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1.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 39-43, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31951799

RESUMEN

Mock board exams are common in residency programs across many disciplines. However, the value of mock board results in predicting success on the actual certifying examination is largely anecdotal and undocumented. The University of Tennessee anatomic pathology residency program has a long history of giving mock board exams twice a year during the course of the 3-year diagnostic training program. The mock exams give residents a sense of the types of questions that may appear on the actual certifying examination. The resulting scores serve to help identify improvement areas to focus additional study. In addition, by providing residents the mental and physical experiences designed to mimic the test day, we hope to better prepare these trainees for optimal performance on the certifying examination. This study correlated mock board results of 16 anatomic pathology residents, from July 2006 through January 2016, with their subsequent performance on the certifying exam. The results of these biannual exams were significantly correlated (p < .001) with results for the American College of Veterinary Pathologists Certifying Examination.


Asunto(s)
Certificación , Educación en Veterinaria , Evaluación Educacional , Patología , Animales , Certificación/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación en Veterinaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Internado y Residencia , Patología/educación , Estados Unidos
2.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 2-7, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920944

RESUMEN

Cultural humility, with its concomitant understanding of the importance of the influences of diversity and inclusion, improves health outcomes in the human medical field. Recent changes to the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requirements in veterinary medicine include teaching the impact of implicit bias on the delivery of veterinary medical services. Because overt enhancement of self-awareness is not fodder for traditional veterinary medical education delivery systems, in this article we review existing literature on the impact of recognition of implicit bias on health care and offer insights on ways to help veterinary students learn this skill, drawing on evidence from an inter-professional intervention called WisCARES (Wisconsin Companion Animal Resources, Education, and Social Services).


Asunto(s)
Sesgo , Competencia Cultural , Diversidad Cultural , Educación Médica , Educación en Veterinaria , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Concienciación , Competencia Cultural/educación , Curriculum , Educación en Veterinaria/normas , Humanos , Wisconsin
3.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 56-68, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920945

RESUMEN

Clinical reasoning is an important skill for veterinary students to develop before graduation. Simulation has been studied in medical education as a method for developing clinical reasoning in students, but evidence supporting it is limited. This study involved the creation of a contextualized, standardized client simulation session that aimed to improve the clinical reasoning ability and confidence of final-year veterinary students. Sixty-eight participants completed three simulated primary-care consultations, with the client played by an actor and the pet by a healthy animal. Survey data showed that all participants felt that the session improved their clinical decision-making ability. Quantitative clinical reasoning self-assessment, performed using a validated rubric, triangulated this finding, showing an improvement in students' perception of several components of their clinical reasoning skill level from before the simulation to after it. Blinded researcher analysis of the consultation video recordings found that students showed a significant increase in ability on the history-taking and making-sense-of-data (including formation of a differential diagnosis) components of the assessment rubric. Thirty students took part in focus groups investigating their experience with the simulation. Two themes arose from thematic analysis of these data: variety of reasoning methods and "It's a different way of thinking." The latter highlights differences between the decision making students practice during their time in education and the decision making they will use once they are in practice. Our findings suggest that simulation can be used to develop clinical reasoning in veterinary students, and they demonstrate the need for further research in this area.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Educación en Veterinaria , Entrenamiento Simulado , Animales , Toma de Decisiones , Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Humanos , Solución de Problemas , Entrenamiento Simulado/normas , Estudiantes/psicología , Pensamiento
4.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 18-26, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920946

RESUMEN

Communication skills are paramount for a successful veterinary curriculum. Technological advances have improved communication processes, and the way instruction is delivered. Yet, with these advances come challenges such as email overload, increased interruptions, and miscommunications. Time is a valuable commodity at any high caseload veterinary teaching hospital. When increasingly more time is spent sending and receiving emails, text messages, pages, and calls in lieu of more focused clinical teaching, then the modes of communication and traditional learning theories need to be evaluated. An effective mode of communication is needed to reduce information overload and miscommunication. This article describes lessons learned from a pilot study to determine if a team-based messaging application could improve a surgical team's communication by having all forms of transmitted media directly related to their scope of work accessible to everyone on the team in one real-time digital platform (Slack). Fifteen members of a university-based surgical team were enrolled into the study and provided with surveys at specific time points to evaluate the efficacy of an internet-based team communication tool during a 3-month period. Results of our study showed an overall perception of improved communication among team members when using a team-based communication platform. Recommendations are provided to address team member's underutilization of the platform, which resulted in duplicate messages and miscommunication. We conclude an initial adoption by staff members is essential when implementing significant shifts in communication platforms.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Educación en Veterinaria , Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Correo Electrónico , Humanos , Aplicaciones Móviles , Proyectos Piloto
5.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 69-77, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920948

