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1.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1171: 25-35, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31823237

RESUMEN

Health care professionals must not only have knowledge, but also be able to organise, synthesise and apply this knowledge in such a way that it promotes the development of clinical reasoning. Panels of Virtual patients (VPs) are widely being used in health professions education to facilitate the development of clinical reasoning. VPs can also be used to teach wider educational outcomes such as communication skills, resource utilisation and longitudinal patient care. This chapter will define virtual patients and examine the evidence behind their use in health professions learning and teaching. The chapter will discuss virtual patient design, such as gamification. Finally, the chapter will discuss where this pedagogical innovation is best integrated into assessment and potential barriers to implementation into existing curricula.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Empleos en Salud , Realidad Virtual , Competencia Clínica , Educación Médica/tendencias , Empleos en Salud/educación , Humanos , Aprendizaje
2.
Eur. j. anat ; 23(6): 447-452, nov. 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | IBECS | ID: ibc-185087

RESUMEN

Anatomy is a key area of knowledge relevant to many disciplines and cadaveric dissection is a popular and effective option for anatomy teaching for many disciplines. Much of the previous re-search into how students learn from cadaveric dissection involves students of medicine. This paper revisits key findings reporting research involving medical students outlining the complexity of the issues raised in learning anatomy through cadaveric dissection. We also present the findings from a small-scale qualitative study, which aimed to explore students from a range of disciplines about their experiences of learning anatomy from human cadavers, conducted over a 12 month period at the University of Sheffield, UK. This included eight first-year medical students, one first-year dentistry student, two students from a post graduate course in the Department of Archaeology, and two second-year biomedical science (BMS) students. The study provides important information about students, including those outside medicine, and their experiences of learning anatomy from cadaveric dissection. Students could observe anatomical variation and learn though the multisensory experience of dissection. Overall, cadaveric dissection was viewed positively although there was one exception. The most important findings are that there was no suggestion that students objectified the body, and this is in contrast to previous work in the area. In fact, students disliked the aspect of pro-sections that meant that they were disconnected from their human bodies. The second important finding is the similarities of perceptions across disciplines, and this is a departure from previous re-search, which focuses on medical students. We make some tentative suggestions for the preparation and support for students learning anatomy from cadaveric dissection


No disponible


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Aprendizaje , Anatomía/educación , Cadáver , Disección , Empleos en Salud/educación , Análisis Cualitativo , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos
4.
Br J Nurs ; 28(17): 1144-1147, 2019 Sep 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31556744

RESUMEN

Interprofessional education is a key requirement identified in various professional and regulatory body education standards in the UK. However, recent high-profile investigatory reports into adverse incidents in NHS organisations have demonstrated failures of translating interprofessional education into practice. This paper explores how a university in the south of England uses service improvement projects to address this. Working with key senior clinicians, small groups of students from a variety of professional backgrounds collaborate to address an identified problem in practice to bring about better, safer practice to benefit patients. This style of learning enables students to acquire essential attributes in preparation for employment, such as critical thinking, teamworking, ethical practice and leadership.


Asunto(s)
Empleos en Salud/educación , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Medicina Estatal/organización & administración , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Curriculum , Inglaterra , Humanos , Universidades
7.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 397-400, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31408385

RESUMEN

Twenty-eight undergraduate students in a health sciences program volunteered for an exercise in the history of examinations. They had completed a second-year course in anatomy and physiology in which they studied modern texts and took standard contemporary exams. For this historical "experiment," students studied selected chapters from two 19th century physiology texts (by Foster M. A Textbook of Physiology, 1895; and Broussais FJV. A Treatise on Physiology Applied to Pathology, 1828). They then took a 1-h-long exam in which they answered two essay-type questions set by Thomas Henry Huxley for second-year medical students at the University of London in 1853 and 1857. These were selected from a question bank provided by Dr. P. Mazumdar (University of Toronto). A questionnaire probed their contrasting experiences. Many wrote thoughtful, reflective comments on the exercise, which not only gave them an insight into the difficulties faced by students in the past, but also proved to be a valuable learning experience (average score: 8.6 ± 1.6 SD).


