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1.
Reprod Health ; 18(1): 26, 2021 Feb 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33618726

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: A coherent sexuality education program for adolescents is part of their sexual and reproductive rights and can help them have a healthier future. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the perspectives and intervention preferences of Iranian stakeholders regarding comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) in male adolescents based on the IMB model (information, motivation, behavioral skills). METHODS: This study was a qualitative study that was analyzed through a directed content analysis approach. Individual interviews and focused group discussions (FGDs) were used for data collection. The data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews with stakeholders in two schools and the Education Department in Sari and the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education in Tehran from March 2019 to August 2019. Data saturation was achieved after 28 interviews and 1 FGDs with 9 participants. Finally, two sets of data were coded and analyzed using directed content analysis. RESULTS: In this study, five themes emerged as (1) role of institutions; (2) role of organizations; (3) need for stakeholder's partnership; (4) need for adolescent sexuality socialization management; and (5) need for enhancing the teachers' professional competence, which seemed to influence the implementation of CSE in male adolescents. Participants also expressed a number of intervention preferences for CSE. The most important of these was the change in macro policies, helping to create a culture against all forms of violence and breaking the taboo of sexuality education for children and adolescents. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study revealed the need for a CSE program for adolescents' sexuality socialization. The finding showed that teachers required training to enhance their professional competence about sexuality issues. Therefore, it is necessary to design and implement culture-appropriate skill based programs to enhance the teachers' professional competence regarding the adolescents' sexual health.


Asunto(s)
Actitud Frente a la Salud , Percepción , Salud Reproductiva/educación , Educación Sexual , Salud Sexual/educación , Adolescente , Conducta del Adolescente/fisiología , Conducta del Adolescente/psicología , Niño , Grupos Focales , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Irán , Masculino , Motivación/fisiología , Investigación Cualitativa , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Educación Sexual/métodos , Conducta Sexual/psicología , Participación de los Interesados , Adulto Joven
2.
Arch Sex Behav ; 50(2): 629-646, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33398696

RESUMEN

We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from a U.S. nationally representative survey of individuals ages 14-24 years old on what sources of information from the past year they considered to be the most helpful about how to have sex (n = 600 adolescents ages 14-17 years old, and n = 666 young adults ages 18-24 years old). Among the 324 adolescents who indicated that they had been helped by at least one source of information, helpful information was most likely to have come from parents (31.0%) and friends (21.6%). Only 8.4% of adolescents said pornography was helpful. However, for those in the 18-24-year-old age group, pornography was the most commonly endorsed helpful source (24.5%), as compared to other possible options such as sexual partners, friends, media, and health care professionals. Multivariable regression analyses revealed that indicating that pornography was the most helpful source of information about how to have sex, compared to the other sources, was inversely associated with being female (OR = 0.32, p = .001), inversely associated with identifying as bisexual compared to heterosexual (OR = 0.15, p = .038), positively associated with being Black compared to being white non-Hispanic (OR = 4.26, p = .021), inversely associated with reporting a household income of either $25 K to $49,999 (OR = 0.31, p = .010) or $50 K to $74,999 (OR = 0.36, p = .019) compared to more than $75 K, and positively associated with having masturbated (OR = 13.20, p = .005). Subsequent research should investigate the role of pornography in both adolescent and adult sexual development, including why one-quarter of U.S. young adults say that pornography is a helpful source of information about how to have sex and what they think that they are learning from it.


Asunto(s)
Literatura Erótica/psicología , Conducta Exploratoria , Conducta Sexual/psicología , Parejas Sexuales/psicología , Adolescente , Medios de Comunicación , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Heterosexualidad/psicología , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalencia , Educación Sexual/métodos , Conducta Sexual/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
3.
Obstet Gynecol ; 136(4): 868-869, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32976376

