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1.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303911, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38768173

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: In this study, it is aimed to determine personal wellbeing and social participation levels across different physical disability types and levels of mobility. METHODS: A sample of 85 individuals with physical disabilities, excluding those with mental disabilities were included. Sociodemographics, mobility of the participants, cause, duration of disability were recorded. Personal Wellbeing Index-Adult (PWI-A) scale was used for the assessment of wellbeing and Keele Assessment of Participation (KAP) for social participation. RESULTS: Female, single, unemployed subjects and individuals with neurologic disability showed significantly higher median KAP-scores(p = 0.009, p = 0.050, p<0.001, p = 0.050, respectively).The median KAP-score of the independently mobile group was significantly lower compared to the other two groups (p = 0.001). The factors affecting KAP were determined as employment, mobility level and personal wellbeing (p = 0.002, p = 0.024, p = 0.050, respectively). CONCLUSION: Mobility level, employment and personal wellbeing are the determinants of social participation in people with disabilities. Neurological disability, female gender, being single, unemployment and mobility limitations are factors that reduce social participation.


Asunto(s)
Personas con Discapacidad , Participación Social , Humanos , Femenino , Masculino , Personas con Discapacidad/psicología , Participación Social/psicología , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Empleo , Adulto Joven , Anciano
2.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303361, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38739576

RESUMEN

Employer branding has emerged as a strategic imperative in the quest for talent. However, existing research has predominantly explored stable periods, overlooking the possible transformative impact of crises and the crucial role that HR managers play in crafting internal employer branding strategies. As such, this research addresses this by scrutinizing internal employer branding during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conducting in-depth interviews with 37 Belgian HR managers, we delve into the perceived challenges and opportunities that the COVID-19 crisis presented with respect to internal employer branding and its touchpoints-internal communication and leadership. A subsequent member and employee check with six HR managers and six employees validated our findings. The results unveiled organizations' heightened concern for employer branding during crises, emphasizing the strategic reflection invested. Remarkably, despite facing organizational/operational constraints/risks imposed by the crisis, the attention and efforts remain steadfastly centered on the experienced internal employer brand in crisis situations. Additionally, a contextual analysis suggests that various employer brand types face similar challenges in crises, however, the employer brand serves as a defining factor that shapes how an organization responds to both external uncertainties and internal dynamics brought about by the crisis. This study contributes to a nuanced understanding of internal employer branding dynamics during crises, shedding light on the strategic considerations of HR managers.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemias , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiología , COVID-19/prevención & control , Investigación Cualitativa , SARS-CoV-2 , Masculino , Femenino , Liderazgo , Bélgica/epidemiología , Adulto , Empleo , Lugar de Trabajo
3.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303439, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38739626

RESUMEN

Young adults experiencing homelessness (YAEH) are faced with instabilities in many areas of their lives, including their living situation, employment, and income. Little is known about how the experience of instability in these different domains might be associated with substance use. Leveraging data collected on 276 YAEH in Los Angeles County, regression analyses examine associations between three distinct types of instability (housing, employment, income) and participants' self-reported alcohol use, alcohol consequences, non-cannabis drug use, and substance use symptoms. Results indicated that recent instability in income, employment, and secure housing for those with access to it (but not housing in general or non-secure housing) were significantly associated with greater alcohol/drug use or substance use symptoms. Depression was also found to moderate the association between employment instability and alcohol use. Our findings suggest that efforts to reduce instability in income, employment, and secure housing may have positive benefits for substance using YAEH, especially those with depressive symptoms.


Asunto(s)
Empleo , Vivienda , Personas con Mala Vivienda , Renta , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Humanos , Personas con Mala Vivienda/estadística & datos numéricos , Personas con Mala Vivienda/psicología , Masculino , Femenino , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Renta/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/epidemiología , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/psicología , Adulto Joven , Adulto , Depresión/epidemiología , Los Angeles/epidemiología , Adolescente
4.
BMJ ; 385: q1072, 2024 05 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38740428
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(5): e2410731, 2024 May 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728029

