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2.
Evid Based Dent ; 21(2): 46-47, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32591653

RESUMEN

Aim This narrative review aims to report on the impacts of COVID-19 on the provision of dental education in the 67 dental schools in the United States (US). Having set the scene and current challenges, it aims to suggest some strategies to overcome the issues facing dental schools going forward.Background In the US the Occupational Safety and Health Administration classified dentists in the very high risk category because of the potential for exposure to the virus as a result of aerosol generating procedures (AGP). In the last 20 years there have been two previous outbreaks of coronaviruses (severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome) which resulted in no long-term changes in the provision of dental education. The recent paper from Wuhan, China described action in the height of the infection but no sustainable actions to deliver dental education going forward.Challenges The challenges identified include: protecting the health of students, faculty and staff; ensuring the continuity and quality of dental education; ensuring confidence in health and safety measures; and keeping up with guidance. There is some variation across the US but most schools have suspended clinical teaching and implemented stay at home policies. Others have implemented social distancing in laboratories including clinical skills. The final challenge is ensuring that students have the teaching, experience and are assessed to ensure the competency of the graduating student.Solutions Technology in teaching and learning offers many opportunities. For didactic teaching distance learning has been implemented. There are 'off the shelf' programmes for teaching and assessment. The development of bespoke content is time consuming and one solution is for schools to share material. Although still requiring social distancing, manikins and haptics offer some opportunities for skills training. The need for excellent information sharing with faculty and students is emphasised.Conclusion Schools should re-evaluate their policies and curricula and incorporate appropriate methods of distance learning permanently into their teaching. Students should have outreach and multi-professional support in order to allow them to assist in the community during public health crises. Finally, gaps have been identified in US dental schools preparedness for pandemics.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Educación en Odontología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Betacoronavirus , China , Humanos , Estados Unidos
3.
Int. j. morphol ; 38(3): 634-639, June 2020. tab, graf
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS | ID: biblio-1098299

RESUMEN

Dental education is in a continuous state of development to adapt to the changing learning strategies of the millennial students. The introduction of electronic learning resources (ELR) is a good example, which has added immense value to the traditional methods of teaching oral histology. The main purpose of the study was to analyze the dental students' perception of learning oral histology the way it was taught. A pre-approved questionnaire survey was electronically distributed to 129 students who had completed the oral histology course. The majority of the students viewed oral histology course to be difficult and irrelevant to their dental career. Similarly, most of them preferred studying alone and used ELR in place of books and atlases. More than three quarters believed using a microscope in practical training sessions will make the oral histology course easier and more interesting. The results of this study will be used to formulate recommendations to be implemented in oral histology course.


La educación dental se encuentra en un estado de desarrollo continuo para adaptarse a las cambiantes estrategias de aprendizaje de los estudiantes milenios. La introducción de recursos de aprendizaje electrónico (RAE) es un buen ejemplo, el cual ha agregado un valor importante a los métodos tradicionales de enseñanza de histología oral. El objetivo principal del estudio fue analizar la percepción de los estudiantes de odontología de aprender histología oral de la forma en que se enseñó. Una encuesta de cuestionario preaprobada se distribuyó electrónicamente a 129 estudiantes que habían completado el curso de histología oral. La mayoría de los estudiantes consideraron que el curso de histología oral era difícil e irrelevante para su carrera dental. Del mismo modo, la mayoría de ellos preferían estudiar solos y usaban RAE en lugar de libros y atlas. Más de las tres cuartas partes creen que usar un microscopio en sesiones de capacitación práctica, permitiría que el curso de histología oral sea más fácil e interesante. Los resultados de este estudio se utilizarán para formular recomendaciones que se implementarán en el curso de histología oral.


