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1.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 109(1): 107-111, 2021 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33424471

RESUMEN

Background: The Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library serves a community of over 22,000 individuals primarily from the Yale Schools of Medicine, Public Health, and Nursing and the Yale New Haven Hospital. Though they are geographically close to one another, reaching these disparate populations can be a challenge. Having a clear and thorough communication plan has proved invaluable in transcending communication chasms, especially in recent times of crisis. Case Presentation: This article describes the Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library's methods for communicating and promoting its remote resources and services in response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It details our communication strategies and messages leading up to, and after, the Yale campus was closed and specifies how we pivoted from reaching users inside the library to reaching our audiences remotely. Conclusions: Our communication plan has provided the foundation for all of our messaging, be it print or digital media. In recent moments of crisis, it has been especially helpful for planning and executing large scale messaging. Similarly, knowing whom to contact around our organization to promote our message in different and broader ways has been extremely beneficial.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Redes de Comunicación de Computadores/organización & administración , Internet , Bibliotecas Médicas/organización & administración , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Connecticut , Femenino , Humanos , Bibliotecólogos/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios de Casos Organizacionales , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
2.
Acad Med ; 96(1): 50-55, 2021 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32910007

RESUMEN

The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has led to dramatic changes in the 2020 residency application cycle, including halting away rotations and delaying the application timeline. These stressors are laid on top of a resident selection process already under duress with exploding application and interview numbers-the latter likely to be exacerbated with the widespread shift to virtual interviewing. Leveraging their trainee perspective, the authors propose enforcing a cap on the number of interviews that applicants may attend through a novel interview ticket system (ITS). Specialties electing to participate in the ITS would select an evidence-based, specialty-specific interview cap. Applicants would then receive unique electronic tickets-equal in number to the cap-that would be given to participating programs at the time of an interview, when the tickets would be marked as used. The system would be self-enforcing and would ensure each interview represents genuine interest between applicant and program, while potentially increasing the number of interviews-and thus match rate-for less competitive applicants. Limitations of the ITS and alternative approaches for interview capping, including an honor code system, are also discussed. Finally, in the context of capped interview numbers, the authors emphasize the need for transparent preinterview data from programs to inform applicants and their advisors on which interviews to attend, learning from prior experiences and studies on virtual interviewing, adherence to best practices for interviewing, and careful consideration of how virtual interviews may shift inequities in the resident selection process.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Internado y Residencia/organización & administración , Pandemias , Selección de Personal , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos
3.
J Surg Res ; 257: 449-454, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32892144

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The interest of medical students and surgery residents in global surgery continues to grow. Few studies have examined how the presence of global surgery opportunities influences an applicant's decision to choose a surgical training program. We designed a survey to examine the interest in global surgery among general surgery residency applicants and the influence of a global surgery rotation on a general surgery residency applicant's rank list. METHODS: In March 2019, an online 20-question qualitative survey was administered to all general surgery applicants to a single academic institution. Results were stratified into two applicant groups; applicants from domestic or international medical schools. The survey was designed to capture demographic information, previous global rotations or experiences, future interest in global surgery opportunities, and the importance of global surgery in choosing a residency program. RESULT: s: A total of 179 (21% response rate) applicants completed the entire survey. Of the respondents 81% were interested in a global surgery rotation during residency, 56% considered a global surgery opportunity as moderately to extremely important to their residency rankings, 71% said they would rank a residency higher if it had a funded global surgery program compared to one without funding and 58% of the surveyed applicants were interested in incorporating global surgery into their future career. CONCLUSIONS: Global surgery opportunities are important to some general surgery residency applicants. A majority of applicants believe a funded global surgery would positively influence their rank list. As residency programs train residents for their future careers greater consideration needs to be given to developing global surgery opportunities.


