Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 6.615
Filtrar
1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(2): e18514, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31914023

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This study will assess the effects of the project-based learning (PBL) for participants undergoing clinical oncology teaching (COT). METHODS: A systematic and comprehensive literature records will be identified from the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Springer, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. All electronic databases will be searched from their inceptions up to the present. Any relevant randomized controlled trials on the effects of PBL in participants receiving COT will be considered for inclusion. Study quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. RevMan 5.3 software will be utilized for statistical analysis. RESULTS: This study will assess the effects of PBL in participants receiving COT through assessing the primary outcomes of psychological disorders, student satisfaction, and student feedback, and secondary outcomes of examination scores, excellence rates, course examination pass rates, and clinical knowledge or skills. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study will summarize the latest evidence on the effects of PBL in participants receiving in COT. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: PROSPERO CRD42019150433.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Oncología Médica/educación , Estudiantes/psicología , China/epidemiología , Bases de Datos Factuales , Humanos , Satisfacción Personal , Investigación Cualitativa , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Proyectos de Investigación , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Enseñanza/normas
3.
Urology ; 135: 28-31, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31628969

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To address information overload for trainees, a concise electronic case-based urology learning program (CBULP) was developed. Previous qualitative assessments suggested CBULP's potential efficacy/utility. Herein we assess CBULP more stringently by evaluating test performance before/after reviewing a CBULP curriculum covering core concepts in testicular cancer. METHODS: Eleven of 33 CBULP testicular cancer cases were strategically selected for this curriculum. A 26 question multiple-choice test was developed to assess fundamental knowledge about testis cancer tumor biology and evaluation/management. Pretest was administered to PGY4/PGY1 residents at 2 pilot urology-training programs, and medical students interested in Urology. Participants were given 4 weeks to review the curriculum and the test was then repeated. A control group (4 PGY1s) was administered the pretest and repeat test in an analogous manner without provision of the CBULP curriculum. RESULTS: Twenty individuals took the pretest (7 medical students, 8 PGY1s, and 5 PGY4s), and 17 (85%) took the post-test (5 medical students, 8 PGY1s, and 4 PGY4s,). As expected, PGY4s performed significantly better than the other 2 groups on the pre- and post-test. However, significant improvement in test performance was seen across all groups that utilized the CBULP curriculum (P <.02), with highest increase demonstrated by PGY1 residents (4.75 more questions correct, P = .002). The control arm did not demonstrate significant improvement (P = .20). CONCLUSION: Significant improvement in test performance was observed after completion of the CBULP testicular series. This study suggests that CBULP can be an efficacious and clinically useful educational resource for urologic residents and students interested in the field.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Neoplasias Testiculares/diagnóstico , Urología/educación , Adulto , Competencia Clínica , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Neoplasias Testiculares/patología , Neoplasias Testiculares/terapia
4.
Rev Med Chil ; 147(6): 790-798, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Español | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31859833

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: A portfolio is a compilation of academic work that demonstrates student's knowledge, reflection and critical thinking. AIM: To describe the development and implementation of an undergraduate portfolio in the School of Medicine at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, its temporal evolution and its educational impact after 10 years of experience. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The development and implementation of a portfolio for 4th-year undergraduate medical student was analyzed. Its design, teaching and learning methodologies, results and perceptions of students and teachers were assessed. The educational impact was measured using Kirkpatrick's levels. RESULTS: A total of 1,320 students participated between 2007 and 2017, supported by six teachers and 190 assistant-students. The portfolio included clinical cases, narrative medicine, palliative care and evidence-based medicine (EBM). The overall student's perception was positive, highlighting the development of critical analysis, clinical reasoning and professionalism. The delivery of feedback and learning assessment, allowed students to obtain excellent grades. There were only two cases of plagiarism reported. Fifteen EBM articles and two books with 52 narrative medicine essays were published. The greatest organizational impact of this teaching innovation, was that it evolved to become an established and continuous assessment instrument in 10 consecutive years. CONCLUSIONS: This portfolio is a project with a high educational impact, with a favorable perception by students and tutors, excellent results related to grades, stimulating both scientific writing and reflective practice.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Chile , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Medicina , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Factores de Tiempo
6.
J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A ; 29(10): 1252-1258, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31509069

