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1.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc1, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33659606

RESUMEN

Introduction: In summer term 2020, the clinical phase of the undergraduate medical curriculum at University Medical Center Göttingen was restructured since distance teaching had to be used predominantly due to contact restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper investigates the impact of restructuring the clinical curriculum on medical students' satisfaction and learning outcomes. Methods: In each cohort, the 13-week curriculum was divided into two parts: During the first 9 weeks, factual knowledge was imparted using distance teaching by means of a modified inverted classroom approach. This was followed by a 4-week period of adapted classroom teaching involving both real and virtual patients in order to train students' practical skills. The evaluation of the 21 clinical modules comprised students' satisfaction with distance teaching as well as students' learning outcome. The latter was assessed by means of comparative self-assessment (CSA) gain and the results of the module exams, respectively. Data of summer term 2020 (= distance teaching, DT) were compared with respective data of winter term 2019/20 (= classroom teaching, CT) and analysed for differences and correlations. Results: Response rates of evaluations were 51.3% in CT and 19.3% in DT. There was no significant difference between mean scores in module exams in CT and DT, respectively. However, CSA gain was significantly lower in DT (p=0.047) compared with CT. Further analyses revealed that CSA gain depended on the time point of data collection: CSA gain was lower the more time had passed since the end of a specific module. Moreover, we found positive correlations between CSA gain and students' satisfaction with various aspects of distance teaching, particularly with "communication between teachers and students" (rho=0.674; p=0.002). Discussion and conclusions: Although some limitations and confounding factors have to be taken into account (such as evaluation response rates, assessment time points, and proportion of familiar items in module exams), the following recommendations can be derived from our findings: A valid assessment of students' learning outcome by means of exam results requires that as few exam items as possible are familiar to the students. CSA gain seems to be valid if assessment time points are standardised and not contaminated by students' learning activities for other modules. Good communication between teachers and students may contribute to increase students' satisfaction with distance teaching.


Asunto(s)
Centros Médicos Académicos/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Competencia Clínica , Comunicación , Curriculum , Educación a Distancia , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Humanos , Pandemias , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/organización & administración , Realidad Virtual
2.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc4, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33659609

RESUMEN

Background: Due to the ban on classroom teaching during the pandemic, the Munich "Anamnesegruppen" had to be switched to e-learning at short notice. There were no established concepts for this, which is why digitalization was piloted and evaluated for feasibility. Student "Anamnesegruppen": "Anamnesegruppen" have existed for over 50 years and are organized as independent student peer teaching. In small groups of medical and psychology students, interviews with patients are conducted once a week during the semester. This is followed by a feedback and discussion round, in which ethical and professional questions are discussed in addition to the patient's medical history. The goal is to train the participants' ability to communicate and reflect. Adaptation to digital methods: The anamnesis seminars have been moved to a virtual group room using video conference. Patients were mainly recruited from the participants' circle of acquaintances. The group size was set at eight people each in four groups and supervised by a pair of student tutors. Confidentiality and data protection declarations were obtained in writing. Results: By switching to digital anamnesis groups, all four groups were successfully completed. Both the final supervision of the tutors and the electronic evaluation of the participants yielded positive feedback. Compared to the two previous evaluations of the semesters in classroom sessions, there were no significant differences in the evaluation. Discussion: The continuously good evaluation results, which did not differ between the digital format and the classroom course of the previous semesters, show that an ad hoc conversion to digital teaching is possible. We want to stress the fact that elements reflecting the doctor-patient relationship were successfully preserved. For the similarly structured Balint groups, virtual sessions may also be considered. Further research, especially prospective, is desirable in order to better understand the possibilities of digital teaching in this area.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Grupo Paritario , Relaciones Médico-Paciente , Enseñanza/organización & administración , Comunicación por Videocoferencia/organización & administración , Comunicación , Procesos de Grupo , Humanos , Pandemias , Estudios Prospectivos
3.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc5, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33659610