RESUMEN

Empirical evidence demonstrates that student learning outcomes improve when animations are developed in alignment with the design principles of the cognitive theory of multimedia learning (CTML). The extent to which these principles are used in the design of veterinary instructional animations is unknown. In this study, we reviewed the veterinary education literature for articles that discussed specific veterinary medical animations as learning resources. The 30 referenced animations accessed through this search were analyzed to determine whether they used the CTML's 11 major design principles. Analysis revealed that the animations most commonly adhered to only 4 principles: coherence, redundancy, modality, and spatial contiguity. The majority of the 11 CTML principles were used in fewer than 40% of the animations. We also examined the alignment between raters' perceptions of the effectiveness and enjoyment of the animations and adherence to the design principles. Analyses revealed that the animations deemed by raters as most enjoyable and effective did not utilize more design principles than animations they viewed as least enjoyable and effective. The results of this study indicate many missed opportunities to increase learning by developing animated learning resources according to empirically based design principles. Decisions to include specific animations in instruction should be based on whether the resources include elements that have been shown to increase learning rather than subjective perceptions of effectiveness and enjoyment.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador , Educación en Veterinaria , Multimedia , Animales , Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes
6.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 91-99, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920949

RESUMEN

With the aim of improving students' ability to handle the complexity of surgery, we introduced a creative assignment in a veterinary surgical course. We hypothesized that by using this active, inductive educational method, reflection, creativity and self-efficacy in student novice surgeons could be improved. During a companion animal surgical course an intervention group was investigated against a control group. Twenty-nine fourth-year students were instructed in ovariohysterectomy by classical lectures, while 23 fourth-year students were provided with creative materials and assigned to consider and illustrate how to perform the procedure themselves. Surgical performance was assessed for both groups using a modified Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) while performing a simulated ovariohysterectomy. Furthermore, both groups were investigated with respect to how they would handle a specific hypothetical surgical complication. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 intervention-group students and were analyzed using thematic analysis. The intervention group showed a significantly better performance and needed significantly less help with the surgical complication than the control group students. Data from interviews furthermore demonstrated that students believed the creative intervention produced increased reflection, more creative initiatives, and a feeling of security before surgery. Our study results thus indicate that an educational tool which stimulates creative thinking can promote reflection, creativity, and self-efficacy in novice surgeons without compromising surgical performance.


Asunto(s)
Creatividad , Educación en Veterinaria , Cirugía Veterinaria , Animales , Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Femenino , Humanos , Ovariectomía , Percepción , Entrenamiento Simulado/normas , Estudiantes , Cirugía Veterinaria/educación , Cirugía Veterinaria/normas
7.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 100-105, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920950

RESUMEN

The Cornell Leadership Program for Veterinary Students is an intensive 10-week learning experience intended to guide competitively selected scholars into careers in science and public health. It features independent research, vocational counseling, and student-directed learning modules. Program scholars are encouraged to objectively evaluate graduate training as preparation for careers promoted by the program. Prominence is given to experiential learning through research, participation in program enrichment modules, and inspirational experiences achieved through group meetings and individual interactions with established scientists. Program alumni are monitored to determine how the careers they pursue relate to their earlier-stated ambitions. In addition, subjective assessments are made of the quality of graduate training and its impact on alumni career paths. The influence of mentors, vocational counseling, and inspirational experiences on subsequent training is also subjectively assessed. Information is obtained from students' anonymous responses to questionnaires and recorded interviews. Program alumni are contacted annually to determine their current activities and career aspirations. The Leadership Program encourages program graduates to undertake careers in science and public health, yet an unanticipated number of alumni enter private veterinary practice. A factor relevant to that outcome is that many students destined for practice lack a definitive career plan. Persuading veterinary students to consider careers in research or public service is challenging but worth the effort. Critical to that connection is the need for veterinary students to objectively evaluate graduate training options because the vocations they follow appear to be strongly influenced by the experiences they choose.


