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2.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(1): 107-111, 2021 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33424471

RESUMEN

Background: The Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library serves a community of over 22,000 individuals primarily from the Yale Schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing and the Yale New Haven Hospital. Though they are geographically close to one another, reaching these disparate populations can be a challenge. Having a clear and thorough communication plan has proved invaluable in transcending communication chasms, especially in recent times of crisis. Case Presentation: This article describes the Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library's methods for communicating and promoting its remote resources and services in response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It details our communication strategies and messages leading up to, and after, the Yale campus was closed and specifies how we pivoted from reaching users inside the library to reaching our audiences remotely. Conclusions: Our communication plan has provided the foundation for all of our messaging, be it print or digital media. In recent moments of crisis, it has been especially helpful for planning and executing large scale messaging. Similarly, knowing whom to contact around our organization to promote our message in different and broader ways has been extremely beneficial.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Redes de Comunicación de Computadores/organización & administración , Internet , Bibliotecas Médicas/organización & administración , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Connecticut , Femenino , Humanos , Bibliotecólogos/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios de Casos Organizacionales , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 13, 2021 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407376

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated a sudden transition to remote learning in medical schools. We aimed to assess perceptions of remote learning among pre-clinical medical students and subsequently to identify pros and cons of remote learning, as well as uncover gaps to address in ongoing curricular development. METHODS: A survey was distributed to first- and second-year medical students at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine in March 2020. Frequencies of responses to structured multiple-choice questions were compared regarding impacts of remote learning on quality of instruction and ability to participate, value of various remote learning resources, living environment, and preparedness for subsequent stages of training. Responses to open-ended questions about strengths and weaknesses of the remote curriculum and overall reflections were coded for thematic content. RESULTS: Of 268 students enrolled, 104 responded (53.7% of first-year students and 23.9% of second-year students). Overall, students felt that remote learning had negatively affected the quality of instruction and their ability to participate. Most (64.1%) preferred the flexibility of learning material at their own pace. Only 25.5% of respondents still felt connected to the medical school or classmates, and feelings of anxiety and isolation were noted negatives of remote learning. Most second-year students (56.7%) felt their preparation for the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 exam was negatively affected, and 43.3% felt unprepared to begin clerkships. In narrative responses, most students appreciated the increased flexibility of remote learning, but they also identified several deficits that still need to be addressed, including digital fatigue, decreased ability to participate, and lack of clinical skills, laboratory, and hands-on learning. CONCLUSIONS: Videocasted lectures uploaded in advance, electronic health record and telehealth training for students, and training for teaching faculty to increase technological fluency may be considered to optimize remote learning curricula.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Curriculum , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , /transmisión , California , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 15, 2021 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407378

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Over the last decade, the use of technology-enhanced learning (TEL) has rapidly expanded and diversified. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a growing demand for distance and online learning strategies to support and even replace learning experiences previously afforded by clinical placements and clerkships. An intriguing but under-researched modality is the use of medical reality television to provide authentic experiences of patient care. This strategy does not feature in published medical educational literature, though promising research is emerging from other disciplines. METHODOLOGY: A programme of learning using medical reality television clips to facilitate case-based learning was developed according to the principles of 'anchored instruction', a technology-based educational theory. Clips were taken from the UK television show '24 hours in A&E'. Medical students' learning experiences were investigated using a qualitative approach addressing the following research questions: - What is the perceived emotional experience of medical students when watching reality television in an educational context? - How do medical students relate their experience of watching reality television in a formal educational setting to their perceived learning needs in the clinical environment? A case study research methodology was adopted within the interpretivist paradigm. Data were triangulated from semi-structured interviews with students and non-participant observation of the teaching session. Field notes and transcripts were analysed through an inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: In response to the medical reality television, a diverse range of emotions were expressed including: excitement, amusement, concern, nervousness, sadness and joy. Students identified gaps in their clinical knowledge such as interpreting results, practical aspects of prescribing and end of life care. Key themes were increased student engagement and a promotion of holistic care practices. DISCUSSION: Students perceived reality television as a highly realistic and relatable medium and an enjoyable, memorable way to contextualise learning from the classroom to real life, a finding mirrored in previous studies in other fields. The high degree of emotion expressed may explain the improved subjective memorability of the cases. CONCLUSION: Medical reality television offers a unique means of engaging students by providing authentic experiences of patient care and should be valued alongside other technology-enhanced learning strategies.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Televisión , /prevención & control , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Atención al Paciente , Reino Unido
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 14, 2021 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407422