RESUMEN

Background and Aim: Training programs for developing laparoscopic suturing skills range from dry-box training to virtual simulator training. There are advantages and disadvantages to each training method; however, which training is best for medical students and young surgeons is unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the proficiency of medical students in acquiring laparoscopic suturing skills after various routes of short-term training: via a video, an expert teacher, or a virtual simulator. Materials and Methods: Seventeen medical students were registered and divided randomly into three groups: group receiving personal training while watching a training video (video group), group receiving training under the guidance of an expert (teaching group), and group receiving personal training with a virtual simulator (virtual group). The students practiced laparoscopic suturing and tying skills for 1 hour. Following their training, they performed the evaluation task of three sutures and ties using a laparoscopic fundoplication simulator. We developed a 1-year-old infant body model (body weight 10 kg) based on computed tomography data and established a pneumoperitoneum body model based on a clinical situation. Results: The path length of the assistant forceps in the virtual group tended to be longer than in the other groups. The average acceleration of the assistant forceps in the virtual group was faster than in the other groups (P = .04). There were no significant differences in the other evaluation parameters. Conclusion: A long-term and combination training study should be performed to develop the best method for training medical students and inexperienced young surgeons.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Fundoplicación/educación , Laparoscopía/educación , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Investigación sobre la Eficacia Comparativa , Fundoplicación/métodos , Humanos , Lactante , Japón , Laparoscopía/métodos
7.
Med Educ Online ; 24(1): 1666538, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31526248

RESUMEN

With the increasing use of technology in education, online learning has become a common teaching method. How effective online learning is for undergraduate medical education remains unknown. This article's aim is to evaluate whether online learning when compared to offline learning can improve learning outcomes of undergraduate medical students. Five databases and four key journals of medical education were searched using 10 terms and their Boolean combinations during 2000-2017. The extracted articles on undergraduates' knowledge and skill outcomes were synthesized using a random effects model for the meta-analysis.16 out of 3,700 published articles were identified. The meta-analyses affirmed a statistically significant difference between online and offline learning for knowledge and skill outcomes based on post-test scores (SMD = 0.81; 95% CI: 0.43, 1.20; p < 0.0001; n = 15). The only comparison result based on retention test scores was also statistically significant (SMD = 4.64; 95% CI: 3.19, 6.09; p < 0.00001). The meta-analyses discovered no significant difference when using pre- and post-test score gains (SMD = 3.03; 95% CI: -0.13, 4.13; p = 0.07; n = 3). There is no evidence that offline learning works better. And compared to offline learning, online learning has advantages to enhance undergraduates' knowledge and skills, therefore, can be considered as a potential method in undergraduate medical teaching.


Asunto(s)
Educación a Distancia , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Enseñanza/normas , Humanos , Internet , Estudiantes de Medicina
8.
Int J Med Inform ; 130: 103944, 2019 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31442848

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the influence of a serious game dedicated to primary health care with traditional learning methods on knowledge of undergraduate medical students. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with undergraduate medical students. The students (n = 27) attended to an expositive leveling lesson regard the theme "Screening on Primary Health Care", and answered to a baseline knowledge test, comprised by objective questions. Students were randomly allocated to the control and game groups, in which received a text-based material regarding "Screening on Primary Health Care" or were exposed to a serious game. An immediate knowledge test and a retention knowledge test, presenting the same questions of baseline test, were responded by students at the finish of exposure and four weeks later. The students also performed a survey evaluating the user experience on the serious game. Knowledge test scores were analysed by repeated measures ANOVA and paired sample t-test. User experience and expectation surveys were descriptively analyzed. RESULTS: For the control group, the mean scores and standard deviation were 7.85 ±â€¯0.99, 9.00 ±â€¯1.87 and 7.69 ±â€¯1.44 for baseline, immediate and retention knowledge tests, respectively; the score at immediate test was higher than for baseline and retention tests. The game group presented 7.07 ±â€¯1.98, 8.00 ±â€¯1.84 and 7.15 ±â€¯1.41 for baseline, immediate and retention knowledge tests, respectively. The comparison between groups did not show differences at any moment (p < 0.05). The majority of the participants consider that the serious game has understandable instructions, presented the contents clearly, and it favors the engagement on study. CONCLUSION: The serious game was effective to improve the students' knowledge on primary health care contents. Learning based on a serious game is as effective as learning based on printed text.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/normas , Atención Primaria de Salud/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Juegos de Video/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
10.
World Neurosurg ; 131: e201-e210, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31330335