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Boca/anatomía & histología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Evaluación Educacional , Histología/educación
5.
J Evid Based Dent Pract ; 20(1): 101421, 2020 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32381402

RESUMEN

ARTICLE TITLE AND BIBLIOGRAPHIC INFORMATION: Conceptual framework explaining "preparedness for practice" of dental graduates: a systematic review. Mohan M, Ravindran TKS. J Dent Educ 2018;82(11):1194-1202. SOURCE OF FUNDING: None declared. TYPE OF STUDY: Systematic review.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Educación en Odontología , Humanos
6.
J Dent Educ ; 84(6): 631-633, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32391578

RESUMEN

The recent 2019-novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV, also known as SARS-CoV-2) has caused >2,622,571 confirmed cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in >185 countries, and >182,359 deaths globally. More than 9000 healthcare workers have also been infected by 2019-nCoV. Prior to the present pandemic of COVID-19, there have been multiple large-scale epidemics and pandemics of other viral respiratory infections, such as seasonal flu, Spanish flu (H1N1), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and others. Dental professionals are at an increased risk for contracting these viruses from dental patients, as dental practice involves face-to-face communication with the patients and frequent exposure to saliva, blood, and other body fluids. Dental education can play an important role in the training of dentists, helping them to adopt adequate knowledge and attitudes related to infection control measures. The current dental curriculum does not cover infection control adequately, especially from airborne pathogens. Infection control education needs to be included in the dental curriculum itself, and students should be trained adequately to protect them and prevent the infection from disseminating even before they see their first patient.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Coronavirus , Brotes de Enfermedades , Educación en Odontología , Subtipo H1N1 del Virus de la Influenza A , Influenza Pandémica, 1918-1919 , Betacoronavirus , Historia del Siglo XX , Humanos , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Facultades de Odontología , Estudiantes de Odontología
7.
J Dent Educ ; 84(6): 718-722, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32342516

RESUMEN

Dental institutions in the United States are reeling from the consequences of the novel SARS-CoV2 coronavirus, the causative agent of CODIV-19. As oral health care providers, we have been trained on prevention of aerosol transmissible diseases, but we are still grappling with many unknown factors regarding COVID-19. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Dental Association (ADA), and local state agencies are releasing updates on guidelines for dentists and patients, no official information exists for dental institutions on how to effectively follow the recommended guidelines including "shelter in place" with social distancing to protect students, faculty, staff, and patients, and still ensure continuity of dental education. This article discusses the challenges that we face currently and offers some simple strategies to bridge the gaps in dental education to overcome this emergency.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Educación en Odontología , Humanos , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Estados Unidos
8.
J Dent Educ ; 84(4): 438-448, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32314384

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of immersive integrated experiential and didactic courses in strengthening competency-based global health learning in dental education. To address global inequities in oral health and student interest in global health, the Harvard School of Dental Medicine introduced two global health courses in 2017-18. The first was a didactic course in the core predoctoral curriculum, and the second, in collaboration with the Inter-American Center for Global Health, was a five-day elective experiential learning course in rural Costa Rica. The experiential course was an extension of the didactic course. All 33 second-year dental students completed the didactic course, and three of those students completed the experiential course. A pre-post survey and a six-month follow-up survey on self-reported knowledge based on course learning objectives were administered. The experiential course students also completed journals and interviews for qualitative analysis. Thirty-two students completed the pre-post didactic course surveys, for a response rate of 94%. There was a 100% response rate on the pre-post didactic surveys by those students who participated in the experiential learning course. While the experiential learning group scored similarly to the class average before the didactic course, they had higher scores than the class averages both immediately after and at the six-month follow-up. All three students reported that the experiential learning course was "extremely effective" in building on what they learned in the didactic course. Qualitative analysis of the journals and interviews suggested enhanced learning from the combination of didactic and experiential methods. These preliminary results support the Global Health Learning Helix Model, a theoretical competency-based teaching model for ethical student global health engagement to better prepare the future generation in tackling oral health disparities both locally and worldwide.


Asunto(s)
Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Estudiantes de Odontología , Curriculum , Educación en Odontología , Salud Global , Humanos
9.
J Dent Educ ; 84(4): 473-477, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32314385

RESUMEN

Recent evidence suggests that, when compared to their cisgender counterparts, transgender youth exhibit more unsafe sexual behavior that may elevate their risk for sexually transmitted infections. The aim of this study was to better understand what transgender youth know about oral sex, related consequences, and mechanisms of protection and where they obtained this information. The findings can be helpful in preparing oral health providers to play a role in meeting this public health need. The study took place at a U.S. academic pediatric medical center in 2017. Participants were recruited at a Transgender Research Day and during Transgender Clinic sessions. English-speaking transgender adolescents ages 14 to 24 were invited to participate in a previously validated survey about their knowledge and behaviors related to oral sex. Of the 138 transgender youth invited to participate, 57 completed the surveys, for a 41% response rate. Most respondents reported feeling they understood the necessity of protection and consequences of oral sex but did not use protection. Over half of the participants (58%) said they had not had a physician, dentist, or parent speak to them about oral sex. Given the lack of standardized, evidence-based sex education, it is imperative that adolescents, particularly in highly vulnerable populations like transgender youth, receive accurate information about oral sexual contact. Dental schools should prepare future practitioners to address these issues with youth using a culturally competent, evidence-based approach.


