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2.
Mil Med ; 187(1-2): 9-11, 2022 01 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34990511

RESUMEN

In response to the COVID pandemic, Uniformed Services University (USU) suspended clerkships. As the nation's military medical school, USU had to keep students safe while still preparing them to be military physicians. In this commentary, we, a group of USU students, explore what this experience taught us about military medicine.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Educación Médica , Medicina Militar , Personal Militar , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Medicina Militar/educación , SARS-CoV-2 , Facultades de Medicina
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 22, 2022 Jan 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34996435

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Medical and pathology education has gone through an immense transformation from traditional face-to-face teaching mode to virtual mode during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study evaluated the effectiveness of online histopathology teaching in medical education during the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic in Griffith University, Australia. METHODS: Second-year medical students (n = 150) who had previously completed one year of face-to-face histopathology teaching, completed an online questionnaire rating their learning experiences before and during the COVID-19 pandemic after the completion of their histology and pathology practical sessions. The students' histopathology assessment results were then compared to the histopathology results of a prior second-year cohort to determine if the switch to online histopathology teaching had an impact on students' learning outcome. RESULTS: A thematic analysis of the qualitative comments strongly indicated that online histopathology teaching was instrumental, more comfortable to engage in and better structured compared to face-to-face teaching. Compared to the previous year's practical assessment, individual performance was not significantly different (p = 0.30) and compared to the prior cohort completing the same curriculum the mean overall mark was significantly improved from 65.36% ± 13.12% to 75.83% ± 14.84% (p < 0.05) during the COVID-19 impacted online teaching period. CONCLUSIONS: The transformation of teaching methods during the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic improved student engagement without any adverse effects on student learning outcomes in histology and pathology education.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 30, 2022 Jan 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35016672

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Medical schools can contribute to the insufficient primary care physician workforce by influencing students' career preferences. Primary care career choice evolves between matriculation and graduation and is influenced by several individual and contextual factors. This study explored the longitudinal dynamics of primary care career intentions and the association of students' motives for becoming doctors with these intentions in a cohort of undergraduate medical students followed over a four-year period. METHODS: The sample consisted of medical students from two classes recruited into a cohort study during their first academic year, and who completed a yearly survey over a four-year period from their third (end of pre-clinical curriculum) to their sixth (before graduation) academic year. Main outcome measures were students' motives for becoming doctors (ten motives rated on a 6-point scale) and career intentions (categorized into primary care, non-primary care, and undecided). Population-level flows of career intentions were investigated descriptively. Changes in the rating of motives over time were analyzed using Wilcoxon tests. Two generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate which motives were associated with primary care career intentions. RESULTS: The sample included 217 students (60% females). Career intentions mainly evolved during clinical training, with smaller changes at the end of pre-clinical training. The proportion of students intending to practice primary care increased over time from 12.8% (year 3) to 24% (year 6). Caring for patients was the most highly rated motive for becoming a doctor. The importance of the motives cure diseases, saving lives, and vocation decreased over time. Primary care career intentions were positively associated with the motives altruism and private practice, and negatively associated with the motives prestige, academic interest and cure diseases. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that career intentions are not fixed and change mainly during clinical training, supporting the influence of clinical experiences on career-related choices. The impact of students' motives on primary care career choice suggests strategies to increase the attractivity of this career, such as reinforcing students' altruistic values and increasing the academic recognition of primary care.


Asunto(s)
Intención , Estudiantes de Medicina , Selección de Profesión , Estudios de Cohortes , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Atención Primaria de Salud , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 35, 2022 Jan 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35022011

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The use of Open Educational Resources (OER) and Social Media (SM) for academic information seeking is common among undergraduates nowadays. There is limited data on OER and SM use for education in Sri Lanka. This study was aimed at evaluating the OER and SM use for education among the medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya. Stratified random sampling was used to select students from the first year to the final year. A self-administrated questionnaire was used to collect data. RESULTS: The study included 257 responses (response rate: 89.5%), of which 185 (72.0%) were females. The OER and SM use for educational purposes at least once a month among students was 96.1% (95%CI: 93.7-98.5%) and 88.3% (95%CI: 84.4-92.3%) respectively. There was no gender difference in OER and SM use. The main reasons for accessing OER were the availability of information at any time (36.1%) and ease of information access (31.5%). Wiki sites (84.4%) and Facebook (79.8%) were the highest accessed OER and SM platforms. The majority of students were in view that the information on wiki sites (51.4%) and results of general non-specific web searches (56.0%) were reliable. Only 33.9% of students searched information from educational and government-related sources and 18.7% had accessed e-journals. Through SM, 79.0% joined educational groups and 77.0% followed the medical-related sites, pages and people. More than one-third of students (35.8%) could not find academic information from SM due to the information overload and 31.1% mentioned that SM distracted their education. CONCLUSION: The majority of the students used OER and SM for education; however, only a minority accessed reliable information. Students accepted information available in wiki sites and general non-specific web searchers without considering the credibility of sources. The majority of the students did not refer to e-journals. Distractions to academic work and the difficulty to access accurate information were major concerns of using SM. This study highlights the importance of improving information literacy among medical students.


Asunto(s)
Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Estudiantes de Medicina , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Facultades de Medicina , Sri Lanka
6.
Saudi Med J ; 43(1): 61-66, 2022 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35022285

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To assess the emotional responses and coping strategies of medical students during the lockdown and social distancing measures implemented during the coronavirus disease -19 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: This cross­sectional study is based on data collected from undergraduate medical students at the College of Medicine, Alfaisal University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during the fall semester of academic year 2020-2021. All the participants completed a self-administered online questionnaire consisting of 3 parts: demographic information, emotional response scale, and 14-item, adapted brief coping orientation to problems experienced inventory to determine the use of avoidant or approach coping strategies. Coping and emotional response scores were compared using t-test. Linear regression analysis was also performed. RESULTS: A total of 261 students from all years were included. Overall scores were higher for avoidant coping strategies. The use of avoidant coping strategies was significantly higher in females (p=0.03) and in preclinical students (p<0.001). Preclinical students had a higher mean score for anger (p=0.002). Conversely, students in the clinical phase had higher scores for anxiety (p=0.005) and sadness (p=0.027). The regression analysis of emotional responses and coping strategies suggests that avoidant coping is a predictor of anger (p=0.003) and sadness (p=0.005). CONCLUSION: Interventions to train medical students in the use of more productive and effective coping strategies may reduce negative emotional responses linked to the present COVID-19 pandemic and in the future.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Estudiantes de Medicina , Adaptación Psicológica , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Estudios Transversales , Emociones , Femenino , Humanos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2024488, 2022 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34986760

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: For years, US medical schools have relied on community-based, private clinicians to educate medical students. There has been a steady decline in the number of physicians willing to take on medical students in their clinical practices. Recent issues related to the pandemic raise questions about how many patients students should see to have a meaningful clinical experience. METHODS: As part of a 16-week longitudinal clinical experience, medical students spend 2 days each week in a family medicine or internal medicine clinic. As repetition enhances learning, maximizing the number of patients students see is important. Using a mixed integer linear program, we sought to determine the optimal schedule that maximizes the number of patients whom students see during a rotation. Patient visits were collected from January to April 2018 for clinics used by the medical school. By maximizing the minimum number of patients per learner over all non-empty day-clinic combinations, we deliver equitable rotation plans based on our assumptions. RESULTS: For this pilot study, multiple experiments were performed with different numbers of students assigned to clinics. Each experiment also generated a weekly rotation plan for a given student. Based on this optimization model, the minimum number of patients per student over 16 weeks was 87 (3 patients per day) and actually increased the number of students who could be assigned to one of the clinics from 1 student per rotation to 8 students. CONCLUSIONS: The mixed integer linear program assigned more students to clinics that have more total visits in order to achieve the optimal and fairest learning quality. In addition, by conducting various experiments on different numbers of students, we observed that we were able to allocate more students without affecting the number of patients students see.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Proyectos Piloto , Facultades de Medicina
8.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 18, 2022 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34991556

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The United States opioid epidemic is a devastating public health crisis fueled in part by physician prescribing. While the next generation of prescribers is crucial to the trajectory of the epidemic, medical school curricula designated to prepare students for opioid prescribing (OP) and pain management is often underdeveloped. In response to this deficit, we aimed to investigate the impact of an online opioid and pain management (OPM) educational intervention on fourth-year medical student knowledge, attitudes, and perceived competence. METHODS: Graduating students completing their final year of medical education at Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University were sent an e-mail invitation to complete a virtual OPM module. The module consisted of eight interactive patient cases that introduced topics through a case-based learning system, challenging students to make decisions and answer knowledge questions about the patient care process. An identical pre- and posttest were built into the module to measure general and case-specific learning objectives, with responses subsequently analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test. RESULTS: Forty-three students (19% response rate) completed the module. All median posttest responses ranked significantly higher than paired median pretest responses (p <  0.05). Comparing the paired overall student baseline score to module completion, median posttest ranks (Mdn = 206, IQR = 25) were significantly higher than median pretest ranks (Mdn = 150, IQR = 24) (p <  0.001). Regarding paired median Perceived Competence Scale metrics specifically, perceived student confidence, capability, and ability in opioid management increased from "disagree" (2) to "agree" (4) (p <  0.001), and student ability to meet the challenge of opioid management increased from "neither agree nor disagree" (3) to "agree" (4) (p <  0.001). Additionally, while 77% of students reported receiving OP training in medical school, 21% reported no history of prior training. CONCLUSION: Implementation of a virtual, interactive module with clinical context is an effective framework for improving the OPM knowledge, attitudes, and perceived competence of fourth-year medical students. This type of intervention may be an important method for standardizing and augmenting the education of future prescribers across multiple institutions.


Asunto(s)
Analgésicos Opioides , Estudiantes de Medicina , Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapéutico , Curriculum , Humanos , Manejo del Dolor , Pautas de la Práctica en Medicina
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 19, 2022 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34991584

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Clinical reasoning is a core competency for every physician, as well as one of the most complex skills to learn. This study aims to provide insight into the perspective of learners by asking students about their own experiences with learning clinical reasoning throughout the medical Master's curriculum. METHODS: We adopted a constructivist approach to organise three semi-structured focus groups within the Master's curriculum at the medical school of the Radboud University Medical Center in Nijmegen (Netherlands) between August and December 2019. Analysis was performed through template analysis. RESULTS: The study included 18 participants who (1) defined and interpreted clinical reasoning, (2) assessed the teaching methods and (3) discussed how they used their context in order to learn and perform clinical reasoning during their clinical rotations. They referred to a variety of contexts, including the clinical environment and various actors within it (e.g. supervisors, peers and patients). CONCLUSION: With regard to the process by which medical students learn clinical reasoning in practice, this study stresses the importance of integrating context into the clinical reasoning process and the manner in which it is learnt. The full incorporation of the benefits of dialogue with the practice of clinical reasoning will require additional attention to educational interventions that empower students to (1) start conversations with their supervisors; (2) increase their engagement in peer and patient learning; (3) recognise bias and copy patterns in their learning process; and (4) embrace and propagate their role as boundary crossers.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Competencia Clínica , Razonamiento Clínico , Curriculum , Humanos , Aprendizaje
10.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 8, 2022 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34991718

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Medical students are vulnerable to test anxiety (TA), which impacts their professional lives and jeopardizes the optimal health care of their patients. The qualitative exploration of TA among medical students is crucial to understanding the problem. Hence, this study examined medical students' insights into TA and their suggestions on how to reduce it. METHODS: We conducted a phenomenological study on medical students at a public university. We utilized focus group discussions (FGDs) to investigate their experiences of TA. The FGDs were transcribed verbatim, and these transcripts were analyzed using Atlas.ti software. The thematic analysis followed the recommended guidelines. RESULTS: Seven FGD sessions were conducted with 45 students. Three major themes emerged: the students, their academic resources, and the examiner. Each theme comprised mutually exclusive subthemes. The "students" theme was divided into negative vs. positive thoughts and self-negligence vs. self-care, "academic recources" into heavy curriculum vs. facilitative curricular aids, and "examiner" into criticism vs. feedback and strict vs. kind approaches. CONCLUSION: This study provides a solid foundation for policymakers and decision makers in medical education to improve current assessment practices and student well-being. Medical students will be able to significantly alter and reduce TA if they are provided with additional psychological support and their examiners are trained on how to deal with examinees.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Curriculum , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Investigación Cualitativa , Ansiedad ante los Exámenes
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 24, 2022 Jan 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34998416

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented changes to medical education. However, no data are available regarding the impact the pandemic may have on medical training in Mexico. The aim of our study was to evaluate and identify the medical school students' perceptions of the changes in their clinical training due to the pandemic in Mexico. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study where a previous validated online survey was translated and adapted by medical education experts and applied to senior medical students from March to April of 2021. The 16-item questionnaire was distributed online combining dichotomous, multiple-choice, and 5-point Likert response scale questions. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were performed to compare the student's perceptions between public and private schools. RESULTS: A total of 671 responses were included in the study period. Most participants were from public schools (81%) and female (61%). Almost every respondent (94%) indicated it was necessary to obtain COVID-19 education, yet only half (54%) received such training. Students in private schools were less likely to have their clinical instruction canceled (53% vs. 77%, p = 0.001) and more likely to have access to virtual instruction (46% vs. 22%, p = 0.001) when compared to students from public schools. Four out of every five students considered their training inferior to that of previous generations, and most students (82%) would consider repeating their final year of clinical training. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of the COVID-19 on medical education in Mexico has been significant. Most final-year medical students have been affected by the cancellation of their in-person clinical instruction, for which the majority would consider repeating their final year of training. Efforts to counterbalance this lack of clinical experience with virtual or simulation instruction are needed.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Estudiantes de Medicina , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , México/epidemiología , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Facultades de Medicina
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 27, 2022 Jan 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35012526

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Over 41 million people in the United States speak Spanish as their primary language, of which 16 million have limited English proficiency (LEP). It is well-established that language barriers contribute to health disparities and that the use of ad-hoc interpretation by untrained family members results in substandard care. We developed a novel interpreter training program for medical students to serve as in-person interpreters at a charitable, resident continuity clinic so as to overcome the language barrier in the delivery of healthcare to LEP patients. METHODS: The Medical Student Interpreter Training Program (MSITP) consists of three steps. First, fluent Spanish-speaking students shadowed a licensed interpreter. Second, students took a standardized phone exam to demonstrate language proficiency. Finally, students completed a three-hour training on the methodology and ethics of interpreting conducted by the Department of Interpreter Services. RESULTS: Pre- and post-tests were administered to assess students' familiarity with the Interpreter Code of Ethics and interpreter skills. Familiarity with the Interpreter Code of Ethics increased significantly with all students reporting feeling comfortable (47%) or very comfortable (53%) after training. The pre- and post-tests included free response questions, which were administered to assess competence in the methodology and ethics of interpreting. The cohort's aggregate score increased by 35% after the training (Wilcoxon signed rank z-score = 2.53; p = .01). CONCLUSIONS: Implementing the MSITP resulted in an increased number of trained, Spanish-speaking interpreters available to provide their services to LEP patients at an affiliated charitable clinic and throughout the university hospital. Unlike other program models which are time and resource-intensive, this program is replicable and easily managed by volunteers. The MSITP is an effective model for training students as medical interpreters to ensure the delivery of quality healthcare for LEP patients.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes de Medicina , Barreras de Comunicación , Curriculum , Humanos , Relaciones Médico-Paciente , Traducción , Estados Unidos , Voluntarios
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 26, 2022 Jan 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35012540

