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1.
J Nurs Adm ; 49(12): 604-609, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31725519

RESUMEN

Caring for multiple complex patients simultaneously is 1 of the biggest challenges for clinical nurses (CNs) in acute care. We utilized the results of research to develop a 6-hour Professional Nursing Practice Curriculum (PNPC) specifically for CNs who are professionally and legally responsible for providing holistic care to an assigned group of patients on inpatient clinical units in acute care hospitals. The curriculum can be used by faculty to prepare senior nursing students for their 1st professional practice role in an acute care setting. Components of the PNPC will be beneficial for nurse leaders in an assessment of their educational practices for transitioning newly licensed RNs to practice and addressing professional development needs of CNs.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Enfermería de Cuidados Críticos/educación , Curriculum , Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Enfermería Holística/educación , Rol Profesional , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estados Unidos
2.
Nurs Educ Perspect ; 40(6): 358-360, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31478988

RESUMEN

The educational structure of many nursing programs is largely monocultural, with a traditional pedagogy. Empowered holistic nursing education (EHNE) creates a learning environment with more cultural responsiveness and support for diverse classrooms. The aim of this study was to determine what impact the theory had on diversification. With EHNE the philosophical framework of a new RN-to-BSN program, student demographic data were collected, along with exit survey questions. A statistically significant increase was found in the diversification of the six cohorts. The EHNE shows potential as a programmatic framework for increasing diversification of the nursing profession.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/organización & administración , Enfermería Holística/educación , Filosofía en Enfermería , Diversidad Cultural , Humanos , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería , Estudiantes de Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
3.
Creat Nurs ; 24(1): 42-51, 2018 Feb 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29490835

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Addressing spirituality in health care is important as it improves health outcomes; however, several provider barriers exist to providing spiritually based care. Local problem: A chart audit at a multidisciplinary wellness center serving a population with chronic mental health problems identified a need to improve the number of spiritually based interventions provided to clients by the nurse practitioner. DESIGN: A quasi-experimental design and pre- and post-test questionnaire were used to measure outcomes including the number of spiritually based interventions and provider attitudes. INTERVENTION: Providers, including a nutritionist, exercise physiologist, pharmacist, acupuncturist, and nurse practitioner, participated in two, 1-hour interactive educational sessions on providing spiritually based care, emphasizing the use of gratitude practices. RESULTS: The mean number of spiritually based interventions charted per visit by the nurse practitioner increased from 0.4 pre-implementation to 1.1 post-implementation (rate ratio = 2.57, with 95% CI [1.75, 3.87]; p < .001). Descriptive statistics from all providers show improvements in attitudes and comfort level in addressing spiritually based care. Several intervention areas documented by the nurse practitioner decreased significantly, including mind/body, which may be related to the study, as many spiritually based interventions are also mind/body interventions. CONCLUSION: Interactive educational sessions on spirituality can improve a health-care team's attitudes, comfort level, and practice of providing spiritually based care. Generalizability is limited to the project site, but the process could be implemented in other facilities to determine if similar results can be achieved.


Asunto(s)
Prestación de Atención de Salud/organización & administración , Empatía , Enfermería Holística/educación , Enfermería Holística/organización & administración , Mejoramiento de la Calidad/organización & administración , Terapias Espirituales/educación , Terapias Espirituales/organización & administración , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Espiritualidad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
4.
J Holist Nurs ; 36(1): 68-78, 2018 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27895209

RESUMEN

Simulation as a technology and holistic nursing care as a philosophy are two components within nursing programs that have merged during the process of knowledge and skill acquisition in the care of the patients as whole beings. Simulation provides opportunities to apply knowledge and skill through the use of simulators, standardized patients, and virtual settings. Concerns with simulation have been raised regarding the integration of the nursing process and recognizing the totality of the human being. Though simulation is useful as a technology, the nursing profession places importance on patient care, drawing on knowledge, theories, and expertise to administer patient care. There is a need to promptly and comprehensively define the concept of holistic nursing simulation to provide consistency and a basis for quality application within nursing curricula. This concept analysis uses Walker and Avant's approach to define holistic nursing simulation by defining antecedents, consequences, and empirical referents. The concept of holism and the practice of holistic nursing incorporated into simulation require an analysis of the concept of holistic nursing simulation by developing a language and model to provide direction for educators in design and development of holistic nursing simulation.