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Preclinical neurosurgery electives have been shown to increase student familiarity with neurosurgery, yet the impact on students without a home neurosurgery program is unknown. We conducted a preclinical neurosurgery elective in a mixed cohort of students with and without home neurosurgery programs to 1) evaluate changes in neurosurgery perceptions, 2) discern differences between cohorts, and 3) identify important factors in those considering neurosurgery. METHODS: A yearly elective was offered to students at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (VUSM; home program) or Meharry Medical College (MMC; no home program) from 2017 to 2018. Each class included a student-led presentation, faculty academic lecture, and faculty round-table discussion. Precourse and postcourse surveys were completed. RESULTS: Thirty-two students completed the course. VUSM students (n = 15) showed no changes in initial perceptions, whereas MMC students (n = 17) had multiple improved perceptions, including collegiality (P = 0.001) and family achievability (P = 0.010), and believed residency to be less rigorous than their initial perceptions (P = 0.046). Fourteen students (44%) showed an increase in the likelihood of considering a neurosurgical career; eight (57%) were MMC students. These 14 students had improved perceptions of neurosurgery as less emotionally draining (P = 0.042), with favorable collegiality (P = 0.003) and work/life balance (P = 0.001) but did not believe residency to be less difficult (P = 0.102) or have added financial security (P = 0.380). CONCLUSIONS: Early exposure to neurosurgery at medical schools without home programs through preclinical electives may improve students' perceptions of neurosurgery, provide valuable information about the benefits and rigors of neurosurgery, and allow students to make informed decisions about further pursuit of neurosurgery.


Asunto(s)
Actitud , Selección de Profesión , Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Neurocirugia/educación , Humanos , Equilibrio entre Vida Personal y Laboral
11.
Tex Med ; 115(7): 42-44, 2019 Jul 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31334824

RESUMEN

Dell Medical School turned students' third year into a "growth year" in which they could pursue either an independent health care project or a dual degree. Here's how three Dell Med students spent this past year.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Facultades de Medicina/tendencias , Humanos , Estudiantes de Medicina , Texas
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 269, 2019 Jul 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31319895

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The relationship between large-group classroom attendance by students and test achievement in problem-based learning (PBL) curricula is unclear. This study examined the correlation between attendance at resource sessions (hybrid lectures in the PBL curriculum) and test scores achieved in pharmacology and determined whether the score achieved was related to student gender. METHODS: A cross-sectional observational study over one academic year of 1404 pre-clerkship medical students was performed. Class attendance during pharmacology resource sessions and MCQ test scores achieved in pharmacology were analysed. RESULTS: The percentage of students' attendance in resource sessions declined over three years of the programme, from 78.7 ± 27.5 in unit I to 22.1 ± 35.6 (mean ± SD) in unit IX. A significant but weakly positive correlation was evident between attendance and achievement in pharmacology (r = 0.280; p < 0.0001). The mean score of the students who attended > 50% of the resource sessions was significantly higher (p < 0.0001). Students who attended ≤50% were more likely to achieve lower tertile scores. The mean score achieved and the number of higher tertile scorers were higher among students who attended > 50% of the resource sessions. Although female students' attendance was significantly higher, no significant gender-related differences in either mean scores or top grades achieved were found. CONCLUSIONS: In a PBL curriculum, the classroom attendance of students in pharmacology declined during the pre-clerkship phase. A weak positive correlation was found between attendance and academic achievement, as measured by MCQ test scores. Factors other than motivation and attendance may confound gender-based academic performance and merit further research.


