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1.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 24(1): 53-62, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31518475

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: In the United Kingdom, the General Dental Council requires newly graduated dentists to be competent in managing orthodontic emergencies. Undergraduate students typically receive limited exposure to orthodontics, with teaching primarily delivered via conventional lectures. Flipped teaching involves knowledge being acquired in students' own time, with class time focussing on construction of meaning. METHODS: A total of 61 undergraduate dental students were randomised into either a flipped or a conventional group. The conventional group (n = 30) attended a lecture describing the management of six common emergencies. The flipped group (n = 31) were given access to six videos via a virtual learning environment and later completed practical tasks related to the material. Both groups completed a single best answer assessment. Perceptions of flipped classroom teaching were explored via focus groups. RESULTS: For questions on orthodontic emergencies, the conventional group had a mean examination result of 70.5% (SD 8.0%) compared with the flipped group of 72.8% (SD 12.9%). There was no significant difference between the groups (P = .532). For regular orthodontic questions, the conventional group had a mean examination result of 64.8% (SD: 19.9%) compared with 78.3% (SD: 21.7%). There was no significant difference between the groups (P = .083). Thematic analysis identified the following themes: ways in which videos encourages more effective learning, improved engagement, awareness of learning needs and proposed teaching/curriculum changes. The overarching theoretical perspective was facilitating an experiential learning cycle using flipped classroom teaching. CONCLUSIONS: In the context of this investigation, the flipped classroom method of teaching resulted in comparable examination performance and improved levels of satisfaction.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Urgencias Médicas , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Curriculum , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Enseñanza , Reino Unido
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 265, 2019 Jul 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31319829

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This study evaluated students' perceptions of their self-confidence regarding aspects of their undergraduate oral and maxillofacial surgical training. It further aimed to develop a reliable Turkish version of the questionnaire originally developed by the Association of British Academic Oral Maxillofacial Surgeons (ABAOMS) Education Committee. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 40 fourth-year and 47 fifth-year dentistry students of Yeditepe University Faculty of Dentistry in Turkey with a mean age of 23.30 ± 1.50 was conducted in January and February 2018. The ABAOMS questionnaire was adapted to the Turkish language and culture. The items were organized in five domains (general information, self-confidence in oral surgery, role of outreach, anatomy knowledge in relation to oral surgery, and career aspirations) with most response options on a five-point Likert-type scale. Reliability was assessed through an internal consistency analysis and a test-retest approach. Descriptive statistics, independent samples t-tests, and Chi-squared for contingency tests were used to examine the data. RESULTS: Cronbach's alpha coefficient on the questionnaire was 0.89. The responses reflected general agreement among the respondents. Females were significantly more self-confident than males. Although the fifth-year respondents were more self-confident than the fourth-year respondents on items regarding anatomy knowledge, fourth-year respondents were more self confident in forceps extractions. Other than that no major differences in self-confidence were found between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Though self-confidence was high regarding extraction of teeth and retained roots, the participants of this study lacked self-confidence in performing surgical extractions and its related procedures, recognition of malignancies, and ability to differentiate between pain of odontogenic or non-odontogenic origin. Female students were relatively more self-confident. Teaching should focus on practical applications that support students' sense of self-confidence in their abilities. The Turkish version of the questionnaire was a reliable instrument.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/métodos , Evaluación Educacional , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Orales/educación , Autoimagen , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Análisis de Varianza , Distribución de Chi-Cuadrado , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Facultades de Odontología/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Odontología/estadística & datos numéricos , Turquia , Adulto Joven
3.
J Dent Educ ; 83(10): 1125-1133, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31285368

