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1.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 800-811, 2021 03 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33757278

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This study aims at reviewing novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) datasets extracted from PubMed Central articles, thus providing quantitative analysis to answer questions related to dataset contents, accessibility and citations. METHODS: We downloaded COVID-19-related full-text articles published until 31 May 2020 from PubMed Central. Dataset URL links mentioned in full-text articles were extracted, and each dataset was manually reviewed to provide information on 10 variables: (1) type of the dataset, (2) geographic region where the data were collected, (3) whether the dataset was immediately downloadable, (4) format of the dataset files, (5) where the dataset was hosted, (6) whether the dataset was updated regularly, (7) the type of license used, (8) whether the metadata were explicitly provided, (9) whether there was a PubMed Central paper describing the dataset and (10) the number of times the dataset was cited by PubMed Central articles. Descriptive statistics about these seven variables were reported for all extracted datasets. RESULTS: We found that 28.5% of 12 324 COVID-19 full-text articles in PubMed Central provided at least one dataset link. In total, 128 unique dataset links were mentioned in 12 324 COVID-19 full text articles in PubMed Central. Further analysis showed that epidemiological datasets accounted for the largest portion (53.9%) in the dataset collection, and most datasets (84.4%) were available for immediate download. GitHub was the most popular repository for hosting COVID-19 datasets. CSV, XLSX and JSON were the most popular data formats. Additionally, citation patterns of COVID-19 datasets varied depending on specific datasets. CONCLUSION: PubMed Central articles are an important source of COVID-19 datasets, but there is significant heterogeneity in the way these datasets are mentioned, shared, updated and cited.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Conjuntos de Datos como Asunto , Difusión de la Información/métodos , PubMed , /aislamiento & purificación , Humanos
2.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 27(3): 310-317, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33729189

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 represents an unprecedented challenge to policy makers as well as those entrusted with capturing, monitoring, and analyzing COVID-19 data. Effective public policy is data-informed policy. This requires a liaison between public health scientists and public officials. OBJECTIVE: This article details the experience, challenges, and lessons learned advising public officials in a large metropolitan area from March to October 2020. METHODS: To effectively do this, an R Markdown report was created to iteratively monitor the number of COVID-19 tests performed, positive tests obtained, COVID-19 hospitalization census, intensive care unit census, the number of patients with COVID-19 on ventilators, and the number of deaths due to COVID-19. RESULTS: These reports were presented and discussed at meetings with policy makers to further comprehension. DISCUSSION: To facilitate the fullest understanding by both the general public and policy makers alike, we advocate for greater centralization of public health surveillance data, objective operational definitions of metrics, and greater interagency communication to best guide and inform policy makers. Through consistent data reporting methods, parsimonious and consistent analytic methods, a clear line of communication with policy makers, transparency, and the ability to navigate unforeseen externalities such as "data dumps" and reporting delays, scientists can use information to best support policy makers in times of crises.


Asunto(s)
Personal Administrativo/psicología , Política de Salud , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Pandemias/prevención & control , Vigilancia en Salud Pública/métodos , Salud Pública/métodos , Adulto , Comunicación , Femenino , Florida/epidemiología , Humanos , Colaboración Intersectorial , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(3): e26718, 2021 03 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33684053

