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1.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf ; 275: 116260, 2024 Apr 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38564867

RESUMEN

Thiram, a commonly used agricultural insecticide and fungicide, has been found to cause tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) in broilers, leading to substantial economic losses in the poultry industry. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of leucine in mitigating thiram-induced TD and leucine effects on gut microbial diversity. Broiler chickens were randomly divided into five equal groups: control group (standard diet), thiram-induced group (thiram 80 mg/kg from day 3 to day 7), and different concentrations of leucine groups (0.3%, 0.6%, 0.9% leucine from day 8 to day 18). Performance indicator analysis and tibial parameter analysis showed that leucine positively affected thiram-induced TD broilers. Additionally, mRNA expressions and protein levels of HIF-1α/VEGFA and Ihh/PTHrP genes were determined via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The results showed that leucine recovered lameness disorder by downregulating the expression of HIF-1α, VEGFA, and PTHrP while upregulating the expression of Ihh. Moreover, the 16 S rRNA sequencing revealed that the leucine group demonstrated a decrease in the abundance of harmful bacteria compared to the TD group, with an enrichment of beneficial bacteria responsible for producing short-chain fatty acids, including Alistipes, Paludicola, CHKCI002, Lactobacillus, and Erysipelatoclostridium. In summary, the current study suggests that leucine could improve the symptoms of thiram-induced TD and maintain gut microbiota homeostasis.


Asunto(s)
Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Osteocondrodisplasias , Animales , Tiram/toxicidad , Osteocondrodisplasias/inducido químicamente , Osteocondrodisplasias/genética , Osteocondrodisplasias/veterinaria , Pollos , Leucina , Proteína Relacionada con la Hormona Paratiroidea , Disbiosis
2.
J Zhejiang Univ Sci B ; 25(4): 271-279, 2024 Apr 15.
Artículo en Inglés, Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38584090

RESUMEN

Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) can be induced by various kinds of diseases, including chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis, and post-pancreatectomy. The main pathogenetic mechanism of PEI involves the decline of trypsin synthesis, disorder of pancreatic fluid flow, and imbalance of secretion feedback. Animal studies have shown that PEI could induce gut bacterial overgrowth and dysbiosis, with the abundance of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium increasing the most, which could be partially reversed by pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. Clinical studies have also confirmed the association between PEI and the dysbiosis of gut microbiota. Pancreatic exocrine secretions and changes in duodenal pH as well as bile salt malabsorption brought about by PEI may affect and shape the abundance and composition of gut microbiota. In turn, the gut microbiota may impact the pancreatic exocrine acinus through potential bidirectional crosstalk. Going forward, more and higher-quality studies are needed that focus on the mechanism underlying the impact of PEI on the gut microbiota.


Asunto(s)
Insuficiencia Pancreática Exocrina , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Pancreatitis , Humanos , Enfermedad Aguda , Disbiosis , Insuficiencia Pancreática Exocrina/tratamiento farmacológico
3.
World J Gastroenterol ; 30(12): 1655-1662, 2024 Mar 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38617735

RESUMEN

The gut microbiota is recognized as an endocrine organ with the capacity to influence distant organs and associated biological pathways. Recent advancements underscore the critical role of gut microbial homeostasis in female health; with dysbiosis potentially leading to diseases among women such as polycystic ovarian syndrome, endometriosis, breast cancer, cervical cancer, and ovarian cancer etc. Despite this, there has been limited discussion on the underlying mechanisms. This editorial explores the three potential mechanisms through which gut microbiota dysbiosis may impact the development of diseases among women, namely, the immune system, the gut microbiota-estrogen axis, and the metabolite pathway. We focused on approaches for treating diseases in women by addressing gut microbiota imbalances through probiotics, prebiotics supplementation, and fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Future studies should focus on determining the molecular mechanisms underlying associations between dysbiosis of gut microbiota and female diseases to realize precision medicine, with FMT emerging as a promising intervention.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de la Mama , Endometriosis , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Femenino , Humanos , Disbiosis , Estrógenos
4.
J Pineal Res ; 76(3): e12954, 2024 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38618998