Asunto(s)
Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Empleos en Salud/educación , Fisiología/educación , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud , Humanos , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología
8.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 414-422, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31408387

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different metacognitive interventions on knowledge and regulation of cognition, as well as academic performance (i.e., exam and final grades) in three sections of an undergraduate human anatomy and physiology course. All targeted classes were randomly assigned to one of three groups (reflection practice, passive acquisition of knowledge, and collaborative learning), and the interventions were implemented after exam 1. A pre- and posttest survey was administered during the semester (during week 2 and after exam 2), and exam and final course grades were collected at the end of the semester. The final sample included 129 students. A significant interaction of group and time was observed for knowledge of cognition: it increased in the reflection practice group, did not change in the collaborative learning group, and it decreased in the passive acquisition of knowledge. The interventions did not produce any significant interactions or main effects on regulation of cognition, exam scores, or final grades. Along with more research on metacognition in physiology education contexts, it is recommended to further examine the ways in which such data can be collected, as self-report measures only tell part of the story.


Asunto(s)
Rendimiento Académico/psicología , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Empleos en Salud/educación , Metacognición , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Enseñanza/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Metacognición/fisiología
9.
BMC Med ; 17(1): 139, 2019 07 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31315642

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines are an important source of information, designed to help clinicians integrate research evidence into their clinical practice. Digital education is increasingly used for clinical practice guideline dissemination and adoption. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of digital education in improving the adoption of clinical practice guidelines. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and searched seven electronic databases from January 1990 to September 2018. Two reviewers independently screened studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We included studies in any language evaluating the effectiveness of digital education on clinical practice guidelines compared to other forms of education or no intervention in healthcare professionals. We used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) approach to assess the quality of the body of evidence. RESULTS: Seventeen trials involving 2382 participants were included. The included studies were diverse with a largely unclear or high risk of bias. They mostly focused on physicians, evaluated computer-based interventions with limited interactivity and measured participants' knowledge and behaviour. With regard to knowledge, studies comparing the effect of digital education with no intervention showed a moderate, statistically significant difference in favour of digital education intervention (SMD = 0.85, 95% CI 0.16, 1.54; I2 = 83%, n = 3, moderate quality of evidence). Studies comparing the effect of digital education with traditional learning on knowledge showed a small, statistically non-significant difference in favour of digital education (SMD = 0.23, 95% CI - 0.12, 0.59; I2 = 34%, n = 3, moderate quality of evidence). Three studies measured participants' skills and reported mixed results. Of four studies measuring satisfaction, three studies favoured digital education over traditional learning. Of nine studies evaluating healthcare professionals' behaviour change, only one study comparing email-delivered, spaced education intervention to no intervention reported improvement in the intervention group. Of three studies reporting patient outcomes, only one study comparing email-delivered, spaced education games to non-interactive online resources reported modest improvement in the intervention group. The quality of evidence for outcomes other than knowledge was mostly judged as low due to risk of bias, imprecision and/or inconsistency. CONCLUSIONS: Health professions digital education on clinical practice guidelines is at least as effective as traditional learning and more effective than no intervention in terms of knowledge. Most studies report little or no difference in healthcare professionals' behaviours and patient outcomes. The only intervention shown to improve healthcare professionals' behaviour and modestly patient outcomes was email-delivered, spaced education. Future research should evaluate interactive, simulation-based and spaced forms of digital education and report on outcomes such as skills, behaviour, patient outcomes and cost.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador , Educación en Salud/métodos , Empleos en Salud/educación , Empleos en Salud/normas , Personal de Salud/educación , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Competencia Clínica , Conducta Cooperativa , Humanos , Internet , Conocimiento , Aprendizaje , Entrenamiento Simulado , Realidad Virtual
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 267, 2019 Jul 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31319892