Asunto(s)
Selección de Profesión , Educación en Veterinaria , Ciencia , Estudiantes , Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Educación en Veterinaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Liderazgo , Ocupaciones/estadística & datos numéricos , Ciencia/educación , Ciencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos
8.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 78-90, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31009276

RESUMEN

Veterinary educators use models to allow repetitive practice of surgical skills leading to clinical competence. Canine castration is a commonly performed procedure that is considered a Day One competency for a veterinarian. In this study, we sought to create and evaluate a canine pre-scrotal closed castration model and grading rubric using a validation framework of content evidence, internal structure evidence, and relationship with other variables. Veterinarians (n = 8) and students (n = 32) were recorded while they performed a castration on the model and provided survey feedback. A subset of the students (n = 7) then performed a live canine castration, and their scores were compared with their model scores. One hundred percent of the veterinarians and 91% of the students reported that the model was helpful in training for canine castration. They highlighted several areas for continued improvement. Veterinarians' model performance scores were significantly higher than students', indicating that the model had adequate features to differentiate expert from novice performance. Students' performance on the model strongly correlated with their performance of live castration (r = .82). Surgical time was also strongly correlated (r = .70). The internal consistency of model and live rubric scores were good at .85 and .94, respectively. The framework supported validation of the model and rubric. The canine castration model facilitated cost-efficient practice in a safe environment in which students received instructor feedback and learned through experience without the risk of negatively affecting a patient's well-being. The strong correlation between model and live animal performance scores suggests that the model could be useful for mastery learning.


Asunto(s)
Perros , Educación en Veterinaria , Orquiectomía , Animales , Competencia Clínica , Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Animales , Orquiectomía/veterinaria , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Estudiantes
9.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 27-38, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31009278

RESUMEN

Although desexing surgeries are considered a core clinical skill for small animal veterinary practice, it can be challenging for veterinary schools to provide students with adequate training opportunities in the traditional curriculum. At the Massey University School of Veterinary Science, we recently established an innovative extracurricular volunteer program designed to have students teaching other students how to perform different elements of desexing procedures as they progress through their degree. This program includes administrative and assistant roles for first-year students (responsible for client communication, patient restraint, and medical record keeping), physical exam and recovery roles for second-year students (responsible for assessing patient fitness for surgery, drawing up anesthetic drugs, and monitoring patients in recovery), anesthesia and neuter surgeon roles for third-year students (responsible for inducing, preparing, and monitoring spay patients and performing cat neuter surgeries), and spay surgeon roles for fourth- and fifth-year students (responsible for performing cat spay surgeries, discharging patients, and following up with clients to monitor recovery). This program has been successful in improving student confidence and competence while also providing a valuable low-cost desexing service to the community. In this article, we discuss the practical considerations and processes involved in implementing this program, including mapping the existing surgical curriculum, recruiting patients, setting up the surgical facilities, purchasing equipment and supplies, establishing standard operating procedures, developing training materials, maintaining clinic records, and monitoring program outcomes. These resources can serve as guidelines for other veterinary schools looking to expand desexing surgery training opportunities for students.


Asunto(s)
Gatos , Educación en Veterinaria , Guías como Asunto , Orquiectomía , Ovariectomía , Cirugía Veterinaria , Animales , Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Educación en Veterinaria/economía , Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Educación en Veterinaria/organización & administración , Femenino , Masculino , Orquiectomía/educación , Orquiectomía/veterinaria , Ovariectomía/educación , Ovariectomía/veterinaria , Facultades de Medicina Veterinaria , Estudiantes , Cirugía Veterinaria/educación , Cirugía Veterinaria/normas , Voluntarios
10.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 44-55, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31009285

RESUMEN

This study evaluated whether one supervised simulated ovariohysterectomy (OVH) using a locally developed canine OVH model, decreased surgical time for final-year veterinary students' first live-animal OVH. We also investigated student perceptions of the model as a teaching aid. Final-year veterinary students were exposed to an OVH model (Group M, n = 48) and compared to students without the exposure (Group C, n = 58). Both groups were instructed similarly on performing an OVH using a lecture, student notes, a video, and a demonstration OVH performed by a veterinary surgeon. Students in Group M then performed an OVH on the model before performing a live-animal OVH. Students in Group C had no exposure to the OVH model before performing a live-animal OVH. Surgical time data were analyzed using linear regression. Students in Group M completed a questionnaire on the OVH model after performing their first live-animal OVH. The OVH model exposure reduced students' first canine live-animal OVH surgery time (p = .009) for students without prior OVH experience. All students (n = 48) enjoyed performing the procedure on the mode; students practicing an OVH on the model felt more confident (92%) and less stressed (73%) when performing their first live-animal OVH. Results suggest that the canine OVH model may be helpful as a clinical training tool and we concluded that the OVH model was effective at decreasing students' first OVH surgical time.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Veterinaria , Histerectomía , Tempo Operativo , Ovariectomía , Cirugía Veterinaria , Animales , Competencia Clínica/normas , Perros , Educación en Veterinaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Histerectomía/veterinaria , Modelos Animales , Ovariectomía/veterinaria , Autoimagen , Cirugía Veterinaria/educación , Cirugía Veterinaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
11.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 8-17, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31009292

