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1.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 13(6): 635-642, 2021 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33867058

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease of 2019 pandemic has changed university routines affecting student mental health. The aims of this study were to survey aspects related to mental health of pharmaceutical course students considering previous and current contexts. METHODS: The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21), Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and Brunel Mood Scale were used. DASS-21 was completed pre- and post-pandemic. The validity and reliability of the data were verified. The prevalence (95% CI) of mental health symptoms was estimated. The relationship between the time spent watching/reading the news and mean scales scores was evaluated (Pearson's correlation coefficient). RESULTS: The prevalence of depression symptoms in students pre-pandemic was 66.7% (95% CI = 65.3-68.1) and during the pandemic was 81% (95% CI = 79.8-82.2). More than 70% (95% CI = 69.8-72.6) of participants had some psychological impact as a result of the pandemic (mild: 16.7% [95% CI = 15.6-17.8]; moderate: 9.1% [95% CI = 8.2-10]; severe: 45.4% [95% CI = 43.9-46.9]). High values of tension, depressed mood, mental confusion, and anger were observed. There was a significant correlation between the time spent following the news of the pandemic and symptoms of anxiety (r = 0.356; P < .001), stress (r = 0.248; P = .014), hyperarousal (r = 0.322; P ≤ 0.001), and intrusion (r = 0.21; P = .039). CONCLUSIONS: Students are highly vulnerable to depressive symptoms and mood swings due to the pandemic. These findings deserve consideration mainly from mental health professionals, but also from managers and educators.


Asunto(s)
Afecto , Ansiedad/etiología , Depresión/etiología , Pandemias , Estrés Psicológico/etiología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Ira , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Trastornos de Ansiedad , Brasil/epidemiología , Confusión , Coronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Depresión/epidemiología , Trastorno Depresivo , Emociones , Femenino , Humanos , Conducta en la Búsqueda de Información , Masculino , Salud Mental , Prevalencia , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades , Adulto Joven
2.
Sr Care Pharm ; 36(4): 217-222, 2021 Apr 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33766194

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of pharmacy interventions on recurrence of falls in older people. DESIGN: Prospective case-crossover study. SETTING: LECOM Health Nursing and Rehabilitation (LNR) and Senior Living Center (SLC) and Millcreek Community Hospital older adult behavioral health and inpatient rehabilitation units (IRU). PARTICIPANTS: Twenty and 15 residents of the SLC and LNR, respectively, and 5 and 2 patients of the older adult behavioral health unit and IRU, respectively, experienced a fall during the 8-week study period. INTERVENTIONS: Medication reviews were conducted by a pharmacist assessing for fall risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs). Adverse effects, drug interactions, and nonpharmacologic causes were evaluated, and recommendations were made to reduce future fall risk. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Recommendation acceptance rate, FRID use, and incidence of recurrent falls. RESULTS: Eighty percent of fall risk-reduction recommendations were accepted and implemented by the medical team. The mean number of potential FRIDs prescribed per participant was reduced from 3.71 to 3.38. There was a 12.4% reduction in recurrent falls after pharmacy intervention (P = 0.0336; odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 1.783 [1.045-3.112]). CONCLUSION: Pharmacist interventions for older people who experience a fall were associated with a high acceptance rate by health care providers, a reduction in FRID use, and decreased rate of recurrent falls.


Asunto(s)
Accidentes por Caídas/prevención & control , Efectos Colaterales y Reacciones Adversas Relacionados con Medicamentos , Administración del Tratamiento Farmacológico/organización & administración , Farmacéuticos/psicología , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Accidentes por Caídas/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Estudios Cruzados , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Farmacia , Estudios Prospectivos
3.
Bull Cancer ; 108(1): 23-29, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Francés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33358508