RESUMEN

Background: Facing the global COVID-19 pandemic University teaching has been digitalized and German medical faculties took great effort to offer curricular contents online as they agreed that semesters during pandemic should not be suspended. Skill training is an essential part of medical education and cannot be fully digitalized nor should it be omitted. The pandemic demonstrates that skills like ultrasound are essential when treating critical ill patients. Medical faculties use peer assisted learning (PAL) concepts to teach skills, like ultrasound through specially trained student tutors. Aim: Here, we would like to share our experiences and elaborate how ultrasound teaching can be safely performed during the pandemic with an emphasis on adjustment of an existing PAL teaching concept. Method: At the hospital of Saarland University, we implemented a PAL teaching concept for abdominal, including emergency, ultrasound, and echocardiography, called "sonoBYstudents" to teach sonography to undergraduate medical students. Students are generally taught in small groups of 5 people in 90min sessions over a time of 8 weeks with an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) at the end of the course program. Each semester nearly 50 students are taught in abdominal and emergency ultrasound and 30 students in echocardiography. Over five years, more than 600 students have been taught with at least 30 students being trained as student tutors. Given the pandemic, course size, course interval and total course time and total course time were adapted to the hygienic precautions. Results: 45 and 30 students were taught in abdominal ultrasound and echocardiography respectively achieving their learning goals measured via OSCE at the end of the courses. OSCE results were the same when compared to previous semesters. Conclusion: PAL as a teaching concept lives out of sustained educational strategies like practical and didactical trainings and an ongoing recruitment of new student tutors. Suspending PAL and its skill teaching would require starting from the beginning which is a time and cost consuming process. With sonoBYstudents we were able to demonstrate that an existing PAL concept can, with some effort, be adjusted to changing teaching circumstances. Apart from this ultrasound is a non-omittable part of medical skill training with easily appliable hygienic precautions during teaching sessions.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Grupo Paritario , Enseñanza/organización & administración , Ultrasonografía/métodos , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Ecocardiografía/métodos , Humanos , Pandemias , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
4.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc6, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33659611

RESUMEN

Objective: The COVID-19 pandemic also called for the teaching of practical skills to develop teaching formats outside of classroom teaching. Methods: Selected physical examination techniques (musculoskeletal system, neurological system) were taught via video conference using a modified Peyton method. The core element was the mutual, real demonstration of the respective skill by student tutor and student with immediate possible correction. Results: The IT requirements turned out to be sufficient, direct feedback from tutors and students was positive. Conclusion: Whether this method can be a substitute for classroom courses must be evaluated in more extensive studies.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Examen Físico/métodos , Comunicación por Videocoferencia/organización & administración , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Humanos , Pandemias , Satisfacción Personal
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 15, 2021 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407378

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Over the last decade, the use of technology-enhanced learning (TEL) has rapidly expanded and diversified. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a growing demand for distance and online learning strategies to support and even replace learning experiences previously afforded by clinical placements and clerkships. An intriguing but under-researched modality is the use of medical reality television to provide authentic experiences of patient care. This strategy does not feature in published medical educational literature, though promising research is emerging from other disciplines. METHODOLOGY: A programme of learning using medical reality television clips to facilitate case-based learning was developed according to the principles of 'anchored instruction', a technology-based educational theory. Clips were taken from the UK television show '24 hours in A&E'. Medical students' learning experiences were investigated using a qualitative approach addressing the following research questions: - What is the perceived emotional experience of medical students when watching reality television in an educational context? - How do medical students relate their experience of watching reality television in a formal educational setting to their perceived learning needs in the clinical environment? A case study research methodology was adopted within the interpretivist paradigm. Data were triangulated from semi-structured interviews with students and non-participant observation of the teaching session. Field notes and transcripts were analysed through an inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: In response to the medical reality television, a diverse range of emotions were expressed including: excitement, amusement, concern, nervousness, sadness and joy. Students identified gaps in their clinical knowledge such as interpreting results, practical aspects of prescribing and end of life care. Key themes were increased student engagement and a promotion of holistic care practices. DISCUSSION: Students perceived reality television as a highly realistic and relatable medium and an enjoyable, memorable way to contextualise learning from the classroom to real life, a finding mirrored in previous studies in other fields. The high degree of emotion expressed may explain the improved subjective memorability of the cases. CONCLUSION: Medical reality television offers a unique means of engaging students by providing authentic experiences of patient care and should be valued alongside other technology-enhanced learning strategies.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Televisión , /prevención & control , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Atención al Paciente , Reino Unido
6.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 14, 2021 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407422

