Cultura Organizacional , Lugar de Trabajo/psicología , Condiciones de Trabajo
2.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 6083, 2024 03 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38480806

RESUMEN

Burnout is a significant concern, particularly within the healthcare field, affecting both nurses and physicians. It is a common issue in health systems, which encompass a range of healthcare facilities, such as hospitals, physician practices, ambulatory sites, and administrative offices like finance. Despite this, there has not been an extensive exploration of burnout in employees working directly with patients versus those in non-patient-facing roles within these health systems. It is important to note that organizational culture plays a crucial role in influencing various aspects of employees' work-life balance and their experiences of burnout. This study adopts a cross-sectional design, involving the distribution of a 57-question Likert scale survey to employees in health systems. These employees serve in various roles, both patient-facing and non-patient-facing, within jointly owned healthcare organizations, which encompass hospitals, ambulatory sites, and administrative offices. The survey was disseminated through trade organizations and employees at the managerial level and above within these health systems. Data was collected between October 2022 and January 2023, resulting in a total of 67 responses. The study employs correlation analysis to explore the connection between organizational culture and burnout. Furthermore, a decision tree model is constructed to predict burnout scores based on survey responses, specifically the question regarding the perceived positivity of the organizational culture. The decision tree models indicate that perceiving organizational culture as positive, safety-oriented, and supportive predicts various outcomes for individuals, including job retention, positive experiences with patients, increased callousness, and stimulation while working with colleagues. Bayesian analysis, considering the small sample size, reinforces these findings and provides a different perspective, incorporating prior knowledge and credible intervals. An association test suggests a strong link between a positive organizational culture and burnout symptoms, while another test supports a connection with engagement signs. Similar to nurses and physicians, administrative health systems' personnel are susceptible to burnout. Organizational culture can affect burnout. Therefore, health systems' leaders should cultivate an organizational culture that protects against burnout.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Profesional , Cultura Organizacional , Humanos , Teorema de Bayes , Estudios Transversales , Agotamiento Psicológico , Árboles de Decisión
3.
Leadersh Health Serv (Bradf Engl) ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2024 Mar 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38520672

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which organizational justice (OJ) mediates between responsible leadership (RL) and employee turnover intention (TI). DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Both online and offline questionnaire was used to collect the data from 387 Indian health-care employees, and the data were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) with the help of SmartPLS 4. FINDINGS: The study's findings demonstrated a significant positive association between RL and OJ and a negative association between OJ and employee TI. Furthermore, results also confirmed the mediating role of OJ between RI and TI. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The generalizability of the study's data collection is limited because it is based on the responses of Indian health-care sector employees to an online and offline survey. The authors propose that the health-care sector uses RL as an approach that takes a broad view of the parties with a stake and focuses on creating fairness in acts and justice at the workplace to address the major issue of employee turnover. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This study expanded on previous research by demonstrating that the influence of responsible leadership on employee TI is mediated by OJ in the context of India's health-care sector. It also contributes to the literature regarding RI, OJ and TI. The study also enriched the body of knowledge about using the PLS-SEM approach to predict employee TI.


Asunto(s)
Intención , Liderazgo , Humanos , Reorganización del Personal , Cultura Organizacional , Justicia Social
4.
J Safety Res ; 88: 16-23, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38485358

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Work-related injuries are a common lagging safety indicator whereas safety climate assessments can help identify constructs serving as leading indicators. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) partnered with the U.S. Department of the Air Force (DAF) Safety Center to examine the association between perceptions of safety climate survey constructs and the number of injury events within the DAF workforce. METHODS: The DAF administers voluntary, anonymous, occupation-specific safety climate surveys to DAF workers using the internal Air Force Combined Mishap Reduction System (AFCMRS). Survey responses from 2014 to 2018 provided by DAF workers and injury events in maintenance, support, and operations occupations were shared with NIOSH. Exploratory Factor Analysis revealed five constructs: Leadership and Communication; Organizational Safety Priority; Error Management; Resource Adequacy; and Deployment/Official Travel Impact. Squadron-level analysis included bivariate correlations and estimated Rate Ratios (RRs). RESULTS: 1,547 squadrons administered the survey, averaging 144 workers and 15.8 reportable injuries per squadron. Higher (more favorable) squadron-level construct scores were consistently correlated with fewer reported injuries (p < 0.001). Controlling for the number of workers, RRs revealed significant reductions in injury rates with each one-unit increase in responses: Leadership and Communication RR = 0.40 (95%CI: 0.32-0.48); Organizational Safety Priority RR = 0.50 (95%CI: 0.40-0.64); Error Management RR = 0.37 (95%CI: 0.30-0.47); Deployment/Official Travel Impact RR = 0.36 (95%CI: 0.29-0.45). Resource Adequacy revealed a non-significant lower injury rate RR = 0.87 (95%CI: 0.73-1.04). CONCLUSIONS: This unique study quantified safety climate and the association with injuries across a multi-year period. While safety climate measurements may be limited by frequent turnover and the self-reported, voluntary, anonymous nature of AFCMRS, the strength of this study is in the census of injuries. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: Future research should include longitudinal analyses to examine the impact on injuries when squadron leaders are provided feedback on safety climate survey results.