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Near-peer tutoring appears to be an efficient approach for teaching clinical skills. However, the clinical experience gained in the form of student medical internships may offset any interest in such tutoring programme. We then investigated the long-term benefits of this programme. METHODS: This study was conducted in a medical school that experimented in near-peer tutoring for semiology intended for undergraduate medical students. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations and a written semiology test were used to assess students' clinical skills immediately on its conclusion and repeated one and 2 years after the tutoring was completed. RESULTS: 116 students were evaluated initially (80 tutored and 36 untutored), 38 at 1 year (16 tutored and 22 untutored), 42 at 2 years (21 tutored and 21 untutored). In the global score for Objective Structured Clinical Examinations: at 1 year, the tutored group scored 14.0 ± 1.05 and the untutored group scored 11.3 ± 2.3 (p < 0.001), at 2 years, the tutored group scored 15.1 ± 1.5 and the untutored group scored 12.4 ± 2.2 (p < 0.001). We found a similar but smaller difference for the written semiology test. The difference for Objective Structured Clinical Examinations between tutored and untutored students vanished over time for cross-cutting skills. CONCLUSIONS: Near-peer tutoring in semiology for undergraduate medical students led to better results that remained with the passing of time. Though internships do allow an improvement in the clinical skills of untutored students, they did not reach the level of tutored students.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Grupo Paritario , Facultades de Medicina , Enseñanza
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 25, 2022 Jan 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35012542

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND INFORMATION: As part of an elective course, the Interdisciplinary Centre for Palliative Medicine at Duesseldorf University Hospital offers medical students the opportunity to personally meet and talk to a seriously ill patient on one or more occasions. The future physicians are provided with an opportunity to broaden their professional competence, i.e. their knowledge and skills in patient-centred communication at the end of life, and enhance their personal competence, for example in how to professionally handle their own emotions. A topical e-learning module helps the students to prepare for the meetings, and writing a reflection paper forms the basis for the concluding reflection seminar. OBJECTIVES: The study's objective is a global and outcome-based evaluation of the elective blended-learning course that provides real-world patient interaction. The outcome-based evaluation or outcome assessment aims to objectively evaluate changes identified in knowledge, skills and attitude among the participants of the elective-course. Furthermore, the evaluation aims to answer the question of whether changes especially in attitude (social skills and self-competence) should be expected after the students have met with severely ill or dying patients. METHOD: On two questionnaires specifically developed for this survey the students were able to provide a global rating of the elective course and describe their learning gains in palliative care. The students' learning gains were measured by means of 14 items reflecting the specific educational objectives of the offered elective course. Using the German school grading system as a rating scale, the students assessed their learning progress by retrospectively evaluating their skills before and after completion of the elective course (Comparative Self-Assessment, CSA). RESULTS: In the time from April 2018 till March 2020, 62 students participated in the evaluation. Overall, learning progress among students could be observed across all areas of competence, and in 50% of all retrospective self-assessment items the learning gains were ≥ 50%. The highest learning gain (63.6%) was observed in the students' ability to meet a severely ill patient without fear. The lowest learning gain was observed when students had to confront and accept their own mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The offered elective course supports students in achieving social and self-competence development goals. According to the obtained results, contact with real-world patients helps mould the students' attitude.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Competencia Clínica , Comunicación , Curriculum , Humanos , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud , Estudios Retrospectivos
15.
BMC Res Notes ; 15(1): 11, 2022 Jan 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35012651