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Undergraduate students across health professions are required to be capable users of evidence in their clinical practice after graduation. Gaining the essential knowledge and clinical behaviors for evidence-based practice can be enhanced by theory-based strategies. Limited evidence exists on the effect of underpinning undergraduate EBP curricula with a theoretical framework to support EBP competence. A systematic review was conducted to determine the effectiveness of EBP teaching strategies for undergraduate students, with specific focus on efficacy of theory-based strategies. METHODS: This review critically appraised and synthesized evidence on the effectiveness of EBP theory-based teaching strategies specifically for undergraduate health students on long or short-term change in multiple outcomes, including but not limited to, EBP knowledge and attitudes. PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, ProQuest Health, ERIC, The Campbell Collaboration, PsycINFO were searched for published studies and The New York Academy of Medicine, ProQuest Dissertations and Mednar were searched for unpublished studies. Two independent reviewers assessed studies using the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument. RESULTS: Twenty-eight studies reporting EBP teaching strategies were initially selected for review with methodological quality ranging from low to high. Studies varied in course duration, timing of delivery, population and course content. Only five included papers reported alignment with, and detail of, one or more theoretical frameworks. Theories reported included Social Cognitive Theory (one study), Roger's Diffusion of Innovation Theory (two studies) and Cognitive Apprenticeship Theory (one study). Cognitive Flexibility Theory and Cognitive Load Theory were discussed in two separate papers by the same authors. All but one study measured EBP knowledge. Mixed results were reported on EBP knowledge, attitudes and skills across the five studies. CONCLUSIONS: EBP programs for undergraduate health students require consideration of multiple domains, including clinical behaviors, attitudes and cognitive learning processes; Interventions grounded in theory were found to have a small but positive effect on EBP attitudes. The most effective theory for developing and supporting EBP capability is not able to be determined by this review therefore additional rigorous research is required.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia/educación , Empleos en Salud/educación , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Teóricos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
11.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 60(2): E119-E123, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31312741

RESUMEN

Introduction: University students are at risk of starting smoking or continuing and increasing the consumption of tobacco products. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of the training course, Sisma Project, about smoking in healthcare degree courses, in terms of knowledge, behaviour and to evaluate the course. Methods: SISMA project was a pre- post study about an intervention delivered to healthcare profession students about smoking and smoking cessation. It had a before-after design and was an online optional course available on the eLearning platform Moodle 2. The course was structured in four lessons of sixty minutes, a debate among experts and a final test of evaluation. The McNemar test was used to measure the effectiveness of Sisma on smoking behaviour of students after the intervention. Students rated the course assigning a score from one to ten, and expressed free comments about point of strength and weakness of Sisma project. Results: The participants were 365 students, 28.5% males and 71.5% females, most were nursing 194 (53.2%) and dental hygienists students 105 (28.8%). Current smokers were 161 (44.1%) before and 142 (38.9%) after the course, there was statistical significant difference in smoking status after attending the course (p < 0.001). Students evaluated the course giving a high score with a mean of 8.13 (SD: 1.1); the main points of strength were the content (33.2%), the structure (15.6%) and knowledge given by the course (12.6%). The main point of weakness were the online structure 62 (37%), problem related to length and time 17 (10%) and the final test 15 (9%). Discussion: Given the central role health professionals play in patient care, students need to be aware and trained in tobacco cessation techniques. Our results indicate that smoking behaviour significantly changed after attending a university course for smoking cessation and students appreciated its contents and structure.