Asunto(s)
Selección de Profesión , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Cirugía General , Salud Global , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
4.
J Surg Res ; 257: 246-251, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32862052

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Training diverse house staff, including those who are underrepresented in medicine, is vital to provide high-quality patient care for the communities that we serve. In 2018, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education announced new common program requirements for systematic efforts to recruit and retain a diverse workforce. However, questions remain about how to implement such efforts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) data from eight residency programs spanning two recruitment cycles (2017-2018, 2018-2019) was reviewed. The number of candidates at each stage in the process (applicant, invited to interview, interviewed, and matched) was examined by self-identified race or ethnicity. These data were presented to residency program directors at our Graduate Medical Education committee meeting before the next recruitment cycle. Data were analyzed following the 2019-20 residency match. Odds ratios and Pearson's chi-squared test were used to assess statistical significance. RESULTS: A total of 10,445 and 10,982 medical students applied to our 8 core residency programs in 2017 and 2018, respectively. Medical students who applied and self-identified as Asian, Black or African American, and Hispanic or Latino or Spanish origin had lower odds of being invited to interview than those who self-identified as White. After data presentation, the odds of inviting Black or African American applicants to interview increased significantly. The odds of attending an interview once invited were the same across groups. CONCLUSIONS: Sharing ERAS data patterns with residency program directors was associated with a significant year over year change in interviewee diversity. Structured analysis of institutional ERAS data can provide insight into the resident selection process and may be a useful tool to improve house staff diversity.


Asunto(s)
Diversidad Cultural , Fuerza Laboral en Salud/organización & administración , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Grupos Minoritarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Selección de Personal/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Afroamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Americanos Asiáticos/estadística & datos numéricos , Grupo de Ascendencia Continental Europea/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios de Factibilidad , Fuerza Laboral en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Hispanoamericanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/organización & administración , Solicitud de Empleo , Selección de Personal/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos
5.
Ann Surg ; 273(1): 109-111, 2021 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941286

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed unique challenges for evaluating general surgery residency applicants to MATCH 2021. In the absence of away rotations, programs are likely to afford greater importance to objective data to stratify the applicant pool and medical students are likely to experience difficulty in thoroughly assessing each program. Virtual rotations, meet-and-greet events conducted before the application submission deadline, personality testing before extending interviews, standardized letters of recommendation, and skills testing can serve as valuable adjuncts for determining the best applicant-program fit. Finally, an interview limit which sets the bar for the maximum number of accepted interviews per applicant per specialty can offer a level playing field in the absence of time and cost limitations associated with travel.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/normas , Cirugía General/educación , Guías como Asunto , Internado y Residencia/normas , Pandemias , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
7.
Front Public Health ; 8: 589437, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33313040

RESUMEN

To effectively control the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) outbreak in later stages in Vietnam requires addressing the existing gaps in the national health emergency framework, consolidate, and inform its structure, we conducted this study to evaluate the importance and collaborative mechanism between health and community service workers with intersectional organizations at grassroots levels in Vietnam. A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted from 12/2019 to 02/2020 on 581 participants (37 health workers, 473 medical students, and 71 community service workers). The snowball sampling technique was used to recruit participants. We used exploratory factor analysis to test the construct validity of the questionnaire measuring the perceived efficiency of involving community service workers in health care-related activities and Tobit models to examine its associated factors. The results showed the importance of local organizations in epidemic preparedness and response at grassroots levels, with scores ranging from 6.4 to 7.1, in which the Vietnam Youth Federation played the most important role (mean = 7.1, SD = 2.2). Of note, community service workers were viewed as performing well in health communication and education at agencies, schools, and other localities. Medical students perceived higher efficiency of involving community service workers in health care-related activities at grassroots levels as compared to health workers. We encourage the government to promote intersectoral collaboration in epidemic preparedness and response, giving attention to scale up throughout training as well as interdistrict and interprovincial governance mechanisms.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Defensa Civil , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Personal de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Colaboración Intersectorial , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , /transmisión , Estudios Transversales , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Vietnam/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
9.
MedEdPORTAL ; 16: 11031, 2020 11 24.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33274292

RESUMEN

Introduction: The emergence of COVID-19 highlighted the critical importance of appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE) for the safety of patients and health care personnel. However, previously published survey data indicated that formal instruction on the correct utilization of PPE is uncommon in medical school curricula, and there is no published guidance about optimal instruction methods. The infectious disease (ID) simulation lab at Oregon Health & Science University filled this need. Methods: Second- through fourth-year medical students participated in the infection intersession, a 2-week didactic session that students were required to enroll in once during their clinical rotations. As part of the course, students completed the ID simulation lab, during which they were presented with common ID syndromes (suspected tuberculosis, C. difficile colitis, and neutropenic fever) and asked to select the proper PPE prior to interacting with standardized patients. ID physicians acted as the patients and then conducted feedback sessions, which focused on PPE choice, donning and doffing techniques, and ID diagnosis and management principles. Results: More than 500 medical students participated between 2016 and 2020, demonstrating the feasibility of the experience. The average exam scores were above 80%, and the average student evaluation score of the session was 8.9 out of 10, demonstrating acceptability. Discussion: The ID simulation lab allowed students to reinforce didactic teaching about PPE, dispel common misconceptions, and receive real-time feedback from ID clinicians. Availability of the lab and facilitators were limiting factors. Future work will focus on better understanding the efficacy of the sessions.


