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1.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 140(1): 107-111, 2020.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31902878

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to examine how students prepare for the pharmaceutical technical English course "Yakugaku-Eigo Nyumon" by qualitative analysis. A sub-text, supplemental material was used to assist students with class preparation. Qualitative questionnaires on understanding and approaches for class preparation as well as review of class were analyzed in comparison with different academic performance levels on the final exam. The results of qualitative analysis of class preparation based on coding revealed that high-academic-performing students understood and adopted deep-processing approaches for the preparation of "English words" and "understanding of content" more often than low-academic-performing students. High-performing students attempted to not literally translate English sentences into Japanese while checking the English words with thinking and ingenuity, and to understand English sentences by drawing figures and thinking of relationships using previously learned knowledge. These approaches were not adopted by low-performing students. Furthermore, sub-text was one of the means for understanding by high-performing students, whereas it was essential for low-performing students to understand the content. Coding results on the review of class also showed that low-performing students were dependent mainly on sub-text for understanding. These results suggest that deep-processing approaches to both English and content of materials are necessary for deep understanding in "Yakugaku-Eigo Nyumon".


Asunto(s)
Comprensión , Curriculum , Educación en Farmacia , Conocimiento , Lenguaje , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Éxito Académico , Pruebas de Aptitud , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
2.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1709, 2019 Dec 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31856775

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Misuse and dependency of opioids especially codeine-containing products is of increasing global concern. Inappropriate use of opioids among healthcare students could affect quality of service and ethical conducts of these future professionals, thereby putting the society at risk. This study aimed to evaluate knowledge and perception of medical and pharmacy students in a Nigerian tertiary University on use of opioids with focus on codeine-containing products. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey among 335-medical and 185-pharmacy students from University of Ibadan, Nigeria, between September and December 2018, using a self-administered semi-structured questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 178 (34.2%) in multiple responses had used opioid-containing products among the respondents, of this, 171 (96.1%) used codeine-containing formulation. Precisely, 146 (28.1%) of the students had used codeine-containing products before, of this, 16 (11.0%) used the products for non-medical or recreational purpose regarded as a misuse/abuse. In all, 201 (38.7%) had good knowledge of opioid use, with 51 (34.9%) among those who had used opioids and 150 (40.1%) among those who had not used opioids (X2 = 1.186; p = 0.276). Majority (469; 90.2%) had good perception of risks associated with opioid use; comprising (130; 89.0%) among those who had taken opioids and (339; 90.6%) among those who had not taken opioids before (X2 = 0.304; p = 0.508). Logistic-regression shows that students who experienced some side effects to be experienced again 22.1 [AOR = 22.1, 95% CI: (5.98-81.72)] as well as those pressured into using codeine-containing products 10.6 [AOR = 10.6, 95% CI: (1.36-82.39)] had more tendency of misuse. CONCLUSION: There is a potential for misuse of codeine-containing products among medical and pharmacy students. Peer-influence and experience of some side effects are possible predictors of misuse among the students. Thus, healthcare students' curriculum should incorporate preventive programme, while public education and policy that favours peer-support programme on medication misuse is advocated for healthcare students.


Asunto(s)
Codeína/uso terapéutico , Abuso de Medicamentos/estadística & datos numéricos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adolescente , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Nigeria , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades , Adulto Joven
3.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 139(9): 1201-1209, 2019.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31474636

RESUMEN

Long-term practical training in the 6-year course of pharmaceutical education is a program for students after acquiring basic knowledge on pharmaceutical sciences and preclinical training. However, it remains unproved whether practical training affects students' robust acquisition and reconstruction of pharmaceutical expertise which they had learned before starting practical training. To address this issue, we administered survey questionnaires to 5th-year students (n=149) of Keio University in 2016 both before and after practical training. From the viewpoint of self-efficacy, psychological approach was applied to evaluate respondents' psychological state "to do well" on a 7-point Likert scale (1=disagree, 4=neither, 7=agree) for specific subjects C1-C18 (18 core units of pharmaceutical expertise in the current Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education), mainly including basic pharmaceutical sciences, public health, clinical pharmacology and pharmacotherapy. C1-C18 total score values, which reflect the strength of certainty to acquire expertise, were significantly higher after the first term of practical training compared to before training, regardless of the pharmacy and the hospital (p<0.001), but not after the second term. Specific factors associated with increased score values for "to do well" were not extracted from other questionnaire answers concerning students' mentors or their self-learning during practical training. These results demonstrated that practical training at least partly reinforced students' feeling of "to do well", contributing to their robust acquisition and reconstruction of pharmaceutical expertise. Giving students recognition individually of their learning process themselves encourages more effective practical training toward their development of resources as a pharmacist.


