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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 416, 2020 Nov 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33167960

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Croatia has closed all educational institutions after 32 cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection were confirmed and switched to exclusive e-learning. Health sciences university students may have been particularly affected with this change due to a lack of practical education. It is not known how health sciences students and schools have adjusted to exclusive e-learning. This study aimed to explore attitudes and concerns of health sciences students in Croatia regarding the complete switch to e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Eligible participants were students from 9 institutions offering university-level health sciences education in Croatia enrolled in the academic year 2019/2010, and participating in e-learning. Data were collected with a questionnaire distributed via email during April/May 2020. RESULTS: A total of 2520 students (aged 25.7 ± 7.7 years) responded to the questionnaire (70.3% response rate). General satisfaction with exclusive e-learning was rated with average grade of 3.7 out of 5. Compared with previous education, exclusive e-learning was rated with average grade of 3.2 out of 5. Compared to classroom learning, equal or higher motivation to attend exclusive e-learning was reported by 64.4% of participants. With a longer duration of exclusive e-learning, equal or higher motivation was reported by 65.5% of participants. Less than half of the students indicated they felt deprived or concerned due to the lack of practical lessons. Most participants indicated that in the future, they would prefer to combine classic classroom and e-learning (N = 1403; 55.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Most health sciences students were satisfied with the exclusive e-learning, as well as their personal and institutional adjustment to it. Students' feedback can help institutions to improve the exclusive e-learning experience for students in the time of the pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Instrucción por Computador , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Actitud , Croacia , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 396, 2020 Oct 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33129295

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic prompted the pediatric department at King Abdulaziz University to continue students' educational activities by offering courses online that utilized web video conferencing (WVC). Given the uncertainties of WVC educational quality and the challenge of shifting to an online environment, this study aimed to evaluate student satisfaction with the teaching quality of case-based discussion (CBD) sessions conducted through WVC. METHODS: One hundred sixty-two undergraduate medical students in pediatrics completed the reduced Students' Evaluation of Educational Quality (SEEQ) survey with a five-point Likert scale over 5 weeks. The WVC CBD sessions were facilitated by 50 faculty members. RESULTS: 82% of respondents were highly satisfied with the WVC CBD session's teaching quality. The majority agreed that the sessions were intellectually challenging, that the instructors were dynamic, and encouraged students to participate. No statistically significant correlation was found between student satisfaction and technical issues (r = 0.037, p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: WVC teaching had an overall positive outcome on student satisfaction, and teaching quality relied on teaching, cognitive, and social presence rather than technology. However, technology remains an important platform that supports teachers' educational activities. Thus, implementing a blended pediatric course to augment future course delivery is optimal.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Comunicación por Videocoferencia/organización & administración , Betacoronavirus , Humanos , Pandemias , Satisfacción Personal , Arabia Saudita , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 400, 2020 Nov 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33138818

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: COVID - 19 pandemic pressured medical schools globally to shift to Distance learning (DL) as an alternative way to ensure that the content delivered is satisfactory for student progression. AIM OF THE WORK: This work aims at mapping priorities for post-COVID planning for better balance between distance learning and face to face learning. METHODS: This qualitative study aimed to develop a model for utilizing DL using The Polarity Approach for Continuity and Transformation (PACT)™. A virtual mapping session was held with 79 faculty from 19 countries. They worked in small groups to determine upsides and downsides of face-to-face and DL subsequently. An initial polarity map was generated identifying five tension areas; Faculty, Students, Curriculum, Social aspects and Logistics. A 63-item assessment tool was generated based on this map, piloted and then distributed as a self-administered assessment. The outcomes of this assessment were utilized for another mapping session to discuss warning signs and action steps to maintain upsides and avoid downsides of each pole. RESULTS: Participants agreed that face-to-face teaching allows them to inspire students and have meaningful connections with them. They also agreed that DL provides a good environment for most students. However, students with financial challenges and special needs may not have equal opportunities to access technology. As regards social issues, participants agreed that face-to-face learning provides a better chance for professionalism through enhanced team-work. Cognitive, communication and clinical skills are best achieved in face-to-face. Participants agreed that logistics for conducting DL are much more complicated when compared to face-to-face learning. Participants identified around 10 warning signs for each method that need to be continuously monitored in order to minimize the drawbacks of over focusing on one pole at the expense of the other. Action steps were determined to ensure optimized use of in either method. CONCLUSION: In order to plan for the future, we need to understand the dynamics of education within the context of polarities. Educators need to understand that the choice of DL, although was imposed as a no-alternative solution during the COVID era, yet it has always existed as a possible alternative and will continue to exist after this era. The value of polarity mapping and leveraging allows us to maximize the benefit of each method and guide educators' decisions to minimize the downsides for the good of the learning process.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/organización & administración , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Innovación Organizacional , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigación Cualitativa , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 385, 2020 Oct 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33109168