RESUMEN

The primary goal of the initial reproductive health visit is to provide preventive health care services, educational information, and guidance, in addition to problem-focused care. The initial reproductive health visit should take place between the ages of 13 and 15 years. The scope of the initial visit will depend on the patient's concerns, medical history, physical and emotional development, and the level of care the patient is receiving from other health care professionals. All adolescents should have the opportunity to discuss health issues with a health care professional one-on-one, because they may feel uncomfortable talking about these issues in the presence of a parent or guardian, sibling, or intimate partner. Addressing confidentiality concerns is imperative because adolescents in need of health care services are more likely to forego care if there are concerns about confidentiality. Laws regarding confidentiality of care to minors vary by state, and health care professionals should be knowledgeable about current laws for their practice. Taking care to establish secure lines of communication can build trust with the patient and guardian, support continuity of care, ensure adherence to legal statutes, and decrease barriers to services. Obstetrician-gynecologists have the opportunity to serve as educators of parents and guardians about reproductive health issues. Preparing the office environment to include adolescent-friendly and age-appropriate reading materials, intake forms, and educational visual aids can make the general office space more inclusive and accessible. Resources should be provided for both the adolescent patient and the parent or guardian, if possible, at the conclusion of the visit. This Committee Opinion has been updated to include gender neutral terminology throughout the document, counseling topics with direct links to helpful resources, screening tools with direct links, addition of gender and sexuality discussion, and inclusion of trauma-informed care.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud del Adolescente , Ginecología/métodos , Obstetricia/métodos , Servicios Preventivos de Salud , Salud Reproductiva , Adolescente , Conducta del Adolescente , Salud del Adolescente , Servicios de Salud del Adolescente/ética , Servicios de Salud del Adolescente/organización & administración , Femenino , Humanos , Servicios Preventivos de Salud/ética , Servicios Preventivos de Salud/métodos , Salud Reproductiva/educación , Salud Reproductiva/ética , Educación Sexual/métodos , Conducta Sexual , Estados Unidos
4.
Obstet Gynecol ; 136(4): e70-e80, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32976378

RESUMEN

The primary goal of the initial reproductive health visit is to provide preventive health care services, educational information, and guidance, in addition to problem-focused care. The initial reproductive health visit should take place between the ages of 13 and 15 years. The scope of the initial visit will depend on the patient's concerns, medical history, physical and emotional development, and the level of care the patient is receiving from other health care professionals. All adolescents should have the opportunity to discuss health issues with a health care professional one-on-one, because they may feel uncomfortable talking about these issues in the presence of a parent or guardian, sibling, or intimate partner. Addressing confidentiality concerns is imperative because adolescents in need of health care services are more likely to forego care if there are concerns about confidentiality. Laws regarding confidentiality of care to minors vary by state, and health care professionals should be knowledgeable about current laws for their practice. Taking care to establish secure lines of communication can build trust with the patient and guardian, support continuity of care, ensure adherence to legal statutes, and decrease barriers to services. Obstetrician-gynecologists have the opportunity to serve as educators of parents and guardians about reproductive health issues. Preparing the office environment to include adolescent-friendly and age-appropriate reading materials, intake forms, and educational visual aids can make the general office space more inclusive and accessible. Resources should be provided for both the adolescent patient and the parent or guardian, if possible, at the conclusion of the visit. This Committee Opinion has been updated to include gender neutral terminology throughout the document, counseling topics with direct links to helpful resources, screening tools with direct links, addition of gender and sexuality discussion, and inclusion of trauma-informed care.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud del Adolescente , Ginecología/métodos , Obstetricia/métodos , Servicios Preventivos de Salud , Salud Reproductiva , Adolescente , Conducta del Adolescente , Salud del Adolescente , Servicios de Salud del Adolescente/ética , Servicios de Salud del Adolescente/organización & administración , Confidencialidad/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Planificación de Atención al Paciente , Servicios Preventivos de Salud/ética , Servicios Preventivos de Salud/métodos , Salud Reproductiva/educación , Salud Reproductiva/ética , Educación Sexual/métodos , Conducta Sexual , Estados Unidos
5.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0236712, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32915798