Asunto(s)
Personas Transgénero , Adolescente , Adulto , Niño , Educación en Odontología , Humanos , Conducta Sexual , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
10.
J Dent Educ ; 84(4): 449-457, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32314388

RESUMEN

Student-led conferences are a type of inquiry learning and student-led pedagogy. They have the potential to foster learning across many of the domains required for professional dental practice including communication and interpersonal skills, adaptive capability, professional attitude and ethical judgment, entrepreneurship, and a social and community orientation. A student-led conference, which provided a framework for students studying oral biosciences to create and host a conference focused on contemporary issues in oral biosciences, was introduced into the Bachelor of Oral Health program at the University of Sydney in Australia in 2017 and 2018. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the educational purposes that the student-led conference satisfied. Data were collected from the 2017 cohort of students in the form of reflective essays. In 2018, students' experience of the conference was recorded from a focus group discussion. In both years, reflective accounts written by attendees were collected. The thematic analysis generated four themes: integration of learning, personal learning, student resourcefulness through peer relationships, and deep commitment to delivering an excellent conference. The learning project served as a platform for students to display their professionalism and skills gained in entrepreneurship, communication, and adaptive capability. This study provided an example of a participatory curriculum approach with the potential to help students generate a working understanding of knowledge structures and how knowledge is created and circulates in the discipline.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación en Odontología , Australia , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes
11.
Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd ; 127(2): 83-88, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Holandés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32271324

RESUMEN

In the context of the series on education and the dentist in 2025, the directors of education and training at the 3 dentistry programmes in the Netherlands were asked about the kind of dentist they are training. If, after all, the head of a dental practice is looking for a new colleague and has 3 candidates, each from a different faculty, what can he expect of each of them and are there differences in the 'kind of dentist' they are? In the spring of 2019, Geerling Langenbach and Corine Visscher of the ACTA (Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam), Nico Creugers and Ohlin Cremers of the Radboud University in Nijmegen and Luc van der Sluis and Berdien Kooistra-Akse of the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen were interviewed one after another by Denise van Diermen, guest editor of the series 'Education and the dentist in 2025'.


Asunto(s)
Odontología , Odontólogos , Educación en Odontología , Humanos , Masculino , Países Bajos
15.
PLoS One ; 15(3): e0230182, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32163487

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: How dental education influences students' dental and dentofacial esthetic perception has been studied for some time, given the importance of esthetics in dentistry. However, no study before has studied this question in a large sample of students from all grades of dental school. This study sought to fill that gap. The aim was to assess if students' dentofacial esthetic autoperception and heteroperception are associated with their actual stage of studies (grade) and if autoperception has any effect on heteroperception. METHODS: Between October 2018 and August 2019, a questionnaire was distributed to 919 dental students of all 5 grades of dental school at all four dental schools in Hungary. The questionnaire consisted of the following parts (see also the supplementary material): 1. Demographic data (3 items), Self-Esthetics I (11 multiple- choice items regarding the respondents' perception of their own dentofacial esthetics), Self-Esthetics II (6 Likert-type items regarding the respondents' perception of their own dentofacial esthetics), and Image rating (10 items, 5 images each, of which the respondents have to choose the one they find the most attractive). Both the self-esthetics and the photo rating items were aimed at the assessment of mini- and microesthetic features. RESULTS: The response rate was 93.7% (861 students). The self-perception of the respondents was highly favorable, regardless of grade or gender. Grade and heteroperception were significantly associated regarding maxillary midline shift (p < 0.01) and the relative visibility of the arches behind the lips (p < 0.01). Detailed analysis showed a characteristic pattern of preference changes across grades for both esthetic aspects. The third year of studies appeared to be a dividing line in both cases, after which a real preference order was established. Association between autoperception and heteroperception could not be verified for statistical reasons. CONCLUSION: Our findings corroborate the results of most previous studies regarding the effect of dental education on the dentofacial esthetic perception of students. We have shown that the effect can be demonstrated on the grade level, which we attribute to the specific curricular contents. We found no gender effect, which, in the light of the literature, suggests that the gender effect in dentofacial esthetic perception is highly culture dependent. The results allow no conclusion regarding the relation between autoperception and heteroperception.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/normas , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Hungría , Labio/fisiología , Masculino , Maxilar/fisiología , Facultades de Odontología/estadística & datos numéricos , Autoimagen , Sonrisa/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
18.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 283-289, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176337