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: While the development of communication competencies in medical schools plays a pivotal role in the curriculum, studies show that students' communication skills and patient-centred attitudes may vary based on gender and ethnicity. The goal of this study was to investigate the socio-demographic factors that influence medical students' communication abilities and, more specifically, to what extent their attitude toward communication skills learning and patient orientation associate with communication abilities. Our population included medical students admitted in 2017. Used tools included a communication score, the patient-provider orientation and communication skills attitudes scales. RESULTS: Three hundred and sixty-five students participated in the study (56.4% female, 85.2% German native speakers, mean age 24.2 ± 3.5 years). Female and German native speaking students had a better communication skills OSCE performance, were more patient-oriented and had more positive attitudes toward communication skills learning than male and non-native speaking students. There was a significant association between gender, native tongue, attitudes towards communication skills learning and communication skills OSCE performance. In conclusion, to support medical students to improve their communication proficiency and attitudes towards the importance of clear communication and patient-oriented care, medical educators should consider teaching and assessment strategies that address socio-cultural aspects of communication.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Adulto , Actitud , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Competencia Clínica , Comunicación , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
16.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 31, 2022 Jan 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35016664

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: A new generation of medical students, Generation Z (Gen Z), is becoming the predominant population in medical schools and will join the workforce in a few years' time. Medicine has undergone serious changes in high-income countries recently. Therefore, it is unclear how attractive the medical profession still is for high school students of Gen Z. The aim of this study was to investigate what motivation leads Gen Z students in their choice to study human medicine, and how they see their professional future. Our study was guided by motivation theory and the influence of personality traits and other personal factors on students' choice of university major. METHODS: In a cross-sectional online survey, we included third- and fourth-year high school students in Northern Switzerland. We examined the importance of criteria when choosing a university major: personality traits, career motivation, life goals, and other considerations influencing the choice of human medicine versus other fields of study. Results Of 1790 high school students, 456 (25.5%) participated in the survey (72.6% women, mean age 18.4 years); 32.7% of the respondents aspired to major in medicine at university. For all respondents, the foremost criterion for selecting a field of study was 'interest in the field,' followed by 'income' and 'job security.' High school students aiming to study human medicine attached high importance to 'meaningful work' as a criterion; supported by 36.2% of those students answering that helping and healing people was a core motivation to them. They also scored high on altruism (p < 0.001 against all groups compared) and intrinsic motivation (p < 0.001) and were highly performance- (p < 0.001) and career-minded (p < 0.001). In contrast, all the other groups except the law/economics group had higher scores on extraprofessional concerns. CONCLUSIONS: Swiss Gen Z students aspiring to study human medicine show high intrinsic motivation, altruism, and willingness to perform, sharing many values with previous generations. Adequate work-life balance and job security are important issues for Gen Z. Regarding the current working conditions, the ongoing shortage of physicians, and recent findings on physicians' well-being, the potential for improvement and optimization is high.


Asunto(s)
Motivación , Estudiantes de Medicina , Adolescente , Selección de Profesión , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Facultades de Medicina , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
17.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2011605, 2022 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34978277

RESUMEN

Of Being a First Generation (First Gen) college graduate is an important intersectionality which impacts the lens through which First Gen students learn to become physicians. In this Perspective, we define the First Gen identity and review some of the salient First Gen literature as it applies to the medical school experience. We discuss the conception, design and execution of First Gen initiatives and program development at our medical school as a call to action and model for other institutions to create communities for their First Gen populations, focusing on inclusion and tailored support. We describe the framework through which we envisioned our programming for First Gen medical students, trainees, staff, and faculty at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Grupos Minoritarios , Facultades de Medicina , Universidades
18.
BMC Neurol ; 22(1): 4, 2022 Jan 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34979985