Asunto(s)
Éxito Académico , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Competencia Profesional , Autoeficacia , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
4.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 76(11): 836-845, 2019 05 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31415690

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To evaluate final-year pharmacy students' perceptions toward pharmacogenomics education, their attitudes on its clinical relevance, and their readiness to use such knowledge in practice. METHODS: A 19-question survey was developed and modified from prior studies and was pretested on a small group of pharmacogenomics faculty and pharmacy students. The final survey was administered to 978 final-year pharmacy students in 8 school/colleges of pharmacy in New York and New Jersey between January and May 2017. The survey targeted 3 main themes: perceptions toward pharmacogenomics education, attitudes toward the clinical relevance of this education, and the students' readiness to use knowledge of pharmacogenomics in practice. RESULTS: With a 35% response rate, the majority (81%) of the 339 student participants believed that pharmacogenomics was a useful clinical tool for pharmacists, yet only 40% felt that it had been a relevant part of their training. Almost half (46%) received only 1-3 lectures on pharmacogenomics and the majority were not ready to use it in practice. Survey results pointed toward practice-based trainings such as pharmacogenomics rotations as the most helpful in preparing students for practice. CONCLUSIONS: Final-year student pharmacists reported varying exposure to pharmacogenomics content in their pharmacy training and had positive attitudes toward the clinical relevance of the discipline, yet they expressed low confidence in their readiness to use this information in practice.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Farmacéuticos/psicología , Farmacogenética/educación , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adulto , Curriculum , Docentes/psicología , Docentes/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Farmacéuticos/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
6.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31430842

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate students' perception of team-based learning (TBL) amongst a cohort who was exposed to this methodology for the first time at an university in the United Kingdom . METHODS: Between November and December 2018, 26 first year Master of Pharmacy and 90 second year B.Sc. Biomedical Science students of School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, United Kingdom were invited to participate and requested to complete a questionnaire that contained quantitative and qualitative questions. The quantitative component was based on the team-based-learning student assessment instrument (TBL-SAI) instrument. It additionally contained questions about key student characteristics. RESULTS: The response rate was 60% (70/116), 74% (n=52) were females and 26% (n=18) males. The percentage of agreement in the TBL-SAI suggested a favourable response to TBL. The overall mean score for the TBL-SAI was 115.6 (SD 5.6) [maximum score: 140] which was above the threshold of 102, thus suggesting a preference for TBL. Statistically significant differences were not found according to demographics characteristics. Students who predicted a final result of ≥70% strongly agreed that TBL help improve their grades. Some students highlighted issues with working in teams and only 56% of students agreed that they could learn better in a team setting. CONCLUSION: This study shows that students exposed to TBL for the first-time favour several aspects of it. However, more focused strategies including team-building exercises activities and expert facilitation skills could potentially tackle resistance to working in teams.


Asunto(s)
Procesos de Grupo , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Reino Unido , Universidades
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 242, 2019 Jul 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31266481

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In addition to administering vaccinations, healthcare professionals (HCPs) also play a crucial role in providing education and advocacy to the public regarding immunizations. Yet, many current and future HCPs are unprepared or reluctant to address the vaccine conversation with hesitant patients. Doctors, pharmacists, and nurses are all recognized as the most trusted sources of vaccine information. By comparing future HCPs in these three distinct programs, we can better understand where potential gaps may lie in their training and education. With insight from students, potential changes to curriculum can improve future HCPs ability to address vaccine hesitancy in their respective careers. The objective of this study was to assess and compare the knowledge, attitudes, and opinions of HCP students on the topic of immunization. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2017 to assess students in nursing, medical, and pharmacy programs at two universities in the state of North Dakota in the United States. The survey assessed six key themes: 1) demographic information; 2) basic vaccine knowledge; 3) vaccine hesitancy; 4) likelihood to recommend vaccines; 5) confidence in addressing vaccine-related topics with patients; 6) an appraisal of the education they have received on vaccinations. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 223 participants (overall response rate = 23.7%). Results indicated that vaccine-related knowledge varied greatly by program; high knowledge scores were achieved by 74.3% of medical students, 62.7% of pharmacy students, 57.1% of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students, and 24.7% of bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students. Over a third (34.2%) of BSN students believed that the current recommended immunization schedule places undue burden on a child's immune system, versus only 4.3% of medical students. Additionally, 54.2% of participants believed that spreading out recommended vaccines over several visits was an appropriate means of reducing parental stress about vaccinating. CONCLUSIONS: Participant responses suggest that negative attitudes, lack of knowledge, and general discomfort exist across all programs, but especially among nursing students, regarding vaccination. Our findings indicate potential areas where targeted interventions could be implemented to better equip future HCPs in their ability to discuss and educate the public regarding vaccination. TRIAL REGISTRATION: #PH17173.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud , Vacunación , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , North Dakota , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
8.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 259-265, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31166127