RESUMEN

Veterinarians regularly face animal ethics conflicts, and research has identified the moral reasoning methods that they utilize to solve these. It is unclear whether students' sensitivity to animal ethics conflicts influences their reasoning methods, and the recent development of appropriate tests allows this to be assessed. We compared the moral reasoning methods, intended action and sensitivity of 112 first-year veterinary students in two contrasting veterinary schools, in Australia and Turkey. Students were presented with two animal ethics issues: breeding blind hens to address welfare concerns in intensive housing, for moral reasoning evaluation; and a video of a lame dairy cow walking, for sensitivity assessment. The sensitivity score was not related to the principal moral reasoning methods, which are Personal Interest (PI), Maintaining Norms (MN), and Universal Principles (UP). However, less sensitive students were more concerned about professional criticism of emotional reactions when addressing the hen scenario. Turkish students, mostly males, used more MN reasoning when deciding the hen dilemma. Australian, mostly female, students did not. Overall, female students were more likely to consider the universal moral principles in moral reasoning than male students and were more likely to recommend against breeding blind hens. This suggests that females are more likely to consider the ethical implications of their actions than males. This study demonstrates relationships between ethical sensitivity (ES) and moral reasoning, and cultural and gender effects on moral action choices. Students placing greater importance on professional criticism about having an emotional reaction are more likely to be those who have less ES.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Veterinaria , Ética , Juicio , Principios Morales , Animales , Australia , Educación en Veterinaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Juicio/ética , Masculino , Factores Sexuales , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Turquia
12.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 106-116, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31009293

RESUMEN

Competency in flexible endoscopy is a major goal of small animal internal medicine residency training programs. Hands-on laboratories to teach entry-level skills have traditionally used anesthetized laboratory dogs (live dog laboratory [LDL]). Virtual-reality endoscopy trainers (VRET) are used for this purpose in human medicine with the clear benefits of avoiding live animal use, decreasing trainee stress, and allowing repeated, independent training sessions. However, there are currently no commercially available veterinary endoscopy simulators. The purpose of the study was to determine whether a human VRET can be a reasonable alternative to a LDL for teaching early veterinary endoscopy skills. Twelve veterinarians with limited or no endoscopy experience underwent training with a VRET (n = 6) or a LDL (n = 6), performed two recorded esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGD) on anesthetized dogs for evaluation purposes (outcomes laboratory), and then underwent training with the alternative method. Participants completed questionnaires before any training and following each training session. No significant differences were found between training methods based on: measured parameters from the outcomes laboratory, including duration of time to perform EGD; evaluators' assessment of skills; and, assessment of skills through blinded review of the esophageal portion of EGD recordings. The VRET was less stressful for participants than the LDL (p = .02). All participants found that the VRET was a useful and acceptable alternative to the LDL for training of early endoscopy skills. Based on this limited study, VRET can serve as a reasonable alternative to LDL for teaching endoscopy skills to veterinarians.


Asunto(s)
Simulación por Computador , Educación en Veterinaria , Endoscopía , Realidad Virtual , Animales , Competencia Clínica , Simulación por Computador/normas , Perros , Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Educación en Veterinaria/normas , Endoscopía/educación , Endoscopía/veterinaria , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
13.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(1): 117-124, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31009300