RESUMEN

Importance: Employment is an important factor in quality of life and provides social and economic support. Longitudinal data on employment and associations with chronic health conditions for adult survivors of childhood cancer are lacking. Objective: To evaluate longitudinal trends in employment among survivors of childhood cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective cohort study of 5-year cancer survivors diagnosed at age 20 years or younger between 1970 and 1986 enrolled in the multi-institutional Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Sex-stratified employment status at baseline (2002 to 2004) and follow-up (2014 to 2016) was compared with general population rates from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System cohort. Data were analyzed from July 2021 to June 2022. Exposures: Cancer therapy and preexisting and newly developed chronic health conditions. Main Outcomes and Measures: Standardized prevalence ratios of employment (full-time or part-time, health-related unemployment, unemployed, not in labor force) among adult (aged ≥25 years) survivors between baseline and follow-up compared with the general population. Longitudinal assessment of negative employment transitions (full-time to part-time or unemployed at follow-up). Results: Female participants (3076 participants at baseline; 2852 at follow-up) were a median (range) age of 33 (25-53) years at baseline and 42 (27-65) years at follow-up; male participants (3196 participants at baseline; 2557 at follow-up) were 33 (25-54) and 43 (28-64) years, respectively. The prevalence of full-time or part-time employment at baseline and follow-up was 2215 of 3076 (71.3%) and 1933 of 2852 (64.8%) for female participants and 2753 of 3196 (85.3%) and 2079 of 2557 (77.3%) for male participants, respectively, with declining standardized prevalence ratios over time (female participant baseline, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.98-1.03; follow-up, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.90-0.98; P < .001; male participant baseline, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.97; follow-up, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.89-0.95; P = .02). While the prevalence of health-related unemployment increased (female participants, 11.6% to 17.2%; male participants, 8.1% to 17.1%), the standardized prevalence ratio remained higher than the general population and declined over time (female participant baseline, 3.78; 95% CI, 3.37-4.23; follow-up, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.97-2.51; P < .001; male participant baseline, 3.12; 95% CI, 2.71-3.60; follow-up, 2.61; 95% CI, 2.24-3.03; P = .002). Among survivors employed full-time at baseline (1488 female participants; 1933 male participants), 285 female participants (19.2%) and 248 male participants (12.8%) experienced a negative employment transition (median [range] follow-up, 11.5 [9.4-13.8] years). Higher numbers and grades of chronic health conditions were significantly associated with these transitions. Conclusions and Relevance: In this retrospective analysis of adult survivors of childhood cancer, significant declines in employment and increases in health-related unemployment among cancer survivors compared with the general population were identified. A substantial portion of survivors in the midcareer age range fell out of the workforce. Awareness among clinicians, caregivers, and employers may facilitate clinical counseling and occupational provisions for supportive work accommodations.


Asunto(s)
Supervivientes de Cáncer , Empleo , Neoplasias , Humanos , Femenino , Masculino , Supervivientes de Cáncer/estadística & datos numéricos , Supervivientes de Cáncer/psicología , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Enfermedad Crónica/epidemiología , Estudios Retrospectivos , Estudios Longitudinales , Neoplasias/epidemiología , Neoplasias/psicología , Adolescente , Niño , Adulto Joven , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
6.
Croat Med J ; 65(2): 101-110, 2024 Apr 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38706236

RESUMEN

AIM: To explore the relationship between the current work ability index (WAI) and depressive and anxiety symptoms in breast cancer (BC) patients and the role of depressive, anxiety, and physical symptoms in mediating this relationship. METHODS: This prospective study enrolled 83 employed women with BC. At baseline assessment (in the first three months following BC diagnosis) and follow-up assessment (one year after baseline), participants completed the WAI, Beck Depression Inventory-II, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire with a breast cancer-specific module. Mediation analyses were conducted to explore the mechanism by which depressive, anxiety, and physical symptoms influenced the relationship between WAI and depressive and anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: WAI was negatively associated with depressive and anxiety symptoms. The effect of baseline depressive and trait anxiety symptoms on WAI at follow-up was mediated by both depressive and trait anxiety symptoms, as well as by physical symptoms at follow-up. The effect of baseline state anxiety symptoms on WAI at follow-up was mediated only by state anxiety symptoms at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Baseline depressive and anxiety symptoms affect WAI at follow-up not only through persisting depressive and anxiety symptoms observed at follow-up but also through physical symptoms at follow-up. This indicates that efforts aimed at improving psychological health may result in simultaneous improvements in both psychological and physical health, as well as the resulting WAI.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad , Neoplasias de la Mama , Depresión , Calidad de Vida , Humanos , Femenino , Neoplasias de la Mama/psicología , Estudios Prospectivos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Croacia/epidemiología , Depresión/epidemiología , Depresión/psicología , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/psicología , Adulto , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Evaluación de Capacidad de Trabajo , Empleo , Escalas de Valoración Psiquiátrica , Anciano
7.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0297266, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38709814