RESUMEN

The use of surveys is popular in dental education research. However, designing and conducting a survey can have many pitfalls. This article aims to prepare a new researcher or one with little experience to undertake survey research. It covers points such as survey design (including question construction), pilot testing for validity and reliability, sampling strategy, methods to increase response rates, logistical considerations, and items to include when writing the manuscript. Careful consideration of a survey from beginning to end can help one design and conduct a successful study that meets its research aims and adds valuable evidence to the literature.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Escritura , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Proyectos de Investigación , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
19.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 377-384, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176338

RESUMEN

The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of a live-video teaching tool on the performance of dental students in bending an orthodontic vestibular arch and to assess the students' perceptions of the technology. All 135 fourth-year dental students in the 2018 academic year at Hacettepe Dental School, Ankara, Turkey, were invited to participate in the study; after exclusions, the remaining 116 were randomly divided into two demonstration cohorts. These students had no prior experience bending an orthodontic wire. Cohort 1 (control, N=58) was shown a conventional live demonstration of the orthodontic bending of a vestibular arch, and Cohort 2 (experimental, N=58) was shown a live-video demonstration of the same procedure. Both cohorts saw the demonstration before beginning the exercise and were evaluated afterwards on their performance of the procedure. In addition, the students' perceptions of the demonstration techniques were collected with a questionnaire. The results did not show any significant differences in the students' bending scores between the control and experimental cohorts (p=0.767). The median values on the questionnaire indicated almost no statistically significant difference in responses between the cohorts. The only significant difference was that Cohort 1 had a higher percentage who answered "yes" they would like to rewatch the demonstration than did Cohort 2 (p=0.024). In this study, the live-video technique was found to be as effective as a conventional live demonstration for orthodontic practical education, suggesting that either technique could be used as an appropriate method for training in orthodontic wire bending.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Alambres para Ortodoncia , Estudiantes de Odontología , Estudios de Cohortes , Humanos , Facultades de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Grabación en Video
20.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 290-300, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176340

RESUMEN

Minimally invasive dentistry (MID) is receiving increased attention. Resin infiltration (RI) is one micro-invasive technique for treating initial caries by sealing white spot lesions on tooth surfaces. The aims of this study were to assess pediatric dentists' RI-related educational experiences, attitudes, and professional behavior and to determine if their educational experiences were significantly related to their professional attitudes and behavior regarding RI. This cross-sectional study used an online survey to collect data from members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) in March-April 2017. Of the 2,367 AAPD members invited to participate, 43 emails could not be delivered, and 273 surveys were completed, for a response rate of 11.8%. While only 9% of the 273 respondents reported that their classroom-based dental education had informed them about RI and only 1% that it had prepared them well to use RI with pediatric patients, higher percentages said they had been informed/prepared well by their classroom-based (24%) and clinical residency education (12%). The majority wanted to learn more about RI (71%) and would like to take a related CE course (59%). The respondents' average RI-related attitudes were positive (on five-point scale with 1=worst attitude: Mean=3.84). Regarding use of RI, 28% of respondents said they used RI sometimes and 4% often/very often, with 64% considering implementing RI in their clinics. Graduation year did not correlate with RI attitudes and use. However, the more education about RI the respondents had received during their residency (r=0.20; p<0.01) and in professional development after graduation (r=0.34; p<0.001), the more they used RI in their own work. This study found that the pediatric dentists' RI-related education was positively correlated with their professional behavior. Increasing predoctoral, resident, and continuing professional education about RI should therefore be considered.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Educación en Odontología , Niño , Estudios Transversales , Odontólogos , Humanos , Odontología Pediátrica , Pautas de la Práctica en Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
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