RESUMEN

The stress of veterinary students ranges from the financial stress associated with high student loan debt combined with possible credit card debt, to relational stress due to lack of time to commit to social activities, to uncertainty regarding the ability to perform at the highest level. While this study considers a multifaceted approach to veterinary student stress and ultimate depressive symptoms, the focus is on the financial stress. A common strategy for reducing debt is to increase financial literacy. While this has the potential to help, it is not the sole solution given that students opt into the program for non-financial reasons. A path analysis was used to explore the predictors of financial satisfaction (the inverse of financial stress). The results were then used to predict depression among pre-vet and veterinary students in combination with relationship stress and demographic characteristics. Results indicate that current and expected student loan debt negatively influence financial satisfaction of pre-veterinary and veterinary students. Lower financial and relational satisfaction predict depressive symptoms among students. Among pre-veterinary students, feeling less intelligent than peers and being a sophomore versus a freshman is associated with depressive symptoms. Among current veterinary students, third-year students are more likely to report depressive symptoms than first-year students.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Veterinaria , Administración Financiera , Estrés Psicológico , Veterinarios , Educación en Veterinaria/economía , Humanos , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Estudiantes/psicología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Apoyo a la Formación Profesional , Veterinarios/economía
15.
Acta Cir Bras ; 34(9): e201900906, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31826098

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To develop 3D anatomical models, and corresponding radiographs, of canine jaw fractures. METHODS: A base model was generated from a mandibular bone scan. With this model it was possible to perform fracture planning according to the anatomical location. RESULTS: The 3D base model of the canine mandible was similar in conformation to the natural bone, demonstrating structures such as canine tooth crowns, premolars and molars, mental foramina, body of the mandible, ramus of the mandible, masseteric fossa, the coronoid process, condylar process, and angular process. It was not possible to obtain detail of the crown of the incisor teeth, mandibular symphysis, and the medullary channel. Production of the 3D CJF model took 10.6 h, used 150.1 g of filament (ABS) and cost US$5.83. CONCLUSION: The 3D canine jaw fractures models, which reproduced natural canine jaw fractures, and their respective radiographic images, are a possible source of educational material for the teaching of veterinary medicine.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Imagen Tridimensional/veterinaria , Fracturas Mandibulares/veterinaria , Modelos Anatómicos , Impresión Tridimensional , Animales , Perros , Imagen Tridimensional/métodos , Mandíbula/anatomía & histología , Mandíbula/diagnóstico por imagen , Fracturas Mandibulares/diagnóstico por imagen , Radiografía/veterinaria , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Factores de Tiempo
16.
J Vet Med Educ ; 46(4): 438-448, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31756148

RESUMEN

The stress of veterinary school and the high prevalence of psychological distress among veterinary students have been well documented. Pet ownership is known to improve overall health and reduce stress among the public. Yet, for veterinary students, owning a pet (especially a dog) can offer both rewards and challenges. The academic schedule for veterinary students often comprises long hours that can make caring for a dog challenging. This study explores the area of veterinary students' dog care options and perspectives by examining two aspects of this issue: (a) currently available options, as reported by academic administrators, and (b) perceived need for these options, as reported by veterinary students. A survey of associate deans for academic affairs (n = 30) found that routine on-site kenneling options for student-owned dogs are available at eight (26.6%) veterinary schools. Simultaneously, results of a student survey (n = 768) revealed a great desire for on-campus services. Among students who did not have access to on-campus kenneling facilities, 71.5% (453 of 634) felt that creating these options would be important or very important. Across all students surveyed, 76% (581 of 764) felt it would be important to have on-site dog housing/care available. Students experience considerable stress over having to find accommodations or care for their dogs while engaged in academic activities. Thus, providing on-site boarding and care options for student-owned dogs can play an important role in both recruiting prospective veterinary students and enhancing the well-being of those currently in the program.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Veterinaria , Propiedad , Mascotas/psicología , Facultades de Medicina Veterinaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Animales , Perros , Humanos , Estudios Prospectivos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
17.
J Vet Med Educ ; 46(4): 545-554, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31756150

RESUMEN

Despite the critical influence of motivation on education and work outcomes, little is known about the motivations driving people to become and remain veterinarians. This qualitative study explored the career motivations stated by Australian veterinary graduates (n = 43) using a free-response Ten Statements Test (TST) at graduation, with follow-up interviews 6-8 months later (n = 10). TST responses were coded using an alternate inductive-deductive approach that tested their fit against existing theories of motivation. Results showed that the stated motivations were predominantly oriented to perceived value, rather than self-beliefs such as expectancy of success. About a quarter of the statements were animal-related, principally themed around intrinsic animal orientation (e.g., I like animals) or extrinsic animal-related purpose (e.g., I want to help animals). However, many non-animal themes also emerged, including both intrinsic (e.g., love of learning, challenge/problem solving, variety, social relatedness) and extrinsic (e.g., helping people, social contribution, career opportunity) motivations. Interview data revealed a motivational narrative of early formative influences, with some interviewees describing a later transition toward more people- or goal-oriented motivations. This exploratory study, outlining a broad taxonomy of veterinary career motivations and their alignment to self-determination theory in particular, may provide a useful framework for exploring career motivations in veterinary education.