RESUMEN

The initiative from patients suffering from cancer or having had the disease in speaking about their illness to medical students during an internship in a cancer control center of the faculty of medicine and to pharmacy students at the university of Strasbourg was implemented in 2014. This action was coordinated by the French Cancer League as part of the National French cancer plan 3. After training, ten patients teachers were able to freely and spontaneously explain their diagnostic and therapeutic journey as well as their feelings about the disease and their relationship with their oncologists in front of 187 medical students and 131 pharmacy students. A moderator, often a former cancer teacher, helped coordinate the discussions. Questionnaires were given to students, patients teachers and moderators in order to assess the merits of the action and the expected benefits at the end of the training. A second questionnaire was sent to the students six months after the interviews. The assessment was made by an independent firm. The students' responses were very favorable and this training met their expectations in almost 98% of the cases and 1/3 of the students were destabilized by this training. Patients teacher were very satisfied with their intervention and felt that they were able to convey a message. Six months later, the 30% of student respondents said that these testimonies had or could have an impact on their practices. This is the first assessment of the interest of resource patients in teaching cancer patients about medical and pharmacy students.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Oncología Médica/educación , Participación del Paciente/métodos , Estudiantes de Medicina , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Personal Docente , Humanos , Narrativas Personales como Asunto , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios/estadística & datos numéricos
4.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 140(11): 1389-1396, 2020.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33132275

RESUMEN

A questionnaire survey was conducted with pharmacy students to obtain useful information for preparing teaching materials in the field of pharmaceutical laws. We conducted a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis by asking pharmacy students to evaluate whether the teaching materials used in the Pharmaceutical Laws class at Kitasato University were effective in promoting learning and understanding. In addition, we asked them about their impressions of attending the Pharmaceutical Laws class and analyzed their freely described answers. The CS analysis suggested teaching materials that included case studies of pharmaceutical law judgments and violations may have been useful for learning this subject. Furthermore, the text analysis showed many of the participants believed the contents of the teaching materials were difficult. Therefore, it is necessary to redesign the contents so that learning can progress step by step from the basic items. In addition, since some students recognized that the subject could be memorized, it is possible they can convey only what they remember and not what they had learned or what knowledge they could use in other contexts and situations. Therefore, it is necessary to clearly present the learning objectives for each item in lesson's teaching materials.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia/legislación & jurisprudencia , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Legislación Farmacéutica , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Materiales de Enseñanza , Adolescente , Adulto , Análisis por Conglomerados , Comprensión , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Satisfacción Personal , Adulto Joven
5.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 140(11): 1397-1403, 2020.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33132276

RESUMEN

Pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) usually refers to the use of medical substances by healthy individuals to improve mental performance. Given that certain substances have been frequently used for years, the long-term effectiveness and safety are essential to know but particularly difficult and costly to determine. Although PCE is a widespread and frequent phenomenon among university students in other countries, PCE prevalence in Japan has not been elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of and the attitude toward PCE among Japanese undergraduates over 3 years (2017-2019). Almost no student had ever used prescription drugs for cognitive enhancement. When asked, "Would you like to use drugs to enhance your cognitive performance?" 68.6-72.0% of the students answered, "No," 25.4-26.7% answered, "I couldn't say," and 2.5-4.8% answered, "Yes." These answers were associated with sex (2017-2018) and stress sensitivity (2019) but not with drinking, smoking, or stress of academic performance. Half of the students had used energy drinks for neural enhancement prior to an examination, which is similar to Western usage. The users of soft enhancers, such as energy drinks, are more likely to use other drugs. Given that caffeine can be a gateway for cognitive enhancement, future education addressing PCE among students should emphasize the side effects of prescription drugs as well as health risks of caffeine products.


Asunto(s)
Actitud Frente a la Salud , Concienciación , Nootrópicos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adolescente , Adulto , Cafeína , Utilización de Medicamentos/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Japón , Masculino , Nootrópicos/efectos adversos , Prevalencia , Factores de Tiempo , Adulto Joven
6.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 140(10): 1275-1284, 2020.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32999206

RESUMEN

In April 2018, as part of their fifth-year pre-clinical education curriculum, pharmacy students at Setsunan University attended a lecture presented by hepatitis B patients and their lawyer entitled "Lecture by Hepatitis B Patients". This lecture was intended to help the students to understand the circumstances and difficulties encountered by hepatitis B patients on a daily basis. For this study, we conducted questionnaire surveys of the pharmacy students before and after the lecture. The survey items pertained to students' knowledge about hepatitis B (e.g., its spread and infection possibility in daily life). Students' responses before and after the lecture varied depending on the survey topic. Hepatitis B knowledge acquired by the students in their junior year increased after the lecture; moreover, attitudes to hepatitis B patients and understanding of the difficulties and prejudice that they experienced showed a significant change. For example, responses to the items, "Feel sympathy for patients suffering from discrimination and prejudice" and "Hard to work…" were much more sympathetic after the lecture; additionally, students were less likely to "Fear infection when near patients" and more likely "… to associate with patients". Thus, the "Lecture by Hepatitis B Patients" had a significant impact on the pharmacy students' perceptions of these patients, allowing them to cultivate greater empathy. From an educational standpoint, it is of the utmost importance for pharmacy/medical students to develop their humanity as members of healthcare teams. Educational real-world experiences, such as the "Lecture by Hepatitis B Patients", provide opportunities for this development.