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the United States (US) medical education system with the necessary, yet unprecedented Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) national recommendation to pause all student clinical rotations with in-person patient care. This study is a quantitative analysis investigating the educational and psychological effects of the pandemic on US medical students and their reactions to the AAMC recommendation in order to inform medical education policy. METHODS: The authors sent a cross-sectional survey via email to medical students in their clinical training years at six medical schools during the initial peak phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Survey questions aimed to evaluate students' perceptions of COVID-19's impact on medical education; ethical obligations during a pandemic; infection risk; anxiety and burnout; willingness and needed preparations to return to clinical rotations. RESULTS: Seven hundred forty-one (29.5%) students responded. Nearly all students (93.7%) were not involved in clinical rotations with in-person patient contact at the time the study was conducted. Reactions to being removed were mixed, with 75.8% feeling this was appropriate, 34.7% guilty, 33.5% disappointed, and 27.0% relieved. Most students (74.7%) agreed the pandemic had significantly disrupted their medical education, and believed they should continue with normal clinical rotations during this pandemic (61.3%). When asked if they would accept the risk of infection with COVID-19 if they returned to the clinical setting, 83.4% agreed. Students reported the pandemic had moderate effects on their stress and anxiety levels with 84.1% of respondents feeling at least somewhat anxious. Adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) (53.5%) was the most important factor to feel safe returning to clinical rotations, followed by adequate testing for infection (19.3%) and antibody testing (16.2%). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the education of US medical students in their clinical training years. The majority of students wanted to return to clinical rotations and were willing to accept the risk of COVID-19 infection. Students were most concerned with having enough PPE if allowed to return to clinical activities.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Agotamiento Psicológico/epidemiología , /psicología , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Control de Infecciones , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 13, 2021 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407376

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated a sudden transition to remote learning in medical schools. We aimed to assess perceptions of remote learning among pre-clinical medical students and subsequently to identify pros and cons of remote learning, as well as uncover gaps to address in ongoing curricular development. METHODS: A survey was distributed to first- and second-year medical students at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine in March 2020. Frequencies of responses to structured multiple-choice questions were compared regarding impacts of remote learning on quality of instruction and ability to participate, value of various remote learning resources, living environment, and preparedness for subsequent stages of training. Responses to open-ended questions about strengths and weaknesses of the remote curriculum and overall reflections were coded for thematic content. RESULTS: Of 268 students enrolled, 104 responded (53.7% of first-year students and 23.9% of second-year students). Overall, students felt that remote learning had negatively affected the quality of instruction and their ability to participate. Most (64.1%) preferred the flexibility of learning material at their own pace. Only 25.5% of respondents still felt connected to the medical school or classmates, and feelings of anxiety and isolation were noted negatives of remote learning. Most second-year students (56.7%) felt their preparation for the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 exam was negatively affected, and 43.3% felt unprepared to begin clerkships. In narrative responses, most students appreciated the increased flexibility of remote learning, but they also identified several deficits that still need to be addressed, including digital fatigue, decreased ability to participate, and lack of clinical skills, laboratory, and hands-on learning. CONCLUSIONS: Videocasted lectures uploaded in advance, electronic health record and telehealth training for students, and training for teaching faculty to increase technological fluency may be considered to optimize remote learning curricula.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Curriculum , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , /transmisión , California , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
10.
Acad Med ; 96(1): 113-117, 2021 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33394663