Asunto(s)
Traumatismos Ocupacionales , Cultura Organizacional , Humanos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Traumatismos Ocupacionales/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Ocupaciones , Autoinforme
5.
J Safety Res ; 88: 41-55, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38485384

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The number of physical and mental problems caused by occupational accidents and diseases increases every year. To control them, the safety climate at work is a recognized critical factor. However, a widely applicable model to capture the safety climate for various industries and organizations is lacking. METHOD: This study proposes a theoretical model to measure the direct and indirect effects of safety climate on workers' physical and mental health, mediated by job satisfaction, in the construction sector. We propose a multidimensional construct of safety climate, considering the most salient factors from the literature, and including psychological capital as a new factor. Using data from the last wave of the European Working Conditions Survey (2015) in Spain, the proposed model was validated using structural equation modeling. RESULTS: Our findings suggest that to further improve the mental health of construction workers, work-life balance and job rewards and compensation must be prioritized along with safety climate. As for physical health, safety climate and work-life balance are crucial. Finally, we provide some recommendations for construction company managers based on a ranking of all the factors affecting the safety climate and the workers' health.


Asunto(s)
Industria de la Construcción , Salud Laboral , Humanos , Cultura Organizacional , Accidentes de Trabajo , Organizaciones , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
6.
Appl Nurs Res ; 75: 151769, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38490801

RESUMEN

AIMS: This study aims to identify the level of nursing care quality and examine its predictors considering nurses' demographic data, organizational culture, and communication skills. BACKGROUND: Quality of care is a determinant of the sustainability of any healthcare organization. Therefore, it is imperative to understand how factors may contribute to the quality of nursing care. Limited research is available on the interaction between the concepts of quality of nursing care, communication skills, and organizational culture. METHODS: A cross-sectional multi-site correlational design was used in this study. A convenience sample of 200 nurses from four Jordanian hospitals was recruited. Data was collected using self-reported questionnaires. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations, and multiple regression were performed to achieve the study's aims. RESULTS: The majority of the nurses in this study were females with bachelor's degrees. Age ranged between 22 and 53 years whereas experience ranged from 1 to 30 years. Communication skills significantly predicted the quality of nursing care; however, organizational culture was not a significant predictor of the quality of nursing care. Nevertheless, Pearson r correlation results revealed a significant correlation between organizational culture and communication skills (r = 0.57, p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Nurses and organizational managers can increase the level of quality of nursing care by investing in programs that target improving nurses' communication skills. Providing a good environment in the hospital can increase communication skills between staff members, ultimately increasing the quality of nursing care. Further studies are recommended to elaborate and further uncover concerns related to the current research.


Asunto(s)
Atención de Enfermería , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital , Femenino , Humanos , Adulto Joven , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Masculino , Cultura Organizacional , Estudios Transversales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Comunicación
8.
Psychol Sport Exerc ; 72: 102604, 2024 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38316334

RESUMEN

This paper examines the relationships within and outside organisations that have the leverage to influence culture in the context of men's elite football clubs in Norway. Participants from three clubs held positions as Performance Director (n=2), sport psychology practitioner (n = 3), and physiotherapist (n = 2) and participated in semi-structured interviews focusing on the relationships, tensions, and dynamic organisational forces in their respective clubs. Using reflexive thematic analysis, we developed two overarching themes showing (1) Organisational cultures in time frames and (2) Relationships among stakeholders influencing organisational culture. Developing these themes indicated that an organisational culture is not only a point of arrival, but also a point of departure for future activities. Hence, those charged with organisational culture work must maintain awareness of the influence of a club's history and how it influences dynamic tensions with stakeholders within and outside clubs. It is also critical that cultural practitioners are mindful of players' and staffs' individual journeys, which influence how they self-organise into fluid and temporary subgroups. The findings can sharpen our understanding of working with culture in elite football by emphasising other sources of culture besides leaders' attempts at controlling or steering it in their preferred way. Using the findings provided in this study can help practitioners recognise organisational tensions or slippage towards cultural problems before they lead to traumatic organisational crises.