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on predoctoral dental students of an experiential and self-learning pedagogical approach to evidence-based decision making. Dental students at one U.S. dental school in 2014 and 2015 participated in an evidence-based decision making course that consisted of minimal lecturing, learning through assigned readings and open-book online quizzes, and individual assignments to reach an evidence-based decision on a clinically relevant question. Before and after the course, each cohort completed a validated survey assessing students' knowledge, attitudes, access of evidence, and confidence related to evidence-based practice. In 2014, of 43 students enrolled in the course, all 43 (100%) completed the pre-course survey, and 33 (77%) completed the post-course survey. In 2015, of 35 students enrolled in the course, all 35 (100%) completed the pre-course survey, and 34 (97%) completed the post-course survey. Of those, the identifier codes for 23 students in 2014 and 25 students in 2015 matched for the pre-course and post-course surveys, allowing direct comparisons. Both cohorts of students showed a significant increase in knowledge regarding critical appraisal of the literature from the pre-course survey results to after the course (p<0.001). Students' reported frequency of accessing evidence from various sources also significantly increased from before to after the course for both cohorts (p<0.01). Students' confidence in evaluating various aspects of a published research report also increased significantly from before to after the course for both cohorts (p<0.001). However, no consistent change was found in students' attitudes about evidence-based practice. In this study, an experiential and self-learning approach to teaching evidence-based decision making in the classroom appeared to be successful in improving students' knowledge, use of evidence, and confidence in critical appraisal skills, though it did not have a consistent impact on their attitudes about evidence-based practice.


Asunto(s)
Toma de Decisiones Clínicas , Instrucción por Computador , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Odontología Basada en la Evidencia , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Curriculum , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 256, 2019 Jul 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31291939

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Education in Japan and other Asian countries advocates the stereotypical passive learning style where students are limited in their breadth of knowledge dismissing anything not imparted by their teachers. With globalized education, professions are becoming very competitive, embracing student-centeredness compelling them to introduce active learning activities. A study funded by Japan's Ministry of Education conducted a needs analysis, proposed a solution, and implemented an active learning approach. Since the latter is still new in the Japanese teaching-learning environment, this current study aimed at assessing the willingness of undergraduate students of dental medicine to participate in active learning activities rather than the typical passive-style teaching-learning educational process. METHODS: Three active implementation-learning activities, namely International Group Discussions (IGD), Student-Teacher Experience (STE) and Role Play Activities (RPA) were included in the Dental English course in a classroom setting at a dental school in Japan. Students had to choose between participating in the activity or taking the final examination. Two hundred and three third-year undergraduate dental students participated over a 5-year period from October 2013 to March 2017. For IGD, the researchers assigned students to a topic and grouped them with visiting international exchange students. For STE, researchers gave students teacher-prepared presentation slides on basic dental topics, which they presented in front of their classmates. For RPA, students had to do prepared role-play and impromptu role play. Peer and teacher feedbacks of the activities were given to all students. At the end of the course, the students evaluated the active learning activities and wrote their comments in a free entry survey. RESULTS: All 203 students participated in the active learning activities confirming the changing learning needs of Japanese students in this dental school. The most common comment was that the class was interesting, fun, an easy-to-understand way to learn dental terms, and a safe way to express themselves in the English language. CONCLUSION: The majority of Japanese students preferred the active learning style. The study revealed that students reported greater engagement and better learning with proper guidance and time to prepare for the activities.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Evaluación Educacional , Lenguaje , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Femenino , Humanos , Internacionalidad , Japón , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Facultades de Odontología/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Odontología/estadística & datos numéricos
5.
Gen Dent ; 67(4): 21-27, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31355760

RESUMEN

Second Life (SL) is an online virtual world with a social environment that may serve as a valuable learning supplement to traditional preclinical teaching methods. The educational advantages of this virtual world include immersion and interactivity. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of using 3-dimensional interactive platforms (3DIPs) designed in SL to that of traditional teaching methods for developing students' understanding of dental clinical situations that are difficult to simulate in real life. For this study, 3DIPs were developed to compare the acquisition of 3 learning objectives: understanding concepts, procedural aspects of interaction with the patient, and spatial interpretation of anatomical structure interactions. A representative dental topic, the use of a semiadjustable articulator, was selected. A quasi-experimental design with 2 groups and pretest-posttest comparison was used. The students in the control group received the conventional teaching established for the subject, which does not include SL experiences. The students in the experimental group received conventional instruction and had access to all 3DIPs for 4 weeks without limitation. The pretest and posttest consisted of a multiple-choice test with 20 questions. A Student t test was used to compare the test results of the groups (significance level α = 0.05). The posttest scores for the understanding of concepts and spatial interpretation were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group (P < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant difference between groups in posttest scores on the topic of procedural aspects. Students who used cooperative methods for acquisition of knowledge were observed to be highly motivated. The results suggest that the SL environment helps students to understand anatomical interactions that are difficult to observe in real life, is attractive to students, and contains tools with high didactic potential.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Realidad Virtual , Odontología , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Aprendizaje
6.
Rev. Ciênc. Plur ; 5(1): 1-17, jun. 2019. graf, tab
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS, BBO - Odontología | ID: biblio-1007332