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Headache is one of the most disturbing complaints worldwide, negatively impacting social and regular life activities. In the background of stressful life in medical schools, adding to the stressful situation in Palestine, a developing country under occupation, this study investigated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of migraines and tension- type headaches among medical students from the Palestinian Universities in West Bank and Gaza. METHODS: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted on all Palestinian Medical Students. Students were diagnosed based on ICHD-3 criteria. Demographic characteristics were compared by gender for each type of headache. Frequency, percentage, and mean ± SD. Pearson's chi-squared test, independent t-test, and one-way ANOVA were used where needed. P-value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The study included 806 medical students; 476 (59.0%) of them were female. TTH and migraine's prevalence was 59.8 and 22%, respectively, with a higher prevalence among basic year students. The female to male ratio was 1:0.6 for both types of headaches. Sleep deprivation, physical activities, and altered sleep patterns were reported as the top triggering factors. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate that the prevalence of both subtypes' primary headache is high among Palestinian medical students, with a higher prevalence among basic year students. The study also showed that these findings are higher than other studies among medical students in other countries.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes de Medicina , Cefalea de Tipo Tensional , Árabes , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Cefalea/epidemiología , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalencia , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
19.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 9, 2022 Jan 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980072

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Chinese government has worked out the "Rural Oriented Medical Students Training Project" to address physician maldistribution, which attempted to train physicians for rural areas. The present study attempted to evaluate the job satisfaction of the graduates of this project in Jiangsu Province, China. METHODS: Online questionnaires were sent to the graduates of the "Rural Oriented Medical Students Training Project" (group A) and their colleagues, who were rural physicians recruited from different sources (group B). The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Xuzhou Medical University, and the approval number was 2,018,057. Information on demographic characteristics, work conditions, and self-reported satisfaction was collected to compare the satisfaction differences between the two recruited rural physicians using the Chi-square test and Mann-Whitney U test. Additionally, factors correlated to the satisfaction of group A were assessed using multivariate linear regression. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 23.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Group A exhibited moderate satisfaction (2.81 ± 0.687). The satisfaction score from the highest to the lowest was for occupational ecology, life satisfaction, stress, competency, and internal environment. Positive factors related to the satisfaction of group A were area, monthly income, working hours per week, professional title, and post. CONCLUSION: The satisfaction of the graduates of the "Rural Oriented Medical Students Training Project" was moderate. Factors related to satisfaction included economic incentives, workload, and professional confidence. Possible solutions for increasing satisfaction should consist of economic support and possible ways to improve the professional identification of these graduates.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Rural , Estudiantes de Medicina , China , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Satisfacción en el Trabajo , Población Rural , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 4, 2022 Jan 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980084

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: A blended learning environment is multifaceted and widely used in medical education. However, there is no validated instrument for exploring students' learning in a blended learning environment in medical programs. This study aimed to develop and validate an instrument for exploring how medical students learn in an undergraduate medical program that employs a blended learning approach. METHOD: Using Artino's seven step approach, we developed a questionnaire to investigate how medical students learn in a blended learning environment. For pilot testing, 120 students completed this 19-item questionnaire. These 19-items were evaluated for construct and convergent validity across an expert medical education panel. Further item testing was analysed with principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation for item reduction and factor estimation. Hence, validity was thoroughly addressed to ensure the questionnaire was representative of the key focus questions. Cronbach's Alpha was used for item reliability testing, and Spearman's Rho was used for the correlation between the questionnaire items and the extensively used MSLQ. Hence, validity and reliability were systematically addressed. RESULTS: Exploratory Factor analysis identified four factors F1 and F3: Resources: Accessibility & Guidance (14-items), F2: Learning behaviours: Social and Contextual (5-items), and F4: Motivational factors: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation (4-items). Internal consistency and reliability tests were satisfactory (Cronbach's Alpha ranged from 0.764 to 0.770). CONCLUSIONS: The resulting Blended Learning Questionnaire (BLQ) was determined to be a reliable instrument to explore undergraduate medical students' learning in a blended learning environment.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Psicometría , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
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