Asunto(s)
Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Cese del Hábito de Fumar , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Empleos en Salud/educación , Humanos , Masculino , Fumar/epidemiología , Fumar/psicología , Cese del Hábito de Fumar/psicología , Prevención del Hábito de Fumar/métodos , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
12.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 107(3): 403-410, 2019 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31258446

RESUMEN

Background: The following case example provides an overview of one innovative way to engage health professions faculty with health sciences librarians in the development of an interprofessional book discussion and identifies strategies to address implementation challenges. Academic health sciences librarians worked with the Interprofessional Education (IPE) Steering Committee to organize interprofessional book discussion groups for incoming health professions students. This inaugural book discussion brought together students and faculty of different disciplines to engage students in "learning from, with, and about" other professions. Case Presentation: When Breath Becomes Air, by Paul Kalanithi, allowed involved discussions on important health sciences issues. The project included outreach, designing pre- and post-surveys, scheduling participants, and communicating with all participants before, during, and after the event. A total of seventy-nine students and thirty-six faculty, representing all health professions schools, participated in the small group IPE book discussions over two weeks. Conclusions: Small group book discussions have been shown to be an effective tool to engage students and faculty in IPE. The results of the participant surveys were positive, and the IPE Steering Committee found value in including health sciences librarians throughout the process. Lessons learned from the pilot project include needing an efficient scheduling system, strongly communicating at all stages of the project, and starting the planning process months ahead of time. The IPE Steering Committee plans to conduct similar book discussions every fall semester moving forward and explore options for other IPE events.


Asunto(s)
Libros , Conducta Cooperativa , Educación Médica/organización & administración , Docentes Médicos/psicología , Empleos en Salud/educación , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Bibliotecólogos/psicología , Adulto , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Proyectos Piloto
13.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 17(1): 66, 2019 Jul 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31277651

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Training in biostatistics is important for strengthening capacity in health research. This is particularly true for Africa, where research output in the health sciences has been low. Training initiatives for the continent are therefore essential. The aim of the present study was to analyse the quality and financial sustainability of the expanded biostatistical support system at a South African health sciences institution between 2013 and 2017. METHODS: A cross-sectional investigation of the initiatives created between the years 2013 and 2017 in the University of the Witwatersrand, Faculty of Health Sciences Research Office was undertaken. An assessment of the one-on-one consultations carried out by postgraduate students and staff, financial costs of the support system and the number of postgraduate student graduations were analysed. RESULTS: The number of statistical consultations increased over the period examined. The consultations were highly recommended by the postgraduate students and staff (consulters). A clear rise in the number of Masters and PhD student graduates and an increase in research units were observed from 2013 to 2017, although these cannot be solely associated with the biostatistical support system. The finances for maintaining the support system are cost effective as the number of graduates increases. The total cost to the Research Office is US$ 225 per graduate per annum. CONCLUSIONS: The expansion of the biostatistical support system has indirectly contributed to an increased number of graduates and research publication units in the institution. While the current finances support the system, any increases in enrolments or growth in diversification of biostatistical requirements may place a strain on the financial sustainability. This service is of value to developed and developing countries.


Asunto(s)
Bioestadística , Empleos en Salud/educación , Investigación/organización & administración , Universidades/organización & administración , Análisis Costo-Beneficio , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Investigación/economía , Investigación/normas , Asignación de Recursos/estadística & datos numéricos , Sudáfrica , Universidades/economía
14.
J Clin Nurs ; 28(21-22): 3759-3775, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31216367

RESUMEN

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To extract, examine and report the highest available levels of evidence from healthcare disciplines in the use of simulation-based education as substitution for clinical placement in prelicensure programmes. BACKGROUND: Simulation is widely employed across prelicensure health professional education to create safe, realistic clinical learning experiences for students. Whether simulation can be employed to substitute for actual clinical placement, and if so, in what proportion, replacement ratio and duration, is unclear. METHODS: A systematic review and quality appraisal of primary studies related to prelicensure students in all health disciplines, guided by the PRISMA checklist. RESULTS: Ten primary studies were included, representing 2,370 students from three health disciplines in four countries. Nine studies were experimental and quasi-experimental and methodological quality was assessed as moderate to high with good to very good inter-rater agreement. Direct substitution of simulation for clinical practice ranged from 5% to 50%. With one exception, replacement ratios were 1:1 and duration of replacement ranged from 21 hr-2 years. Levels of evaluation included measures of reaction, knowledge and behaviour transfer; no negative outcomes were reported. We appraised practicalities for design of substitution, design limitations and knowledge transfer to accreditation standards for prelicensure programmes. CONCLUSIONS: This review synthesised highest levels and quality of available evidence for substitution of simulation for clinical placement in health professional education. Included studies were heterogenous in simulation interventions (proportion, ratio and duration) and in the evaluation of outcomes. Future studies should incorporate standardised simulation curricula, widen the health professions represented and strengthen experimental designs. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Current evidence for clinical educational preparation does not appear to be translated into programme accreditation standards governing clinical practice experience for prelicensure programmes in relevant jurisdictions. Overall, a stronger evidence base is necessary to inform future curricula and policy development, to strengthen clinical practice in health.