RESUMEN

Introdução:Apesar do advento das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais (DCN) dos cursos de Odontologia desde 2002, o desenho dos currículos de grande parte dos cursos ainda mantém disciplinas isoladas, sem articulação com os elementos essenciais para a formação de generalistas, com distanciamento entre o ciclo básico e o profissionalizante.Objetivo:Desenvolver proposta de currículo integrado, mediado por metodologias ativas de aprendizagem e avaliação processual da aprendizagem.Método:Para construção da proposta foram identificados eixos sobre os quais foi formulado currículo integrado coerente com as DCN.Resultados:O currículo é composto por cinco eixos: Módulos integrados, Estágio supervisionado, Extensão curricular, Flexibilização e Trabalho de Conclusão do Curso. Os Módulos integrados articulam habilidades e competências que envolvem conhecimentos das áreas básica, clínica e saúde coletiva. O Estágio supervisionado ocorre ao longo dos dois últimos períodos do curso, no Sistema Único de Saúde. A Extensão curricular configura-se pelo desenvolvimento de atividades que articulam a inserção da comunidade com o aprendizado dos alunos, buscando benefícios para o entorno do curso. Para a Flexibilização foram definidos: (1) Atividades complementares e (2) Componentes curriculares optativos, permitindo ao aluno definição do percurso formativo singular. O Trabalho de Conclusão do Curso deve ser desenvolvido de forma transversal desde o primeiro semestre do curso, por componentes curriculares específicos relacionados ao aprendizado das metodologias da pesquisa científica ou nos próprios módulos integrados.Conclusões:Para viabilizar o desenvolvimento do currículo é fundamental a adoção de metodologias ativas de aprendizagem em todos os eixos previstos, permitindo que o aluno construa seu aprendizado. Da mesma forma é fundamental processo de avaliação que contribua efetivamente com uma relação professor-aluno mediada pela busca de conhecimento, permitindo que ambos sejam sujeitos no processo. O principal desafio para alcance da proposta refere-se ao processo permanente de desenvolvimento docente na construção de uma "nova" sala de aula (AU).


ntroduction:Despite the advent of the National Curricular Guidelines (DCN) of Dentistry courses since 2002, the curriculum design of most courses still maintains isolated disciplines, without articulation with the essential elements for the formation of generalists, with a distance between the cycle basic and professional one.Objective:To develop a proposal for an integrated curriculum, mediated by active learning methodologies and process evaluation of learning.Methods:To construct the proposal, axes were identified to compose an integrated curriculum, coherent with the DCN.Results:The curriculum consists of five axes: Integrated Modules, Supervised Internship, Extension, Flexibilization and Course Completion Work. The Integrated modules articulate skills and competences that involve knowledge of the basic, clinical and collective health areas. The Supervised internship takes place during the last two periods of the course, in the Unified Health System. The Extension is configured by the development of activities that articulate the insertion of the community with the students' learning, seeking benefits for the course environment. For Flexibilization were defined: (1) Complementaryactivities and (2) Optional curricular components, allowing the student to define the singular formative course. The Course Conclusion Work should be developed transversally from the first semester of the course, by specific curricular components related to the learning of scientific research methodologies or in the integrated modules themselves.Conclusions:In order to make curriculum development, it is fundamental to adopt active learning methodologies in all the planned axes, allowing the student to build his learning. Likewise, it is fundamental to evaluate the evaluation process that effectively contributes to a teacher-student relationship mediated by the search for knowledge, allowing both to be subjects in the process. The main challenge to reachthe proposal refers to the permanent process of teacher development in the construction of a "new" classroom (AU).