RESUMEN

Pharmacy school applications have steadily declined over the past several years. Thus pharmacy schools are not only searching for effective means to increase enrollment of qualified candidates, but are also focusing on the development of programs to improve academic performance and retention of enrolled students. To address the needs of struggling first-year pharmacy students enrolled in an Integrated Biological Sciences (BSI) course, an academic performance enrichment program (APEP) was developed. The program was designed to improve academic success by engaging low-performing students with the aims of improving their time management skills, study skills, metacognition, and understanding of BSI course material. The APEP consisted of structured tutoring sessions twice per week, which were required for all students with a course grade ≤73.5% at any point during the semester. To assess program effectiveness, performance improvement on BSI exams by the APEP students were compared with that of non-APEP students in the same class and to those in the previous 3 yr. Student perceptions of the program were also evaluated via an online survey. The APEP was deemed effective in that a greater percentage of students were able to improve their exam scores and to a greater extent by attending the APEP sessions compared with non-APEP students in the same class and with low-performing students in previous years when the APEP did not exist. Furthermore, APEP students believed the program was effective in meeting its aims. In conclusion, the APEP was effective in improving academic performance of low-performing students in BSI.


Asunto(s)
Rendimiento Académico/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/normas , Facultades de Farmacia/normas , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Rendimiento Académico/tendencias , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/métodos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/tendencias , Facultades de Farmacia/tendencias , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
9.
BMC Complement Altern Med ; 19(1): 95, 2019 May 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31053114

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Traditional medicine has always been Pakistan's cultural heritage, providing health care to a large part of its population. Thus, we aimed to assess and compare the knowledge, attitude, and perception about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) between pharmacy and non-pharmacy students, the results of which may be helpful in devising national health-education policy. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted by enrolling 937 students, pharmacy (437) and non-pharmacy (500), of Punjab University, Lahore. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using SPSS. (IBM v22). RESULTS: Data suggested that majority of students knew about the use of traditional herbs and considered massage (P: 84.4%, NP: 82%, p = 0.099), homeopathy, herbs (P: 86.5%, NP: 81%, p = 0.064], yoga [P: 357 (81.7%), NP: 84%), p = 0.42] and spiritual healing (P: 85.6%, NP: 86.2%, p = 0.55) as effective and least harmful CAM modalities. The pharmacy students had better knowledge about CAM modalities compared to non-pharmacy students. Despite utilizing non-reliable sources of CAM information and their belief that CAM is practiced by quacks, the majority of students had positive attitudes and perceptions about CAM usage. Students also believed that CAM had a positive impact on health outcomes [P: 3.19 ± 1.04, NP: 3.02 ± 1.09, p = 0.008] and acceded to include CAM in the pharmacy curriculum. However, non-pharmacy students scored higher in their beliefs that CAM usage should be discouraged due to the non-scientific basis of CAM (P: 3.04 ± 0.97, NP: 3.17 ± 1.02, p = 0.028) and a possible threat to public health (P: 3.81 ± 1.74, NP: 4.06 ± 1.56, p = 0.02). On the other hand, pharmacy students believed that patients might get benefits from CAM modalities (P: 4.31 ± 1.48, NP: 4.12 ± 1.45, p = 0.02). Majority of students perceived that spiritual healing is the most useful and safer CAM modality, while acupuncture (P: 25.4%, NP: 21.8%, p = 0.0005), hypnosis (P: 26.8%, NP: 19.6%, p = 0.001) and chiropractic (P: 18.8%, NP: 11.6%, p = 0.0005) were among the harmful ones. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, despite poor knowledge about CAM, students demonstrated positive attitudes and beliefs regarding CAM. They exhibited better awareness about yoga, spiritual healing/prayer, herbs, and massage. Students also showed willingness to advance their knowledge about CAM and favored its inclusion in the curriculum.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Terapias Complementarias/psicología , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , India/epidemiología , Masculino , Adulto Joven
10.
Int J Med Educ ; 10: 98-105, 2019 May 24.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31129658