Asunto(s)
Rendimiento Académico , Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Farmacología/educación , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Prácticas Clínicas , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Factores de Riesgo , Factores Sexuales , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Análisis y Desempeño de Tareas , Adulto Joven
13.
Can Assoc Radiol J ; 70(3): 320-326, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31300315

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: There is a lack of evidence for developing radiology mobile apps for medical students. This study identifies the characteristics which students perceive as most valuable to teaching radiology with mobile apps (m-learning). METHODS: An online anonymous survey was administered to second- to fourth-year medical students at a single institution. The survey, which was based on established theoretical framework, collected students' preferred content organization, content presentation, and delivery strategies. The Copeland method was used to rank student preferences and a 2-tailed t test was used to determine if student responses were related to their clinical experience, with statistical significance at P < .05. RESULTS: The response rate was 25.6% (163/635). For content organization, image interpretation (66.9%), imaging anatomy (61.3%), and common pathological conditions (50.3%) were selected as the most important. For content presentation, quizzes (49.1%) and case presentations (46.0%) were selected as the most useful. Students with clinical experience rated algorithms as more important (P < .01) and quizzes as less important (P = .03). For delivery strategies, ease of use (92.6%), navigation (90.8%), and gestural design (74.8%) were deemed the most applicable. CONCLUSION: This study documents medical students' preferences for m-learning in radiology. Although learner preferences are not the only feature to consider in the development of educational technology, these provide the initial framework for radiologists wishing to develop and incorporate mobile apps into their teaching.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Aplicaciones Móviles , Radiología/educación , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes de Medicina , Adulto Joven
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 263, 2019 Jul 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31311546

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Adequate clinical skills training is a challenge for present day medical education. Simulation Based Education (SBE) is playing an increasingly important role in healthcare education worldwide to teach invasive procedures. The impact of this teaching on students along with retention of what is taught is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the retention levels of practical skills taught and assessed by SBE and to explore the degree of re-training required to restore decayed performance. In exploring this aim, the study further investigates how skilled performance decays over time and which dimensions of clinical skills were more likely to decay. METHODS: Study participants were 51 final year medical students. They were provided with online pre-course videos and procedural guides asynchronously with repeatedly access. 7 of the skills taught over 2 years using task trainers were selected. Following demonstration from faculty, students practiced in small groups with faculty facilitated supervision and peer support prior to formal testing. Score sheets with itemised procedure checklists detailing the minimum passing standard (MPS) for each skill were designed. To test retention of skills, 18 months later, there was an unannounced test to demonstrate proficiency in the skills. Students were asked to complete a questionnaire indicating how many times and where they had practiced or performed the skills. RESULTS: 55% of the students were deficient in 3 or more skills and 4% were not competent in 5 or more skills. A significant number of students had never practiced some skills following the initial teaching session. A relationship was noted with the number of times students self-declared that they had practiced and their performance. Decay is evident in both psychomotor and cognitive domains of the skills. CONCLUSION: A curriculum with deliberate practice significantly increases the competence of students in defined clinical skills. Deliberate practice of clinical skills, under supervision of an engaged instructor, is a key component of the mastery model. Experiences and assessments in the clinical setting need to be augmented with focus on direct observation and focused feedback to reinforce the skills acquired in the simulated setting.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Estudios de Cohortes , Femenino , Humanos , Irlanda , Masculino , Estudios Prospectivos , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
15.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 213(3): 644-650, 2019 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31287725

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to compare the effectiveness of practical radiology learning by medical students in a 3D virtual world versus the real world. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Two hundred fifteen 3rd-year medical students were randomized into two groups to attend the same workshop on abdominal radiography interpretation in a virtual world classroom (VW group) and in real life (RL group). Pre- and post-training knowledge tests consisting of 12 multiple choice questions were performed at the beginning of the workshop and 2 months later. RESULTS. Fifty-four of 107 and five of 108 students refused to attend their respective group, resulting in the participation of 53 students (VW group) and 103 students (RL group) in this study. No significant differences were found between groups in the tests taken before (VW group, mean [± SD], 4.5 ± 1.8 points; RL group, 4.0 ± 1.3 points) and after (VW group, 6.2 ± 1.2; RL group, 6.0 ± 1.7 points) training. CONCLUSION. Radiology education in a 3D virtual classroom fosters participatory learning and results in similar acquisition of interpretive skills as a traditional face-to-face classroom. Virtual worlds allow the performance of online activities to learn interpretive skills with guaranteed success in learning similar to that of conventional activities. Additionally, the relative lack of identity in the virtual workshops makes students less afraid to speak and more participatory.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Radiografía Abdominal , Radiología/educación , Realidad Virtual , Evaluación Educacional , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 264, 2019 Jul 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31315611