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The Reproductive Life Plan (RLP) is a clinical tool to help clients find strategies to achieve their reproductive goals. Despite much research on the RLP from high-income countries, it has never been studied in low- or middle income countries. Together with health workers called Mentor Mothers (MMs), we used a context-adapted RLP in disadvantaged areas in Eswatini. Our aim was to evaluate the implementation of the RLP in this setting. METHODOLOGY: MMs participated in focus group discussions (FGDs, n = 3 MMs n = 29) in January 2018 and at follow-up in May 2018 (n = 4, MMs n = 24). FGDs covered challenges in using the RLP, how to adapt it, and later experiences from using it. We used a deductive qualitative thematic analysis with the integrated Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (i-PARIHS) framework, creating themes guided by its four constructs: facilitation, innovation, recipients and context. The MMs also answered a questionnaire to assess the implementation process inspired by normalization process theory. RESULTS: The RLP intervention was feasible and acceptable among MMs and fit well with existing practices. The RLP questions were perceived as advantageous since they opened up discussions with clients and enabled reflection. All except one MM (n = 23) agreed or strongly agreed that they valued the effect the RLP has had on their work. Using the RLP, the MMs observed progress in pregnancy planning among their clients and thought it improved the quality of contraceptive counselling. The clients' ability to form and achieve their reproductive goals was hampered by contextual factors such as intimate partner violence and women's limited reproductive health and rights. DISCUSSION: The RLP was easily implemented in these disadvantaged communities and the MMs were key persons in this intervention. The RLP should be further evaluated among clients and suitable approaches to include partners are required.


Asunto(s)
Implementación de Plan de Salud/normas , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Educación Sexual/métodos , Adulto , Esuatini , Femenino , Implementación de Plan de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Conducta Reproductiva/psicología , Conducta Reproductiva/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación Sexual/normas , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Poblaciones Vulnerables
6.
Lancet Child Adolesc Health ; 4(9): 699-708, 2020 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32827491

RESUMEN

Sexual and reproductive health is an important aspect of human development, but discussions with adolescents and young adults on this topic are often challenging for health-care providers. As a result, many adolescents and young adults do not receive appropriate, comprehensive sexual education, despite recognition from WHO and the UN that access to this education is a human right. Adolescents and young adults with mild to moderate intellectual or developmental disability, or both, are just as likely to be sexually active as are their peers without disability; however, these individuals are less likely to receive comprehensive sexual education. To ensure adequate comprehensive sexual education for adolescents and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, sexual health educators should facilitate conversations about sexual and reproductive health that are non-judgmental and sexually inclusive. Such initiatives should use an educational framework grounded in universal design for learning, including use of multiple media types with clear, concise language and images.


Asunto(s)
Educación Sexual/métodos , Conducta Sexual , Salud Sexual/educación , Adolescente , Discapacidades del Desarrollo/psicología , Discapacidades del Desarrollo/terapia , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Discapacidad Intelectual/psicología , Discapacidad Intelectual/terapia , Masculino , Medición de Riesgo , Adulto Joven
8.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 5: CD011189, 2020 May 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32356377

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Sexual dysfunction following stroke is common but often is poorly managed. As awareness of sexual dysfunction following stroke increases as an important issue, a clearer evidence base for interventions for sexual dysfunction is needed to optimise management. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to reduce sexual dysfunction following stroke, and to assess adverse events associated with interventions for sexual dysfunction following stroke. SEARCH METHODS: We conducted the search on 27 November 2019. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; from June 2014), in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (from 1950); Embase (from 1980); the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; from 1982); the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED; from 1985); PsycINFO (from 1806); the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro; from 1999); and 10 additional bibliographic databases and ongoing trial registers. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared pharmacological treatments, mechanical devices, or complementary medicine interventions versus placebo. We also included other non-pharmacological interventions (such as education or therapy), which were compared against usual care or different forms of intervention (such as different intensities) for treating sexual dysfunction in stroke survivors. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently selected eligible studies, extracted data, and assessed study quality. We determined the risk of bias for each study and performed a 'best evidence' synthesis using the GRADE approach. MAIN RESULTS: We identified three RCTs with a total of 212 participants. We noted significant heterogeneity in interventions (one pharmacological, one physiotherapy-based, and one psycho-educational), and all RCTs were small and of 'low' or 'very low' quality. Based on these RCTs, data are insufficient to provide any reliable indication of benefit or risk to guide clinical practice in terms of the use of sertraline, specific pelvic floor muscle training, or individualised sexual rehabilitation. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Use of sertraline to treat premature ejaculation needs to be tested in further RCTs. The lack of benefit with structured sexual rehabilitation and pelvic floor physiotherapy should not be interpreted as proof of ineffectiveness. Well-designed, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials of long-term duration are needed to determine the effectiveness of various types of interventions for sexual dysfunction. It should be noted, however, that it may not be possible to double-blind trials of complex interventions.