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the United States (US) medical education system with the necessary, yet unprecedented Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) national recommendation to pause all student clinical rotations with in-person patient care. This study is a quantitative analysis investigating the educational and psychological effects of the pandemic on US medical students and their reactions to the AAMC recommendation in order to inform medical education policy. METHODS: The authors sent a cross-sectional survey via email to medical students in their clinical training years at six medical schools during the initial peak phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. Survey questions aimed to evaluate students' perceptions of COVID-19's impact on medical education; ethical obligations during a pandemic; infection risk; anxiety and burnout; willingness and needed preparations to return to clinical rotations. RESULTS: Seven hundred forty-one (29.5%) students responded. Nearly all students (93.7%) were not involved in clinical rotations with in-person patient contact at the time the study was conducted. Reactions to being removed were mixed, with 75.8% feeling this was appropriate, 34.7% guilty, 33.5% disappointed, and 27.0% relieved. Most students (74.7%) agreed the pandemic had significantly disrupted their medical education, and believed they should continue with normal clinical rotations during this pandemic (61.3%). When asked if they would accept the risk of infection with COVID-19 if they returned to the clinical setting, 83.4% agreed. Students reported the pandemic had moderate effects on their stress and anxiety levels with 84.1% of respondents feeling at least somewhat anxious. Adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) (53.5%) was the most important factor to feel safe returning to clinical rotations, followed by adequate testing for infection (19.3%) and antibody testing (16.2%). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the education of US medical students in their clinical training years. The majority of students wanted to return to clinical rotations and were willing to accept the risk of COVID-19 infection. Students were most concerned with having enough PPE if allowed to return to clinical activities.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Agotamiento Psicológico/epidemiología , /psicología , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Control de Infecciones , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
6.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(1): e9, 2021 01 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33398943
8.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 45(1): 37-43, 2021 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33464190

RESUMEN

In the wake of COVID-19, the postgraduate activities in physiology were shifted from live (face-to-face teaching) to virtual mode. This transition posed a challenge to postgraduate students and faculty moderators, especially for participant-centric group discussion, wherein face-to-face interaction contributes significantly to active learner engagement. To bridge the gap between live group discussion (GD) and virtual GD in the conventional format (VGD), we implemented an innovative yet feasible multistep approach of conducting structured virtual group discussion (sVGD). It involved priming of students during the preparatory phase and incorporation of the Tuckman model of group dynamics, which consists of sequential substages of forming, storming, norming, and performing into the virtual format. Unsupervised synchronous and asynchronous, as well as supervised synchronous interactions within and in between the minigroups in a structured way, led to active engagement of students with one another and the moderator, despite the constraints imposed by the virtual format. After establishing the feasibility of the approach during the first GD (sVGD-1), sVGD-2 was conducted, further refining the approach, and feedback was obtained from the postgraduate students. Pre-GD feedback revealed that the live session was preferred over virtual for the conduct of GD, whereas both live GD and sVGD were perceived to be more effective than VGD in the post-GD feedback. Such pedagogical innovations may also help to address the challenges posed in traditional teaching across the undergraduate and postgraduate courses in medical education and beyond during such unforeseeable circumstances.


Asunto(s)
Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Postgrado/organización & administración , Pandemias , Fisiología/educación , Estudiantes/psicología , Realidad Virtual , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación de Postgrado/métodos , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Estudios de Factibilidad , Retroalimentación Psicológica , Procesos de Grupo , Humanos , India , Internet , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33466459

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this ecological study was to investigate what the impact of digital learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic was on the burnout and overall mental health (MH) of medical students. BACKGROUND: During the unprecedented era of the COVID-19 pandemic, the majority of countries worldwide adopted very strong measures. Universities closed their doors, and education continued through digital learning lectures. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was administered to all 189 eligible candidates before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mental health was assessed via the MH domain of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and burnout with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS). RESULTS: The overall response rate was 81.5%. The overall burnout prevalence did not differ significantly between the two periods (pre-COVID-19 18.1% vs. COVID-19 18.2%). However, the burnout prevalence dropped significantly in year 4 (pre-COVID-19 40.7% vs. COVID-19 16.7%, p = 0.011), whereas it increased significantly in year 6 (pre-COVID-19 27.6% vs. COVID-19 50%, p = 0.01). When looking at each MBI-SS dimension separately, we found that emotional exhaustion decreased significantly in year 4 but increased in year 6, and cynicism increased in all years. The overall MH deteriorated significantly between the two periods (pre-COVID-19 58.8 ± 21.6 vs. COVID-19 48.3 ± 23, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Digital learning in medical studies carries significant risks. Not only does the MH deteriorate, but cynicism levels also increase. Emotional exhaustion was found to increase particularly in final year students, who struggle with the lack of clinical experience just before they start working as qualified junior doctors.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Psicológico , Educación a Distancia , Educación Médica/tendencias , Pandemias , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Humanos , Salud Mental , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
12.
J Surg Res ; 257: 449-454, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32892144