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has been an unprecedented and potentially stressful event that inserted itself into the 2019-2020 Canadian medical curriculum. However, its impact on stress and subsequent professional pathways is not well understood. This study aims to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental well-being, training, and career choices of Canadian medical clerks within the first three months of the pandemic. It also aims to assess their use of university support systems and their appreciation of potential solutions to common academic stressors. METHODS: An electronic survey composed of four sections: demographics, stressors experienced during the pandemic, World Health Organization (WHO) well-being index, and stress management and resources was distributed to Canadian clerks. RESULTS: Clerks from 10 of the 17 Canadian medical faculties participated in this study (n = 627). Forty-five percent of clerks reported higher levels of stress than usual; 22% reconsidered their residency choice; and 19% reconsidered medicine as a career. The factors that were most stressful among clerks were: the means of return to rotations; decreased opportunities to be productive in view of residency match; and taking the national licensing exam after the beginning of residency. The mean WHO well-being index was 14.8/25 ± 4.5, indicating a poor level of well-being among a considerable proportion of students. Clerks who reconsidered their residency choice or medicine as a career had lower mean WHO well-being indices. Most clerks agreed with the following suggested solutions: training sessions on the clinical management of COVID-19 cases; being allowed to submit fewer reference letters when applying to residency; and having protected time to study for their licensing exam during residency. Overall, clerks were less concerned with being infected during their rotations than with the impact of the pandemic on their future career and residency match. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic had a considerable impact on the medical curriculum and well-being of clerks. A number of student-identified solutions were proposed to reduce stress. The implementation of these solutions throughout the Canadian medical training system should be considered.


Asunto(s)
Selección de Profesión , Prácticas Clínicas , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Canadá/epidemiología , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Internado y Residencia , Masculino , Adulto Joven
5.
J Card Surg ; 35(10): 2539-2542, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33043661

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: A major difference exists between the rate of females and males entering cardiac surgery (CSx) residency in Canada. The objective of this study was to investigate the concerns and perceived obstacles of medical students with regards to CSx residency training to identify potential modifiable factors. METHODS: A 15-question web-based survey was designed to compare male to female medical students' perceptions with regards to CSx training. The survey was distributed to all 682 medical students at Western University (London, ON, Canada) enrolled during 2018 to 2019 academic year. A total of 153 students (63 males vs 90 females) completed the survey. RESULTS: More females perceived significant levels of difficulties to getting accepted in CSx residency programs (44/63 [63.8%] males vs 77/90 [85.6%] females, P = .03). As for their perception of the most difficult aspect about a career in CSx, more males expressed significant concerns about finding a job after completing the residency training (16/63 [25.3%] males vs 10/90 [11.0%] females, P = .02). A similar proportion of students expressed a strong interest in applying to a CSx residency (12/63 [19.0%] males vs 15/90 [16.7%] females, P = .83). Of these, more males expressed concerns about maintaining a work-life balance (6/12 [50%] males vs 1/15 [6.67%] female, P = .02), and more females expressed fears of not getting matched to CSx residency (3/12 [25%] males vs 11/15 [73.3%] females, P = .02). CONCLUSION: Despite showing a strong interest in completing a residency in CSx, female medical students perceive a significant fear of not getting matched to the speciality, which limits them from applying.