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The rapid adoption of modern technology has changed many aspects of our life and communication; it has the power to influence and change the way we teach, learn and practice different types of professions mainly teaching and health care providing. Smartphone applications are increasingly becoming popular and widespread. Generally, these applications are likely to play a significant role in supporting education, in general, and medical education, in particular. This study aims at investigating how medical faculty members are using smartphones in medical education and practice, and how they perceive them as an educational tool at university level. METHODS: The researchers have distributed an online questionnaire - including three parts: a demographic part with five variables; a 15-item part of various applications of the smartphones; and a 14-item part measuring attitudes towards using these smartphones - among medical faculty members at two Palestinian universities. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Medical faculty members working at two Palestinian universities. Data have been collected from 30 participants out of 72 representing a response rate of 41.6%. RESULTS: The average skills score with smartphones usage is (3.18) which tells that faculty members use smartphones to support their teaching practices. In general, faculty members are positive towards smartphones as a prospective teaching tool since the average attitude towards using smartphones is (3.60). The study results show no significant differences among faculty members based on the five demographic variables, i.e. university, title, department affiliation, gender, and years of experience. CONCLUSION: It seems that the majority of faculty members believe that smartphones would be a significant instrument as well as addition to their teaching practices.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Docentes Médicos/psicología , Teléfono Inteligente/estadística & datos numéricos , Percepción Social , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Árabes/psicología , Actitud , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Medio Oriente , Facultades de Medicina
19.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 378-382, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31361148

RESUMEN

Learning clinical skills in a large group of undergraduate medical students is challenging. Innovative technology-based modalities are being evaluated to complement limited hospital rotations. We determined the effectiveness of clinical skills-related audiovisual (AV) aids embedded in electronic-problem-based learning (PBL) sessions, in terms of students' feedback and formative Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) grades. This mixed-method study was conducted during the Cardiovascular System module in year 3 of the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery program. The AV aids, mainly consisting of abnormal chest auscultation sounds, were linked to the cases for the intervention group. The control group received only a description of clinical signs. Sessions were conducted using an intranet platform. At the end of the module, feedback was obtained from intervention group students and faculty using a self-administered questionnaire. The learning was compared between intervention and control groups through an OSCE. Finally, focus group interviews were conducted to explore factors underlying deviation from the expected results. Out of 110 intervention group students, 86 (78%) responded. The students appreciated the inclusion of AV aids, as suggested by a high average satisfaction score of 4.2 (SD 0.8). They agreed that, apart from being appropriate and relevant, the aids improved the learning environment and engagement in the process. The tutors also gave a similar feedback. However, no difference in the OSCE scores was found between control and intervention groups. The study indicates that inclusion of AV aids improved students' engagement and classroom environment in electronic-PBL sessions, but did not improve diagnostic abilities based on the learned clinical skills.


Asunto(s)
Recursos Audiovisuales , Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Competencia Clínica/normas , Curriculum/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino
20.
Lakartidningen ; 1162019 May 07.
Artículo en Sueco | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31192435

RESUMEN

Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) define observable key tasks that a doctor should be able to do independently after having completed a certain level of education. Progression is facilitated by frequent assessments of the defined activities, with increased degree of independence. The observations should be supported by constructive feed-forward. EPA is currently used in several countries both in undergraduate and post graduate education. In the context of pending changes in Swedish legislation regarding undergraduate education qualifications ordinance and medical licensing, a Swedish national work group has begun to define Swedish EPA for the future undergraduate education.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Educación Basada en Competencias , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Educación Basada en Competencias/métodos , Educación Basada en Competencias/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Evaluación Educacional , Retroalimentación Formativa , Humanos , Médicos/normas , Suecia , Confianza
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA