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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 412, 2024 Apr 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38622577

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Nowadays, Artificial intelligence (AI) is one of the most popular topics that can be integrated into healthcare activities. Currently, AI is used in specialized fields such as radiology, pathology, and ophthalmology. Despite the advantages of AI, the fear of human labor being replaced by this technology makes some students reluctant to choose specific fields. This meta-analysis aims to investigate the knowledge and attitude of medical, dental, and nursing students and experts in this field about AI and its application. METHOD: This study was designed based on PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases were searched with relevant keywords. After study selection according to inclusion criteria, data of knowledge and attitude were extracted for meta-analysis. RESULT: Twenty-two studies included 8491 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled analysis revealed a proportion of 0.44 (95%CI = [0.34, 0.54], P < 0.01, I2 = 98.95%) for knowledge. Moreover, the proportion of attitude was 0.65 (95%CI = [0.55, 0.75], P < 0.01, I2 = 99.47%). The studies did not show any publication bias with a symmetrical funnel plot. CONCLUSION: Average levels of knowledge indicate the necessity of including relevant educational programs in the student's academic curriculum. The positive attitude of students promises the acceptance of AI technology. However, dealing with ethics education in AI and the aspects of human-AI cooperation are discussed. Future longitudinal studies could follow students to provide more data to guide how AI can be incorporated into education.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes de Medicina , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Humanos , Inteligencia Artificial , Emociones , Conocimiento , Escolaridad
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 411, 2024 Apr 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38622620

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The concept of "total pain" plays an important role in palliative care; it means that pain is not solely experienced on a physical level, but also within a psychological, social and spiritual dimension. Understanding what spirituality entails, however, is a challenge for health care professionals, as is screening for the spiritual needs of patients. OBJECTIVE: This is a novel, interprofessional approach in teaching undergraduate medical students about spiritual care in the format of a seminar. The aim of this study is to assess if an increase in knowledge about spiritual care in the clinical context is achievable with this format. METHODS: In a mandatory seminar within the palliative care curriculum at our university, both a physician and a hospital chaplain teach strategies in symptom control from different perspectives (somatic domain - spiritual domain). For evaluation purposes of the content taught on the spiritual domain, we conducted a questionnaire consisting of two parts: specific outcome evaluation making use of the comparative self-assessment (CSA) gain and overall perception of the seminar using Likert scale. RESULTS: In total, 52 students participated. Regarding specific outcome evaluation, the greatest gain was achieved in the ability to define total pain (84.8%) and in realizing its relevance in clinical settings (77.4%). The lowest, but still fairly high improvement was achieved in the ability to identify patients who might benefit from spiritual counselling (60.9%). The learning benefits were all significant as confirmed by confidence intervals. Overall, students were satisfied with the structure of the seminar. The content was delivered clearly and comprehensibly reaching a mean score of 4.3 on Likert scale (4 = agree). The content was perceived as overall relevant to the later work in medicine (mean 4.3). Most students do not opt for a seminar solely revolving around spiritual care (mean 2.6). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that implementing spiritual care education following an interprofessional approach into existing medical curricula, e.g. palliative medicine, is feasible and well perceived among medical students. Students do not wish for a seminar which solely revolves around spiritual care but prefer a close link to clinical practice and strategies.


Asunto(s)
Medicina Paliativa , Terapias Espirituales , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Curriculum , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Dolor , Espiritualidad
3.
Nurs Open ; 11(4): e2149, 2024 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38622906

RESUMEN

AIM: To offer a practical way in which the status of healthcare assistants (HCAs) can be increased by drawing on their experience, knowledge and skillset, whilst mentoring medical students during an HCA project. DESIGN: Qualitative, reflexive thematic analysis. METHODS: One-to-one semi-structured interviews were conducted between April and June 2019, with 13 participants. Participants included five healthcare assistants; three practice development nurses, two of whom were former HCAs; one registered general nurse and four clinical educators. RESULTS: Two themes were identified: HCAs as silent, invisible caregivers (theme 1) and the formation of an HCA identity through mentoring (theme 2). HCAs are often silent performers of complex patient care with limited opportunity to engage in the interprofessional team dialogue. Social perceptions of HCAs describe them as a marginalised, poorly understood, 'unqualified' group with 'lowly status'. Mentoring medical students allows HCAs to draw on their experience, knowledge and skillset by actively contributing to the learning and development of future doctors. CONCLUSION: The mentoring of medical students gave HCAs an active voice within the interprofessional team, instilling their confidence and self-worth. Mentoring allowed HCAs to move from a homogenous, group-based social identity to a role-based one that enabled HCAs to reveal the true extent of their work whilst negotiating their place and identity within the interprofessional team. IMPACT: Leaders in healthcare will see that a re-evaluation of HCAs as performers of basic, hands-on patient care is needed to breakdown ingrained beliefs, eliminating a 'us and them' mentality. Involving HCAs in the mentoring of medical students will impact on the personal development of both HCAs and medical students in the cultivation of a future, person-centred, inclusive and collaborative workforce. REPORTING METHOD: COREQ guidelines to enhance methodological rigour were strictly adhered to. PATIENT AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT: There is no patient or public involvement.


Asunto(s)
Tutoría , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Técnicos Medios en Salud/educación , Investigación Cualitativa , Mentores
4.
BMJ Open Qual ; 13(2)2024 Apr 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38589055

RESUMEN

High-acuity trauma necessitates experienced and rapid intervention to prevent patient harm. However, upskilling junior trainees through hands-on management of real trauma cases is rarely feasible without compromising patient safety. This quality education report sought to investigate whether a simulation course operated via mixed reality (MR) headset devices (Microsoft HoloLens) could enhance the clinical knowledge recall and preparedness to practice of junior trainees with no prior experience managing trauma.The Plan-Do-Study-Act quality improvement method was used to refine six emergency trauma vignettes compatible with an MR teaching platform. Each vignette was curated by a multidisciplinary team of orthopaedic surgeons, clinical fellows and experts in simulation-based medical education. As a baseline assessment, a 2-hour emergency trauma course was delivered using traditional didactic methods to a cohort of pre-registration medical students with no clinical exposure to high-acuity trauma (n=16). Next, we delivered the MR simulation to an equivalent cohort (n=32). Clinical knowledge scores derived from written test papers were recorded for each group during and 2 weeks after each course. Each attendee's end-of-rotation clinical supervisor appraisal grade was recorded, as determined by a consultant surgeon who supervised participants during a 2-week placement on a major trauma ward. Balancing measures included participant feedback and validated cognitive load questionnaires (National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index).Overall, attendees of the MR simulation course achieved and sustained higher clinical knowledge scores and were more likely to receive a positive consultant supervisor appraisal. This project serves as a proof of concept that MR wearable technologies can be used to improve clinical knowledge recall and enhance the preparedness to practice of novice learners with otherwise limited clinical exposure to high-acuity trauma.


Asunto(s)
Realidad Aumentada , Educación Médica , Estudiantes de Medicina , Estados Unidos , Humanos , Simulación por Computador , Educación Médica/métodos
5.
MedEdPORTAL ; 20: 11398, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38628548

RESUMEN

Introduction: Integrating climate change and health into a medical school curriculum is critical for future physicians who will manage health crises caused by a rapidly changing climate. Although medical schools have increasingly included climate change in the curriculum, there remains a need to address the link between the climate crisis, environmental justice, and historical policies that shape environmental health disparities in local communities. Methods: In academic years 2021-2022 (AY22) and 2022-2023 (AY23), second-year medical students participated in a 2.5-hour seminar utilizing didactic teaching and small breakout groups that included interactive mapping activities and case scenarios. Learner knowledge and attitudes were self-assessed using pre- and postcurriculum surveys and a quiz. Qualitative thematic and content analysis was used to evaluate short-answer quiz responses and feedback. Results: Of 357 students who participated in the seminar, 208 (58%) completed both the precurriculum and postcurriculum surveys. Self-assessed ability increased significantly for all educational objectives across both years. Attitudes on the importance of climate change knowledge for patient health also improved from a mean of 3.5 precurriculum to 4.2 postcurriculum (difference = 0.7, p < .01) in AY22 and from 3.6 pre- to 4.3 postcurriculum (difference = 0.7, p < .01) in AY23 on a 5-point Likert scale. Discussion: This climate change and health session highlighting the link between environmental policy and climate change health vulnerability in the local context was successful in improving students' self-assessed ability across all stated educational objectives. Students cited the interactive small-group sessions as a major strength.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Justicia Ambiental , Cambio Climático , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional
6.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 16(1): e1-e3, 2024 Mar 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38572862

RESUMEN

Responding to the need for authentic clinical training for students in the context of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the Stellenbosch University Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences developed an innovative 12-week longitudinal, integrated rotation for pre-final-year medical students, the Integrated Distributed Engagement to Advance Learning (IDEAL) rotation. This saw 252 students being placed across 30 primary and secondary healthcare facilities in the Western and Northern Cape provinces. With a focus on service learning, the rotation was built on experiences and research of members of the planning team, as well as partnership relationships developed over an extended period. The focus of student learning was on clinical reasoning through being exposed to undifferentiated patient encounters and the development of practical clinical skills. Students on the distributed platform were supported by clinicians on site, alongside whom they worked, and by a set of online supports, in the form of resources placed on the learning management systems, learning facilitators to whom patient studies were submitted and wellness supporters. Important innovations of the rotation included extensive distribution of clinical training, responsiveness to health service need, co-creation of the module with students, the roles of learning facilitators and wellness supporters, the use of mobile apps and the integration of previously siloed learning outcomes. The IDEAL rotation was seen to be so beneficial as a learning experience that it has been incorporated into the medical degree on an ongoing basis.Contribution: Longitudinal exposure of students to undifferentiated patients in a primary health care context allows for integrated, self-regulated learning. This provides excellent opportunities for medical students, with support, to develop both clinical reasoning and practical skills.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Curriculum , Competencia Clínica
7.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 16(1): e1-e13, 2024 Mar 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38572858

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In South Africa, medical students are expected to have acquired a generalist competence in medical practice on completion of their training. However, what the students and their preceptors understand by 'generalist medical practice' has not been established in South African medical schools. AIM: This study aimed to explore what the students and their preceptors understood by 'generalist medical practice'. SETTING: Four South African medical schools: Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Walter Sisulu University and the University of the Witwatersrand. METHODS: The exploratory descriptive qualitative design was used. Sixteen focus group discussions (FGDs) and 27 one-on-one interviews were conducted among students and their preceptors, respectively. Participants were recruited through purposive sampling. The inductive and deductive data analysis methods were used. The MAXQDA 2020 (Analytics Pro) software was used to arrange data, yielding 2179 data segments. RESULTS: Ten themes were identified: (1) basic knowledge of medicine, (2) first point of contact with all patients regardless of their presenting problems, (3) broad field of common conditions prevalent in the community, (4) dealing with the undifferentiated patient without a diagnosis, (5) stabilising emergencies before referral, (6) continuity, (7) coordinated and (8) holistic patient care, necessitating nurturance of doctor-patient relationship, (9) health promotion and disease prevention, and (10) operating mainly in primary health care settings. CONCLUSION: The understanding of 'generalist medical practice' in accordance with internationally accepted principles augurs well in training undergraduate medical students on the subject. However, interdepartmental collaboration on the subject needs further exploration.Contribution: The study's findings can be used as a guide upon which the students' preceptors and their students can reflect during the training in generalist medical practice.


Asunto(s)
Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Sudáfrica , Relaciones Médico-Paciente , Grupos Focales
8.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 385, 2024 Apr 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38589869

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The undergraduate bioethics curriculum introduced in a private medical college in Pakistan in 1988 and revised in 2009 has evolved over time to incorporate globally relevant innovations, including integration of bioethics spirally within an existing problem-based learning curricular framework. The present evaluation study shares the results of this integrated bioethics curriculum delivered for 10 years across the five-year undergraduate medical curriculum. The study assessed the effectiveness of the curriculum in terms of student achievement, appropriateness of course contents and efficiency of instructional methods. METHODS: The study utilized a mixed method sequential explanatory design. The quantitative method was used in the first phase to gather data by utilizing a structured online questionnaire. This was followed by the second phase of qualitative methods to explain the findings of the first phase and enrich the data gathered. This phase was based on focus group discussions and document review. RESULTS: Student and faculty responses showed the curriculum contents to be relevant, informative, and appropriate as per learning objectives and student achievement. Multi-modal instructional methods used were stated to be effective and engaging; small group teaching and shorter sessions suggested to be preferable for fostering discussion and maintaining student engagement and attention. Large class formats were stated to be less effective. Students affirmed the contribution of bioethics education to their personal and professional development and ethical positioning. The majority of students agreed that the curriculum contributed to their knowledge acquisition (60.3-71.2%), skill development (59.41-60.30%) and demonstration of ethical/professional behavior (62.54-67.65%). The ranges indicate agreement with related sets of questions. Participants suggested that the curriculum could be further strengthened by better integration in clinical years, role modelling and providing opportunities for application in clinical health care settings. Moreover, topics like ethical issues related to the use of social media, public health ethics and ethics and law were suggested as additions to the existing curriculum. These findings have regional and global relevance for the development and assessment of effective bioethics curricula. CONCLUSION: An effective bioethics curriculum for undergraduate medical education should run longitudinally across the 5 year curriculum and be integrated in the modules and clerkships. Basic acquisition of knowledge and skills takes place in Years 1 & 2 with reinforcement and application in Years 3-5. Learning embedded in an integrated curriculum can help students recognize, critically analyze and address ethical dilemmas. Involvement and commitment of the clinical faculty is essential for reinforcing the ethical principles and concepts learnt in the earlier years.


Asunto(s)
Bioética , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Bioética/educación , Curriculum , Aprendizaje
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 386, 2024 Apr 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38589890

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Medical students face a heavy burden as they are tasked with acquiring a vast amount of medical knowledge within a limited time frame. Self-directed learning (SDL) has become crucial for efficient and ongoing learning among medical students. However, effective ways to foster SDL ability among Chinese medical students are lacking, and limited studies have identified factors that impact the SDL ability of medical students. This makes it challenging for educators to develop targeted strategies to improve students' SDL ability. This study aims to assess SDL ability among Chinese medical students and examine the effects of career calling and teaching competencies on SDL ability, as well as the possible mechanisms linking them. METHODS: Data were collected from 3614 respondents (effective response rate = 60.11%) using cross-sectional online questionnaires and analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics 22.0. The questionnaire comprised a Demographic Characteristics Questionnaire, Self-directed Learning Ability Scale (Cronbach's alpha = 0.962), Teaching Competencies Scale, and Career Calling Scale. RESULTS: The average SDL ability score of Chinese medical students was 3.68 ± 0.56, indicating a moderate level of SDL ability. The six factors of the Self-directed Learning Ability Scale-self-reflection, ability to use learning methods, ability to set study plans, ability to set studying objectives, ability to adjust psychological state, and willpower in studying-accounted for 12.90%, 12.89%, 12.39%, 11.94%, 11.34%, and 8.67% of the variance, respectively. Furthermore, career calling was positively associated with SDL learning ability (ß = 0.295, p < 0.001), and SDL learning ability was positively associated with teaching competencies (ß = 0.191, p < 0.01). Simple slope analysis showed that when the level of teaching competencies was higher, the influence of career calling on SDL ability was stronger. CONCLUSIONS: Chinese medical students' SDL ability has room for improvement. Medical students could strengthen their willpower in studying by setting milestones goals with rewards, which could inspire their motivation for the next goals. Teachers should guide students to learn experience to improve students' reflective ability. Educators play a crucial role in bridging the gap between career calling education and SDL ability enhancement, highlighting the significance of optimal teaching competencies. Colleges should focus on strengthening teachers' sense of career calling and teaching competencies.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Curriculum , China
10.
MedEdPORTAL ; 20: 11397, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38595707

RESUMEN

Introduction: Foundational and clinical science integration, a long-standing goal of undergraduate medical education, benefits learners by promoting retention of critical knowledge and skills as well as their transfer to the clinical setting. We implemented a team-based learning (TBL) module in which foundational knowledge and skills from the disciplines of biochemistry, nutrition, and genetics were leveraged in a simulated patient encounter for diagnosis and management of a patient with dyslipidemia. Methods: The TBL was deployed in a first-year medical student cardiovascular system course with 125 students over three academic years. Following individual and team readiness assurance tests (iRAT and tRAT, respectively), teams participated in an initial application exercise requiring consideration of clinical and laboratory data and other risk factors to engage the patient in a shared decision-making process. Using dietary and family history narratives in subsequent application exercises, teams completed recommendations for an individualized diet plan and an assessment of potential disease inheritance patterns to formulate appropriate patient care management strategies. Results: Student engagement with prelearning materials and session team activities was high as judged by RAT performance and application exercise outcomes: iRAT question performance ranged from 89% to 99% for individual items, and tRAT performance was routinely 100%. Learners reported that the exercises were impactful and believed the learned foundational knowledge and skills were transferable to future patient care. Discussion: The dyslipidemia TBL module provides an illustration for early clinical learners of how foundational knowledge and skills can be operationalized and transferred for optimal patient care.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional
11.
JMIR Med Educ ; 10: e52483, 2024 Apr 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38598263

RESUMEN

ChatGPT (OpenAI), a cutting-edge natural language processing model, holds immense promise for revolutionizing medical education. With its remarkable performance in language-related tasks, ChatGPT offers personalized and efficient learning experiences for medical students and doctors. Through training, it enhances clinical reasoning and decision-making skills, leading to improved case analysis and diagnosis. The model facilitates simulated dialogues, intelligent tutoring, and automated question-answering, enabling the practical application of medical knowledge. However, integrating ChatGPT into medical education raises ethical and legal concerns. Safeguarding patient data and adhering to data protection regulations are critical. Transparent communication with students, physicians, and patients is essential to ensure their understanding of the technology's purpose and implications, as well as the potential risks and benefits. Maintaining a balance between personalized learning and face-to-face interactions is crucial to avoid hindering critical thinking and communication skills. Despite challenges, ChatGPT offers transformative opportunities. Integrating it with problem-based learning, team-based learning, and case-based learning methodologies can further enhance medical education. With proper regulation and supervision, ChatGPT can contribute to a well-rounded learning environment, nurturing skilled and knowledgeable medical professionals ready to tackle health care challenges. By emphasizing ethical considerations and human-centric approaches, ChatGPT's potential can be fully harnessed in medical education, benefiting both students and patients alike.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Médicos , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Razonamiento Clínico
13.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 74(3): 436-439, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38591273

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of various learning styles and their correlation with academic performance and mental health of medical students. METHODS: The cross-sectional study was conducted at the King Faisal University, Houfof, Saudi Arabia, from January to June 2019, and comprised medical students regardless of gender or the academic year. Data was collected using the Visual Aural Read/write Kinesthetic questionnaire. Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 was used to assess mental health. Data was analysed using SPSS 22. RESULTS: Of the 315 students, 179(57%) were males and 136(43%) were females. Overall, 152(48.3%) subjects preferred multimodal, while 163(51.7%) preferred unimodal style; 93(29%) aural, 53(16.8%) visual, 11(3.5%) read/write and 6(1.9%) kinesthetic. Males preferred visual and quardimodal styles of learning, while females preferred aural learning (p<0.05). Academic achievement was associated with learning style (p<0.05), but no relationship was observed between depression scores and learning styles (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The most preferred learning styles among medical students were found to be aural and bimodal.


Asunto(s)
Rendimiento Académico , Estudiantes de Medicina , Masculino , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Arabia Saudita/epidemiología , Universidades , Salud Mental
14.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 74(3): 499-503, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38591286

RESUMEN

Objective: To assess awareness, perceptions and use related to evidence-based revision methods by undergraduate medical students. METHODS: The descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in three medical colleges of Rawalpindi, Islamabad, Pakistan, from December 01, 2019, to January 31, 2020, after approval from the ethics review committee of Army Medical College, Rawalpindi. The sample comprised undergraduate medical students of either gender. Data was collected online using a 10-item standardised questionnaire. Students were asked about the revision methods they used routinely and their perceptions of conventional and evidence-based revision methods. Data was analysed using SPSS 23. RESULTS: Of the total 136 respondents, 92(67%) were females and 44(32.3%) were male students. The response from preclinical and clinical years was 67 (50.7%) and 69(49.2%), respectively. Highlighting was the most widely used revision method among students (70 (51%) students), followed by re-reading important points (65 (47.7%) students). 126 (92%) students had the opinion that conventional revision methods were effective learning tools. Only 52 (38.2%) students were aware of the term 'evidence-based revision methods'. Digital tools based on principles of evidence-based revision were used by a minority of students which included use of online question banks by 21 (15.4%) students, osmosis by 40 (29.4%) students, sketchy pharma by 35 (25%)students, flashcards by 19 (14%) and picmonic by only 3 (2.2%). More than 114 (80%) students responded that they wanted evidence-based revision methods to be incorporated into curriculum, and 116 (85%) students said they would like to have a workshop on these techniques. Conclusion: Most medical students were not aware of and were not using evidence-based revision methods, and relied on conventional revision tools. They were, however, eager to learn about newer revision strategies.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Aprendizaje
15.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 372, 2024 Apr 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38575953

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Mentoring medical students with varied backgrounds and individual needs can be challenging. Mentors' satisfaction is likely to be important for the quality and sustainability of mentorships, especially in programs where the mentor has responsibility for facilitating a group of mentees. However, little is known about what influences mentors' satisfaction. The aim of this study was to measure mentors' self-reported satisfaction with the mentoring experience and to explore associations between satisfaction and its putative factors. METHODS: An online survey was sent out to all physician mentors in each of the three mentorship programs (UiT The Arctic University of Norway, the University of Bergen, and McGill University, graduation years 2013-2020, n = 461). Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, dimension reduction, and linear regression. RESULTS: On a scale from 1 to 5, mean mentor satisfaction score at two Norwegian and one Canadian medical school was 4.55 (95% CI 4.47, 4.64). In a multilevel multivariate regression analysis, two predictors were significantly associated with mentors' satisfaction: (1) the perception that students found the group meetings valuable (ß = 0.186, 95% CI 0.021, 0.351, p = 0.027) and (2) mentors' perceived rewards (ß = 0.330, 95% CI 0.224, 0.437, p < 0.001). Perceived rewards included experiencing gratifying relationships with students, and mentors' perception of self-development. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, mentors appeared to be highly satisfied with their mentoring functions. Our findings suggest that mentors' overall satisfaction is closely linked to their experiences of fulfilling mentor-student relationships and personal and professional development. Interestingly, and perhaps contrary to commonly held assumptions, we found no association between mentor satisfaction and financial compensation. Furthermore, satisfaction was not associated with the provision of pre-assigned topics for discussions for mentor group meetings. We propose that the mentors' experienced psycho-social rewards, and their competence in establishing well-functioning group dynamics, should be areas of focus for faculty development.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Tutoría , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Mentores , Canadá , Satisfacción Personal
16.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 373, 2024 Apr 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38576032

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Modern healthcare systems require the right mix of medical specialties for effective provision of high-quality services. Despite increased availability of general physicians and specialists, Türkiye lags behind high-income countries in terms of availability of specialists. The purpose of the study is to identify several specific factors that affect the choice of medical specialization. METHODS: All 350 medical school graduates in a specialty examination preparation bootcamp were requested to participate in the survey and 333 completed the self-administered questionnaire. The survey asked questions about factors affecting choice of medical specialty by medical graduates. RESULTS: The empirical results indicate that surgical specialties, compared to other broad medical specializations, are selected because of its higher income-earning potential and social prestige. The likelihood of selecting surgical specialties is negatively affected by rigorousness of the training program, high work-load, risk of malpractice lawsuits and risk of workplace violence. Male participants were 2.8 times more likely to select surgery specialty compared to basic medical science. Basic medical science areas were selected at a higher rate by female graduates and graduates with high level of academic performance in medical schools. CONCLUSIONS: It is critically important to improve trust and inter-personal communications between the patients and physicians in all specialties to lower the likelihood of malpractice lawsuits and workplace violence. Policy-makers may adopt policies to affect income earning potential and social prestige of targeted specializations to improve their supply.


Asunto(s)
Médicos Generales , Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Estudios Transversales , Turquia , Selección de Profesión , Especialización
18.
Sante Publique ; 36(1): 109-120, 2024 04 05.
Artículo en Francés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38580460

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Nowadays, Internet addiction is a major concern due to the growing number of Internet users and the consequences associated with this addiction. PURPOSE OF THE RESEARCH: In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with Internet addiction among health sciences students at the University of Abomey-Calavi. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 346 students from the Faculty of Health Sciences and the National Institute of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Abomey-Calavi. Participants were selected using simple random sampling. Internet addiction was assessed using K. Young's "Internet Addiction Test." Logistic regression modeling was employed to explore factors associated with Internet addiction. The strength of the association was assessed using odds ratios; the confidence interval (CI) was 95%; and a p-value < 0.05 in the final model was considered significant. RESULTS: The prevalence of Internet addiction was 31.8% (95% CI: [23.26% - 41.38%]). Factors associated with Internet addiction were the participant's field of study, poor relationships with friends and family, communication difficulties, depression, and psychoactive substance consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence of Internet addiction exists among students in health sciences institutions in Benin. These findings can support the development of prevention and intervention strategies centered on addressing a public health issue that is still insufficiently recognized.