RESUMEN

As the wave of industrial intelligence (AI) swept, the demographic dividend era in the Chinese labor market continued to decrease. This study aimed to explore how AI reshaped the labor employment structure of the floating population. Additionally, it clarified the internal mechanism of AI on the employment structure of the floating population based on the existing AI model and the theoretical model of AI technology. At the same time, the workforce was divided into high-, medium-, and low-skilled groups according to education level. Empirical analysis was conducted using relevant data from 31 Chinese provinces spanning from 2012 to 2018. The aim was to test the impact of AI technology on the employment of different types of floating populations. The results indicated that: (1) industrial robots impacted heterogeneous skilled floating population labor by bipolar promotion and central substitution. (2) The application of industrial robots had a promotion effect on unfinished school and primary school groups, a substitution effect on middle school, high school/technical secondary school, and college specialties, and a promotion effect on college undergraduate and graduate students. (3) Distinguish employment status, industrial robot application had a significant negative impact on low-skilled employees and significant positive effects on high-skilled employers. Hence, it was recommended to put forward corresponding policy suggestions to address this issue.


Asunto(s)
Inteligencia Artificial , Empleo , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , China , Industrias
8.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0302746, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728340

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Long-term health conditions can affect labour market outcomes. COVID-19 may have increased labour market inequalities, e.g. due to restricted opportunities for clinically vulnerable people. Evaluating COVID-19's impact could help target support. AIM: To quantify the effect of several long-term conditions on UK labour market outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic and compare them to pre-pandemic outcomes. METHODS: The Understanding Society COVID-19 survey collected responses from around 20,000 UK residents in nine waves from April 2020-September 2021. Participants employed in January/February 2020 with a variety of long-term conditions were matched with people without the condition but with similar baseline characteristics. Models estimated probability of employment, hours worked and earnings. We compared these results with results from a two-year pre-pandemic period. We also modelled probability of furlough and home-working frequency during COVID-19. RESULTS: Most conditions (asthma, arthritis, emotional/nervous/psychiatric problems, vascular/pulmonary/liver conditions, epilepsy) were associated with reduced employment probability and/or hours worked during COVID-19, but not pre-pandemic. Furlough was more likely for people with pulmonary conditions. People with arthritis and cancer were slower to return to in-person working. Few effects were seen for earnings. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 had a disproportionate impact on people with long-term conditions' labour market outcomes.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Empleo , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiología , COVID-19/economía , Reino Unido/epidemiología , Masculino , Femenino , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias/economía , SARS-CoV-2/aislamiento & purificación , Adulto Joven , Adolescente , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Anciano , Renta/estadística & datos numéricos
9.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303897, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38771807

RESUMEN

China has experienced rapid development in the digital economy. Using data from 30 provinces in China between 2011 and 2017, this paper constructs a two-way fixed effects model to study the effects and mechanisms of the digital economy development on social insurance funds revenue. An increase of one unit in digital economy development led to a 0.56% increase in basic endowment insurance funds revenue and a 0.33% increase in basic health insurance funds revenue. The digital economy increased the social insurance funds revenue by promoting employment and increasing income. Furthermore, the effects of digital economic development on social insurance funds revenue were heterogeneous for different levels of economic development and urbanization. The conclusions stood after robustness tests by changing the method of weighting the digital economy indicators and using instrumental variables. This paper confirmed the positive role of the development of the digital economy in increasing the revenue of social insurance funds from the perspective of quantitative research and explored the mechanisms in depth. In order to increase social insurance funds revenue, it is essential to accelerate the development of the digital economy, especially in regions with lower economic development and urbanization, and to address the needs of the technically unemployed and those engaged in flexible employment.