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The interest of medical students and surgery residents in global surgery continues to grow. Few studies have examined how the presence of global surgery opportunities influences an applicant's decision to choose a surgical training program. We designed a survey to examine the interest in global surgery among general surgery residency applicants and the influence of a global surgery rotation on a general surgery residency applicant's rank list. METHODS: In March 2019, an online 20-question qualitative survey was administered to all general surgery applicants to a single academic institution. Results were stratified into two applicant groups; applicants from domestic or international medical schools. The survey was designed to capture demographic information, previous global rotations or experiences, future interest in global surgery opportunities, and the importance of global surgery in choosing a residency program. RESULT: s: A total of 179 (21% response rate) applicants completed the entire survey. Of the respondents 81% were interested in a global surgery rotation during residency, 56% considered a global surgery opportunity as moderately to extremely important to their residency rankings, 71% said they would rank a residency higher if it had a funded global surgery program compared to one without funding and 58% of the surveyed applicants were interested in incorporating global surgery into their future career. CONCLUSIONS: Global surgery opportunities are important to some general surgery residency applicants. A majority of applicants believe a funded global surgery would positively influence their rank list. As residency programs train residents for their future careers greater consideration needs to be given to developing global surgery opportunities.


Asunto(s)
Selección de Profesión , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Cirugía General , Salud Global , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
13.
Acad Radiol ; 28(1): 112-118, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33268209

RESUMEN

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The need for social distancing has resulted in rapid restructuring of medical student education in radiology. While students traditionally spend time learning in the reading room, remote clinical learning requires material shared without direct teaching at the radiology workstation. Can remote clinical learning meet or exceed the educational value of the traditional in-person learning experience? Can student engagement be matched or exceeded in a remote learning environment? MATERIALS AND METHODS: To replace the in-person reading room experience, a small-group learning session for medical students named Virtual Read-Out (VRO) was developed using teleconferencing software. After Institutional Review Board approval, two student groups were anonymously surveyed to assess differences in student engagement and perceived value between learning environments: "Conventional" students participating in the reading room (before the pandemic) and "Remote" students participating in VRO sessions. Students reported perceived frequency of a series of five-point Likert statements. Based on number of respondents, an independent t-test was performed to determine the significance of results between two groups. RESULTS: Twenty-seven conventional and 41 remote students responded. Remote students reported modest but significantly higher frequency of active participation in reviewing radiology exams (p < 0.05). There was significantly lower frequency of reported boredom among Remote students (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in perceived educational value between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Students report a high degree of teaching quality, clinical relevance, and educational value regardless of remote or in-person learning format. Remote clinical radiology education can be achieved with equal or greater student interaction and perceived value in fewer contact hours than conventional learning in the reading room.


Asunto(s)
Radiología , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Pandemias
14.
J Surg Res ; 257: 246-251, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32862052

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Training diverse house staff, including those who are underrepresented in medicine, is vital to provide high-quality patient care for the communities that we serve. In 2018, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education announced new common program requirements for systematic efforts to recruit and retain a diverse workforce. However, questions remain about how to implement such efforts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) data from eight residency programs spanning two recruitment cycles (2017-2018, 2018-2019) was reviewed. The number of candidates at each stage in the process (applicant, invited to interview, interviewed, and matched) was examined by self-identified race or ethnicity. These data were presented to residency program directors at our Graduate Medical Education committee meeting before the next recruitment cycle. Data were analyzed following the 2019-20 residency match. Odds ratios and Pearson's chi-squared test were used to assess statistical significance. RESULTS: A total of 10,445 and 10,982 medical students applied to our 8 core residency programs in 2017 and 2018, respectively. Medical students who applied and self-identified as Asian, Black or African American, and Hispanic or Latino or Spanish origin had lower odds of being invited to interview than those who self-identified as White. After data presentation, the odds of inviting Black or African American applicants to interview increased significantly. The odds of attending an interview once invited were the same across groups. CONCLUSIONS: Sharing ERAS data patterns with residency program directors was associated with a significant year over year change in interviewee diversity. Structured analysis of institutional ERAS data can provide insight into the resident selection process and may be a useful tool to improve house staff diversity.