Introduction: De nos jours, l'addiction à Internet est une préoccupation majeure en raison de l'évolution croissante du nombre d'internautes mais aussi de ses conséquences. But de l'étude: Dans cette étude, nous avons déterminé la prévalence et les facteurs associés à l'addiction à Internet chez les étudiants des sciences de la santé de l'Université d'Abomey-Calavi. Méthodes: Il s'agit d'une étude transversale menée auprès de 346 étudiants de la Faculté des sciences de la santé et de l'Institut national médico-sanitaire de l'Université d'Abomey-Calavi. Ces derniers ont été sélectionnés par échantillonnage aléatoire simple. L'addiction à Internet a été mesurée grâce à l'outil « Internet addiction test de Young ¼. Une modélisation par régression logistique a été utilisée pour explorer les facteurs associés à l'addiction à Internet. La force de l'association a été évaluée avec un rapport de cotes et son intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % ; une valeur p <0,05 dans le modèle final a été considérée comme significative. Résultats: La prévalence de l'addiction à Internet était de 31,8 % (IC95 % : [23,26 % - 41,38 %]). La filière d'études, les mauvaises relations avec les proches, les difficultés de communication, la dépression et la consommation de substances psychoactives étaient associées à l'addiction à Internet. Conclusions: Il existe des évidences qui montrent l'addiction à Internet des étudiants des institutions universitaires de santé au Benin. Ces évidences peuvent soutenir la mise en place de stratégies de prévention et de prise en charge axées sur la communication autour d'un phénomène encore insuffisamment perçu comme le problème de santé publique qu'il constitue.


Asunto(s)
Conducta Adictiva , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Benin , Trastorno de Adicción a Internet , Estudiantes , Conducta Adictiva/epidemiología , Internet
19.
Int J Med Educ ; 15: 37-43, 2024 Apr 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38581237

RESUMEN

Methods:   A pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted at our institution's simulation center with 32 first year medical students from a single medical institution. Participants were randomly divided into two equal groups and completed an educational module the identification and pathophysiology of five common cardiac sounds. The control group utilized traditional education methods, while the interventional group incorporated multisensory stimuli. Afterwards, participants listened to randomly selected cardiac sounds and competency data was collected through a multiple-choice post-assessment in both groups. Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the data. Results: Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher in the multisensory group (Mdn=100%) compared to the control group (Mdn=60%) on the post-assessment (U=73.5, p<0.042). Likewise, knowledge acquisition was substantially better in the multisensory group (Mdn=80%) than in the control group (Mdn=50%) (U= 49, p<0.031). Conclusions: These findings suggest the incorporation of multisensory stimuli significantly improves cardiac auscultation competency. Given its cost-effectiveness and simplicity, this approach offers a viable alternative to more expensive simulation technologies like the Harvey simulator, particularly in settings with limited resources. Consequently, this teaching modality holds promise for global applicability, addressing the worldwide deterioration in cardiac auscultation skills and potentially leading to better patient outcomes. Future studies should broaden the sample size, span multiple institutions, and investigate long-term retention rates.


Asunto(s)
Ruidos Cardíacos , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Auscultación Cardíaca , Competencia Clínica , Ruidos Cardíacos/fisiología , Evaluación Educacional/métodos
20.
Ann Glob Health ; 90(1): 27, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38618271

RESUMEN

Patient-centered care (PCC) is a key domain of healthcare quality. Its importance is driven by evidence-based medicine, the predominance of chronic conditions requiring self-care, and the recognition of the priority of patient goals, values, priorities, and preferences in determining care plans. This article emphasizes the urgent need for Africa to develop PCC and a workforce committed to its implementation, as well as highlights an initiative by African medical students to champion PCC continent-wide. Embracing this transformative approach presents Africa with an unprecedented opportunity to improve care for each person. Through a comprehensive exploration of unique strategies and considerations in African health professions education, this viewpoint seeks to spark dialogue and inspire action towards a future where patient-centered care is the foundation of healthcare delivery in Africa.


Asunto(s)
Medicina Basada en la Evidencia , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , África , Instituciones de Salud , Atención Dirigida al Paciente
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