RESUMEN

Osteoporosis (OP) is a severe global health issue that has significant implications for productivity and human lifespan. Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been demonstrated to be closely associated with OP progression. Melatonin (MLT) is an important endogenous hormone that modulates bone metabolism, maintains bone homeostasis, and improves OP progression. Multiple studies indicated that MLT participates in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and gut barrier function. However, the promising effects of gut microbiota-derived MLT in OP remain unclear. Here, we found that OP resulted in intestinal tryptophan disorder and decreased the production of gut microbiota-derived MLT, while administration with MLT could mitigate OP-related clinical symptoms and reverse gut microbiota dysbiosis, including the diversity of intestinal microbiota, the relative abundance of many probiotics such as Allobaculum and Parasutterella, and metabolic function of intestinal flora such as amino acid metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, and energy metabolism. Notably, MLT significantly increased the production of short-chain fatty acids and decreased trimethylamine N-oxide-related metabolites. Importantly, MLT could modulate the dynamic balance of M1/M2 macrophages, reduce the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restore gut-barrier function. Taken together, our results highlighted the important roles of gut microbially derived MLT in OP progression via the "gut-bone" axis associated with SCFA metabolism, which may provide novel insight into the development of MLT as a promising drug for treating OP.


Asunto(s)
Melatonina , Humanos , Melatonina/farmacología , Triptófano , Disbiosis/tratamiento farmacológico , Metilaminas
5.
Arch Microbiol ; 206(5): 205, 2024 Apr 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38573383

RESUMEN

Honeybees are vital for global crop pollination, making indispensable contributions to agricultural productivity. However, these vital insects are currently facing escalating colony losses on a global scale, primarily attributed to parasitic and pathogenic attacks. The prevalent response to combat these infections may involve the use of antibiotics. Nevertheless, the application of antibiotics raises concerns regarding potential adverse effects such as antibiotic resistance and imbalances in the gut microbiota of bees. In response to these challenges, this study reviews the utilization of a probiotic-supplemented pollen substitute diet to promote honeybee gut health, enhance immunity, and overall well-being. We systematically explore various probiotic strains and their impacts on critical parameters, including survival rate, colony strength, honey and royal jelly production, and the immune response of bees. By doing so, we emphasize the significance of maintaining a balanced gut microbial community in honeybees. The review also scrutinizes the factors influencing the gut microbial communities of bees, elucidates the consequences of dysbiosis, and evaluates the potential of probiotics to mitigate these challenges. Additionally, it delineates different delivery mechanisms for probiotic supplementation and elucidates their positive effects on diverse health parameters of honeybees. Given the alarming decline in honeybee populations and the consequential threat to global food security, this study provides valuable insights into sustainable practices aimed at supporting honeybee populations and enhancing agricultural productivity.


Asunto(s)
Apicultura , Probióticos , Abejas , Animales , Agricultura , Antibacterianos , Disbiosis
6.
NPJ Biofilms Microbiomes ; 10(1): 39, 2024 Apr 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38589501

RESUMEN

Dysbiosis of the human oral microbiota has been reported to be associated with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) while the host-microbiota interactions with respect to the potential impact of pathogenic bacteria on host genomic and epigenomic abnormalities remain poorly studied. In this study, the mucosal bacterial community, host genome-wide transcriptome and DNA CpG methylation were simultaneously profiled in tumors and their adjacent normal tissues of OSCC patients. Significant enrichment in the relative abundance of seven bacteria species (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Treponema medium, Peptostreptococcus stomatis, Gemella morbillorum, Catonella morbi, Peptoanaerobacter yurli and Peptococcus simiae) were observed in OSCC tumor microenvironment. These tumor-enriched bacteria formed 254 positive correlations with 206 up-regulated host genes, mainly involving signaling pathways related to cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. Integrative analysis of bacteria-transcriptome and bacteria-methylation correlations identified at least 20 dysregulated host genes with inverted CpG methylation in their promoter regions associated with enrichment of bacterial pathogens, implying a potential of pathogenic bacteria to regulate gene expression, in part, through epigenetic alterations. An in vitro model further confirmed that Fusobacterium nucleatum might contribute to cellular invasion via crosstalk with E-cadherin/ß-catenin signaling, TNFα/NF-κB pathway and extracellular matrix remodeling by up-regulating SNAI2 gene, a key transcription factor of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our work using multi-omics approaches explored complex host-microbiota interactions and provided important insights into genetic and functional basis in OSCC tumorigenesis, which may serve as a precursor for hypothesis-driven study to better understand the causational relationship of pathogenic bacteria in this deadly cancer.