Asunto(s)
Miedo , Identidad de Género , Internado y Residencia , Solicitud de Empleo , Selección de Personal , Médicos Mujeres/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Cirugía Torácica/educación , Adulto , Canadá , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
6.
BMJ Open ; 10(10): e041886, 2020 10 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33122327

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: (1) Understanding the characteristics of online learning experiences of Chinese undergraduate medical students; (2) Investigating students' perceptions of ongoing online education developed in response to COVID-19 and (3) Exploring how prior online learning experiences are associated with students' perceptions. DESIGN: Students' familiarity with online learning modes and corresponding perceived usefulness (PU) according to their previous experiences were investigated using an online survey. The survey also collected data on students' perceptions through their evaluation of and satisfaction with current online learning. SETTING: In response to the educational challenges created by COVID-19, medical schools in China have adopted formal online courses for students. PARTICIPANTS: The questionnaire was sent to 225 329 students, of whom 52.38% (118 080/225 329) replied, with valid data available for 44.18% (99 559/225 329). METHODS: Pearson correlations and t-tests were used to examine the relationship between familiarity and PU. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression analyses were used to determine the impact of prior learning experiences and its interactions with gender, area, learning phase and academic performance on students' perceptions. RESULTS: Students' PU had a significant positive correlation with their familiarity with online learning modes (p<0.01). Students' evaluation of and satisfaction with their current online education were positively associated with their familiarity (ß=0.46, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.48, p<0.01; OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.14, p<0.01) with and PU (ß=3.11, 95% CI 2.92 to 3.30, p<0.01; OR 2.55, 95% CI 2.37 to 2.75, p<0.01) of online learning. Moreover, the higher the students' learning phases, the lower the associations between PU and students' evaluation of and satisfaction with ongoing online education. CONCLUSIONS: Medical students in China have experiences with various online learning modes. Prior learning experiences are positively associated with students' evaluation of and satisfaction with current online education. Higher learning phases, in which clinical practices are crucial, and high academic performance led to lower evaluation and satisfaction scores.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Modelos Educacionales , Evaluación de Necesidades , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Betacoronavirus , China , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/tendencias , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Organizacionales , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Investigación Cualitativa , Percepción Social , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto Joven
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 342, 2020 Oct 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33008374

RESUMEN

Worldwide it is being discussed whether medical students might be of help during the present COVID-19 epidemic. Although this question is probably a legitimate one, one should however discuss this thoroughly before deciding whether medical students are to be included in this kind of medical care on a larger scale.Various arguments should be weighted, and potential tasks should be chosen carefully. This period could however be also an opportunity for medical students to learn things they would probably never learn about. Nevertheless, medical students have a deficit concerning knowledge about epidemics, and they are also not really well skilled in many hygiene measures. Furthermore, some of the known medical students' behaviour could be a risk factor for further spread of the virus as well. Then, young adults are at risk of getting infected themselves. Last but not least, medical students in general are under a great deal of pressure from their studies which could lead to the development of anxiety and other mental disorders. One could only speculate on the effects of this epidemic on their further mental well-being. Therefore, medical students participating in direct care of patients with COVID-19 should first be trained well, and then properly supervised at all times. Only then it might be a really useful and exceptional experience, for healthcare, medical schools as well as for society.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus/terapia , Educación Médica/organización & administración , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Neumonía Viral/terapia , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Humanos , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología
11.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 23(10): 1462-1469, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33047707