Asunto(s)
Competencia Profesional , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Metodología , Brasil
7.
Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am ; 31(3): 387-398, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31153725

RESUMEN

The economic forces in the dental education industry yield a high cost for a dental degree, yet the financial return for this education yields a small margin above the costs for this degree. Industries with unfavorable return to investment ratios tend to be vulnerable to changes. Productive technologies are emerging that may be useful in improving the return to investment ratios in dental education. Virtual reality and online learning provide productive value that could be useful to the dental education industry. A description and use cases of virtual reality in dental implantology education are provided.


Asunto(s)
Implantes Dentales , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Realidad Virtual , Odontología , Humanos
8.
J Dent Educ ; 83(6): 645-653, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31154434

RESUMEN

In a multicultural society, the ability to work effectively with spoken-language interpreters is a critical skill for oral health professionals. The aims of this study were to design and evaluate training for oral health professions students to work effectively with interpreters as a health care team. A total of 89 University of Minnesota dental, dental hygiene, and dental therapy students and 41 Century College translating and interpreting students participated in the elective three-hour training from 2016 to 2018. The 89 oral health professions participants were invited to respond to a seven-item survey about working with interpreters and patients who are limited English proficient (LEP), along with a comparison group of an additional 462 oral health professions students who did not participate in the program. Of the oral health professions participants, 49 responded to the survey, for a 55% response rate; and 245 of the comparison group responded, for a 53% response rate. A qualitative focus group with 11 program participants and inductive analysis provided further insights. The differences between participants' pre and post self-ratings were statistically significant (p<0.001) for each of the seven survey questions. After training, students were more familiar with provider and interpreter best practices and the context for patients who are LEP, as well as more confident in their skills to work effectively with interpreters. Student focus groups identified training relevance and necessity and learning format as the most significant success factors. This project highlights the process and value of creating these experiences for and with students and the value of simulation to develop knowledge, skills, and confidence.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/métodos , Traducción , Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Humanos , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Salud Bucal/educación , Higiene Bucal/educación , Grupo de Atención al Paciente , Estudiantes de Odontología
9.
J Dent Educ ; 83(10): 1205-1212, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31235501

RESUMEN

The photostimulable phosphor (PSP) plate and charge-coupled device (CCD) are receptors commonly used for intraoral radiography in U.S. dental schools. However, it is unclear which receptor is more beneficial for radiology education and patient care in an academic setting. The aim of this study was to compare the time efficiency, image quality, and operator performance for student-operated PSP plate and CCD receptors. At one U.S. dental school in 2018, 20 dental hygiene and dental students (n=10 each) were recruited as operators. They each exposed anterior and posterior periapical and bitewing radiographs on dental radiograph teaching and training replica using the PSP plate and CCD as receptors. The time taken to expose the radiographs was recorded. Image sharpness/definition, brightness/contrast, and technical errors, including placement, angulation, and cone cut errors, were evaluated on a three-point scale with 0=non-diagnostic, 1=diagnostic acceptable with minor errors, and 2=perfect diagnostic quality. The results showed that it was generally faster for the students to expose intraoral radiographs with CCDs than with PSP plates, although the difference was not significant (p>0.05). Image quality and technical accuracy, especially angulation, were significantly superior for PSP relative to CCD (p<0.05). This study found that PSP imaging was of higher quality and accuracy than CCD, whereas CCD was more efficient. Dental and dental hygiene students would benefit from being trained on both receptors to be able to adapt to a diversified workplace.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/métodos , Intensificación de Imagen Radiográfica/instrumentación , Radiografía de Mordida Lateral/instrumentación , Radiografía Dental Digital/instrumentación , Eficiencia , Humanos , Procesamiento de Imagen Asistida por Computador , Higiene Bucal/educación , Intensificación de Imagen Radiográfica/métodos , Radiografía de Mordida Lateral/métodos , Radiografía Dental Digital/métodos
10.
J Dent Educ ; 83(10): 1151-1157, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31235502