RESUMEN

This paper aims to provide a perspective on data sharing practices in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The scientific community has made several important inroads in the fight against COVID-19, and there are over 2500 clinical trials registered globally. Within the context of the rapidly changing pandemic, we are seeing a large number of trials conducted without results being made available. It is likely that a plethora of trials have stopped early, not for statistical reasons but due to lack of feasibility. Trials stopped early for feasibility are, by definition, statistically underpowered and thereby prone to inconclusive findings. Statistical power is not necessarily linear with the total sample size, and even small reductions in patient numbers or events can have a substantial impact on the research outcomes. Given the profusion of clinical trials investigating identical or similar treatments across different geographical and clinical contexts, one must also consider that the likelihood of a substantial number of false-positive and false-negative trials, emerging with the increasing overall number of trials, adds to public perceptions of uncertainty. This issue is complicated further by the evolving nature of the pandemic, wherein baseline assumptions on control group risk factors used to develop sample size calculations are far more challenging than those in the case of well-documented diseases. The standard answer to these challenges during nonpandemic settings is to assess each trial for statistical power and risk-of-bias and then pool the reported aggregated results using meta-analytic approaches. This solution simply will not suffice for COVID-19. Even with random-effects meta-analysis models, it will be difficult to adjust for the heterogeneity of different trials with aggregated reported data alone, especially given the absence of common data standards and outcome measures. To date, several groups have proposed structures and partnerships for data sharing. As COVID-19 has forced reconsideration of policies, processes, and interests, this is the time to advance scientific cooperation and shift the clinical research enterprise toward a data-sharing culture to maximize our response in the service of public health.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Ensayos Clínicos como Asunto/métodos , Difusión de la Información/métodos , /virología , Manejo de Datos/métodos , Humanos , Pandemias , Proyectos de Investigación , /aislamiento & purificación
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(3): e24948, 2021 03 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33674257

RESUMEN

During disease outbreaks or pandemics, policy makers must convey information to the public for informative purposes (eg, morbidity or mortality rates). They must also motivate members of the public to cooperate with the guidelines, specifically by changing their usual behavior. Policy makers have traditionally adopted a didactic and formalistic stance by conveying dry, statistics-based health information to the public. They have not yet considered the alternative of providing health information in the form of narrative evidence, using stories that address both cognitive and emotional aspects. The aim of this viewpoint paper is to introduce policy makers to the advantages of using narrative evidence to provide health information during a disease outbreak or pandemic such as COVID-19. Throughout human history, authorities have tended to employ apocalyptic narratives during disease outbreaks or pandemics. This viewpoint paper proposes an alternative coping narrative that includes the following components: segmentation; barrier reduction; role models; empathy and support; strengthening self-efficacy, community efficacy, and coping tools; preventing stigmatization of at-risk populations; and communicating uncertainty. It also discusses five conditions for using narrative evidence to produce an effective communication campaign on social media: (1) identifying narratives that reveal the needs, personal experiences, and questions of different subgroups to tailor messaging to produce targeted behavioral change; (2) providing separate and distinct treatment of each information unit or theory that arises on social networks; (3) identifying positive deviants who found creative solutions for stress during the COVID-19 crisis not found by other members of the community; (4) creating different stories of coping; and (5) maintaining a dialogue with population subgroups (eg, skeptical and hesitant groups). The paper concludes by proposing criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of a narrative.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Informática Aplicada a la Salud de los Consumidores , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Red Social , Humanos , Medicina Narrativa , Pandemias
6.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 27(3): 278-284, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33762543

RESUMEN

CONTEXT: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in more than 20 million cases and 350 000 deaths in the United States. With the ongoing media coverage and spread of misinformation, public health authorities need to identify effective strategies and create culturally appropriate and evidence-based messaging that best encourage preventive health behaviors to control the spread of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between COVID-19 sources of information and knowledge, and how US adults' knowledge may be associated with preventive health behaviors to help mitigate COVID-19 cases and deaths. DESIGN AND SETTING: For this cross-sectional study, survey data pertaining to COVID-19 were collected via online platform, Qualtrics, in February and May 2020. PARTICIPANTS: Data responses included 718 US adults from the February survey and 672 US adults from the May survey-both representative of the US adult population. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 knowledge score, COVID-19 reliable sources of information, and adherence to COVID-19 preventive health behaviors. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The main findings showed that disseminating COVID-19 information across various sources, particularly television, health care providers, and health officials, to increase people's COVID-19 knowledge contributes to greater adherence to infection prevention behaviors. Across February and May 2020 survey data, participants 55 years and older and those with higher educational background reported a higher average COVID-19 knowledge score. In addition, among the racial and ethnic categories, Black/African American and Native American/Alaska Native participants reported a lower average COVID-19 knowledge score than white participants-signaling the need to establish COVID-19 communication that is culturally-tailored and community-based. Overall, health care authorities must deliver clear and concise messaging about the importance of adhering to preventive health behaviors, even as COVID-19 vaccines become widely available to the general public. Health officials must also focus on increasing COVID-19 knowledge and dispelling misinformation.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Pandemias/prevención & control , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
8.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E19, 2021 03 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33661727