Asunto(s)
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello , Microbiota , Neoplasias de la Boca , Humanos , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas de Cabeza y Cuello/genética , Epigenómica , Disbiosis , Neoplasias de la Boca/genética , Neoplasias de la Boca/metabolismo , Neoplasias de la Boca/patología , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/genética , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/metabolismo , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/patología , Bacterias , Fusobacterium nucleatum , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/genética , Epigénesis Genética , Microambiente Tumoral
7.
Front Immunol ; 15: 1347676, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38590519

RESUMEN

The gut-lung axis is critical during viral respiratory infections such as influenza. Gut dysbiosis during infection translates into a massive drop of microbially produced short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Among them, butyrate is important during influenza suggesting that microbiome-based therapeutics targeting butyrate might hold promises. The butyrate-producing bacterium Faecalibacterium duncaniae (formerly referred to as F. prausnitzii) is an emerging probiotic with several health-promoting characteristics. To investigate the potential effects of F. duncaniae on influenza outcomes, mice were gavaged with live F. duncaniae (A2-165 or I-4574 strains) five days before infection. Supplementation of F. duncaniae was associated with less severe disease, a lower pulmonary viral load, and lower levels of lung inflammation. F. duncaniae supplementation impacted on gut dysbiosis induced by infection, as assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing. Interestingly, F. duncaniae administration was associated with a recovery in levels of SCFAs (including butyrate) in infected animals. The live form of F. duncaniae was more potent that the pasteurized form in improving influenza outcomes. Lastly, F. duncaniae partially protected against secondary (systemic) bacterial infection. We conclude that F. duncaniae might serve as a novel next generation probiotic against acute viral respiratory diseases.


Asunto(s)
Gripe Humana , Probióticos , Ratones , Animales , Humanos , Disbiosis/microbiología , ARN Ribosómico 16S/genética , Ácidos Grasos Volátiles , Butiratos , Faecalibacterium/genética
8.
Immunity ; 57(4): 832-834, 2024 Apr 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38599173

RESUMEN

IL-23 activates pathogenic Th17 cells to drive inflammatory disease at barrier surfaces. Kim et al. now identify oral epithelial cells as the critical producers of IL-23 in human and mouse periodontitis, linking microbial dysbiosis to non-hematopoietic regulation of IL-17-associated inflammation.


Asunto(s)
Inflamación , Periodontitis , Humanos , Animales , Ratones , Inflamación/patología , Células Epiteliales/patología , Interleucina-23 , Células Th17/patología , Disbiosis
9.
Front Immunol ; 15: 1380476, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38605957

RESUMEN

Obesity and chronic low-grade inflammation, often occurring together, significantly contribute to severe metabolic and inflammatory conditions like type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer. A key player is elevated levels of gut dysbiosis-associated lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which disrupts metabolic and immune signaling leading to metabolic endotoxemia, while short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) beneficially regulate these processes during homeostasis. SCFAs not only safeguard the gut barrier but also exert metabolic and immunomodulatory effects via G protein-coupled receptor binding and epigenetic regulation. SCFAs are emerging as potential agents to counteract dysbiosis-induced epigenetic changes, specifically targeting metabolic and inflammatory genes through DNA methylation, histone acetylation, microRNAs (miRNAs), and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). To assess whether SCFAs can effectively interrupt the detrimental cascade of obesity and inflammation, this review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the current evidence for their clinical application. The review emphasizes factors influencing SCFA production, the intricate connections between metabolism, the immune system, and the gut microbiome, and the epigenetic mechanisms regulated by SCFAs that impact metabolism and the immune system.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Epigénesis Genética , Humanos , Disbiosis , Obesidad/genética , Inflamación , Ácidos Grasos Volátiles/metabolismo
10.
Front Immunol ; 15: 1352744, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38605969