Asunto(s)
Actividades Cotidianas , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Empatía , Hepatitis B/psicología , Participación del Paciente/métodos , Pacientes/psicología , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Relaciones Profesional-Paciente , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Actitud Frente a la Salud , Curriculum , Humanos , Conocimiento , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
7.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0236085, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32730277

RESUMEN

Developing professional identity is a vital part of health professionals' education. In Auckland four tertiary institutions have partnered to run an interprofessional simulation training course called Urgent and Immediate Patient Care Week (UIPCW) which is compulsory for Year Five medical, Year Four pharmacy, Year Three paramedicine and Year Three nursing students. We sought to understand student experiences of UIPCW and how those experiences informed student ideas about professional identity and their emergent practice as health professionals within multidisciplinary teams. In 2018, we commenced ethnographic research involving participant observation, field notes, interviews, photography and observational ethnographic film. A total of 115 students participated in this research. The emergent findings concern the potentially transformative learning opportunity presented within high fidelity multi-disciplinary simulations for students to develop their professional identity in relation to peers from other professions. Our work also exposes the heightened anxiety and stress which can be experienced by students in such interdisciplinary simulations. Student experience suggests this is due to a range of factors including students having to perform in front of peers and staff in such simulation scenarios when their own professional identity and capabilities are still in emergent stages. Staff-led simulation debriefs form a critical success factor for transformative learning to be able to occur in any such simulations so that students can reflect on, and move beyond, the emotion and uncertainty of such experiences to develop future-focused concepts of professional identity and strategies to support effective interprofessional teamwork.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Prestación de Atención de Salud/normas , Personal de Salud/psicología , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/normas , Profesionalismo/educación , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Antropología Cultural , Personal de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Estudiantes de Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos
8.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8088, 2020 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32665717

RESUMEN

Pharmacy schools and colleges worldwide are facing unprecedented challenges to ensuring sustainable education during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The experiences of pharmacy educators in the Asia-Pacific region in delivering emergency remote teaching, ensuring purposeful experiential placements, supporting displaced or isolated students, and communicating with faculty members, staff members, and students are discussed. The role of this pandemic in accelerating opportunities for new models of pharmacy education across the world is also discussed.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación en Farmacia/organización & administración , Docentes de Farmacia/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Facultades de Farmacia/organización & administración , Betacoronavirus , Comunicación , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación en Farmacia/normas , Humanos , Pandemias , Preceptoría/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología
9.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8144, 2020 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32665720

RESUMEN

During times of stress, such as those experienced during the novel coronavirus identified in 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, pharmacy students handle the experience differently. For some, the experience may negatively impact their sense of well-being; for others, being at home with family could actually improve their well-being. While students are completing academic work at home and after they finally return to campus, pharmacy schools need to be keenly aware of students' experiences and implement strategies to build their resilience and improve their well-being. One approach will not meet the needs of all students. Many of the challenges that pharmacy students have faced or will face when they return to the classroom are discussed along with some programs and activities that have proven successful.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación en Farmacia/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Facultades de Farmacia/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Éxito Académico , Betacoronavirus , Conducta Cooperativa , Empoderamiento , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Relaciones Interpersonales , Salud Mental , Motivación , Estrés Laboral/epidemiología , Pandemias , Resiliencia Psicológica , Incertidumbre , Estados Unidos
10.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8146, 2020 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32665721

RESUMEN

This commentary, written primarily by a recent pharmacy graduate, discusses the impact of COVID-19 on the class of 2020. Everyone has been impacted by COVID-19, but pharmacy students have been affected by and experienced COVID-19 in unique ways. This was the first class to complete pharmacy practice experiences in an online format, miss out on milestone events including graduation, and face uncertainty about becoming licensed and entering the job market in the midst of a pandemic. However, instead of discouraging them, these events have in many ways strengthened the resilience of the class of 2020. Additionally, COVID-19 has highlighted the importance of continued advocacy for the profession and articulation of the pharmacist's expanded role and value to the health care team, and inspired the class of 2020 to join the ranks of colleagues nationwide in raising awareness in these areas. Nevertheless, uncertainty over their future and that of their peers lingers as COVID-19 has forever changed pharmacy education and practice.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación en Farmacia/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Betacoronavirus , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Humanos , Pandemias , Rol Profesional , Resiliencia Psicológica
11.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8149, 2020 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32665722