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to determine the educational methods and tools used to teach tooth prognosis and treatment complexity determination in U.S. predoctoral dental programs. In 2018, an online survey was emailed to the academic deans of all 66 accredited U.S. dental schools. Of these, 42 schools responded (63.6%), and 36 schools completed the entire survey (54.5%). The methods reported for teaching tooth prognosis and case complexity determination varied widely among the participating schools. Among the respondents, 25% reported using the American Association of Endodontists' Endodontic Case Difficulty Assessment, while 10% reported having no specific method for teaching prognosis. The most common method for teaching overall treatment complexity was the Prosthodontic Diagnostic Index, which was used by 24% of the respondents. However, another 24% reported that their school did not have a specific method for teaching treatment complexity. Large percentages of the respondents reported that students sometimes or often made wrong tooth prognosis and case complexity determination (90% and 92%, respectively). The most prominent feedback provided by the respondents based on their experience was the importance of faculty standardization, the understanding of students' inexperience, and the need for an interdisciplinary approach. The majority of these respondents reported that their schools had specific methods of teaching prognosis and case complexity determination. However, there was a wide range of teaching practices related to the contents and levels of evidence.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Educación en Odontología/normas , Enseñanza/normas , Odontopatías/diagnóstico , Odontopatías/terapia , Curriculum , Humanos , Pronóstico , Facultades de Odontología/normas , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
11.
J Dent Educ ; 83(10): 1142-1150, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31235505

RESUMEN

Simulation may help translate didactic learning to patient care in areas such as communication skills and medical emergency management. The aims of this study were to investigate how multiple cohorts of dental students evaluated simulations utilizing standardized patients and manikins and to explore evaluations of a simulation that combined social determinants of health with oral health education. All approximately 600 second- and fourth-year dental students at one U.S. dental school participated in simulation activities for five years (2014-18). The activities involved clinical communication skills with an urgent care patient, medical emergency management, and communication skills with a parent with low income. After the simulations, students were invited to complete an evaluation of the experience. Questionnaire items addressed perceived applicability to patient care, value of the experience, and fulfillment of objectives; and open-ended questions asked for comments specific to the parent with low income simulation. A total of 497 responses from D2 and D4 students were collected over the five-year period, as well as from all 12 periodontics residents in 2017, for an overall 91.7% response rate. The vast majority (>90.6%) positively evaluated all items for each simulation. The positive ratings ranged from a mean of 99.3% for the urgent care simulation to 93.8% for the parent with low income simulation. Positive student comments often related to learning from/with others and effective practice of teach back and patient education tactics. Students' most frequent suggestions for improvement called for better preparation. In this study, simulations with both standardized patients and manikins led to positive evaluations as well as anticipated improvement of clinical performance. These results suggest that incorporating simulation into an already-crowded curriculum is worth it from the student perspective, especially for reinforcement of clinical skills not easily amenable to classroom instruction.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Competencia Clínica , Comunicación , Relaciones Dentista-Paciente , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Simulación de Paciente , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Atención Ambulatoria , Estudios de Cohortes , Curriculum , Servicios Médicos de Urgencia , Humanos , Maniquíes , Pobreza , Facultades de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
12.
J Dent Educ ; 83(10): 1233-1239, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31182621

RESUMEN

Teaching radiographic interpretation skills to predoctoral dental students is challenging. The results of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) at one U.S. dental school failed to yield expected outcomes for students' radiographic interpretation skills. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of the radiology OSCE and subsequent curricular revisions based on the outcomes. Examples of curricular changes are a series of self-assessed radiographic interpretation cases using the university learning management system. Each case contains a set of four intraoral radiographs and a series of questions. In year 4, an OSCE and final radiographic interpretation competency exam are administered; students are required to pass both exams. OSCE outcomes over a period of six years were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curricular revisions. A questionnaire developed to capture student perceptions of the curricular changes was administered. The pilot OSCE of 2.9% first attempt pass rates initiated curricular revision. The strongest results to date occurred in 2018 with a 73.3% first attempt pass rate. Results from the questionnaire showed that students reported greater confidence in their interpretation skills when it came to recognizing radiographic errors, dental caries, and periodontal disease/pathologies (65%, 64%, and 57%, respectively). The use of the OSCE for programmatic assessment revealed the need for curricular revision in radiology. Students' participation in the newly revised radiology curriculum resulted in improved student performance and outcomes. This article emphasizes the importance of global and programmatic assessment for assessing student competence along with analysis of how assessment and accompanying data can inform curricular decisions.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Radiografía Dental , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Humanos , Percepción , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
13.
J Dent Educ ; 83(10): 1199-1204, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31182623