Asunto(s)
Fútbol Americano , Masculino , Humanos , Cultura Organizacional , Noruega
11.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 25(1): 167, 2024 Feb 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38388888

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Workplace factors are important predictors of occurrence of musculoskeletal pain among different occupational populations. In healthcare, a psychologically unsafe work environment can negatively affect the emotional, physical and psychological well-being of physicians. This study aimed to examine the relationship between workplace violence, sexual harassment and musculoskeletal pain among Egyptian physicians in their years of residency. METHODS: We distributed an online self-administered questionnaire to 101 residents working in various healthcare sectors in Egypt. It included sections on demographic data, working conditions, widespread pain index (WPI), pain interference short-form, workplace violence and harassment questionnaire, psychosocial safety climate questionnaire (PSC) and sexual harassment climate questionnaire. RESULTS: All residents had at least one painful site on the WPI (range 1-11). The mean WPI was 3.5 ± 2.4, and 39.6% satisfied the criteria of having widespread pain by having at least 4 pain sites. Widespread pain index showed a weak statistically significant negative correlation with workplace PSC score (rho = - 0.272, p = 0.006), and a statistically significant weak positive correlation with the calculated total abuse index (rho = 0.305, p = 0.002). Workplace violence and abuse, as measured by a calculated abuse index was the only significant predictors of widespread pain among residents. CONCLUSION: WPV was found to be a predictor of musculoskeletal pain among medical residents. Healthcare organizations need to address WPV by employing preventive strategies to minimize its hazardous effects and ensure a safe working environment for physicians.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Dolor Musculoesquelético , Acoso Sexual , Humanos , Dolor Musculoesquelético/diagnóstico , Dolor Musculoesquelético/epidemiología , Dolor Musculoesquelético/etiología , Cultura Organizacional , Estudios Transversales , Lugar de Trabajo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Condiciones de Trabajo
14.
J Occup Environ Med ; 66(4): 298-304, 2024 Apr 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38234091

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to extend safety climate research by considering perceptions across the following three hierarchical levels within a workplace: (1) senior leaders/executives, (2) field leaders/supervisors, and (3) front-line employees. METHODS: We conducted a quantitative survey study at a US utility company where we collected data related to safety climate perceptions and employee-reported safety behaviors across the different levels of organizational hierarchy. RESULTS: The findings revealed the highest safety climate scores among senior leaders/executives, followed by field leaders/supervisors, and then employees, suggesting potential discrepancies between espoused and enacted safety values in the workplace. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that supervisors and top managers may have different mental models of workplace safety compared with employees. Consequently, assessing perceptions at different organizational levels provides a fuller picture of safety in the workplace.


Asunto(s)
Cultura Organizacional , Administración de la Seguridad , Humanos , Lugar de Trabajo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
15.
J Nurs Adm ; 54(2): 126-132, 2024 Feb 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38261645

RESUMEN

This program evaluation assessed a caring science program's impact on nurse and interdisciplinary professionals' self-reported caring, compassion satisfaction, and intent to leave at an academic-affiliated community hospital. A 3-session program resulted in self-caring and intent to leave significant increases at 60 days post intervention. Findings demonstrated caring science interventions alone are insufficient to impact staff engagement and intent to leave. Further actions for organizational culture changes are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Hospitales Comunitarios , Intención , Humanos , Cultura Organizacional , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Autoinforme
16.
Adv Health Care Manag ; 222024 Feb 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38262013

RESUMEN

Designing and developing safe systems has been a persistent challenge in health care, and in surgical settings in particular. In efforts to promote safety, safety culture, i.e., shared values regarding safety management, is considered a key driver of high-quality, safe healthcare delivery. However, changing organizational culture so that it emphasizes and promotes safety is often an elusive goal. The Safe Surgery Checklist is an innovative tool for improving safety culture and surgical care safety, but evidence about Safe Surgery Checklist effectiveness is mixed. We examined the relationship between changes in management practices and changes in perceived safety culture during implementation of safe surgery checklists. Using a pre-posttest design and survey methods, we evaluated Safe Surgery Checklist implementation in a national sample of 42 general acute care hospitals in a leading hospital network. We measured perceived management practices among managers (n = 99) using the World Management Survey. We measured perceived preoperative safety and safety culture among clinical operating room personnel (N = 2,380 (2016); N = 1,433 (2017)) using the Safe Surgical Practice Survey. We collected data in two consecutive years. Multivariable linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant relationship between changes in management practices and overall safety culture and perceived teamwork following Safe Surgery Checklist implementation.