Asunto(s)
Enfermería Holística/educación , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Competencia Clínica/normas , Formación de Concepto , Educación Continua en Enfermería/métodos , Educación Continua en Enfermería/normas , Enfermería Holística/métodos , Humanos , Enseñanza
5.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 48(8): 358-364, 2017 Aug 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28759693

RESUMEN

Increasing focus is being placed on providing spiritual care for patients as a component of holistic nursing care. Studies indicate that patients whose spiritual needs are met report higher quality of and satisfaction with their care. However, nurses are not including spiritual assessment and care into their practice. One barrier cited by nurses is that they lack educational preparation. A 2-hour, face-to-face educational module about the provision of spiritual care was implemented for inpatient nursing staff at a large academic medical center. Program evaluations of the module suggested an increase in the comfort of nurses providing spiritual care. This article describes the development and implementation of this educational program, with preliminary results. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(8):358-364.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación Continua en Enfermería/organización & administración , Enfermería Holística/educación , Personal de Enfermería en Hospital/educación , Espiritualidad , Desarrollo de Personal/métodos , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Sudeste de Estados Unidos
6.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 31(3): 183-192, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28406872

RESUMEN

Over the past several years, holistic nursing education has become more readily available to nurses working in high-income nations, and holistic practice has become better defined and promoted through countless organizational and governmental initiatives. However, global nursing community members, particularly those serving in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) within resource-constrained health care systems, may not find holistic nursing easily accessible or applicable to practice. The purpose of this article is to assess the readiness of nursing sectors within these resource-constrained settings to access, understand, and apply holistic nursing principles and practices within the context of cultural norms, diverse definitions of the nursing role, and the current status of health care in these countries. The history, current status, and projected national goals of professional nursing in Rwanda is used as an exemplar to forward the discussion regarding the readiness of nurses to adopt holistic education into practice in LMICs. A background of holistic nursing practice in the United States is provided to illustrate the multifaceted aspects of support necessary in order that such a specialty continues to evolve and thrive within health care arenas and the communities it cares for.


Asunto(s)
Países en Desarrollo , Educación Continua en Enfermería/métodos , Enfermería Holística/educación , Rol de la Enfermera , Prestación de Atención de Salud/métodos , Prestación de Atención de Salud/normas , Humanos , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/provisión & distribución , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/tendencias , Rwanda , Enfermería Transcultural/métodos
12.
Nurse Educ Today ; 44: 74-8, 2016 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27429332

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council competency standards highlight the need to provide holistic care that is inclusive of spiritual care. Literature shows that internationally many nurses feel unsure of how to provide spiritual care which has been attributed to a lack of spiritual care education during undergraduate nursing programs. AIM: This study explores the impact of a spiritual care subject in an undergraduate nursing program in an Australian tertiary institution. METHOD: Qualitative research design using in-depth semi-structured interviews. SETTING: A tertiary institution with a Christian orientation in Sydney, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Six undergraduate nursing students who had completed the spiritual care subject. DATA RESULTS: Two themes emerged from the data: Seeing the person as a whole and Being with the person. CONCLUSIONS: The spiritual care subject had a positive impact on the perceptions of undergraduate nursing students. In particular students perceived themselves more prepared to provide holistic care that was inclusive of spiritual care.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería , Enfermería Holística/educación , Espiritualidad , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Adulto , Australia , Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería
14.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 30(3): 148-54, 2016.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27078809

RESUMEN

Stress affects the well-being of both nursing students and the individuals with whom they work. With the theory of cognitive appraisal as a framework for this study, it is proposed that mind-body self-care strategies promote stress management by stabilization of emotions. Outcomes will be a perception of less stress and more mindful engagement with the environment. Objective of the study was to describe an evaluation of student perceived stress and mindfulness to 1-hour per week of class time dedicated to mind-body self-care (yoga, mindful breathing, Reiki, and essential oil therapy). It was a quasi-experimental study; data collection took place at 4 time points. Participants were entry-level accelerated nursing students from 3 US universities: 50 in the treatment group, 64 in the comparison group. Data included health-promoting practices using Health-Promoting Promotion Lifestyle Profile II as a control variable, stress and mindfulness (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS] and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale [MAAS]), and demographic information; analysis using mixed-design repeated-measures analysis of variances. There was a statistically significant interaction between intervention and time on PSS scores, F(3, 264) = 3.95, P = .009, partial η(2) = 0.043, with PSS scores of the intervention group decreasing from baseline to T3 when intervention ended whereas PSS scores of the comparison group increased from baseline. The average scores on the MAAS did not differ significantly. Evaluation of an embedded mind-body self-care module in the first nursing course demonstrated promising improvements in stress management. The findings support the appropriateness of integrating mind-body self-care content into nursing curricula to enhance students' ability to regulate stress.