Asunto(s)
Disfunciones Sexuales Fisiológicas/terapia , Accidente Cerebrovascular/complicaciones , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Antidepresivos/efectos adversos , Antidepresivos/uso terapéutico , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Orgasmo , Diafragma Pélvico , Eyaculación Prematura/tratamiento farmacológico , Eyaculación Prematura/etiología , Calidad de Vida , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Entrenamiento de Resistencia/métodos , Sertralina/efectos adversos , Sertralina/uso terapéutico , Educación Sexual/métodos , Disfunciones Sexuales Fisiológicas/etiología , Disfunciones Sexuales Fisiológicas/rehabilitación , Parejas Sexuales/psicología , Vitamina B 12/análogos & derivados , Vitamina B 12/uso terapéutico , Complejo Vitamínico B/uso terapéutico , Adulto Joven
9.
J Environ Public Health ; 2020: 3675684, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32405301

RESUMEN

Background: Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) remains a challenge globally. This study aims to gauge the perceptions of parents towards the delivery of SRH education in mainstream public secondary schools in Fiji. Methods: The qualitative study design was used to collect the data from parents in Suva, Fiji, from July to August 2018. A semistructured questionnaire was developed to run Focus Group Discussion (FGD) among parents residing in Suva who had school-attending children from years 11 to 13. Parents were recruited from five schools with the help of students. Twenty-six parents of which 10 were males, aged between 38 and 65, participated in this study. Consent was obtained from each participant prior to the data collection stage. Data collected were transcribed verbatim and were analyzed thematically. Ethical approvals were obtained before collecting the data. Results: Seven themes emerged which included the provision of school-based sex education, parental involvement with school-based sex education, sex education at home, age-appropriate incremental sex education, ethnic variations regarding sex education, barriers and facilitators for the delivery of school-based sex education, and perceived ideal version of sex education. Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest for policy and programs to match parents, schools, and students' expectations. Effective interventions need to involve and help parents to take a more active part to change policy, program, and advocacy for relevant SRH education.


Asunto(s)
Padres/psicología , Salud Reproductiva/educación , Servicios de Salud Escolar/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación Sexual/métodos , Salud Sexual/educación , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Niño , Femenino , Fiji/epidemiología , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Investigación Cualitativa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
10.
Rev Med Suisse ; 16(691): 765-768, 2020 Apr 22.
Artículo en Francés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32320150

RESUMEN

Despite obvious needs, adolescent boys do not access information and care in the field of sexual and reproductive health as easily as adolescent girls. The primary care setting gives the opportunity to tackle sexuality topics with boys. It allows to defuse frequent causes of concern in this crucial developmental phase, in a proactive and open-minded way, while focusing on strengths rather than on risks. It also allows to discuss masculine norms and their impact on health, and to come up with essential prevention elements. It is -necessary to focus on boys' health to have them involved in a -changing process on behalf of their own health but also on behalf of girls' and young women's health.


Asunto(s)
Salud del Hombre , Atención Primaria de Salud/métodos , Educación Sexual/métodos , Salud Sexual/educación , Adolescente , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Reproductiva/educación , Sexualidad , Salud de la Mujer
11.
Enferm. clín. (Ed. impr.) ; 30(supl.3): 66-70, mar. 2020. graf, tab
Artículo en Inglés | IBECS | ID: ibc-196114

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This study is aimed to analyze the effectiveness of Titeer game toward preventing of teenage pregnancy. METHOD: A quasi experiment with pre-posttest control group was used in this study. One hundreed and thirty eight of tenagers aged 2-10 years were recruited as participants (69 of tenagers each group). Titeer game was given to intervention group during a month. Conventional intervention (leaflet) were provided to control group. The illustrative questionnaires were measured before intervention, 2 and 10 weeks after intervention to measure knowledge, attitude, sefl-eficacy, life skill, peer influenced, behavior, and prevent of pregnancy of tenagers. Independent T-Test and General Linear Model Repeated Measured (GLM-RM) was used to complete of analysis. RESULTS: Knowledge, attitude, self efficacy, life skill peer influenced, and pregnancy prevention were significantly increase 2 and 10 of weeks after intervention. CONCLUSION: The Titeer game could be increase of preventing tenagers' pregnancy aged 2-10 years