RESUMEN

Like other infections, a SARS-CoV-2 infection can also trigger Post-Acute Infection Syndromes (PAIS), which often progress into myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). ME/CFS, characterized by post-exercise malaise (PEM), is a severe multisystemic disease for which specific diagnostic markers or therapeutic concepts have not been established. Despite numerous indications of post-infectious neurological, immunological, endocrinal, and metabolic deviations, the exact causes and pathophysiology remain unclear. To date, there is a paucity of data, that changes in the composition and function of the gastrointestinal microbiota have emerged as a potential influencing variable associated with immunological and inflammatory pathways, shifts in ME/CFS. It is postulated that this dysbiosis may lead to intestinal barrier dysfunction, translocation of microbial components with increased oxidative stress, and the development or progression of ME/CFS. In this review, we detailed discuss the findings regarding alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and its microbial mediators in ME/CFS. When viewed critically, there is currently no evidence indicating causality between changes in the microbiota and the development of ME/CFS. Most studies describe associations within poorly defined patient populations, often combining various clinical presentations, such as irritable bowel syndrome and fatigue associated with ME/CFS. Nevertheless, drawing on analogies with other gastrointestinal diseases, there is potential to develop strategies aimed at modulating the gut microbiota and/or its metabolites as potential treatments for ME/CFS and other PAIS. These strategies should be further investigated in clinical trials.


Asunto(s)
Síndrome de Fatiga Crónica , Enfermedades Gastrointestinales , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Humanos , Síndrome de Fatiga Crónica/etiología , Enfermedades Gastrointestinales/complicaciones , Estrés Oxidativo , Disbiosis/complicaciones
11.
Food Res Int ; 184: 114228, 2024 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38609215

RESUMEN

There is a growing interest in employing whole food-based strategies to prevent chronic diseases, owing to the potential synergistic interactions among various bioactive components found within whole foods. The current research aimed to determine inhibitory effects of the whole edible mushroom Pleurotus eryngii (WPE) on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice. Our results showed that dietary intake of WPE significantly inhibited the abnormal gain of body weight and adipose tissue weight, improved glucose tolerance, and ameliorated the serum biochemical parameters in HFD-fed mice. The histological analysis illustrated that the severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver induced by HFD was significantly reduced by WPE. Oral intake of WPE profoundly modulated the mRNA levels of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism and also increased the level of short-chain fatty acids in the mouse cecum. Moreover, WPE alleviated the HFD-induced gut microbiota dysbiosis, increasing the abundance of beneficial bacteria (Akkermansia, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Sutteralla), and decreasing the harmful ones (rc4-4, Dorea, Coprococcus, Oscillospira, and Ruminococcus). These findings presented new evidence supporting that WPE could be used as a whole food-based strategy to protect against obesity and obesity-driven health problems.


Asunto(s)
Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Pleurotus , Animales , Ratones , Disbiosis , Metabolismo de los Lípidos , Obesidad/prevención & control , Ingestión de Alimentos
13.
Nutrients ; 16(7)2024 Mar 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38612951

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The study investigated the impact of starch degradation products (SDexF) as prebiotics on obesity management in mice and overweight/obese children. METHODS: A total of 48 mice on a normal diet (ND) and 48 on a Western diet (WD) were divided into subgroups with or without 5% SDexF supplementation for 28 weeks. In a human study, 100 overweight/obese children were randomly assigned to prebiotic and control groups, consuming fruit and vegetable mousse with or without 10 g of SDexF for 24 weeks. Stool samples were analyzed for microbiota using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and amino acids (AA) were assessed. RESULTS: Results showed SDexF slowed weight gain in female mice on both diets but only temporarily in males. It altered bacterial diversity and specific taxa abundances in mouse feces. In humans, SDexF did not influence weight loss or gut microbiota composition, showing minimal changes in individual taxa. The anti-obesity effect observed in mice with WD-induced obesity was not replicated in children undergoing a weight-loss program. CONCLUSIONS: SDexF exhibited sex-specific effects in mice but did not impact weight loss or microbiota composition in overweight/obese children.