RESUMEN

The coronavirus identified in 2019 (COVID-19) has caused dramatic disruptions in pharmacy experiential education. Administrators and programs have worked to help external preceptors, faculty members, and students cope with the new realities of virtual or remote experiences and new or increased use of telemedicine. Clear and effective lines of communication as well as well-reasoned and resourced alternative plans are necessary to help manage the current issues and prepare for future challenges. Doctor of Pharmacy programs should enhance their focus not just on the physical health and well-being of students, faculty members, and external preceptors, but also on their mental and emotional health. The full scope of the impact of the pandemic on experiential education in pharmacy is still unclear, but this situation should serve as a stimulus for innovation and rethinking the paradigm of how pharmacy programs educate and prepare students for pharmacy practice.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación en Farmacia/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/organización & administración , Facultades de Farmacia/organización & administración , Adaptación Psicológica , Betacoronavirus , Comunicación , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Docentes de Farmacia/psicología , Humanos , Pandemias , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Comunicación por Videocoferencia
12.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 84(6): ajpe8154, 2020 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32665725

RESUMEN

The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the way we live, work, and study. As faculty members, staff members, and students attempt to create and maintain a new normal because of this pandemic, the preservation of wellbeing becomes the responsibility of each and every one of us. The pandemic has taught us not to presume the importance of wellbeing and has allowed us time to reflect on establishing new assumptions and beliefs about how and when we work and study; how to be more efficient in our work and home responsibilities; and above all, what is most important. We must support ourselves and our students by maintaining a routine, modifying work and coursework expectations, and seeking psychosocial support if needed. Focusing on promoting wellbeing through leadership will move our institutions forward to a brighter future beyond COVID-19.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación en Farmacia/organización & administración , Docentes de Farmacia/psicología , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Betacoronavirus , Docentes de Farmacia/organización & administración , Estado de Salud , Humanos , Salud Mental , Pandemias , Resiliencia Psicológica
13.
East Asian Arch Psychiatry ; 30(2): 57-62, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32611829

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the level of social distance towards people with mental illness among pharmacy students in a Nigerian university and to explore its associated factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 433 pharmacy students in University of Nigeria, Nsukka. The 8-item Social Distance Scale was used to assess an individuals' avoidance reaction directed towards people with mental disorder. Descriptive statistics, Student's t test, and multivariate logistic regression were used for data analysis. RESULTS: Overall, the students demonstrated a low social distance towards people with mental illness. Lower social distance towards people with mental disorder was associated with younger students (p = 0.006) and students who have had contact with a person with mental illness (p = 0.026), who have visited a mental hospital (p = 0.019), who have experienced mental illness (p = 0.028), and who know a family member or friend with mental illness (p = 0.015). Independent predictors for high social distance towards people with mental illness were age of ≥25 years (odds ratio = 1.488, p = 0.046) and no prior visit to a mental hospital (odds ratio = 2.676, p = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Our pharmacy students had a low social distance towards people with mental illness. Predictors for the low social distance were younger age and previous visits to a mental hospital. We recommend more robust educational and training programme, and increased exposure to clinical clerkship in psychiatry to improve social distance towards people with mental illness among pharmacy students.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Universidades , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Nigeria , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
14.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 140(7): 949-953, 2020.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32612061

RESUMEN

To contribute to research on the effective practice of pharmaceutical law, we analyzed the learner characteristics that influence learning outcomes in this field at Kitasato University School of Pharmacy. Specifically, we conducted a forced entry multiple regression analysis. The explanatory variables were the learner's gender, course, university entrance examination format, course year progression, completion of related subjects, and submission of class quizzes, while examination performance in pharmaceutical law was the response variable. The learners' course of study and submission of class quizzes were found to have a significant influence on the examination results. The examination performance of students enrolled in a four-year course was 14.4% lower than students enrolled in a six-year course, while students with records of not submitting the class quizzes scored 8.4% lower than those who submitted all the quizzes. It is probable that there was a fundamental difference between the academic ability of the students enrolled in the two courses that affected the examination results. The fact that the submission of class quizzes had an effect on the examination results may be useful in developing a learning guide for the students. To further enhance the evidence of the analysis of learner characteristics in this field, obtaining the results of joint research with other universities is necessary.