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Communication networks among professionals can be pathways for accelerating the diffusion of innovations if some local health departments (LHDs) drive the spread of knowledge. Such a network could prove valuable during public health emergencies such as the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Our objective was to determine whether LHDs in the United States were tied together in an informal network to share information and advice about innovative community health practices, programs, and policies. METHODS: In January and February 2020, we conducted an online survey of 2,303 senior LHD leaders to ask several questions about their sources of advice. We asked respondents to rank up to 3 other LHDs whose practices informed their work on new public health programs, evidence-based practices, and policies intended to improve community health. We used a social network analysis program to assess answers. RESULTS: A total of 329 LHDs responded. An emergent network appeared to operate nationally among 740 LHDs. Eleven LHDs were repeatedly nominated by peers as sources of advice or examples (ie, opinion leaders), and 24 acted as relational bridges to hold these emergent networks together (ie, boundary spanners). Although 2 LHDs played both roles, most LHDs we surveyed performed neither of these roles. CONCLUSION: Opinion leading and boundary spanning health departments can be accessed to increase the likelihood of affecting the rate of interest in and adoption of innovations. Decision makers involved in disseminating new public health practices, programs, or policies may find our results useful both for emergencies and for practice-as-usual.


Asunto(s)
Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia/normas , Sistemas de Información en Salud , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Sistemas de Información/organización & administración , /epidemiología , Comunicación , Difusión de Innovaciones , Sistemas de Información en Salud/organización & administración , Sistemas de Información en Salud/tendencias , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Bases del Conocimiento , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
9.
Health Secur ; 19(1): 31-43, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33606574

RESUMEN

In this paper, we investigate how message construction, style, content, and the textual content of embedded images impacted message retransmission over the course of the first 8 months of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the United States. We analyzed a census of public communications (n = 372,466) from 704 public health agencies, state and local emergency management agencies, and elected officials posted on Twitter between January 1 and August 31, 2020, measuring message retransmission via the number of retweets (ie, a message passed on by others), an important indicator of engagement and reach. To assess content, we extended a lexicon developed from the early months of the pandemic to identify key concepts within messages, employing it to analyze both the textual content of messages themselves as well as text included within embedded images (n = 233,877), which was extracted via optical character recognition. Finally, we modelled the message retransmission process using a negative binomial regression, which allowed us to quantify the extent to which particular message features amplify or suppress retransmission, net of controls related to timing and properties of the sending account. In addition to identifying other predictors of retransmission, we show that the impact of images is strongly driven by content, with textual information in messages and embedded images operating in similar ways. We offer potential recommendations for crafting and deploying social media messages that can "cut through the noise" of an infodemic.


Asunto(s)
Difusión de la Información/métodos , Informática en Salud Pública/métodos , Medios de Comunicación Sociales/estadística & datos numéricos , Comunicación , Humanos , Mercadeo Social
10.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 68(5): e28962, 2021 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33629507

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic quickly led to an abundance of publications and recommendations, despite a paucity of information on how COVID-19 affects children with cancer. This created a dire need for a trusted resource with curated information and a space for the pediatric oncology community to share experiences. The Global COVID-19 Observatory and Resource Center for Childhood Cancer was developed, launched, and maintained by the International Society of Pediatric Oncology and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The three components (Resource Library, Global Registry, and Collaboration Space) complement each other, establishing a mechanism to generate and transfer knowledge rapidly throughout the community.