Asunto(s)
Obesidad Pediátrica , Solanum tuberosum , Niño , Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Animales , Ratones , Dextrinas , Dieta Occidental , Disbiosis , Sobrepeso , ARN Ribosómico 16S/genética , Peso Corporal , Almidón/farmacología , Frutas
14.
Nutrients ; 16(7)2024 Apr 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38613087

RESUMEN

The microbiota-gut-brain (MGB) axis is a complex communication network linking the gut, microbiota, and brain, influencing various aspects of health and disease. Dysbiosis, a disturbance in the gut microbiome equilibrium, can significantly impact the MGB axis, leading to alterations in microbial composition and function. Emerging evidence highlights the connection between microbiota alterations and neurological and psychiatric disorders, including depression. This review explores the potential of psychobiotics in managing depressive disorders, emphasizing their role in restoring microbial balance and influencing the MGB axis. Psychobiotics exhibit positive effects on the intestinal barrier, immune response, cortisol levels, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Studies suggest that probiotics may serve as an adjunct therapy for depression, especially in treatment-resistant cases. This review discusses key findings from studies on psychobiotics interventions, emphasizing their impact on the gut-brain axis and mental health. The increasing acceptance of the expanded concept of the MGB axis underscores the importance of microorganisms in mental well-being. As our understanding of the microbiome's role in health and disease grows, probiotics emerge as promising agents for addressing mental health issues, providing new avenues for therapeutic interventions in depressive disorders.


Asunto(s)
Eje Cerebro-Intestino , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Humanos , Depresión/terapia , Encéfalo , Disbiosis
15.
Nutrients ; 16(7)2024 Apr 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38613099

RESUMEN

In the aging process, physiological decline occurs, posing a substantial threat to the physical and mental well-being of the elderly and contributing to the onset of age-related diseases. While traditional perspectives considered the maintenance of life as influenced by a myriad of factors, including environmental, genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle elements such as exercise and diet, the pivotal role of symbiotic microorganisms had been understated. Presently, it is acknowledged that the intestinal microbiota plays a profound role in overall health by signaling to both the central and peripheral nervous systems, as well as other distant organs. Disruption in this bidirectional communication between bacteria and the host results in dysbiosis, fostering the development of various diseases, including neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. This review aims to delve into the intricate biological mechanisms underpinning dysbiosis associated with aging and the clinical ramifications of such dysregulation. Furthermore, we aspire to explore bioactive compounds endowed with functional properties capable of modulating and restoring balance in this aging-related dysbiotic process through epigenetics alterations.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedades Cardiovasculares , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Anciano , Humanos , Disbiosis , Envejecimiento , Comunicación
16.
Nutrients ; 16(7)2024 Apr 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38613109

RESUMEN

The impact of cancer cachexia on the colonic microbiota is poorly characterized. This study assessed the effect of two cachectic-producing tumor types on the gut microbiota to determine if a similar dysbiosis could be found. In addition, it was determined if a diet containing an immunonutrient-rich food (walnuts) known to promote the growth of probiotic bacteria in the colon could alter the dysbiosis and slow cachexia. Male Fisher 344 rats were randomly assigned to a semi-purified diet with or without walnuts. Then, within each diet group, rats were further assigned randomly to a treatment group: tumor-bearing ad libitum fed (TB), non-tumor-bearing ad libitum fed (NTB-AL), and non-tumor-bearing group pair-fed to the TB (NTB-PF). The TB group was implanted either with the Ward colon carcinoma or MCA-induced sarcoma, both transplantable tumor lines. Fecal samples were collected after the development of cachexia, and bacteria species were identified using 16S rRNA gene analysis. Both TB groups developed cachexia but had a differently altered gut microbiome. Beta diversity was unaffected by treatment (NTB-AL, TB, and NTB-PF) regardless of tumor type but was affected by diet. Also, diet consistently changed the relative abundance of several bacteria taxa, while treatment and tumor type did not. The control diet increased the abundance of A. Anaeroplasma, while the walnut diet increased the genus Ruminococcus. There were no common fecal bacterial changes characteristic of cachexia found. Diet consistently changed the gut microbiota, but these changes were insufficient to slow the progression of cachexia, suggesting cancer cachexia is more complex than a few gut microbiota shifts.