Asunto(s)
Diversidad Cultural , Fuerza Laboral en Salud/organización & administración , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Grupos Minoritarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Selección de Personal/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Afroamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Americanos Asiáticos/estadística & datos numéricos , Grupo de Ascendencia Continental Europea/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios de Factibilidad , Fuerza Laboral en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Hispanoamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/organización & administración , Solicitud de Empleo , Selección de Personal/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos
16.
Acad Radiol ; 28(1): 128-135, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33132008

RESUMEN

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic reducing medical student presence on clinical services and in classrooms, academic institutions are utilizing a virtual format to continue medical student education. We describe a successful initial experience implementing a virtual elective in interventional radiology (IR) and provide the course framework, student feedback, and potential improvements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 2-week virtual IR elective curriculum was created utilizing a combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning and the "flipped" classroom educational model. Students virtually participated in daily IR resident education conferences, resident-led case review sessions, and dedicated lectures. Asynchronous prelearning material consisted of text and video correlating to lecture topics. Anonymous precourse and postcourse surveys were sent to all participating students (n = 10). RESULTS: Ten students (100%) completed precourse and seven (70%) completed postcourse surveys. Enrolled students were considering residencies in surgery (50%), internal medicine (40%), interventional radiology (30%), and/or diagnostic radiology (30%). Students' understanding of what IRs do and the procedures they perform (p < 0.001), when to consult IR for assistance in patient management (p = 0.005), and the number of IR procedures students could recall (p = 0.015) improved after the course. Case-review sessions and virtual lectures ranked as having the highest education value. Students recommended additional small-group case workshops. CONCLUSION: This successful virtual IR elective provides a framework for others to continue IR medical student education during the pandemic and grow the specialty's presence within an increasingly virtual medical school curriculum. The described model may be modified to improve IR education beyond the COVID-19 era.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes de Medicina , Curriculum , Humanos , Pandemias , Radiología Intervencional/educación
17.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1857322, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33327877

RESUMEN

Many challenges could occur that result in the need to handle an increase in the number of medical student clinical placements, such as curricular transformations or viral pandemics, such as COVID 19. Here, we describe four different institutions' approaches to addressing the impact of curricular transformation on clerkships using an implementation science lens. Specifically, we explore four different approaches to managing the 'bulge' as classes overlap in clerkships Curriculum leaders at four medical schools report on managing the bulge of core clinical placements resulting from reducing the duration of the foundational sciences curriculum and calendar shifts for the respective clerkship curriculum. These changes, which occurred between 2014 and 2018, led to more students being enrolled in core clinical rotations at the same time than occurred previously. Schools provided respective metrics used to evaluate the effectiveness of their bulge management technique. These data typically included number of students affected in each phase of their curricular transformation, performance on standardized examinations, and student and faculty feedback. Not all data were available from all schools, as some schools are still working through their 'bulge' or are affected by COVID-19. There is much to be learned about managing curricular transformations. Working on such endeavors in a learning collaborative such as the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education Initiative provided support and insights about how to survive, thrive and identifying lessons learned during curricular transformation.


Asunto(s)
Prácticas Clínicas , Curriculum , Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Humanos
19.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1842661, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33108248

RESUMEN

Methods of anatomical education have, as with many facets of normal life, been forced to evolve rapidly due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Whilst some authors claim that cadaver dissection is now under threat, we believe the centuries-old practice can and must be upheld.


Asunto(s)
Anatomía/educación , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Disección/educación , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Betacoronavirus , Cadáver , Humanos , Pandemias , Estudiantes de Medicina
20.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1842660, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33121393

RESUMEN

SUBSTANCE: We reviewed the effect of a hybrid remediation model combining co-regulated learning and deliberate practice on future exam performance of pre-clerkship medical students who had been unsuccessful on a previous clinic skills exam. With this remediation model, we aimed to strengthen students' self-regulated learning to improve future exam performance and support sustained and improved learning. Educational problem addressed: Observing that some students who initially performed well post remediation with deliberate practice, still struggled on future exams, we looked to address a method that could improve both short-and long-term clinical skills learning success with sustained performance. Intervention outcome: Comparing the remediated students' exam scores pre- and post-coaching to their cohort's performance, we observed the majority of students post remediation performed above their cohort's exam average. Lessons learned: Combining learning models resulted in improved learning outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Prácticas Clínicas , Competencia Clínica , Evaluación Educacional , Tutoría , Logro , Prácticas Clínicas/métodos , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Modelos Educacionales , Estudiantes de Medicina
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