RESUMEN

Learning indirect vision with a dental mirror is challenging and can be overwhelming for beginning dental students. The Jumpstart Mirror Trainer is a new device that allows students to become proficient with mirror use before the start of preclinic without requiring in-class practice sessions. The aim of this study, conducted in 2017, was to compare the effectiveness of the Jumpstart Mirror Trainer with the Mirroprep for teaching indirect motor skills. Forty-seven first-year dental students were randomized into three groups to use the Jumpstart Mirror Trainer, Mirroprep, or a control device for 15 minutes a day for ten days. To assess indirect motor skills improvement, students performed a maxillary cavity preparation before and after using their devices. A survey was used to assess students' comfort level with mirror skills and perceived helpfulness of the exercises. Forty students completed the study. The Jumpstart Mirror Trainer activities improved the students' scores significantly more than the Mirroprep activities (p=0.04) and the control device (p=0.006). Students in the Jumpstart Mirror Trainer group rated their device as being significantly more helpful than the control group rated its device in preparing them for the evaluation (p=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in perceived helpfulness between the Mirroprep group and the control group (p=0.75). These results suggest that the Jumpstart Mirror Trainer may be able to improve students' indirect motor skills without requiring in-class practice sessions and to do so more effectively than other existing methods.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Instrumentos Dentales , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Destreza Motora , Enseñanza , Preparación de la Cavidad Dental , Diseño de Equipo , Humanos , Simulación de Paciente
14.
J Dent Educ ; 83(10): 1224-1232, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31182626

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to assess inter-and intra-grader agreement with the use of digital scanning and a tooth preparation assessment software program in comparison to the current traditional visual grading method in a dental student simulation laboratory. Students' typodont teeth preparations from previous practical examinations were used (cast crown n=50; cast fixed partial denture abutments n=50). Five preclinical instructors received calibration training and evaluated each of the preparations by the traditional visual grading method using a rubric. The same preparations were assessed by the same instructors using a tooth preparation assessment software program (PrepCheck, Sirona). The results showed that intra-grader agreement was significantly higher when grades were determined by PrepCheck compared to the traditional visual grading method. The traditional method was associated with significantly greater inter-grader disagreement in comparison to grading using PrepCheck (p<0.05). When the average final grade for students' crown preparations by each grader was compared for the traditional method and PrepCheck, significant differences were found for all graders (p<0.001). In this study, the use of the PrepCheck software program greatly improved intra-and inter-grader agreement during grading in a student simulation laboratory. Digital technology may improve the objectivity and reliability of assessments by preclinical evaluators.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Tecnología Educacional/métodos , Programas Informáticos , Competencia Clínica , Coronas , Humanos , Laboratorios Odontológicos , Simulación de Paciente , Preparación Protodóncica del Diente
15.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 233, 2019 Jun 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31238927

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to compare the effect of virtual and traditional education on theoretical knowledge and reporting skills of dental students in radiographic interpretation of bony lesions of the jaw. METHODS: This experimental study evaluated 39 dental students who had not received any instruction regarding radiographic interpretation of bony lesions of the jaw. They were randomly divided into two groups of virtual (n = 20) and traditional education (n = 19) and matched in terms of their grade point average (GPA). The virtual group received a virtual learning package while the traditional group received traditional classroom instruction for 6 one-hour sessions. Similar contents were taught to both groups by the same mentor. All students participated in a theoretical test with multiple-choice questions and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Similar exams were also held 2 months later to assess knowledge retention. Data were analyzed using independent sample t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: The mean scores of theoretical test (P < 0.05) and OSCE (P > 0.05) in the virtual education group (16.60 ± 0.91 and 15.13 ± 0.78) were higher than those in the traditional education group (14.89 ± 0.99 and 14.71 ± 0.92). In both methods of instruction, the mean scores of theoretical test and OSCE at 2 months were lower than the scores acquired immediately after instruction but this difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Type of education had a significant effect on the theoretical test score (P < 0.001) but had no significant effect on the clinical score (P = 0.072). CONCLUSIONS: Virtual learning was superior to traditional lecture-based method for enhancement of knowledge acquisition in radiographic interpretation of bony lesions of the jaw. However, to improve our students' reporting skills, we need to revise our virtual educational program so that the students have more opportunities to engage in reporting skills.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Instrucción por Computador , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Maxilares/diagnóstico por imagen , Radiografía Dental , Realidad Virtual , Análisis de Varianza , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Irán , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Odontología
16.
J Dent Educ ; 83(8): 966-972, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31085686