Asunto(s)
Biofarmacia/educación , Biofarmacia/legislación & jurisprudencia , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Japón , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades
15.
Med Educ Online ; 25(1): 1780697, 2020 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32552527

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: To promote better collaboration for patient care, interprofessional education (IPE) is required in many health professions courses. However, successful IPE implementation at scale can be challenging because of complicated logistics and competing priorities. Implementing across multiple geographies adds further complexity. OBJECTIVE: This paper describes the implementation of a full cohort IPE activity for medical and pharmacy students delivered at both the Australian and Malaysian campuses of Monash University. DESIGN: We designed a 150-minute, blended learning activity centred around asthma care for second-year medical and pharmacy students. Student perceptions were measured with a pre- and post-activity survey using the validated ten-item, three-factor, SPICE-R2 instrument. Analysis focused on differences between professions and countries. RESULTS: All second-year medicine (N = 301 in Australia and N = 107 in Malaysia) and pharmacy students (N = 168 in Australia and N = 117 in Malaysia) participated in the learning activity. A total of 326/693 (47%) students participated in the associated research by completing both the pre- and post-activity surveys. The pre-activity survey showed significant differences in four items between medicine and pharmacy students in Australia and two items in Malaysia. Post-activity, we observed significant changes in 8/10 items when the two professions were combined. Specifically, we noted changes across the countries in perceptions of roles and responsibilities for collaborative practice and patient outcomes from collaborative practice. CONCLUSIONS: IPE across different professions and countries is feasible. Positive outcomes in role understanding and perceived patient outcomes are achievable through a context-sensitive, locally driven approach to implementation. Longitudinal experiences may be required to influence perceptions of teamwork and team-based care.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica/organización & administración , Educación en Farmacia/organización & administración , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Asma/terapia , Australia , Humanos , Malasia , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Percepción , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Rol Profesional , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología
16.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 140(6): 799-808, 2020.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32475930

RESUMEN

Pharmacy practice experience (PPE) is essential in the six-year course of pharmaceutical education in Japan. We previously found that PPE reinforced students' self-efficacy for curriculums (SECs), leading robust acquisition and reconstruction of pharmaceutical expertise. In this study, we aimed to clarify whether students' SECs affect successful experiences as enactive attainments in PPE. We distributed survey questionnaires to the fifth-year students in Keio University in 2016-2017 before and after PPE. The students made a self-assessment of their psychological state "expect to do well" on a seven-point Likert scale for each curriculum (C1 to C18), and their successful experiences were also collected from free description type questionnaire. We could follow up 139 students. The SEC scores increased from pre-PPE to post I (p<0.001) and II terms (p<0.01). The increase in SEC scores during PPE was associated with the rate of students' successful experiences in the first-term PPE (p=0.04). The path analysis revealed the following as significant predictive factors of SECs for successful experiences: basic sciences (C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, and C6) with stand-ardizing coefficient 0.35, health and environmental sciences (C11 and C12) with 0.39, and pharmaceutical sciences (C7, C8, C9, C10, C13, and C14) with -0.51. Students in the first-term PPE tended to experience successful performance in medical professions by using their pharmaceutical expertise that they had learned. In this study, for the first time, we demonstrated that Japanese students' SECs for pharmaceutical expertise affected successful experiences, leading better outcomes of PPE.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Acontecimientos que Cambian la Vida , Autoeficacia , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Curriculum , Humanos , Japón , Aprendizaje , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
17.
Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet) ; 18(2): 0-0, abr.-jun. 2020. tab, graf
Artículo en Inglés | IBECS | ID: ibc-194061