Asunto(s)
Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Juglans , Sarcoma , Masculino , Animales , Ratas , Caquexia/etiología , Disbiosis , ARN Ribosómico 16S/genética , Dieta
17.
BMC Microbiol ; 24(1): 105, 2024 Apr 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38561662

RESUMEN

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by an elevated level of blood glucose due to the absence of insulin secretion, ineffectiveness, or lack of uptake of secreted insulin in the body. The improperly diagnosed and poorly managed DM can cause severe damage to organs in the body like the nerves, eyes, heart, and kidneys. This study was aimed at investigating the effect of Clostridium butyricum (probiotic) with magnesium supplementation to evaluate the effect on gut microbial dysbiosis and blood glucose levels. In the laboratory, 6-8 weeks old 24 male albino rats weighing 200-250 g were given free access to water and food. Diabetes was induced using streptozotocin (60 mg/kg) in overnight fasted rats. Diabetic rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 6, 6 replicates in each group). Metformin (100 mg/kg/day) with a standard basal diet was provided to control group (G0), Clostridium butyricum (1.5 × 105 CFU/day) with standard basal diet was provided to treatment group (G1), magnesium (500 mg/kg/day) was provided to group (G2). Clostridium butyricum (1.5 × 105 CFU/day) and magnesium (300 mg/kg/day) in combination with a standard basal diet was provided to group (G3). Blood Glucose, Magnesium blood test and microbial assay were done. Random blood glucose levels were monitored twice a week for 21 days and were represented as mean of each week. The results conclude that Clostridium butyricum (1.5 × 105 CFU) is very effective in balancing random blood glucose levels from 206.6 ± 67.7 to 85.1 ± 3.8 (p = 0.006) compared to other groups (p > 0.005). The results of stool analysis showed that Clostridium butyricum as probiotic restores microbial dysbiosis as evident by the 105 CFU Clostridium butyricum load in G1, which was higher than G0, G2 and G3 which were 103 and 104 CFU respectively. The findings of this study conclude that Clostridium butyricum supplementation improved blood glucose levels and intestinal bacterial load in type II diabetes mellitus.


Asunto(s)
Clostridium butyricum , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Probióticos , Masculino , Ratas , Animales , Clostridium butyricum/fisiología , Glucemia , Magnesio , Disbiosis , Probióticos/farmacología
18.
BMC Microbiol ; 24(1): 112, 2024 Apr 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38575862

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Postpartum women often experience stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and vaginal microbial dysbiosis, which seriously affect women's physical and mental health. Understanding the relationship between SUI and vaginal microbiota composition may help to prevent vaginal diseases, but research on the potential association between these conditions is limited. RESULTS: This study employed 16S rRNA gene sequencing to explore the association between SUI and vaginal dysbiosis. In terms of the vaginal microbiota, both species richness and evenness were significantly higher in the SUI group. Additionally, the results of NMDS and species composition indicated that there were differences in the composition of the vaginal microbiota between the two groups. Specifically, compared to postpartum women without SUI (Non-SUI), the relative abundance of bacteria associated with bacterial dysbiosis, such as Streptococcus, Prevotella, Dialister, and Veillonella, showed an increase, while the relative abundance of Lactobacillus decreased in SUI patients. Furthermore, the vaginal microbial co-occurrence network of SUI patients displayed higher connectivity, complexity, and clustering. CONCLUSION: The study highlights the role of Lactobacillus in maintaining vaginal microbial homeostasis. It found a correlation between SUI and vaginal microbiota, indicating an increased risk of vaginal dysbiosis. The findings could enhance our understanding of the relationship between SUI and vaginal dysbiosis in postpartum women, providing valuable insights for preventing bacterial vaginal diseases and improving women's health.