No disponible


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Femenino , Adolescente , Adulto Joven , Adulto , Embarazo en Adolescencia/prevención & control , Educación Sexual/métodos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Juego e Implementos de Juego/psicología , Embarazo en Adolescencia/psicología , Educación Sexual/organización & administración , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Autoeficacia , Servicios de Salud del Adolescente
12.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 58: 102802, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32057560

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Myocardial infarction (MI) greatly impacts an individual's sexual health. It is reported that almost 40 to 80% population with MI are not able to resume their sexual routine after the illness due to organic or psychological sexual dysfunction. To reduce the prevalence of sexual dysfunction after MI, cardiac nurses are required to provide sexual counselling to their stable patients. However, this responsibility is seldom fulfilled by nurses due to several barriers. These barriers are not explicitly explored from the nurses' perspective, which is necessary to understand in order to promote sexual counselling in cardiac health care settings. OBJECTIVE: To explore the facilitators and barriers of cardiac nurses in providing sexual education to post-MI patients. DESIGN AND METHOD: A qualitative systematic review was undertaken by performing a systematic search from six databases along with search from reference lists of related studies. FINDINGS: Four studies revealed 49 findings, which formed 10 categories and yielded four synthesised findings. These are: (1) Institutional Barriers such as lack of education, guidelines and material resources can prevent nurses from providing sexual education to MI patients; (2) Personal barriers such as uncertainty about the nurse's role in sexual education, giving least priority to sexual counselling and lack of comfort with discussing sexuality can affect how nurses provide sexual education to MI patients; (3) Socio-cultural and religious barriers such as contradictory beliefs and gender differences can challenge nurses when providing sexual education to MI patients and (4) Nurses consider different strategies for addressing sexual education with MI patients, in individual or group settings. CONCLUSION: To promote sexual counselling, strategies are proposed by nurses, which can help in limiting barriers and facilitate in conducting counselling sessions. These strategies need to be validated from extensive research before implementing them into nursing practice.


Asunto(s)
Infarto del Miocardio/terapia , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/psicología , Investigación Cualitativa , Educación Sexual/normas , Humanos , Infarto del Miocardio/psicología , Rol de la Enfermera/psicología , Relaciones Enfermero-Paciente , Educación Sexual/métodos
13.
Trials ; 21(1): 50, 2020 Jan 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31915060

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: School-based comprehensive sexual health education can improve adolescent health outcomes, and web-based programs are a promising approach to overcoming challenges associated with teacher-led formats by ensuring that students receive content that is consistent, unbiased, and medically accurate. However, many adolescents do not receive high-quality sexual health education and turn to the media for information about sex and relationships. Consumption of sexual media messages is related to early and risky sexual behaviors. Media literacy education (MLE) is a proven approach to adolescent sexual health promotion, yet there are no rigorously evaluated web-based MLE programs to promote sexual and relationship health among high school students. METHODS: This study will test the efficacy, in a randomized controlled trial, of Media Aware, a web-based comprehensive sexual health promotion program for high school students that uses an MLE approach. Participants will be students in 9th and 10th grade health classes in participating schools. Randomization will take place at the school level, and data collection will take place at three time points (i.e., pretest, posttest, and 3 months follow-up). Students in the intervention classrooms will receive Media Aware between pretest and posttest, and students in the delayed-intervention classrooms will receive Media Aware after study completion (i.e., after 3 months follow-up data collection). Students in the delayed-intervention classes will receive their standard health education programming, and teachers in the delayed-intervention classes will be asked to refrain from teaching sexual health or MLE during the study timeframe. The primary outcome variables are intentions, willingness, and behaviors related to sexual health and sexual activity. DISCUSSION: There are currently no evidence-based comprehensive sexual health programs for high school students that are web-based and use an MLE approach. Media Aware has the potential to be an engaging, less expensive, and effective sexual and relationship health program for high school students. Media Aware is unique in two important ways: (1) the web-based format reduces many of the challenges to fidelity of implementation associated with teacher-led sexual health education; and (2) the MLE approach addresses a commonly ignored influence on adolescent sexual and relationship health, namely, media. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04035694. Registered on 29 July 2019. Contact for Scientific Queries: Tracy Scull, PhD (Principal Investigator); innovation Research & Training at 5316 Highgate Drive, Suite 121, Durham, North Carolina, USA 27713; tscull@irtinc.us.