RESUMEN

Objectives: To determine non-Western situated health professional student experiences and preferences for feedback in workplace-based settings. Methods: We conducted five focus groups with 27 students of Arab-origin enrolled in a Canadian-accredited cross-border pharmacy program in Qatar. Transcripts of recorded discussions were analyzed using the framework method.  Hofstede's and Hall's cultural dimension models were employed to understand described feedback encounters and behaviours. Results: We identified three themes associated with cultural influences on student feedback experiences, namely: 1) collectivism; 2) power distance; and 3) context.  Trainees described clinical supervisors who inadequately recognized individual performance, rejected critique, and insufficiently documented feedback onto the written in-training evaluation report. Conversely, students expected specific and timely feedback, invited criticism for learning, and desired clear written commentary. Conclusions: Feedback behaviours of clinical supervisors, but not those of trainees, were consistent with local cultural norms as described by Hofstede and Hall.  Instead, feedback expectations of pharmacy students in Qatar largely echo those of other trainees enrolled in professional curricula situated outside the Middle East. Principles for optimal feedback in clinical training largely arise from Western perspectives but are not necessarily universal. Our work demonstrates that practices, in part, may be subject to local socio-cultural influences.  This is of particular importance in the experiential training component of cross-border medical education programs adopted by overseas institutions. Our findings also further add to the growing body of literature reporting suboptimal feedback in workplace-based learning, reinforcing the need to cultivate more student-centered practices in health professional training globally.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Retroalimentación , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Acreditación , Canadá , Comparación Transcultural , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Cooperación Internacional , Qatar , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Lugar de Trabajo
11.
PLoS One ; 14(4): e0214624, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30969976

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Recently, flipped classrooms (FCs) have gradually been used in Chinese higher education settings. However, few studies have focused on the effects of FCs on interdisciplinary curricula. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an FC on the engagement, performance, and perceptions of students and on teacher-student interaction in a pharmaceutical marketing course. DESIGN: A clustered randomized controlled study was conducted, with 137 junior-year pharmacy undergraduates using an FC serving as the intervention group, in contrast to students using lecture-based learning (LBL) as the control group. Flanders' interaction analysis system (FIAS) was used to measure teacher-student interaction, and questionnaires regarding attitudes toward and satisfaction with the teaching model were administered. RESULTS: The students in the FC group scored significantly higher than those in the LBL group (88.21±5.95 vs. 80.05±5.59, t = -8.08, p = 0.000) on pharmaceutical marketing. The multiple linear regression results showed that the FC model had a significant impact on student performance (ß = 8.16, p<0.0001). The percentages of teacher talk in the FC and LBL groups were 21% and 96%, respectively (χ2 = 2170.274, p = 0.000); however, the percentages of student talk in the FC and LBL groups were 75% and 2.6%, respectively (χ2 = 2012.483, p = 0.000). Compared with the LBL group, most students in the FC group held more positive attitudes toward the teaching model; the mean scores for the 8 attitude attributes in the FC group were significantly higher than those in the LBL group (p = 0.000). There were significant differences in the ratings of satisfaction with teacher-student interaction (p = 0.000), the students' learning attitude (p = 0.000), the teacher's preparatory work (p = 0.000), the teaching objective (p = 0.000), and the teaching effect (p = 0.000) between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Compared with LBL methods, implementing the FC model improved student performance, increased teacher-student interaction and generated positive student attitudes toward the experience. As an effective pedagogical model, it can also stimulate pharmacy students' learning interest and improve their self-learning abilities.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Aprendizaje , Mercadotecnía/educación , Rendimiento Académico , Actitud , Docentes de Farmacia/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Modelos Lineales , Masculino , Satisfacción Personal , Preparaciones Farmacéuticas , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
13.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 83(1): 6432, 2019 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30894761

RESUMEN

Objective. To assess the impact of a diabetes simulation activity on empathy in pharmacy students. Methods. Students enrolled in an elective diabetes course were required to complete a 3-day diabetes simulation. Pre- and post-activity survey questions were administered to assess the effect of the simulation activity on empathy. Students maintained daily logs of their actual blood glucose readings (tested twice a day), pre-meal simulated blood glucose readings, and simulated insulin doses. Students were required to take a placebo oral medication and to respond (and document their approach) to a simulated hypo- or hyperglycemic event. Results. The pre- and post-activity survey results indicated statistically significant changes in responses regarding empathy. Conclusion. This 3-day diabetes simulation increased student empathy and confidence in managing select aspects of diabetes.