Asunto(s)
Microbiota , Incontinencia Urinaria de Esfuerzo , Enfermedades Vaginales , Femenino , Humanos , Incontinencia Urinaria de Esfuerzo/etiología , Disbiosis/microbiología , ARN Ribosómico 16S/genética , Vagina/microbiología , Microbiota/genética , Lactobacillus/genética , Bacterias/genética , Enfermedades Vaginales/complicaciones
19.
BMC Microbiol ; 24(1): 114, 2024 Apr 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38575861

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Diarrhea poses a major threat to bovine calves leading to mortality and economic losses. Among the causes of calf diarrhea, bovine rotavirus is a major etiological agent and may result in dysbiosis of gut microbiota. The current study was designed to investigate the effect of probiotic Limosilactobacillus fermentum (Accession No.OR504458) on the microbial composition of rotavirus-infected calves using 16S metagenomic analysis technique. Screening of rotavirus infection in calves below one month of age was done through clinical signs and Reverse Transcriptase PCR. The healthy calves (n = 10) were taken as control while the infected calves (n = 10) before treatment was designated as diarrheal group were treated with Probiotic for 5 days. All the calves were screened for the presence of rotavirus infection on each day and fecal scoring was done to assess the fecal consistency. Infected calves after treatment were designated as recovered group. Fecal samples from healthy, recovered and diarrheal (infected calves before sampling) were processed for DNA extraction while four samples from each group were processed for 16S metagenomic analysis using Illumina sequencing technique and analyzed via QIIME 2. RESULTS: The results show that Firmicutes were more abundant in the healthy and recovered group than in the diarrheal group. At the same time Proteobacteria was higher in abundance in the diarrheal group. Order Oscillospirales dominated healthy and recovered calves and Enterobacterials dominated the diarrheal group. Alpha diversity indices show that diversity indices based on richness were higher in the healthy group and lower in the diarrheal group while a mixed pattern of clustering between diarrheal and recovered groups samples in PCA plots based on beta diversity indices was observed. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that probiotic Limosilactobacillus Fermentum N-30 ameliorate the dysbiosis caused by rotavirus diarrhea and may be used to prevent diarrhea in pre-weaned calves after further exploration.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedades de los Bovinos , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Limosilactobacillus fermentum , Probióticos , Infecciones por Rotavirus , Rotavirus , Animales , Bovinos , Rotavirus/genética , Infecciones por Rotavirus/tratamiento farmacológico , Infecciones por Rotavirus/veterinaria , Microbioma Gastrointestinal/genética , Disbiosis , Diarrea/tratamiento farmacológico , Diarrea/veterinaria , Heces/microbiología , Probióticos/uso terapéutico , Enfermedades de los Bovinos/tratamiento farmacológico , Enfermedades de los Bovinos/microbiología
20.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0300869, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38578736

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Numerous recent studies have found a strong correlation between intestinal flora and the occurrence of hypertension. However, it remains unclear whether fecal microbiota transfer might affect the blood pressure of the host. This study aimed to quantify both associations. METHODS: An electronic search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), WanFang database, Weipu, Embase, and SinoMed to retrieve relevant studies. The final search was completed on August 22, 2022. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias assessment. All data were analyzed using RevMan 5.4. RESULTS: A total of 5 articles were selected for final inclusion. All studies were assessed as having a high risk of bias according to the SYRCLE risk of bias tool. The meta-analysis results showed that transplantation of fecal bacteria from the hypertensive model can significantly improve the host's systolic pressure (MD = 18.37, 95%CI: 9.74~26.99, P<0.001), and diastolic pressure (MD = 17.65, 95%CI: 12.37~22.93, P<0.001). Subgroup analyses revealed that the increase in systolic pressure in the hypertension model subgroup (MD = 29.56, 95%CI = 23.55-35.58, P<0.001) was more pronounced than that in the normotensive model subgroup (MD = 12.48, 95%CI = 3.51-21.45, P<0.001). CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis suggests a relationship between gut microbiota dysbiosis and increased blood pressure, where transplantation of fecal bacteria from the hypertensive model can cause a significant increase in systolic pressure and diastolic pressure in animal models.


Asunto(s)
Trasplante de Microbiota Fecal , Hipertensión , Animales , Presión Sanguínea , Hipertensión/terapia , Heces , Disbiosis
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