Asunto(s)
Desarrollo Económico , China , Humanos , Renta , Empleo/economía , Seguridad Social/economía , Seguro de Salud/economía , Urbanización
10.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0300455, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38771867

RESUMEN

The number of Americans with multiple jobs is increasing and multiple jobholders work more hours per week. However, the associations between multiple jobholding and hypertension are unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of multiple jobholding with hypertension and determine whether weekly working hours moderated this association. Data from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey on adults (age ≥18 years) were used and included participants who self-identified as non-Hispanic Asian, non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, or non-Hispanic White in the U.S. (n = 16,926), The associations of multiple jobholding with self-reported hypertension by sex were assessed using modified Poisson regressions. Both the number of working hours per week and race/ethnicity were assessed as moderators using multiplicative interaction terms. Multiple jobholding was not associated with hypertension among women. However, there was a significant three-way interaction such that multiple jobholding was associated with hypertension among non-Hispanic Black men who worked ≥55 hours per week (relative risk = 1.02, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.05). The results suggest that the associations between multiple jobholding, number of working hours, and hypertension should be examined at the intersection of race/ethnicity and sex. Future studies should further characterize multiple jobholding and hypertension among non-Hispanic Black men.


Asunto(s)
Hipertensión , Humanos , Masculino , Hipertensión/epidemiología , Hipertensión/etnología , Femenino , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Factores Sexuales , Etnicidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven , Hispánicos o Latinos/estadística & datos numéricos , Negro o Afroamericano/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Anciano , Población Blanca/estadística & datos numéricos
11.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0302979, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38781248

RESUMEN

This study examines the socioeconomic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the sufficiency of government support. Based on an online survey with 920 respondents, the cross-tabulation and binary logistic regression results show: firstly, in terms of loss of income, male respondents are more likely to have a loss of income as compared to female counterparts, and secondly, among different categories of employment status, the self-employed respondents are the most vulnerable group, given that more than 20 percent of them experienced loss of income due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, respondents working in small-and-medium enterprises (SMEs) and the informal sector are more likely to face loss of income as compared to respondents working in other sectors of employment. Likewise, respondents without tertiary education level are more likely to have a loss of income as compared to respondents with university certification. The baseline results highlight the insufficiency of government financial support programs based on the perspective of Malaysians from different demographic backgrounds. As a policy implication, the findings could guide the State in formulating the right policies for target groups who need more assistance than others in the community.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemias , Factores Socioeconómicos , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiología , COVID-19/economía , Masculino , Femenino , Adulto , Estudios Retrospectivos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias/economía , Gobierno , Renta/estadística & datos numéricos , Empleo/economía , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Apoyo Financiero , SARS-CoV-2 , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Financiación Gubernamental/economía , Adulto Joven
13.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1389, 2024 May 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38783221

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to vast changes in working life and conditions in which we work. These changes may affect people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) differently. We aimed to describe the working situation of PwMS during the COVID-19 pandemic and the pandemic's impact on their working lives. METHODS: All individuals aged 20-50 listed in the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Registry were invited to participate in an online survey in 2021. Closed and open-ended responses linked to individual-level register data were used in this exploratory mixed-methods study. Differences in the proportions reporting specific impacts were assessed with chi-square tests by sex, MS severity, education, and profession. The open-ended answers were analysed through content analysis. RESULTS: Over 8500 PwMS were invited (52% response rate). We included the 3887 respondents who answered questions about the impact of the pandemic on working life. Most (93.7%) reported being in paid work. An impact of the ongoing pandemic to one's daily occupation was reported by 26.2%, with different characteristics observed across the impacts. Four categories of type of answers were identified from the open-ended answers: Direct impact on one's occupation, Disclosing or concealing MS in the workplace, Worry and uncertainty, and Broader impact to life situation. CONCLUSIONS: PwMS navigated the pandemic by interrupting as well as continuing their working lives. Many PwMS reported that the pandemic did not affect their work situation. However, the reported impacts differed among the participants and a sense of uncertainty and worry was often underlying their statements. Lessons from the pandemic may support future work participation.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Esclerosis Múltiple , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiología , COVID-19/psicología , Suecia/epidemiología , Masculino , Femenino , Esclerosis Múltiple/psicología , Esclerosis Múltiple/epidemiología , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Empleo/psicología , Sistema de Registros , Pandemias , Lugar de Trabajo/psicología
14.
F1000Res ; 13: 420, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38784086