Asunto(s)
Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Intervención basada en la Internet , Instituciones Académicas/organización & administración , Educación Sexual/organización & administración , Adolescente , Salud del Adolescente , Femenino , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Conductas de Riesgo para la Salud , Humanos , Internet , Alfabetización/psicología , Masculino , North Carolina , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Educación Sexual/métodos , Salud Sexual , Estudiantes/psicología
14.
Patient Educ Couns ; 103(2): 343-349, 2020 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31451362

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The aim was to assess the effects of a parental sex education program on knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and practices among immigrant parents. METHODS: A cluster randomized trial was conducted at immigrant activity centers in northern Taiwan. Recruited participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (four centers, n = 86) or control (four centers, n = 67) group. A practical booklet and a booster session were delivered. In total, 132 participants' knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and practice of parenting sexual education were examined at the baseline and 6 weeks after the intervention. RESULTS: After controlling for possible confounders, the posttest scores of self-efficacy of the experimental group were higher than those of the control group. The Johnson-Neyman procedure indicated that the intervention was effective for participants who had pretest knowledge, attitude, and practice scores of <14.62, <110.27, and <41.5, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: An intervention with both practical booklet and booster session can improve knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and practices of parental sex education among immigrant parents. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: In addition to practical booklets, health care professionals should provide booster sessions that meet the needs of immigrant parents to prevent sexual problems among children and adolescents at an early age.


Asunto(s)
Emigrantes e Inmigrantes/educación , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Relaciones Padres-Hijo/etnología , Padres/educación , Educación Sexual/métodos , Conducta Sexual/etnología , Adulto , Emigrantes e Inmigrantes/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Folletos , Padres/psicología , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Autoeficacia , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Taiwán
15.
J Sex Marital Ther ; 46(1): 43-56, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31250709

RESUMEN

Mindful attention and awareness may promote sexual satisfaction. However, experiencing cumulative childhood interpersonal trauma (CCT; sexual abuse, neglect, etc.) is associated with distress, which might interfere with dispositional mindfulness and lead to lower sexual satisfaction. Although the concept of mindfulness emerged as an interesting variable to understand sexual difficulties, little empirical data are available on this topic. This study tested an integrative mediation model of the relation between CCT, psychological distress, dispositional mindfulness, and sexual satisfaction within a clinical sample of 410 adult patients consulting in sex therapy. Patients completed questionnaires assessing CCT, psychological distress, dispositional mindfulness, and sexual satisfaction. Results showed that the majority of patients reported experiences of childhood interpersonal trauma. Path analyses highlighted three distinct significant paths from CCT to sexual satisfaction. First, dispositional mindfulness mediated the relationship between CCT and sexual satisfaction. Second, psychological distress also mediated the relationship between CCT and sexual satisfaction. Third, the effect of CCT on sexual satisfaction was sequentially mediated through greater levels of psychological distress and lower levels of dispositional mindfulness. The model explained 19% of the variance in sexual satisfaction. Findings suggest that dispositional mindfulness and psychological distress are key processes explaining sexual satisfaction in CCT survivors.


Asunto(s)
Adultos Sobrevivientes del Maltrato a los Niños/psicología , Atención Plena/métodos , Personalidad , Educación Sexual/métodos , Disfunciones Sexuales Psicológicas/psicología , Adaptación Psicológica , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Control Interno-Externo , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Disfunciones Sexuales Psicológicas/etiología
16.
Autism ; 24(1): 64-79, 2020 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31096780

RESUMEN

Youth with autism spectrum disorder can face social-communication challenges related to sexuality, dating, and friendships. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of the Supporting Teens with Autism on Relationships program. In total, 84 youth with autism spectrum disorder aged 9 to 18 and their parents participated in this study; two groups received the Supporting Teens with Autism on Relationships program (interventionist-led parent group vs parent self-guided), while an attentional control group received a substance abuse prevention program that included instruction in problem-solving and social skills. Feasibility and acceptability of the Supporting Teens with Autism on Relationships program was high overall. The Supporting Teens with Autism on Relationships program was effective in increasing parent and youth knowledge of sexuality, while the attentional control was not. There was preliminary support for improvement in parenting efficacy related to discussing sexuality with their children. Gains were seen among completers regardless of whether the parent received support from a facilitator. Implications and future directions are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Trastorno del Espectro Autista/psicología , Responsabilidad Parental/psicología , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/métodos , Educación Sexual/métodos , Conducta Sexual/psicología , Habilidades Sociales , Adolescente , Niño , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Padres/psicología
18.
Reprod Health ; 16(1): 180, 2019 Dec 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31852538