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different types of instructional styles-traditional lecture with and without video examples and contemporary format that simulated a flipped classroom-on dental students' learning of behavior guidance techniques (BGTs) in pediatric dentistry. The study also sought to determine if students had an improved comfort level with BGTs with these instructional methods, if videos improved learning and comfort with BGTs, and if there were differences in outcomes by gender. All 96 second-year dental students at one U.S. dental school were recruited to participate in the study in 2017. Students were randomly divided into three groups: contemporary instruction (CI), traditional instruction with video (TIV), and traditional instruction with no video (TI). CI students watched a 20-minute mini-lecture and were divided into discussion groups led by calibrated faculty members. TIV students received 50 minutes of traditional lecture with video examples. TI students received a traditional lecture with no video examples. All groups completed a questionnaire prior to and on completion of the course. The questionnaire assessed students' learning and perceptions of the learning experience. All students participated in the course and the assessments, for a 100% response rate. The students' post-course scores improved for all teaching methods (TI>CI>TIV) with no significant differences among them. CI students rated comfort with BGTs and usefulness of videos higher than the other groups, but the difference was not statistically significant. Students rated their satisfaction with and usefulness of the course high for all groups (>3 on a four-point scale). Learning style and comfort treating children were not statistically significant by gender. Overall, the students reported high satisfaction with all the teaching methods. Although the differences were not statistically significant, discussion groups were ranked highest in satisfaction and usefulness.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/métodos , Odontología Pediátrica/educación , Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Enseñanza , Adulto , Evaluación Educacional , Tecnología Educacional/métodos , Docentes de Odontología , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Facultades de Odontología , Factores Sexuales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Tennessee , Adulto Joven
17.
Morphologie ; 103(341 Pt 2): 72-79, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31092318

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Difficulties are encountered in embryology learning such as imagining embryo modifications in three-dimensions and time. We provided an experimentation to evaluate if short videos during magisterial lecture could increase the quality and the efficiency of embryology teaching. METHODS: The study was conducted amongst students in first year of medical studies in France. It is an intense and highly competitive year at the end of which students can engage in medical or paramedical specialties depending on their rank. In a first step, pre-implantation embryo development and microscopic videos of in vitro Fertilization were presented during a course of medical ethics. Three months later, students gave their opinion on this presentation in a satisfaction survey using a Likert scale. In a second step (the two following years), similar videos were integrated in the regular embryology lectures and the results of the subsequent embryology test were analyzed. RESULTS: In the first step, students declared that movies could increase their interest in embryology and significantly help to the comprehension and memorization of embryologic processes. In the second step, we found that students answered better to the video-related questions of the test even if globally in the first year, results were weaker compared to previous years. DISCUSSION: The effects of movies in pedagogy are discussed, especially the accelerated rhythm imposed by this medium. Adverse consequences could be balanced by traditional drawing. CONCLUSIONS: The association of complementary pedagogic methods like movies and drawing could allow an optimization of embryo teaching.


Asunto(s)
Embriología/educación , Enseñanza , Grabación en Video , Curriculum , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Embrión de Mamíferos/diagnóstico por imagen , Embrión de Mamíferos/embriología , Francia , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos
18.
Simul Healthc ; 14(3): 169-174, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31116175