RESUMEN

In this opinion article, the author argues that highly skilled migrants in Japan face many challenges and are ineffectively used due to the existence of interior frontiers. Although interior frontiers are more subtle than the external boundaries these migrants have had to cross to enter the country, they have tremendous power over their everyday lives. Ethnocentric attitudes, influenced by Nihonjinron, have contributed to the existence of these frontiers. They emphasise homogeneity instead of flexibility and accommodation, and exist in the workplace. Employers want a homogeneous workplace and highly skilled migrants face strong pressures to assimilate. There is also an insistence on Japanese human resource practices such as seniority-based pay and promotion. An interior frontier also exists in the hiring process, and migrants are less likely to progress beyond the first round of interviews. With Japan's rapidly aging and declining population and acute labour shortages, there is urgency in addressing these frontiers.


Asunto(s)
Migrantes , Japón , Humanos , Migrantes/psicología , Empleo , Lugar de Trabajo
15.
Inquiry ; 61: 469580241251935, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38785255

RESUMEN

Many social services have work requirements. Notably, Medicaid has no requirement that healthy, able-bodied beneficiaries work to receive benefits. There have been attempts at incorporating work requirement policies into several US states, but only a few have been implemented. The effect of work requirements has been studied in several other federally funded programs such as TANF, SNAP, and historically in the Civilian Corps created by Franklin Roosevelt. In general, these programs seem to have modest improvements in employment but are better when implemented with work supports which show improvement in employment and income. In this study, we examine the history of work requirements in Medicaid and other social programs to see which policies have the most effect on enrollment and employment.


Asunto(s)
Empleo , Medicaid , Estados Unidos , Humanos , Política de Salud , Determinación de la Elegibilidad , Historia del Siglo XX
16.
Transl Behav Med ; 14(6): 333-337, 2024 May 24.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38734881

RESUMEN

Although many have investigated the impacts of minimum wage on a broad array of health outcomes, innovative policies surrounding broader employment policies have largely not been studied. To that end, this paper contributes in three ways. First, it discusses the rise in precarious employment. Then, it turns to the current federal framework of employment policies, namely minimum wage. Finally, it explores what a broader definition of employment policies could include and how future studies could use state, county, and municipal policymaking in this space to investigate ways in which they might contribute to reducing food insecurity and in turn, improve health outcomes.


About 30% of low-income households experienced food insecurity in 2023. Given that food security is strongly tied to employment conditions, there is potential to reduce food insecurity through innovative employment-focused policy changes. Minimum wage is often studied as an indicator of employment quality. However, employment policies now stretch beyond hourly rate, as several jurisdictions have adopted innovative, broader approaches to improving employment. More research is needed to determine whether these broader employment policies, such as secure scheduling, paid leave, and collective bargaining, may mitigate food insecurity.


Asunto(s)
Empleo , Inseguridad Alimentaria , Salarios y Beneficios , Humanos , Empleo/legislación & jurisprudencia , Salarios y Beneficios/legislación & jurisprudencia , Política Pública/legislación & jurisprudencia , Estados Unidos
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 24(1): 652, 2024 May 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38773454

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Strong growth in graduate supply from health, welfare and care courses across Australia may bode well for easing rural workforce shortages. However, little is known about the employment opportunities available for recent graduates in non-metropolitan areas. This study aimed to quantify and describe advertised job vacancies for health, welfare and care professions in Tasmania, a largely rural and geographically isolated island state of Australia. Further, it aimed to examine those job vacancies specifying that recent graduates were suitable to apply. METHODS: Job advertisements for health, welfare and care professionals were collected weekly throughout 2018 from six online job vacancy websites. Data were extracted on 25 variables pertaining to type of profession, number of positions, location, and graduate suitability. Location of positions were recoded into a Modified Monash Model (MM) category, the Australian geographic standard used to classify rurality. Positions advertised in MM2 areas were considered regional and MM3-7 areas rural to very remote. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: Over the twelve-month period, 3967 advertisements were identified, recruiting for more than 4700 positions across 49 different health, welfare and care professions in Tasmania. Most vacancies were in the non-government sector (58.5%) and located in regional areas (71.7%) of the state. Professions most frequently advertised were registered nurse (24.4%) and welfare worker (11.4%). Eleven professions, including physiotherapist and occupational therapist, recorded a disproportionate number of advertisements relative to workforce size, suggesting discipline specific workforce shortages. Only 4.6% of collected advertisements specified that a recent graduate would be suitable to apply. Of these, most were for the non-government sector (70.1%) and located in regional areas (73.4%). The professions of physiotherapist (26.6%) and occupational therapist (11.4%) were most frequently represented in advertised graduate suitable positions. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a range of advertised employment opportunities for health, welfare and care professionals across Tasmania, few specified vacancies as suitable for recent graduates and most were located in regional areas of the state. Health, welfare and care services in non-metropolitan locations may need to develop more employment opportunities for recent graduates and explicitly advertise these to job-seeking graduates to help grow and sustain the rural and remote health workforce into the future.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Rural , Tasmania , Humanos , Fuerza Laboral en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Selección de Personal , Población Rural/estadística & datos numéricos , Personal de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Ubicación de la Práctica Profesional/estadística & datos numéricos , Recursos Humanos
18.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 10703, 2024 05 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38730233