Asunto(s)
/patología , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Bibliotecas Médicas , Neoplasias/patología , Niño , Comorbilidad , Recursos en Salud , Humanos , Sistema de Registros
11.
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol ; 50(3): 275-283, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33602536

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assess the #Radiology conversation on Twitter social media platform during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From February 1 to December 31, 2020, all tweets with a #Radiology hashtag were identified using the healthcare social media analytics tool, Symplur Signals. Data collected included number of tweets, retweets, impressions, links, and user characteristics. Data were stratified by the presence of a COVID-19-related keyword, and a social media network analysis was further performed. RESULTS: Of the 68,172 tweets, 10,093 contained COVID-19 content from 2809 users generating 65,513,669 impressions. More tweets with COVID-19 content contained links than without (P < 0.01). Network analysis demonstrated most users were physicians (48.10%), authoring the most tweets (40.38%), using the most mentions (32.15%), and retweeting the most (51.45%). The most impressions, however, were by healthcare organizations not providing clinical care (20,235,547 impressions, 30.89%). Users came from 80 countries, most from the United States (29.3%) and the United Kingdom (8.69%). During early March, COVID-19 dominated the #Radiology conversation, making up 54.67% of tweets the week of March 14 and 64.74% of impressions the week of March 21 compared to 13.97% of tweets and 16.76% of impressions in the remainder of the study period (P < 0.01).There was an influx of new users to the #Radiology conversation during this time period with more users tweeting about COVID-19 than not (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Discussion of COVID-19 in the #Radiology community increased significantly during the early weeks of the pandemic. Real time sharing and collaboration proved a useful tool when rapid information dissemination was needed to manage an emerging pathogen.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Radiología/métodos , Medios de Comunicación Sociales/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Pandemias
12.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(5): e41, 2021 Feb 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33527783

RESUMEN

Infographics are pictorial representations of information intended to disseminate information quickly and clearly. Their use has increased in the past decade due to wider and easy access to technology. Infographics are being increasingly used for public advisories, disseminating protocols for healthcare professionals, and post-publication promotion of research. Due to their potential to rapidly reach a vast audience, these have gained larger importance during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Two key aspects determine the quality of infographics, content and visual appeal. In this brief, the authors attempt to delineate the key aspects of designing an infographic, and the freeware that they may have at their disposal for creating informative, appealing, and useful infographics.


Asunto(s)
Recursos Audiovisuales/tendencias , Investigación Biomédica/métodos , Comunicación en Salud , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Gráficos por Computador , Personal de Salud , Humanos , Pandemias
13.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 74Suppl 1(Suppl 1): e20200291, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33533803

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: to analyze YouTube videos with information about COVID-19 in Brazilian sign language. METHODS: a cross-sectional study conducted with 402 videos from the YouTube sharing platform. Chi-square, Fisher's exact, Mann-Whitney and Spearman's correlation tests were used. RESULTS: the videos mainly covered COVID-19 prevention (20.6%). There was a positive correlation between video length and number of views (p<0.001). The length of more than 20 minutes was associated with narration only in BSL (p=0.37) and in BSL with audio (p<0.001), while videos with less than 20 minutes were associated with simultaneous narration in BSL, audio and subtitles. Those with narration only in BSL had a similar number of views to those narrated with subtitles and/or audio (p=0.998). CONCLUSION: the videos were mostly short and included COVID-19 prevention. The longer the video, the greater the number of views. Regardless the presentation of narrations, the videos had a similar number of views.


Asunto(s)
/diagnóstico , /terapia , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Lengua de Signos , Medios de Comunicación Sociales/estadística & datos numéricos , Grabación en Video/estadística & datos numéricos , Brasil , Estudios Transversales , Humanos
14.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 74Suppl 1(Suppl 1): e20200631, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33533806

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: to know the strategies to cope with domestic violence against women disseminated by digital media at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: a documentary study with a qualitative approach. The search took place from March 11 to April 30, 2020, from four sources: newspapers and online portals, social network, official government pages and third sector portals. Thematic content analysis of the findings was performed. RESULTS: seventy-seven strategies were identified in the journalistic press, 93 in the social network, 45 in government portals and 40 in third sector organizations. From analysis, three empirical categories emerged: Strategies for communication with women; Strategies adopted by customer service; Strategies to inform the population. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: most of strategies were adaptations of existing services, centered on the reporting of violence by women.