Asunto(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Empatía , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Curriculum , Educación en Farmacia , Femenino , Humanos , Relaciones Profesional-Paciente , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
14.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 83(1): 6457, 2019 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30894762

RESUMEN

Objective. To determine pharmacy students' experiences of stress as part of the current pharmacy degree, and to explore the potential of incorporating the principles of mindfulness into course work in the undergraduate degree. Methods. Undergraduate pharmacy students from the five pharmacy schools in Ireland were invited to participate in focus groups between February and November 2016. Recruitment occurred via emails sent by a school's academic or administrative member. Focus groups were audio recorded, anonymized and transcribed by the corresponding author. Transcripts were analyzed using the Braun and Clarke method of thematic analysis and coded. Results. Twenty pharmacy students (60% female) representing all years of study from three of the five pharmacy schools participated across five focus groups. The five key themes that emerged were: so much to do, so little time; the role of lecturers; we are smart people, we want to do well; learning by doing; and mindfulness as a coping tool. Conclusion. The findings of this study support the hypothesis that students experience stress and would welcome mindfulness-based interventions as a management option in the degree. Specifically, the emphasis that mindfulness places on experiential learning would be well-received by students.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Atención Plena , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adulto , Curriculum , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Irlanda , Masculino , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Estrés Psicológico/psicología
15.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 83(1): 6499, 2019 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30894764

RESUMEN

Objective. To determine the critical thinking skills, critical thinking disposition, and personal strengths that contribute to student success and excellence in the first year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Methods. Student pharmacists from three cohorts completed the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) to assess their critical thinking skills, the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) to assess their critical thinking disposition, and the StrengthsFinder 2.0 assessment to determine their top five Signature Themes. HSRT overall categories, CCTDI subcategories, and top five Signature Themes were analyzed to determine both independent predictors and a logistic regression model of success and excellence. Results. HSRT and the Signature Theme of Consistency were independently associated with both success and excellence. CCTDI Open-mindedness and the Signature Themes of Achiever and Learner were also independent predictors of excellence. Age and several Signature Themes were negative independent predictors of success. In a multiple logistic regression model, HSRT overall category and the absence of Signature Themes Command and Woo predicted success and HSRT overall category predicted excellence. Conclusion. This is the first model to determine performance in the first year of PharmD program using Signature Themes. Critical thinking skills, the critical thinking disposition of Open-mindedness and the Signature Themes of Achiever, Consistency, and Learner are associated with the highest student performance.


Asunto(s)
Éxito Académico , Educación en Farmacia , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Pensamiento , Adulto , Evaluación Educacional , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino
16.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 83(1): 6795, 2019 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30894770

RESUMEN

Objective. To characterize the religiosity and spirituality of final year pharmacy students and examine the impact on performance in pharmacy school and future practice. Methods. An electronic survey was sent to 308 students in their final year of pharmacy school at four universities (two private and two public institutions). Results. There were 141 respondents to the survey for a response rate of 46%. Key findings are religiosity/spirituality did not impact academic performance, students felt supported in their spiritual/religious beliefs, religiosity/spirituality had a positive impact on students' emotional/mental well-being, attending pharmacy school decreased organized religion, less than half of the students would work for a pharmacy not allowing the "right to refuse to dispense," students felt religiosity/spirituality could affect health/medication adherence, and most students were not familiar with how to conduct a spiritual assessment. Conclusion. Pharmacy schools should find ways to acknowledge and support religiosity/spirituality for pharmacy students and for promoting holistic patient well-being.