RESUMEN

Research in psychology and medicine has linked mental health disorders, and particularly bipolar disorder (BD), to employment in creative professions. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms for this link, which could be due to biology (primarily through a person's genes) or environmental (through socioeconomic status). Using administrative data on mental health diagnoses and occupations for the population of Denmark, we find that people with BD are more likely to be musicians than the population, but less likely to hold other creative jobs. Yet, we also show that healthy siblings of people with BD are significantly more likely to work in creative professions. Notably, people from wealthy families are consistently more likely to work in creative professions, and access to family wealth amplifies the likelihood that siblings of people with BD pursue creative occupations. Nevertheless, family wealth explains only a small share of the correlation between BD and creative employment.


Asunto(s)
Trastorno Bipolar , Creatividad , Empleo , Ocupaciones , Humanos , Trastorno Bipolar/psicología , Masculino , Femenino , Dinamarca , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Familia , Clase Social , Factores Socioeconómicos , Adulto Joven , Selección de Profesión
19.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1231, 2024 May 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38702701

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Socioeconomic inequalities in type 2 diabetes (T2D) are well established in the literature. However, within the background of changing work contexts associated with digitalization and its effect on lifestyle and sedentary behavior, little is known on T2D prevalence and trends among different occupational groups. This study aims to examine occupational sector differences in T2D prevalence and trends thereof between 2012 and 2019. METHODS: The study was done on 1.683.644 employed individuals using data from the German statutory health insurance provider in Lower Saxony, the "Allgemeine Ortskrankenkasse Niedersachsen" (AOKN). Predicted probabilities for T2D prevalence in four two-year periods between 2012 and 2019 were estimated based on logistic regression analyses for nine occupational sectors. Prevalence ratios were calculated to illustrate the effect of time period on the prevalence of T2D among the nine occupational sectors. Analyses were stratified by gender and two age groups. RESULTS: Results showed differences among occupational sectors in the predicted probabilities for T2D. The occupational sectors "Transport, logistics, protection and security" and "Health sector, social work, teaching & education" had the highest predicted probabilities, while those working in the sector "Agriculture" had by far the lowest predicted probabilities for T2D. Over all, there appeared to be a rising trend in T2D prevalence among younger employed individuals, with gender differences among occupational sectors. CONCLUSION: The study displayed different vulnerability levels among occupational sectors with respect to T2D prevalence overall and for its rising trend among the younger age group. Specific occupations within the vulnerable sectors need to be focused upon in further research to define specific target groups to which T2D prevention interventions should be tailored.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Humanos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiología , Alemania/epidemiología , Masculino , Femenino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto , Prevalencia , Ocupaciones/estadística & datos numéricos , Seguro de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Anciano , Adulto Joven , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Revisión de Utilización de Seguros
20.
J Health Econ ; 95: 102886, 2024 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38703637

RESUMEN

This study examines the gender-specific and enduring impacts of parental health shocks on adult children's employment in China, where both formal care and health insurance are limited. Using an event-study approach, we establish a causal link between parental health shocks and a notable decline in female employment, which persists for at least six years following the shock. Male employment, however, exhibits minimal change on average, although this conceals an increase among poor families, indicating a channel beyond heightened informal care. Our findings underscore the consequences of "growing old before getting rich" for developing countries.


Asunto(s)
Hijos Adultos , Empleo , Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Empleo/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , China , Factores Sexuales , Padres , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estado de Salud
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