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Teaching by way of asking questions is a time-honored practice that has taken on the negative connotation of "pimping" among medical students and has made some faculty hesitant to ask students questions during clerkship rotations. Yet, quantitative studies exploring student perspectives on this practice are limited. This study aimed to solicit student and faculty views and investigate faculty perceptions of students' preferences. METHOD: Students who completed their internal medicine clerkship during the 2017-2018 academic year (n = 165) and were from the 2020 graduating class and their supervising faculty (n = 144) at the University of Michigan Medical School were asked to complete a Likert response survey in April 2019. The survey solicited perspectives on questions probing medical knowledge posed to students by faculty. Surveys were constructed using an iterative process, and data were analyzed using t tests and linear regressions. RESULTS: A total of 140 (85%) students and 112 (78%) faculty participated. Of those, 125 (89%) students and 109 (97%) faculty agreed that probing questions are valuable for student education, but only 73 (65%) faculty perceived that students agreed with this statement (P < .001). In addition, 115 (82%) students preferred to be asked too many questions than none at all. Fifty-five (39%) students agreed that they feel humiliated when they answer a question incorrectly. However, only 7 (5%) students agreed that faculty ask questions to humiliate them, and only 20 (14%) preferred that faculty stop asking questions if they answer a question incorrectly. CONCLUSIONS: Students valued probing questions more than faculty perceived, which argues against a withdrawal from the Socratic teaching method in the clinical arena. The students' experience of humiliation when answering incorrectly requires further study and perhaps can be tempered by more explicit framing of the role of the questioning process.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Docentes/psicología , Internado y Residencia/organización & administración , Filosofía Médica , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
13.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 62(1): e1-e3, 2020 12 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33314949

RESUMEN

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the world as we knew it, and medical education is not an exception. Walter Sisulu University (WSU) has a distributed model of clinical training for the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBChB) programme. To address the challenges occasioned by the pandemic, the Department of Family Medicine and Rural Health undertook a modification of its MBChB VI programme. The changes aim to ensure the protection of all stakeholders and maintain the integrity of the programme, including the assessment. Changes were made in the delivery of the programme and in the way people interact with one another. Continuous assessment was modified, and the oral portfolio examination was introduced as the summative assessment tool. Although COVID-19 threatened the traditional way of teaching and learning, it however provided us with the opportunity to refocus and reposition our undergraduate medical programme.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria/educación , /epidemiología , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Pandemias , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Sudáfrica/epidemiología
14.
Educ. med. (Ed. impr.) ; 21(6): 364-369, nov.-dic. 2020. tab, graf
Artículo en Español | IBECS | ID: ibc-198373

RESUMEN

En la actualidad, la medicina incorpora diferentes recursos y estrategias para mejorar la educación que brinda a los estudiantes, entre ellas las actividades de aprendizaje por simulación. La simulación trae consigo varios beneficios, pero para ello es necesario saber implementarla y contar con los recursos necesarios, y además, tener claros los objetivos de aprendizaje que se plantearán en esta y valorar qué tan útil resulta para el participante. Retomando lo anterior, se realizó un estudio descriptivo en el que participaron estudiantes de primer año de la licenciatura de médico cirujano de la Facultad de Medicina de la UNAM, quienes, a través de la simulación, tuvieron un acercamiento introductorio a la importancia de la relación médico-paciente y aprendieron la técnica de exploración ginecológica en una actividad dividida en 3 fases, utilizando pacientes estandarizados y simuladores de baja fidelidad. Al término de la actividad, esta fue evaluada por los participantes mediante una lista de cotejo clasificada en 4rubros para conocer su perspectiva, que ayudará a mejorar la calidad de la simulación planteada y a saber si el estudiante considera que ha adquirido habilidades propias del médico


Medicine currently incorporates different resources and strategies to improve the education it provides to students, including simulation-based activities. Simulation brings several benefits, but for this it is necessary to know how to implement it and have the necessary resources, as well as having clear learning objectives that will be raised in it and assess how useful it is for the participant. With this objective, a descriptive study was conducted in which first year medical students of the UNAM's Faculty of Medicine participated. Using the simulation, they had an introductory approach to the importance of the doctor-patient relationship, and learned the technique of gynaecological examination in an activity that was divided into 3 phases, using standardised patients and low fidelity simulation models. At the end, this was evaluated by the participants through a checklist classified into 4areas in order to determine their perspective. This would help improve the quality of the simulation and to determine if the students consider that they have acquired their doctor skills


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Competencia Clínica , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Entrenamiento Simulado/tendencias , Estudios Transversales , Relaciones Médico-Paciente , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos
15.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc66, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33364345