Asunto(s)
Selección de Profesión , Educación en Veterinaria , Veterinarios , Animales , Australia , Humanos , Motivación
18.
BMC Vet Res ; 15(1): 326, 2019 Sep 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31506098

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The YouTube channel "TiHoVideos" was created by the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation (TiHo) to enable easy, public access to the university's instructional videos as an additional support for learning clinical skills. Video production is expensive and time-consuming. To be able to optimize video production and aligning content to student needs we wanted to know if and how our students use these videos. RESULTS: Results show that the participating students primarily prepared for learning stations in the Clinical Skills Lab (CSL) by watching TiHoVideos at home on tablets or laptops and then concentrated at the CSL on learning the practical skills hands on. The videos available on TiHoVideos are rated as being a "very helpful" educational tool when preparing for CSL learning stations. CONCLUSIONS: Instructional videos represent an unquestionably suitable medium to aid veterinary students learn practical skills and a contribution to animal welfare by reducing the use of live animals in undergraduate veterinary education. The university's production of educational video material proves to be worth the effort because the videos are being used, appreciated and well-rated by TiHo students for their learning experience.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Educación en Veterinaria/métodos , Grabación en Video , Bienestar del Animal
19.
Res Vet Sci ; 125: 370-373, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31377419

RESUMEN

It is no secret that the rigors of professional medical programs are creating an immense strain on mental health, and studies show that students are coping poorly. It is becoming more widely known that this problem especially exists in veterinary medicine. Veterinary colleges are starting to make changes to address the mental health crisis among their student (and practitioner) population, however, in order to solve a problem you must first understand your audience. There are still questions regarding who is more often affected and why? In this study, the prevalence and correlates of stress, anxiety, and depression among veterinary students in the Southeastern US is the primary focus. Three hundred and forty two participants answered survey questions addressing socio-demographics, as well as, completed a perceived stress scale and patient health questionnaire (PHQ-4) to measure anxiety and depression. Chi-square, independent samples t-test, and ANOVA were conducted to assess demographic correlates of stress, anxiety, and depression. High levels of stress, anxiety, and depression were identified among veterinary students participating in the study. Stress level was significantly associated with sex and Grade Point Average (GPA): females and those with GPA <3.0 exhibited higher levels of stress. While it is good that veterinary colleges are already making changes, the question remains if these changes are significant enough. Based on this study's results, transitioning to a pass/fail grading system and implementing regular mindfulness practice are proposed changes that may aid in promoting a positive mental health culture for students and future veterinary professionals.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Ansiedad/psicología , Depresión/psicología , Educación en Veterinaria/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalencia , Factores Socioeconómicos , Sudeste de Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
20.
J Vet Med Educ ; 46(3): 302-339, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31460842

RESUMEN

Ethical sensitivity has been identified as one of the four necessary components of moral action, yet little has been done to assess ethical sensitivity to animal issues in animal-related professions. The aim of this study was to develop assessment tools to measure and enhance ethical sensitivity to animal issues, and determine relationships between ethical sensitivity and moral reasoning. Of a cohort of 115 third-year veterinary students from the University of Queensland, Australia, 104 students gave permission to use their responses to written ethical sensitivity and moral judgment tests, and 51 to use their video role-plays to demonstrate ethical sensitivity to current animal farming issues. Inter-rater reliability of scoring by an expert panel was moderate to substantial for the written assessment, but only slight to moderate for the video response. In the written test, students' mean scores for recognition of animals' emotions, expression of empathy and recognition of alternative actions and their impacts improved after teaching. Scores did not increase for identification of their own emotions, moral conflicts between stakeholders, and conflicts between legal, organizational and ethical responsibilities as a professional. There was no overall relationship between ethical sensitivity and moral reasoning scores. However, high scores for reasoning using universal principles were correlated with high scores for recognition of moral conflicts between stakeholders and between legal, organizational, and ethical responsibilities as a professional. Further development of these ethical sensitivity assessment tools is encouraged to enable veterinary and animal science students to raise and address animal ethics issues and alleviate moral distress.


Asunto(s)
Bienestar del Animal , Educación en Veterinaria , Principios Morales , Estudiantes/psicología , Bienestar del Animal/ética , Animales , Animales Domésticos , Australia , Granjas , Humanos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados
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