Asunto(s)
Educación Profesional/normas , Empleos en Salud/educación , Entrenamiento Simulado/organización & administración , Curriculum/normas , Humanos , Concesión de Licencias/normas
15.
J Allied Health ; 48(2): e53-e59, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31167019

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Interprofessional education (IPE) is most effective when delivered as an experiential continuum. When to initiate IPE to undergraduate college students is unclear. This pilot project developed, implemented, and evaluated an IPE modular project introducing Interprofessional Communication and Teams and Teamwork IPE competencies to first-year allied health professions undergraduate students. METHODS: Students (n=127) were divided into two groups such that five different health science majors were represented in each. One group participated in an experiential 4-part IPE modular program, and one did not. Module components consisted of: a) an online IPE component; b) structured in-class IPE activities and discussion; c) an IPE CPR training course emphasizing communication, conflict resolution, and collaborative practice techniques; and d) an IPE CPR simulation with reflective debriefing session. Both groups' self-efficacy and confidence regarding targeted Interprofessional Communication and Teams and Teamwork IPE competencies were assessed at the same timepoints pre- and post-module using standardized Likert scale surveys. RESULTS: Results indicated a positive impact on modular group students' perception of changes in their interprofessional knowledge and skills compared with non-modular group students such that post-module students' self-efficacy and confidence ratings were both significantly higher. CONCLUSIONS: First-year allied health professions undergraduates benefit from experiential IPE targeting foundational communication and teamwork skills.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Empleos en Salud/educación , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/organización & administración , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Reanimación Cardiopulmonar/educación , Procesos de Grupo , Humanos , Grupo de Atención al Paciente , Proyectos Piloto , Estudios Prospectivos , Autoeficacia , Factores de Tiempo
16.
Global Health ; 15(1): 37, 2019 06 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31174554

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Globalization and funding imperatives drive many universities to internationalize through global health programmes. University-based global health researchers, advocates and programmes often stress the importance of addressing health inequity through partnerships. However, empirical exploration of perspectives on why universities engage in these partnerships and the benefits of them is limited. OBJECTIVE: To analyse who in international partner universities initiated the partnerships with four East African universities, why the partnerships were initiated, and what the international partners value about the partnerships. METHODS: Fifty-nine key informants from 26 international universities partnering with four East African universities in medicine, nursing and/or public health participated in individual in-depth interviews. Transcripts were analysed thematically. We then applied Burton Clark's framework of "entrepreneurial" universities characterized by an "academic heartland", "expanded development periphery", "managerial core" and "expanded funding base", developed to examine how European universities respond to the forces of globalization, to interpret the data through a global health lens. RESULTS: Partnerships that were of interest to universities' "academic heartland" - research and education - were of greatest interest to many international partners, especially research intensive universities. Some universities established and placed coordination of their global health activities within units consistent with an expanded development periphery. These units were sometimes useful for helping to establish and support global health partnerships. Success in developing and sustaining the global health partnerships required some degree of support from a strengthened steering or managerial core. Diversified funding in the form of third-stream funding, was found to be essential to sustain partnerships. Social responsibility was also identified as a key ethos required to unite the multiple elements in some universities and sustain global health partnerships. CONCLUSION: Universities are complex entities. Various elements determine why a specific university entered a specific international partnership and what benefits it accrues. Ultimately, integration of the various elements is required to grow and sustain partnerships potentially through embracing social responsibility as a common value.