RESUMEN

Objective: During the early Covid 19 pandemic, undergraduate medical teaching of pediatric medicine had to be switched to online teaching at the Hanover Medical School (MHH). The aim was to develop an online module together with students. Methodology: In a multi-stage process, a working group consisting of lecturers and students developed the concept and implemented it. Afterwards the online module was evaluated. Results: The conceptualization process and the implementation of the module together with students can be represented as a modified PDCA cycle (Plan-Do-Check-Act). We showed that including students in the development of an online module is helpful in times of limited resources e.g. such as personnel and time. Conclusion: The cooperation between students and lecturers is suitable for developing and implementing an online module in a short time. In the future, in addition to joint conceptualization phases, digital elements (e.g. preparatory webinars) for the module itself in attendance phases should be retained.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Docentes Médicos/organización & administración , Pediatría/educación , Estudiantes de Medicina , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Humanos , Pandemias
16.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc85, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33364364

RESUMEN

Objectives: The limitations in teaching resulting from the Covid-19 epidemic were the rational for transferring the course in Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology (doctor-patient communication) into an asynchronous e-learning course. For this purpose, ten exercises were developed to be downloaded by the students and the solutions returned to the course lecturer on a weekly basis. In addition, two students individually recorded via video one of eight doctor-patient exercise conversations, which were then evaluated by four other students and the respective lecturer. Methods: For evaluation, the students filled out an exercise and an effect-related questionnaire with 21 items. Results: The questionnaire was completed by n=203 (98%) students (59% female, 41% male). The video-based situation analyses (91%) helped most of them to become rather closely or very well acquainted with medical conversation practice. 76% rated the exercise "Enlightenment Conversation/SPIKES Protocol" as fairly helpful or very helpful in respect to the practicing concepts of medical conversation. When asked about the effects, most of them found the idea of patient orientation in medicine to be quite helpful or very helpful (83%). About a quarter of them (24%) stated that the online course could not, or only slightly, replace face-to-face teaching. This assessment was less pronounced among female students than among male students (Wilcoxon test p<.01). Conclusion: Our online course concept of physician-patient conversation found good overall response among pre-clinical medical students. However, the participants expressed different opinions about the extent to which the concept can replace face-to-face teaching.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Relaciones Médico-Paciente , Competencia Clínica , Comunicación , Escolaridad , Humanos , Pandemias , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
17.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc91, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33364370

RESUMEN

Background: Diagnostic tests and examinations inform clinical decision making. Thus, an essential part of medical students' workplace-based training is dedicated to core skills in clinical diagnostic sciences. Due to a reduction of clinical internships for fifth-year students in the wake of COVID-19 learning activities replacing this aspect of training were needed. Project description: Virtual Patient online learning materials addressing clinical diagnostic sciences, specifically, radiology, were developed to prepare students for the transition to workplace-based learning. Three types of activities related to interprofessional patient treatment, showing how radiology knowledge improves the diagnosing and treatment of patients, were used to design the narrative of each virtual patient. The materials also showed students "how to learn" in the clinical workplace while showing "what to learn". Students complete relevant tasks and compare their approach with experts' approach in a self-directed way. Results: Twenty self-study quizzes, accompanied by nine interactive Webinars were developed, providing 13% of the overall available replacement learning materials for the summer term 2020. In June 2020, 486 students completed the program and collected a mean share of 16% (SD=10) of their required credits by choosing to learn with these materials. Conclusion: Developing virtual patients based on three types of clinical activities to prepare students for the transition to workplace based learning proved successful and allowed rapid development of learning materials. The presented online quiz format and webinar format showed high acceptance and interest among students.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Radiología/educación , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Pandemias , Simulación de Paciente
18.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc96, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33364375