Asunto(s)
Adaptación Psicológica , Comunicación , Violencia Doméstica/psicología , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Internet/estadística & datos numéricos , Medios de Comunicación Sociales/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Brasil/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias
15.
J Proteome Res ; 20(3): 1464-1475, 2021 03 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33605735

RESUMEN

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is the causative agent of the 2020 pandemic leading to the COVID-19 respiratory disease. With many scientific and humanitarian efforts ongoing to develop diagnostic tests, vaccines, and treatments for COVID-19, and to prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2, mass spectrometry research, including proteomics, is playing a role in determining the biology of this viral infection. Proteomics studies are starting to lead to an understanding of the roles of viral and host proteins during SARS-CoV-2 infection, their protein-protein interactions, and post-translational modifications. This is beginning to provide insights into potential therapeutic targets or diagnostic strategies that can be used to reduce the long-term burden of the pandemic. However, the extraordinary situation caused by the global pandemic is also highlighting the need to improve mass spectrometry data and workflow sharing. We therefore describe freely available data and computational resources that can facilitate and assist the mass spectrometry-based analysis of SARS-CoV-2. We exemplify this by reanalyzing a virus-host interactome data set to detect protein-protein interactions and identify host proteins that could potentially be used as targets for drug repurposing.


Asunto(s)
/virología , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Espectrometría de Masas/métodos , /química , /tratamiento farmacológico , /métodos , Biología Computacional , Bases de Datos de Proteínas/estadística & datos numéricos , Reposicionamiento de Medicamentos , Interacciones Microbiota-Huesped/fisiología , Humanos , Espectrometría de Masas/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias , Dominios y Motivos de Interacción de Proteínas , Mapas de Interacción de Proteínas , Procesamiento Proteico-Postraduccional , Proteómica/métodos , Proteómica/estadística & datos numéricos , /fisiología , Proteínas Virales/química , Proteínas Virales/fisiología
16.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 119(1): 51-55, feb. 2021. tab
Artículo en Inglés, Español | LILACS, BINACIS | ID: biblio-1147087

RESUMEN

Internet permitió expandir la promoción de alimentos/bebidas a diferentes medios. El objetivo del estudio fue identificar las estrategias de marketing en sitios web de marcas de alimentos y bebidas consumidos por niños/as y adolescentes, y clasificarlos según las recomendaciones de las Guías Alimentarias para la Población Argentina.Se seleccionaron los alimentos/bebidas más consumidos por la población infantojuvenil según la Encuesta Alimentaria Nutricional de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. Se identificaron las páginas web de las marcas; se analizaron las estrategias de marketing y se clasificaron los alimentos/bebidas promocionados según las Guías.Se encontraron 80 páginas web, donde las estrategias más frecuentes fueron identificación de la marca, beneficios y declaraciones, y vínculos a páginas web y/o redes sociales. El 30 % de los sitios estaban dirigidos a niños/as/adolescentes, donde el 75 % de los alimentos/bebidas promocionados correspondieron al grupo de dulces y grasas, que incluye aquellos de bajo valor nutricional.