Asunto(s)
Empleos en Salud/educación , Cooperación Internacional , Universidades/organización & administración , África Oriental , Salud Global , Humanos , Motivación , Responsabilidad Social , Valores Sociales
19.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 221, 2019 Jun 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31227027

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The learning climate within a learning environment is a key factor to determine the potential quality of learning. There are different groups of postgraduate trainees who study primarily in the operating theater (OT), which is a complex, high-stake environment. This study created and validated an interprofessional measure of the OT educational climate and explored how postgraduate trainees from different health professions experienced the learning climate within the operating theater. METHODS: An explanatory, sequential mixed-method design was used. The quantitative phase used and validated a newly developed questionnaire, the Operating Theater Educational Climate Test (OTECT), to evaluate the perceptions of anesthesia residents, surgical residents and student registered nurse anesthetists. In the qualitative phase, three mono-professional focus groups participants' opinions on the factors influencing their learning climate were explored. RESULTS: The OTECT questionnaire was found to be valid. The questionnaire response rate was 78.9% (142 respondents from 180). Questionnaire results indicated similar perceptions of the OT learning climate by learners from all disciplines. Focus groups revealed three major influencing factors on the experienced learning climate: 1) nature of work in the OT, 2) the role of the supervisor, and 3) the interprofessional dimension of work in the OT. CONCLUSIONS: The OT learning climate was perceived similarly by trainees from three health profession. The high stakes nature of the OT inhibited learning most as it impacted both trainees and supervisors. The results can be applied to improve the overall learning environment in the OT for all groups of learners.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Empleos en Salud/educación , Internado y Residencia , Quirófanos , Apoyo a la Formación Profesional/normas , Adulto , Estudios de Evaluación como Asunto , Análisis Factorial , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino
20.
Rev. Fund. Educ. Méd. (Ed. impr.) ; 22(3): 103-107, mayo-jun. 2019. tab
Artículo en Español | IBECS | ID: ibc-183064

RESUMEN

Introducción: Las prácticas pedagógicas siguen siendo un fenómeno poco investigado, pese a su relevancia para la calidad de la formación universitaria. Objetivo: Analizar la relación entre las prácticas pedagógicas percibidas por estudiantes de programas de grado en salud de una universidad de Chile y su satisfacción académica. Sujetos y métodos: Se encuestó a 649 estudiantes de la salud de una universidad chilena, quienes respondieron el cuestionario de satisfacción académica y el cuestionario de prácticas pedagógicas percibidas por estudiantes, previo consentimiento informado. Resultados: Los alumnos percibieron prácticas pedagógicas más tradicionales, planificadas y menos centradas en el estudiante. Además, las prácticas pedagógicas percibidas, junto con el nivel cursado, la titulación, el sexo y la edad del alumno, predicen un 37,19% de la satisfacción académica. Conclusión: La satisfacción académica varía según la titulación y los niveles formativos cursados por el alumno, se asocia a su sexo y es favorecido por prácticas pedagógicas constructivistas


Introduction: Teaching practices are still a little investigated phenomenon, despite its relevance for the quality of higher education. Aim: To analyze the relationship between teaching practices perceived by Chilean health degree students and their academic satisfaction. Subjects and methods: 649 health students from a university in Chile were surveyed. They answered the Academic Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Teaching Practices Perceived by Students Questionnaire, after an informed consent process. Results: Students perceived more traditional, more planned and less student-centered teaching practices. In addition, perceived teaching practices and student information, such as training moment, degree, sex and age predicted 37.19% of the academic satisfaction. Conclusion: Academic satisfaction varies according to degree and educational levels completed by the student. It is also associated to their sex and is enhanced by constructivist pedagogical practices


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Adolescente , Adulto Joven , Adulto , Empleos en Salud/educación , Percepción , Capacitación Profesional , Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Chile , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estudios Transversales , Análisis de Datos , Modelos Lineales , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos
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