RESUMEN

Objectives: In undergraduate medical education and in the subject of child and adolescent psychiatry, examining young patients face-to-face is a key element of teaching. With the abrupt shutdown of face-to-face teaching caused by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, a case-based online training program integrating audio and video of real patients was developed. Methods: The blended learning platform CaseTrain guides medical students in their final year through real child-psychiatric patient cases, such as anorexia, autism, or attention deficit disorder, through presentation of video and audio of real patients and parents. The teaching format complements lectures on child psychiatric topics, comprising asynchronous elements (self-study using the digital material) as well as synchronous elements (web-conferences with a specialist). Learning objectives for students were set to develop knowledge of the spectra of psychiatric disorders that affect children and to recognize approaches how to assess and manage common psychiatric problems of childhood and adolescence. Results: The feedback from medical students through oral and written evaluation was positive. They appreciated getting to know 'real-world patients' in times of such a pandemic, to learn explorative techniques from role models, and to be in close contact with the supervising specialist. In consequence of critical feedback on the length of some video sequences, these training units will undergo revision. Conclusions: Case-based online training may continue to be a useful option in a post-pandemic future as integral part of medical education, complementing face-to-face lectures and training in (child) psychiatry.


Asunto(s)
Psiquiatría del Adolescente/educación , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Anorexia/diagnóstico , Anorexia/fisiopatología , Déficit de la Atención y Trastornos de Conducta Disruptiva/diagnóstico , Déficit de la Atención y Trastornos de Conducta Disruptiva/fisiopatología , Trastorno Autístico/diagnóstico , Trastorno Autístico/fisiopatología , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Pandemias
19.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 416, 2020 Nov 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33167960

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Croatia has closed all educational institutions after 32 cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection were confirmed and switched to exclusive e-learning. Health sciences university students may have been particularly affected with this change due to a lack of practical education. It is not known how health sciences students and schools have adjusted to exclusive e-learning. This study aimed to explore attitudes and concerns of health sciences students in Croatia regarding the complete switch to e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Eligible participants were students from 9 institutions offering university-level health sciences education in Croatia enrolled in the academic year 2019/2010, and participating in e-learning. Data were collected with a questionnaire distributed via email during April/May 2020. RESULTS: A total of 2520 students (aged 25.7 ± 7.7 years) responded to the questionnaire (70.3% response rate). General satisfaction with exclusive e-learning was rated with average grade of 3.7 out of 5. Compared with previous education, exclusive e-learning was rated with average grade of 3.2 out of 5. Compared to classroom learning, equal or higher motivation to attend exclusive e-learning was reported by 64.4% of participants. With a longer duration of exclusive e-learning, equal or higher motivation was reported by 65.5% of participants. Less than half of the students indicated they felt deprived or concerned due to the lack of practical lessons. Most participants indicated that in the future, they would prefer to combine classic classroom and e-learning (N = 1403; 55.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Most health sciences students were satisfied with the exclusive e-learning, as well as their personal and institutional adjustment to it. Students' feedback can help institutions to improve the exclusive e-learning experience for students in the time of the pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Instrucción por Computador , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Actitud , Croacia , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(46): e23096, 2020 Nov 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33181674

RESUMEN

Flipped classroom has received much attention in medical education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of flipped classroom combing with human anatomy web-based learning system in anatomy education.A total of 89 freshmen in medical specialty were enrolled and randomly allocated into either the experimental group (receiving the flipped classroom with human anatomy web-based learning system, n = 45) or control group (receiving the traditional classroom teaching, n = 44). A pre-quiz and a post-quiz were conducted before and after the classes, respectively. The improvement in scores between groups was compared. A 5-point Likert scale questionnaire was used to evaluate perceptions and experience.The mean pre-quiz scores of the 2 groups were comparable (all P > .05). However, the mean post-quiz score in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group (91.44 ±â€Š6.25 vs 86.13 ±â€Š11.67, P < .05). The results of questionnaires showed that 44 (97.8%) students agreed with flipped classroom combined with human anatomy web-based learning system, 43 (95.6%) students obtained improved study interest in anatomy learning, and 42 (93.3%) students felt that the interactive, applied in-class activities during the class greatly enhanced their learning.Flipped classroom combined with human anatomy web-based learning system can be used as an effective learning tool for anatomy education.


Asunto(s)
Anatomía/educación , Redes de Comunicación de Computadores , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Enseñanza/tendencias , Adulto , Curriculum/tendencias , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Escolaridad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Educacionales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Materiales de Enseñanza
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