Asunto(s)
Control de Infecciones/métodos , Exposición Profesional/prevención & control , Simulación de Paciente , Equipo de Protección Personal/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , /prevención & control , Humanos
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 396, 2020 Oct 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33129295

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic prompted the pediatric department at King Abdulaziz University to continue students' educational activities by offering courses online that utilized web video conferencing (WVC). Given the uncertainties of WVC educational quality and the challenge of shifting to an online environment, this study aimed to evaluate student satisfaction with the teaching quality of case-based discussion (CBD) sessions conducted through WVC. METHODS: One hundred sixty-two undergraduate medical students in pediatrics completed the reduced Students' Evaluation of Educational Quality (SEEQ) survey with a five-point Likert scale over 5 weeks. The WVC CBD sessions were facilitated by 50 faculty members. RESULTS: 82% of respondents were highly satisfied with the WVC CBD session's teaching quality. The majority agreed that the sessions were intellectually challenging, that the instructors were dynamic, and encouraged students to participate. No statistically significant correlation was found between student satisfaction and technical issues (r = 0.037, p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: WVC teaching had an overall positive outcome on student satisfaction, and teaching quality relied on teaching, cognitive, and social presence rather than technology. However, technology remains an important platform that supports teachers' educational activities. Thus, implementing a blended pediatric course to augment future course delivery is optimal.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Comunicación por Videocoferencia/organización & administración , Betacoronavirus , Humanos , Pandemias , Satisfacción Personal , Arabia Saudita , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
11.
Croat Med J ; 61(5): 391-400, 2020 Oct 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33150757

RESUMEN

AIM: To determine the level of professional commitment of medical students by developing and applying a new scale. METHODS: The study enrolled 999 students of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, School of Medicine. Factor analysis, reliability analysis, and item analysis were performed based on the classical test theory and item response theory. The data obtained through scale application were analyzed using factorial ANOVA. RESULTS: The Commitment to Profession of Medicine Scale was identified as a unidimensional scale consisting of nine items. The scale in its present form explained 51% of the variance in commitment t.o profession of medicine. The reliability was 0.88. The scale application revealed that female students had higher commitment than male students. The highest level of commitment was observed in third- and first-year students, students with the lowest level of family income, and students whose ideal profession was medicine. CONCLUSION: There are many factors affecting professional commitment levels of university students. Therefore, it is of great importance to examine students' commitment at an early stage. In addition, the experiences of students during university years are important since they directly affect the commitment level. Considering these factors, teachers should support their students and strive to increase their commitment levels.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Competencia Profesional/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Psicometría , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Turquia
12.
Croat Med J ; 61(5): 457-464, 2020 Oct 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33150764

RESUMEN

AIM: To assess the attitude about the importance of introducing education on artificial intelligence (AI) in medical schools' curricula among physicians whose everyday job is significantly impacted by AI. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was distributed at the national level in Croatia among radiologists and radiology residents practicing in primary, secondary, and tertiary health care institutions, both in the private and the public sectors. The overall response rate was 45% (144 of 321). RESULTS: A large majority of participants - 89.6% (95% Agresti-Coull confidence interval 0.83-0.94) agreed on the need for education on AI to be included in medical curricula. Answers revealed a very high support across age groups and regardless of subspecialty area. A slightly higher support was present among physicians working in university hospitals compared with those in primary care centers, and among radiology residents compared with radiologists - but these estimated differences are uncertain, and the support levels were clearly high across the considered variables. CONCLUSION: Since medical students have previously been shown to support introducing education on AI, a growing literature argues the same for reasons here reviewed, and physicians practicing a highly relevant area (radiology) overwhelmingly agree, we conclude that medical schools should indeed take steps to keep pace with technological progress in medicine by including education on AI in their curricula, be it as part of existing or new courses.