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To determine the perception of undergraduate pharmacy students of their experiential learning (EL) placements both in the community and hospital settings. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted utilizing a six-item online survey consisting of one open-ended and five closed-ended questions, the latter utilising five-point Likert-type scales ranging from strongly disagree (1) to strongly agree (5). All undergraduate pharmacy students from the School of Pharmacy (N=496) were included in the study. Survey questions assessed students' perceptions on the effectiveness of the EL, tutors and placements sites, and organisation and structure of the EL. Thematic content analysis was performed on the open-ended comments, where relevant themes were generated. RESULTS: From the 139 responses (response rate: 28%), 121 responses were analysed, and of these, 72.5% already had part-time jobs in community pharmacies. Close to 85% felt that their part-time work should contribute to EL hours, which is currently not recognised by the university. Respondents were positive about the effectiveness of EL in developing their professionalism and communication (M=3.84, SD=1.05), clinical (M=3.42, SD=1.22), and technical skills (M=3.32, SD=1.25) Respondents provided favourable feedback about their experience in the hospital as it gave them a real-world exposure to the role of a hospital pharmacist. Community placements were not viewed favourably and this was mainly attributed to the poor experience with tutors whom they felt used them as an extra pair of hands. This was thought to impede their learning experience. They also felt that hospital placements were of insufficient duration, reported by 72.5% of respondents. Respondents also felt they should be sent to other sites such as primary care for placements. CONCLUSIONS: Tutor-training is key to ensure tutors are aware of the responsibilities and expectations. Similarly, quality assurance measures should be adopted to ensure tutors and placement sites are capable of providing students with an effective placement experience. While placement durations are a concern, the focus should be on the quality of the placement experience, and ensuring there is structure and flexibility. Content changes are also needed to include emerging placement sites such as primary care to prepare students for evolving pharmacist roles in the changing healthcare system


No disponible


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Percepción , Aprendizaje , Atención Primaria de Salud , Servicios Farmacéuticos/organización & administración , Estudios Transversales , Farmacias
19.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 140(1): 107-111, 2020.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31902878

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to examine how students prepare for the pharmaceutical technical English course "Yakugaku-Eigo Nyumon" by qualitative analysis. A sub-text, supplemental material was used to assist students with class preparation. Qualitative questionnaires on understanding and approaches for class preparation as well as review of class were analyzed in comparison with different academic performance levels on the final exam. The results of qualitative analysis of class preparation based on coding revealed that high-academic-performing students understood and adopted deep-processing approaches for the preparation of "English words" and "understanding of content" more often than low-academic-performing students. High-performing students attempted to not literally translate English sentences into Japanese while checking the English words with thinking and ingenuity, and to understand English sentences by drawing figures and thinking of relationships using previously learned knowledge. These approaches were not adopted by low-performing students. Furthermore, sub-text was one of the means for understanding by high-performing students, whereas it was essential for low-performing students to understand the content. Coding results on the review of class also showed that low-performing students were dependent mainly on sub-text for understanding. These results suggest that deep-processing approaches to both English and content of materials are necessary for deep understanding in "Yakugaku-Eigo Nyumon".


Asunto(s)
Comprensión , Curriculum , Educación en Farmacia , Conocimiento , Lenguaje , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Éxito Académico , Pruebas de Aptitud , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 12(1): 41-48, 2020 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31843163

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To describe elements of an interprofessional second year capstone experience designed to incorporate each step of the Pharmacists' Patient Care Process (PPCP) and to evaluate changes in attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration. METHODS: Second year pharmacy students collaborated with dental students to collect information from a standardized patient (SP), assess dental and pharmacy-related problems, and develop a plan resolving the problems identified. Students documented via a SOAP note (subjective, objective, assessment, and plan) and followed up with the SP after an emergency room visit, developing a new plan for implementation. Pharmacy students followed up in the inpatient setting when the SP was preparing for discharge, collecting information from the electronic health record (EHR), assessing the patient's medical conditions, and planning for treatment. Multiple assessment methods were used including extended multiple-choice questions (eMCQs) to assess clinical reasoning skills and a rubric for SOAP note grading. RESULTS: Students performed well on the assessments especially communicating with the SP during medication history and discharge counseling and documenting their care in a SOAP note. Students stated value was added to their education through this experience. CONCLUSIONS: This capstone allowed students the opportunity to practice each step of the PPCP and to collaborate as a member of an interprofessional team As the PPCP is integrated into pharmacy curricula, assessments such as this will be essential for determining practice-readiness and team-readiness of graduates.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum/tendencias , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Atención al Paciente/métodos , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Estudiantes de Farmacia/psicología , Educación en Odontología/métodos , Educación en Farmacia/métodos , Humanos , Estudiantes de Odontología/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Farmacia/estadística & datos numéricos
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