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Early marriage and early childbearing are highly prevalent in Niger with 75% of girls married before age 18 years and 42% of girls giving birth between ages 15 and 18 years. In 2012, only 7% of all 15-19-year-old married adolescents (male and female) reported use of a modern contraceptive method with barriers including misinformation, and social norms unsupportive of contraception. To meet the needs of married adolescents and their husbands in Niger, the Reaching Married Adolescents (RMA) program was developed with the goal of improving modern contraceptive method uptake in the Dosso region of Niger. METHODS: Using a four-arm cluster randomized control design, the RMA study seeks to assess whether household visits only (Arm 1), small group discussions only (Arm 2), or a combination of both (Arm 3), as compared to controls (no intervention - Arm 4), improve modern contraceptive method use among married adolescent girls and young women (AGYW), age 13-19 years-old, in three districts of the Dosso region. Intervention conditions were randomly assigned across the three districts, Dosso, Doutchi, and Loga. Within each district, eligible villages were assigned to either that intervention condition or to the control condition (12 intervention and 4 control per district). Across the three intervention conditions, community dialogues regarding modern contraceptive use were also implemented. Data for the study was collected at baseline (April - June 2016), at 24 months post-intervention (April - June 2018), and a final round of data collection will occur at 40 months post-intervention (October - December 2019). DISCUSSION: The RMA intervention is a gender-synchronized and community-based program implemented among married adolescent girls and their husbands in the context of rural Niger. The intervention is designed to provide education about modern contraception and to promote gender equity in order to increase uptake of modern contraceptive methods. Results from this cluster randomized control study will contribute to the knowledge base regarding the utility of male engagement as a strategy within community-level approaches to promote modern contraceptive method use in the high need context of West Africa. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registered October 2017 - ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03226730.


Asunto(s)
Conducta Anticonceptiva/psicología , Anticoncepción/psicología , Composición Familiar , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Matrimonio , Conducta Reproductiva/psicología , Educación Sexual/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anticoncepción/estadística & datos numéricos , Conducta Anticonceptiva/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicios de Planificación Familiar/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Embarazo , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Adulto Joven
19.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1614, 2019 Dec 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31791323

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Disparities in sexually transmitted infections (STI) are an urgent problem among Native American youth and young adults which are not fully explained by different sexual or related behaviors. These sexual health disparities are more likely attributed to social environments and structural determinants such as a shortage of sexual healthcare providers, lower socioeconomic status, and access barriers to STI screening and treatment, including geographic isolation and confidentiality concerns. Innovative, non-clinic based alternatives to promote STI screening and treatment are essential for alleviating these disparities. Self-care, or the care taken by individuals towards their own health and well-being may be such a strategy. This study will assess the efficacy of a self-care intervention, called Protecting Our Future Generation, for increasing uptake of STI screening and impacting sexual risk and protective behaviors among Native American youth and young adults living in a reservation-based community in the Southwestern United States. METHODS: The proposed study is a randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of a self-care intervention compared to a control condition. Participants will be Native Americans ages 14-26 years old who have had vaginal or anal sex at least once in their lifetime. Participants will be randomized to the intervention which includes: 1) a sexual health self-assessment with embedded clinical prediction tool predicting STI positivity, and 2) personalized messaging with key steps to lower risk for STIs, or the control condition which includes: 1) a self-assessment about water, soda and sugar sweetened beverage consumption, and 2) personalized messaging to meet recommended daily intake. All participants will be offered a self-administered STI test. Participants will complete assessments at baseline, 3- and 6-months follow-up. The primary outcome measure is completion of STI screening. DISCUSSION: Protecting Our Future Generation is among the first self-care interventions uniquely focused on sexual health among a Native American population, who endure significant sexual health disparities and are under-represented in research. If efficacious, the intervention will be a model of sexual health self-care for Native American youth and young adults adaptable for use in healthcare and community-based settings. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical Trials: http://clinicaltrials.gov; NCT03895320; Registered 03/28/2019.