Asunto(s)
Religión , Espiritualidad , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
17.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 83(1): 6821, 2019 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30894771

RESUMEN

Objective. To assess students' impressions on whether Virtual Interactive Cases (VICs) contribute to their learning experience. Methods. Ten fourth- year pharmacy students each independently completed the same four VICs followed by a semi-structured interview conducted by VIC project team members. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes using qualitative research methods. Results. All participating students completed all the cases. Overall, students' feedback on VIC was positive. Five main themes emerged from the transcripts: VIC facilitated their skills in information gathering; they learned from the built-in, real-time, formative feedback; they had a fun and positive learning experience; VICs were realistic; and VIC system was user-friendly. Students also recommended that VIC be incorporated into classroom learning. Some students required additional explanation on the concept of time and costs associated with each action they selected, and the associated performance score. Conclusion. Pharmacy students' positive experiences with VICs support its use to bridge classroom learning with clinical practice.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Programas Informáticos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Curriculum , Humanos
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 43, 2019 Feb 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30717723

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Korean pharmacy students' empathy and psychological need satisfaction and their levels of burnout and psychological well-being, using structural equation modeling. METHODS: The participants were 452 pharmacy students from five South Korean universities. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (Health Professions Students version), the Activity-Feeling States Scale, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey were used to assess empathy, psychological need satisfaction, and burnout, respectively. Psychological well-being was measured with the Mood Rating Scale, Self-Esteem Scale, and Satisfaction With Life Scale. The fits of the measurement and structural regression (SR) models with data on the four variables were evaluated using the Tucker-Lewis index (TLI), incremental fit index (IFI), comparative fit index (CFI), and root mean-square error of approximation (RMSEA) using AMOS 18.0. RESULTS: A total of 447 students (98.9%) completed the survey. The measurement model showed adequate fit indices; all hypothesized factor loadings were significant. The proposed SR model also showed an acceptable fit (TLI = 0.92, IFI = 0.94, CFI = 0.94, RMSEA = 0.072); each path was supported except the path from empathy to burnout (ß = 0.005). Empathy was positively associated with psychological well-being (ß = 0.18). Perceived satisfaction of psychological needs was positively related to psychological well-being (ß = 0.59), but strongly and negatively related to burnout (ß = - 0.71). The model explained 50 and 44% of variances in burnout and psychological well-being, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacy students' empathy and psychological needs should be considered in pharmacy education systems to promote psychological adjustment.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Profesional/psicología , Educación en Farmacia , Empatía , Salud Laboral , Satisfacción Personal , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Psicológicos , Modelos Estadísticos , República de Corea , Universidades , Adulto Joven
19.
Int J Pharm Pract ; 27(4): 399-402, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30784142

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore pharmacists' barriers and facilitators regarding participation in pharmacy practice research. METHODS: We conducted an online cross-sectional survey in 1974 community pharmacies in the Netherlands. KEY FINDINGS: A total of 252 pharmacists completed the questionnaire. The majority agreed that participation in research should be part of daily practice. Efficient time investment and a clear benefit for general professional knowledge, patient care and pharmacy organisation were the most important facilitating factors. CONCLUSIONS: To encourage pharmacists' participation, researchers should offer clear instructions, possibilities for flexible time management, simple patient inclusion, task delegation and no additional contacts with healthcare professionals due to the research.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Servicios Comunitarios de Farmacia/organización & administración , Farmacéuticos/psicología , Investigación en Farmacia , Compromiso Laboral , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Países Bajos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
Int J Pharm Pract ; 27(3): 295-302, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30648772

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Increased demands from healthcare services have led to new roles for healthcare professionals (HCPs). Simulation based learning (SBL) can offer multidisciplinary HCPs and students a format to train for such emerging roles. The aim of this work was to adapt existing nursing SBL to involve pharmacy students and evaluate perceptions and effectiveness of SBL when used for interprofessional education (IPE). METHODS: Settings were a simulated hospital ward and a general practitioner (GP) practice. Participants were pharmacy and nursing students. Evaluation was by questionnaires and interviews. Ethical approval was obtained from the University Ethics Committee. KEY FINDINGS: A total of 440 students participated. The majority of respondents (317/330;96%) found the sessions useful. All elements were highly rated: briefing (315/340;93%), setting (301/321;94%), scenario (325/338;96%), feedback (303/327;93%), interaction with the "patient" (328/338;97%), interactions with other HCP trainee (293/329;89%). The majority (304/327;93%) agreed that they felt the sessions had enhanced their skills. Significant (p ≤ 0.05) enhancement in communication confidence was perceived by the students. Students gained understanding of each other's roles, and appreciated practicing communication and teamwork. CONCLUSIONS: Students recognised the importance, usefulness and need for IPE. SBL has the potential to support a variety of HCPs to facilitate uptake of new roles and working in multidisciplinary teams.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Enfermería/métodos , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Comunicación Interdisciplinaria , Prácticas Interdisciplinarias/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Medicina General , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Servicio de Farmacia en Hospital , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Estudiantes de Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Lugar de Trabajo
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