Asunto(s)
Lista de Verificación , Administración de la Seguridad , Humanos , Cultura Organizacional , Instituciones de Salud , Hospitales
17.
BMC Psychol ; 12(1): 38, 2024 Jan 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38243327

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to uncover the effect of psychological safety climate (PSC) on employees' job satisfaction and organisational climate mediating processes explaining that association. It is posited that the four PSC aspects (management commitment, management priority, organisational participation, and organisational communication) are important for employees' job satisfaction and organisational climate act as resources to facilitate the enactment of managerial quality. METHODS: This study uses a quantitative approach through a questionnaire survey method involving 340 Kota Kinabalu City Hall employees who were selected through simple random sampling. RESULTS: The results of linear regression analysis found that organisation participation has a positive significant relationship with job satisfaction. Organisational communication also showed a negative and significant relationship with job satisfaction. Meanwhile, both management commitment and management priority are statistically insignificant. When the organisational climate is included in the relationship as a mediator through Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) to reinforce the role of psychological safety climate in increasing job satisfaction, such mediating role can only strengthen the relationship between management commitment and organisational participation with job satisfaction. CONCLUSION: Despite the study being cross-sectional, it contributes to knowledge on the resources facilitating PSC, which is important for employees' psychological health. From a practical viewpoint, this study contributes to the literature showing that organizations with good PSC should have policies and practices directed towards employee well-being. The implications of the study for DBKK management are to providing knowledge on the types of psychosocial safety climate domains that plays a crucial role in improving the job satisfaction of DBKK employees.


Asunto(s)
Cultura Organizacional , Sector Público , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Proyectos de Investigación
18.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 24(1): 139, 2024 Jan 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38279162

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In Japan, medical doctors have traditionally been assigned from university medical offices, under the medical office system. The present study examined the effects of the medical office system on job satisfaction, engagement, loyalty, and organizational commitment among cardiologists. METHODS: In this study, a survey of 156 cardiologists was conducted, from April 22, 2023, to May 21, 2023, to examine the effect of the medical office system on employee job satisfaction, employee engagement, and organizational commitment. RESULTS: Compared with the group that belonged to a medical office system (affiliated group, n = 117), the group that did not belong to a medical office system (non-affiliated group, n = 39) was affiliated to hospitals with a smaller number of beds. The results of the factor analysis showed that four types of hospital management styles were generated, namely, environment-, loyalty-building-, treatment-, and philosophy-oriented hospitals. There is an indication that the philosophy-oriented management style was adopted at the workplaces of the non-affiliated group. The treatment-oriented style also tended to be higher in the non-affiliated group than in the affiliated group. Furthermore, the non-affiliated group had higher organizational commitment, indicating that they were more likely to agree with the management philosophy set forth by hospital executives. CONCLUSION: Although the medical office system did not affect job satisfaction, compared with medical doctors with the affiliated group, those with the non-affiliated group tended to work in hospitals that emphasized philosophy-oriented management, and they received moderate compensation while practicing in an environment suitable for their specialty. These results suggest that the medical office system makes it difficult for medical doctors to have high workplace loyalty, engagement, and commitment to the hospital to which they are dispatched.


Asunto(s)
Cardiólogos , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital , Humanos , Japón , Lealtad del Personal , Satisfacción en el Trabajo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Cultura Organizacional
19.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 59(1): 131-139, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38272579

RESUMEN

Providing care is central to the operations of health care organizations. This article discusses how organizations can create a culture of care. It also identifies key elements that health care organizations can implement to build a culture that nurtures both patients and employees. Additionally, the article examines the benefits of implementing practices that demonstrate compassion toward both employees and patients. This article explores the significance of creating and supporting a culture of care for both patients and employees in health care organizations. Finally, the article identifies prevalent practices that contribute to a culture of care.


Asunto(s)
Atención a la Salud , Cultura Organizacional
20.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 32: e4092, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés, Español, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38294053

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the patient safety climate in Primary Health Care from the perspective of nurses working in the services. METHOD: a quantitative and cross-sectional study conducted with 148 nurses from a municipality in the state of São Paulo. The Brazilian version of the Primary Care Safety Questionnaire Survey and personal, professional, and organizational performance variables (intention to stay at work, job satisfaction, care quality, and frequency of incidents) were used. Parametric and non-parametric comparison tests and Spearman's correlation coefficient were performed, considering a 5% significance level. RESULTS: the safety climate was positive, varying from 4.52 to 5.33 and differing across districts for workload (p=0.0214) and leadership (p=0.0129). The safety climate professional variables and dimensions differed in relation to the frequency of incidents. Teamwork and safety and learning system were strongly correlated with job satisfaction and moderately with perceived care quality. CONCLUSION: teamwork and safety and learning system stood out for their positive correlations with job satisfaction and care quality. A positive safety climate favors the involvement of Primary Care nurses to develop improvement plans aligned with the National Patient Safety Program. BACKGROUND: (1) The safety climate is perceived differently across health districts. (2) There is a correlation between the climate dimensions and professional satisfaction. (3) Workload and leadership exert an influence on the safety climate perception. (4) There is a relationship between the safety climate and reporting of care-related incidents. (5) The safety climate is perceived differently among nurses regarding their role.


Asunto(s)
Enfermeras y Enfermeros , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital , Humanos , Cultura Organizacional , Seguridad del Paciente , Estudios Transversales , Brasil , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Satisfacción en el Trabajo , Atención Primaria de Salud , Actitud del Personal de Salud
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA
...