Asunto(s)
Inteligencia Artificial , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Curriculum , Radiología/educación , Selección de Profesión , Croacia , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Atención Primaria de Salud , Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
13.
Acad Med ; 95(12S Addressing Harmful Bias and Eliminating Discrimination in Health Professions Learning Environments): S121-S130, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33229956

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Efforts to address inequities in medical education are centered on a dialogue of deficits that highlight negative underrepresented in medicine (UIM) learner experiences and lower performance outcomes. An alternative narrative explores perspectives on achievement and equity in assessment. This study sought to understand UIM learner perceptions of successes and equitable assessment practices. METHOD: Using narrative research, investigators selected a purposeful sample of self-identified UIM fourth-year medical students and senior-level residents and conducted semistructured interviews. Questions elicited personal stories of achievement during clinical training, clinical assessment practices that captured achievement, and equity in clinical assessment. Using re-storying and thematic analysis, investigators coded transcripts and synthesized data into themes and representative stories. RESULTS: Twenty UIM learners (6 medical students and 14 residents) were interviewed. Learners often thought about equity during clinical training and provided personal definitions of equity in assessment. Learners shared stories that reflected their achievements in patient care, favorable assessment outcomes, and growth throughout clinical training. Sound assessments that captured achievements included frequent observations with real-time feedback on predefined expectations by supportive, longitudinal clinical supervisors. Finally, equitable assessment systems were characterized as sound assessment systems that also avoided comparison to peers, used narrative assessment, assessed patient care and growth, trained supervisors to avoid bias, and acknowledged learner identity. CONCLUSIONS: UIM learners characterized equitable and sound assessment systems that captured achievements during clinical training. These findings guide future efforts to create an inclusive, fair, and equitable clinical assessment experience.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/normas , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto/métodos , Narración , Investigación Cualitativa , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos
14.
Acad Med ; 95(12S Addressing Harmful Bias and Eliminating Discrimination in Health Professions Learning Environments): S136-S138, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33229957

RESUMEN

Recent data suggest that students from population groups that have been underrepresented in medicine are disproportionately excluded from admission into the national medical honor society, Alpha Omega Alpha (AΩA). This finding, in combination with increasing concerns about bias in medical student assessment, has led some medical schools to reexamine their AΩA selection process and/or their relationship with the organization. The Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago formed a task force to study the schools process of choosing students for recognition and to make recommendations regarding this issue.


Asunto(s)
Criterios de Admisión Escolar/estadística & datos numéricos , Sesgo de Selección , Sociedades Médicas/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Illinois , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Facultades de Medicina/normas , Facultades de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Sociedades Médicas/organización & administración , Sociedades Médicas/estadística & datos numéricos
15.
Acad Med ; 95(12S Addressing Harmful Bias and Eliminating Discrimination in Health Professions Learning Environments): S163-S168, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33229958

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Faculty from different racial and ethnic backgrounds developed and piloted an antiracism curriculum initially designed to help medical students work more effectively with patients of color. Learning objectives included developing stronger therapeutic relationships, addressing the effects of structural racism in the lives of patients, and mitigating racism in the medical encounter. METHOD: The antiracism curriculum was delivered and evaluated in 2019 through focus groups and written input before and after each module. The process and outcome evaluation used a grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Three emergent themes reflect how medical students experienced the antiracism curriculum and inform recommendations for integrating an antiracism curriculum into future medical education. The themes are: 1) the differential needs and experiences of persons of color and Whites, 2) the need to address issues of racism within medical education as well as in medical care, and 3) the need for structures of accountability in medical education. CONCLUSIONS: Medical educators must address racism in medical education before seeking to direct students to address it in medical practice.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Cultural/educación , Racismo/prevención & control , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Curriculum/normas , Curriculum/tendencias , Humanos , Racismo/psicología , Racismo/estadística & datos numéricos , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Facultades de Medicina/normas , Facultades de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud/etnología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos
16.
Afr Health Sci ; 20(2): 960-965, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33163065