Asunto(s)
Terapia Conductista/métodos , Indios Norteamericanos/psicología , Autocuidado/métodos , Educación Sexual/métodos , Salud Sexual/etnología , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Tamizaje Masivo/psicología , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Conducta Sexual , Enfermedades de Transmisión Sexual/prevención & control , Responsabilidad Social , Sudoeste de Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
20.
Med. infant ; 26(4): 358-363, dic. 2019. Tab
Artículo en Español | LILACS | ID: biblio-1047047

RESUMEN

Introducción: Según el Plan Nacional de Prevención del Embarazo no Intencional en la Adolescencia en Argentina, 109 mil adolescentes y 3 mil niñas menores de 15 años, tienen un hijo cada año. Los factores son múltiples, pero el más importante y frecuente es la falta de educación sexual integral. Objetivos: 1- Evaluar el conocimiento sobre salud sexual y reproductiva antes y después de un taller dirigido a madres y padres internados con sus hijos. 2- Detectar si hubo diferencia entre los padres y madres según la edad. Material y métodos: estudio observacional, descriptivo, analítico, longitudinal, prospectivo y antes- después. Se incluyeron madres y padres con sus hijos internados que realizaron el taller por primera vez. Los padres y madres participantes fueron categorizados en función de la edad en menores de 19 años y 11 meses (Gr1= adolescentes) e igual o mayor a 20 años (Gr2= jóvenes/adultos). Se analizaron las variables: edad, sexo, lugar de residencia, si recibió información sobre salud sexual y reproductiva y cuál fue la fuente de la misma. Se aplicó una encuesta autoadministrada con 12 preguntas sobre métodos anticonceptivos, infecciones de transmisión sexual (ITS) y derechos sexuales y reproductivos y se analizaron los datos antes y después de la intervención. Resultados: Se encuestaron a 116 padres que cumplían los criterios y accedieron a participar. (Gr1 = 24 y Gr2 = 92) Mediana de edad: 22 años (15-47). Un 53% refirió haber recibido anteriormente información, 30% de la escuela observándose un desconocimiento previo de la temática antes del taller independiente de la edad. La intervención realizada en el taller aumentó significativamente los conocimientos en ambos grupos. Conclusión: La estrategia educativa debe centrarse en participación e integración. La metodología de taller es la más adecuada, ya que facilita el debate y posibilita la adquisición de competencias y habilidades, además de aportar conceptos teóricos (AU)


Introduction: According to the National Unintentional Pregnancy Prevention Plan in Adolescence in Argentina, yearly 109 thousand adolescents and 3 thousand girls under 15 years of age give birth. Multiple factors are involved; however, the most common and important is the lack of integrated sexual education. Objectives: 1- To evaluate the knowledge on sex and reproductive health before and after a a workshop addressed to mothers and fathers of hospitalized children. 2- To detect if there was a difference between mothers and fathers regarding age. Material and methods: A prospective, longitudinal, analytical, descriptive, observational beforeand-after study was conducted. Mothers and fathers of hospitalized children who participated in the workshop for the first time were included. The participating mothers and fathers were categorized according to age into younger than 19 years and 11 months (Gr1= adolescents) and 20 years or older (Gr2= young/adults). The following variables were analyzed: age, sex, place of origin, whether or not the person received sex and reproductive health education, and the source of sex and reproductive health information. A selfadministered survey was used with 12 questions on contraceptive methods, sexually transmissible diseases (STDs), and sex and reproductive rights and data were analyzed before and after the intervention. Results: 116 parents who met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate were surveyed. (Gr1 = 24 and Gr2 = 92) Median age: 22 años (15-47). Overall, 53% reported having received prior information. 30% of whom had received information at school. A previous lack of knowledge on the topic was observed before attending the workshop regardless of age. The intervention of the workshop significantly increased the knowledge in both groups. Conclusion: The educational strategy should be focused on participation and integration. The methodology of a workshop is the most adequate as it facilitates debate and acquisition of competencies and skills and additionally provides theoretical concepts (AU)


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Adolescente , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Padres/educación , Embarazo en Adolescencia/prevención & control , Educación Sexual/métodos , Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos , Planificación Familiar , Salud Sexual/educación , Estudios Prospectivos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estudios Longitudinales
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