Asunto(s)
Enfermería Holística/educación , Terapias Mente-Cuerpo , Autocuidado , Estrés Psicológico , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Estrés Psicológico/terapia , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Estudiantes de Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
15.
Nurse Educ Today ; 38: 36-41, 2016 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26825027

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Spiritual care is a critical part of holistic care, and nurses require adequate preparation to address the spiritual needs of patients. However, nurses' willingness to provide such care has rarely been reported. Hence, nurses' education, and knowledge of spiritual care, as well as their willingness to provide it require further study. METHODS: A convenience sample of 200 nurses participated in the study. Quantitative data were collected using a 21-item Spiritual Care Needs Inventory (content validity index=.87; Cronbach's alpha=.96). RESULTS: The majority of participants were female (96.5%, n=193) between 21 and 59years old (mean=35.1years). Moreover, the majority of participants had a Bachelor's degree (74.0%, n=148) and 1-36years of clinical experience (mean=12.13years). Regarding religious beliefs, 63 (31.5%) had no religious belief, and 93 (46.5%) did not engage in any religious activity. Overall, the nurses were willing to provide spiritual care, although only 25 (12.5%) felt that they had received adequate education. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicate the need for further educational preparation in spiritual care for nurses. Specifically, additional teaching materials are required that are more directly related to spiritual care. Greater emphasis should be placed on different subject areas in school-based education, continuing education, and self-learning education according to the needs of nurses. Since spiritual care education needs policy support, in-depth discussions should take place regarding the approach and cultural environment for providing spiritual care in future nursing courses. Moreover, further studies should investigate barriers in providing spiritual nursing care to patients and whether they are the results of a lack of relevant knowledge or other factors.


Asunto(s)
Enfermería Holística/educación , Rol de la Enfermera/psicología , Espiritualidad , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Educación Continua en Enfermería , Escolaridad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Religión y Medicina
16.
J Holist Nurs ; 34(2): 167-76, 2016 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26130464

RESUMEN

Given the current transformation of traditional health care to provide more integrative and complementary modalities, health systems are implementing new programs and services to meet consumer and provider needs. One such integrative modality, Healing Touch, with a foundation in holistic nursing, is a gentle therapy that uses touch to promote health and well-being by balancing the human energy system. This article describes the perceptions of registered nurses regarding the implementation of a Healing Touch training program at a multihospital health system. Five themes were identified: benefit to the patient, benefit to the nurse, holism beyond task orientation, integrating Healing Touch into acute care, and barriers and challenges. Nurses recognize the importance of creating caring-healing relationships and a holistic approach to care. Training in Healing Touch provides one avenue for nurses and health care providers to provide compassionate care.


Asunto(s)
Hospitales/tendencias , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/psicología , Percepción , Tacto Terapéutico/enfermería , Adulto , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Enfermería Holística/educación , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Tacto Terapéutico/psicología
17.
J Holist Nurs ; 34(1): 44-55, 2016 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25911026

RESUMEN

A cohort of holistic nurses, recognizing opportunities inherent in health care transformation, organized and worked together from 2009 to 2012. The goal was to hold space for holistic nursing by developing a health and wellness coaching role and certification program for holistic nurses. The intent was to ensure that holistic nurses could work to the fullest of their ability within the evolving health care system, and others could discover the merit of holistic nursing as they explored the possibilities of nurse coaching. Challenges emerged that required the cohort plan strategies that would hold the space for nursing while also moving toward the intended goal. As they worked, this cohort demonstrated leadership skills, knowledge, values, and attitudes of holistic nursing that provide an example for others who follow in the wake of health care transformation. The American Holistic Credentialing Corporation's perspective of the events that unfolded and of the related decisions made by the coalition provides a record of the evolution of holistic nursing.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Enfermería/organización & administración , Salud Holística/tendencias , Enfermería Holística/educación , Enfermería Holística/tendencias , American Nurses' Association/organización & administración , Certificación/normas , Competencia Clínica/normas , Educación en Enfermería/normas , Salud Holística/educación , Salud Holística/normas , Enfermería Holística/normas , Humanos , Licencia en Enfermería , Rol de la Enfermera , Enfermeras y Enfermeros , Autonomía Profesional , Estados Unidos
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