RESUMEN

Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess our use of OSCE from the perception of final year medical students. Materials and methods: This is a cross sectional survey of final year medical students undergoing the final examination in Surgery. All 102 medical students in the class were given the self-administered questionnaire to fill. The data were collated into excel spreadsheets and analysed using the SPSS version 21. Results: A total of 79 completed questionnaires were retrieved (return rate of 78%).All the students knew about and had participated previously in OSCE, 94.9% accorded the OSCE fair. 76(93.2%) wanted the examination as the main method of clinical assessment, 38(46.6%) had adequate preparation.In terms of the OSCE stations not mirroring real clinical scenarios, 38(48.1%) disagreed, and 26(20.5%) strongly disagreed. 34(43%) disagreeing that the logistics was poor. The students rating of the OSCE, on a scale of 1 - 10, gave a mean score of >8 for spread of the OSCE stations, detail of the questions and objectivity of the examination. The nearness to clinical reality was rated as 7.52 with artificiality of the stations rated as 4.12. Conclusion: The OSCE has gained acceptance amongst final year medical students.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
17.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 51(4): 610-616, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33077414

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Online open book assessment has been a common alternative to a traditional invigilated test or examination during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, its unsupervised nature increases ease of cheating, which is an academic integrity concern. This study's purpose was to evaluate the integrity of two online open book assessments with different formats (1. Tightly time restricted - 50 min for mid-semester and 2. Take home - any 4 h within a 24-h window for end of semester) implemented in a radiologic pathology unit of a Bachelor of Science (Medical Radiation Science) course during the pandemic. METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving a review and analysis of existing information related to the integrity of the two radiologic pathology assessments. Three integrity evaluation approaches were employed. The first approach was to review all the Turnitin plagiarism detection software reports with use of 'seven-words-in-a-row' criterion to identify any potential collusion. The second approach was to search for highly irrelevant assessment answers during marking for detection of other cheating types. Examples of highly irrelevant answers included those not addressing question requirements and stating patients' clinical information not from given patient histories. The third approach was an assessment score statistical analysis through descriptive and inferential statistics to identify any abnormal patterns that might suggest cheating occurred. An abnormal pattern example was high assessment scores. The descriptive statistics used were minimum, maximum, range, first quartile, median, third quartile, interquartile range, mean, standard deviation, fail and full mark rates. T-test was employed to compare mean scores between the two assessments in this year (2020), between the two assessments in the last year (2019), between the two mid-semester assessments in 2019 and 2020, and between this and last years' end of semester assessments. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: No cheating evidence was found in all Turnitin reports and assessment answers. The mean scores of the end of semester assessments in 2019 (88.2%) and 2020 (90.9%) were similar (p = 0.098). However, the mean score of the online open book mid-semester assessment in 2020 (62.8%) was statistically significantly lower than that of the traditional invigilated mid-semester assessment in 2019 (71.8%) with p < 0.0001. CONCLUSION: This study shows the use of the online open book assessments with tight time restrictions and the take home formats in the radiologic pathology unit did not have any academic integrity issues. Apparently, the strict assessment time limit played an important role in maintaining their integrity.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Educación a Distancia/normas , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Plagio , Radiología/educación , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Australia , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Oncología Médica/educación , Pandemias , Estudios Retrospectivos , Programas Informáticos , Factores de Tiempo , Adulto Joven
19.
Urology ; 146: 36-42, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33007312

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To capture the perspective of prospective urology applicants experiencing unique challenges in the context of COVID-19. METHODS: A voluntary, anonymous survey was distributed online, assessing the impact of COVID-19 on a large sample of US medical students planning to apply to urology residencies. Themes of (1) specialty discernment, (2) alterations to medical education, and (3) the residency application process were explored. RESULTS: A total of 238 medical students, 87% third and fourth years, responded to the survey. While 85% indicated that the pandemic had not deterred their specialty choice, they noted substantial impacts on education, including 82% reporting decreased exposure to urology. Nearly half of students reported changes to required rotations and 35% reported changes to urology-specific rotations at their home institutions. Students shared concerns about suspending in-person experiences, including the impact on letters of recommendation (68% "very concerned) and program choice (73% "very concerned"). Looking to the possibility of virtual interactions, students identified the importance of small group and one-on-one communication with residents (83% "very important") and opportunities to learn about hospital facilities (72% "very important"). CONCLUSION: Despite the impacts of COVID-19 on medical education, prospective urology applicants appear to remain confident in their specialty choice. Students' biggest concerns involve disruption of away rotations, including impacts on obtaining letters of recommendation and choosing a residency program.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Urología/educación , Selección de Profesión , Humanos , Internet , Internado y Residencia/organización & administración , Solicitud de Empleo , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos , Urología/normas , Urología/estadística & datos numéricos
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