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the transfer of skills between various levels of force feedback (FFB) using the Simodont dental trainer (Moog, Nieuw-Vennep, the Netherlands). Students practiced a manual dexterity exercise in a virtual reality environment at a standard level of FFB and then were tested at the standard and an altered level of FFB. In addition, the students' satisfaction with the training exercise was evaluated. METHODS: One hundred twenty-six first-year dental students were randomly distributed into four groups and underwent a manual dexterity test in the virtual reality environment with automatic assessment after a 3-month period of practicing with standard FFB. The test consisted of drilling with the standard FFB and an altered level of FFB to evaluate the effect on performance. After the test, the participants completed a questionnaire. RESULTS: The results showed that 74% of the students who passed completed between one of three and three of three successful attempts at FFB levels at which they had not previously practiced. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study imply that if students practice a sufficient amount of time at one level of FFB, a skill is transferable from one level of FFB to another.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Retroalimentación Formativa , Destreza Motora , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Humanos , Países Bajos , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Factores de Tiempo , Interfaz Usuario-Computador , Realidad Virtual
19.
J Dent Educ ; 83(9): 1000-1011, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31133618

RESUMEN

Maldistribution of the dental workforce contributes to poor access to oral health care. Community-based dental education (CBDE) may help to address this problem by using experiential learning to encourage new dentists to practice in underserved areas. The East Carolina University School of Dental Medicine (East Carolina University SoDM) employs a multifaceted strategy, including CBDE, to increase the number of dentists practicing in underserved areas of North Carolina. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of CBDE and other factors on practice choice among East Carolina University SoDM graduates. This cross-sectional study assessed practice intentions before and after a senior-year CBDE experience. Data were obtained for students in three graduating years from written student reflections and self-reported practice plans solicited at graduation. Of the total 156 students between 2015 and 2017 (52 each year), all students participated in at least one component of this evaluation: all students (100%) completed required student reflections, and 148 (95%) provided pre-graduation practice plans. Data were also obtained on alumni practice characteristics via a survey of recent graduates; 72 alumni (46% response rate) participated in the alumni survey. The assessments found positive attitudes towards the CBDE program before and after participation, although areas for improvement relating to business management and financial viability were reported. The majority of alumni respondents (67%) remained in the state to practice after graduation, with half reporting practicing in rural areas. For most alumni respondents (>75%), debt, salary, benefits, type of patient population, and desire to own/run a business were important factors other than the CBDE program influencing their practice choice. Nearly half of them (45.8%) rated desire to work in a public health setting as an important factor. This study provides preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of this educational model in retaining new dentists within the state to address the critical shortage of dentists in North Carolina.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Odontología Comunitaria/educación , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Datos Preliminares , Universidades , Selección de Profesión , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Atención Odontológica , Servicios de Salud Dental , Odontólogos/estadística & datos numéricos , Fuerza Laboral en Salud , Humanos , North Carolina , Administración de la Práctica Odontológica , Salud Pública , Facultades de Odontología , Autoinforme , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Estudiantes de Odontología/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
J Dent Educ ; 83(9): 1076-1080, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31133620

RESUMEN

With the extensive amount of learning required in dental schools, educators are constantly seeking more efficient learning models. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate a fixed prosthodontics course after its curriculum transitioned from a traditional lecture format to an active learning structure over the course of five years. In this retrospective, mono-centered study completed in 2018 at a U.S. dental school, data from the school's fixed prosthodontics course exams, National Board Dental Examination Part II (NBDE II), and the operative portion of the Western Regional Examining Board (WREB) licensure exam were collected for 381 students from the inaugural Class of 2015 to the Class of 2019. Data were evaluated for two groups based on method of instruction: the Classes of 2015 and 2016 were taught in a traditional model, and the Classes of 2017-19 were taught in the modified learning model. The data showed a 30% reduction in time students spent in the classroom and simulation clinic as compared to the previous model. The modified learning model reduced time spent in lecture, length of the course, and number of projects needed, while student performance remained consistent. Students in the active learning classes were able to pass all assessments including practical examinations at the same rate as previous classes using traditional learning methods. Students' performance on standardized national exams (NBDE II and WREB licensure exams) remained consistent among the graduating classes, and scores were comparable to the national average. Although limited in scope, this study suggests that it is possible to reduce contact time in fixed prosthodontics and maintain performance by increasing student engagement through active learning techniques.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Prostodoncia/educación , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Enseñanza , Educación Basada en Competencias , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Estudios Retrospectivos , Facultades de Odontología , Estados Unidos
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