The Internet has allowed the expansion of food and beverage advertising in different media. The objective of this study was to identify the marketing strategies used in brand websites of foods and beverages consumed by children and adolescents, and classify them based on the Food Guidelines for the Argentinean Population.The foods and beverages most commonly consumed by the child and adolescent population as per the Survey on Nutritional Food Intake of the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires were selected. Brand websites were identified; marketing strategies were analyzed and marketed foods and beverages were classified based on the Guidelines.A total of 80 websites were found; the most common strategies were brand identity, benefits and claims, and links to websites and/or social media. Also, 30 % of sites were aimed at children and adolescents, and 75 % of marketed foods and beverages corresponded to the group of sweets and fats, including those of low nutritional value


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Niño , Adolescente , Publicidad/métodos , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Mercadotecnía/métodos , Comunicación Persuasiva , Argentina , Epidemiología Descriptiva , Estudios Transversales , Alimentos y Bebidas , Internet , Preferencias Alimentarias/psicología
17.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(1): 23-34, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33625323

RESUMEN

In March 2020, the Dean of the George Washington (GW) University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) and the GW COVID-19 Incident Management Team asked the Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Public Health to initiate a daily report that surveyed COVID-19 literature/resources. This COVID-19 Intelligence Report would serve as a concise, authoritative source of COVID-19 information for clinicians, the Incident Management Team, and operational leaders. The Senior Associate Dean established an Intelligence Gathering Team comprised of clinicians and librarians. Himmelfarb librarians facilitated the collection, distribution, and archiving of COVID-19 resources and Intelligence Reports.


Asunto(s)
Investigación sobre Servicios de Salud/organización & administración , Investigación sobre Servicios de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Bibliotecas Digitales/organización & administración , Bibliotecas Médicas/organización & administración , Bibliotecas Médicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Centros Médicos Académicos , District of Columbia , Humanos , Bibliotecas Digitales/estadística & datos numéricos
18.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(1): 67-78, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33625324

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected libraries across the globe, including academic health sciences libraries, in many ways. This manuscript describes the challenges, solutions, and practices employed by the Stony Brook University Health Sciences Library in order to maintain continuity of services to patrons including faculty, hospital staff, students, and clinicians while operating in one of the earliest epicenters of the pandemic. Some of the major changes the library underwent in response to the pandemic included implementing new online anatomy resources, contactless circulation, remote interlibrary loan services and modified operating practices.


Asunto(s)
Defensa Civil/organización & administración , Planificación en Desastres/organización & administración , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Bibliotecas Digitales/organización & administración , Bibliotecas Médicas/organización & administración , Pandemias , Humanos , Bibliotecas Digitales/estadística & datos numéricos , Bibliotecas Médicas/estadística & datos numéricos , New York
19.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(1): 122-129, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33625325

RESUMEN

Telehealth services have slowly yet steadily increased over the past few decades as new technologies emerge. However, social distancing mandates, state shutdowns, and an overburdened healthcare system during the COVID-19 pandemic forced a dramatic surge forward in telehealth use and policy. While many of these emergency measures are temporary, the successes, failures and lessons learned during this period will change the way telehealth is administered, moving forward. This column will review recent changes to telehealth and telemedicine services during the pandemic and their impact on healthcare systems.


Asunto(s)
Prestación de Atención de Salud/organización & administración , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Bibliotecólogos/educación , Bibliotecas Digitales/organización & administración , Bibliotecas Médicas/organización & administración , Telemedicina/organización & administración , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Bibliotecas Digitales/estadística & datos numéricos , Bibliotecas Médicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estados Unidos
20.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 40(1): 79-89, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33625326

RESUMEN

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Mountain Area Health Education Center formed a response team with the goal of building capacity across Western North Carolina health systems to collectively identify needs, coordinate resources to fill gaps, and strategically manage the regional threats of the pandemic. The library team collaborated on interprofessional projects by gathering information and using LibGuides to quickly and easily organize and share resources. The team met challenges, including moving to telecommuting, balancing a growing workload, and navigating a changing information landscape, and in doing so, strengthened relationships across the organization and the region.


Asunto(s)
Difusión de la Información/métodos , Colaboración Intersectorial , Bibliotecólogos/psicología , Bibliotecas Digitales/organización & administración , Bibliotecas Médicas/organización & administración , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Bibliotecas Digitales/estadística & datos numéricos , Bibliotecas Médicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , North Carolina
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