RESUMEN

Background: Educational environment (EE) affects transfer/acquisition of knowledge and skills needed in training medical students. Evaluation of EE by students is paramount to rating the EE of a medical school as well as evaluate effects of interventions. Assessing EE of medical schools is a current global trend. Objectives: : To evaluate EE at the new medical school of the Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University Teaching Hospital Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria; calculate the total and subscale (Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure) DREEM scores and assess differences in these scores amongst the different classes, age groups, and sexes. Methodology: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study using census survey. We administered DREEM questionnaire to 4th, 5th, and 6th year medical students in the 2018/2019 academic session after ethical approval from Health Research and Ethics Committee (HREC). Data entry and analysis done using SPSS. ANOVA was used for association between level of study, age group, and total DREEM/Subscale scores. Test for association between sex and mean subscale/total score was done using independent sample t-test. P value <0.05 was adjudged significant. Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was calculated. Results: Of 206 students, 185 filled in the questionnaire. Total DREEM score was 119.66, Students' perception of teachers 26.74, Students' academic self Perception 21.94, Students' Perception of Learning 30.75, Students' Social Self Perception 15.04, Students' Perception of Atmosphere 25.26. Three items scored above 3 while 11 items scored ≤2. Fourth year students significantly scored higher than others for all subscale and total DREEM score. No significant associations between age or gender and subscale or total DREEM scores. Cronbach's alpha for all scores was 0.91. Conclusions: The EE was not excellent but "more positive than negative." Improvements are necessary in all domains of DREEM to ensure better quality of the educational environment.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Autoimagen , Medio Social , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Nigeria , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Enseñanza , Universidades
12.
Acad Med ; 95(10): 1521-1523, 2020 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33006869

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic is a public health emergency that demands leadership throughout the health care system. Leadership is the ability to guide a team or organization toward a stated goal or objective. In addition to hospital-wide leadership, there is need for leadership at the level of medical teams. Resident leadership is essential to ensure team function and patient care, yet residents are often overlooked as valuable leaders. This Perspective argues that residents can demonstrate leadership during a public health crisis by creating a culture of emotional intelligence in their medical teams. Emotional intelligence has been identified as a critical aspect of leadership and consists of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. In psychiatry, patient interactions depend upon psychiatrists demonstrating a high level of attention to their own thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as well as those of the patient to communicate in a way that demonstrates both understanding and empathy. In this Perspective, a psychiatry resident uses expertise in emotional intelligence to recommend residents (1) be mindful, (2) ask and listen, (3) establish safety, and (4) unite around a common goal. These practical recommendations can be immediately implemented to increase emotional intelligence on medical teams to improve team function and patient care. Emotional intelligence is valuable at all levels of leadership, so hospital leadership and program directors should also heed these suggestions. While these recommendations are not unique to COVID-19, they are of paramount importance during the pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Inteligencia Emocional , Internado y Residencia/organización & administración , Liderazgo , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Betacoronavirus , Humanos , Pandemias
13.
Int J Occup Environ Med ; 11(4): 196-209, 2020 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33098404

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Clinical students are at increased risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens. However, little has been documented about their exposure to blood and body fluids and their knowledge of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) in high-HIV burden settings, such as Nigeria. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and predictors of BBF exposure and knowledge about PEP among medical and allied health students in northern Nigeria. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, 273 clinical students were asked to complete structured questionnaires. The prevalence of BBF exposure was determined. Binary logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors of BBF exposure. RESULTS: The majority of the respondents (98.2%) had heard about PEP; 26.0% (n=71) had adequate knowledge about PEP. 76 (27.8%) of the 273 respondents reported accidental exposure to HIV. 230 (84.2%) respondents had positive attitude toward HIV PEP. Of those who had had accidental exposure to HIV (n=76), only 13% (n=10) received PEP. The level of knowledge about PEP was predicted by previous training (aOR 0.43, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.80 ["no" vs "yes"]), year of training (aOR 4.10, 95% CI 1.60 to 10.47 [6th vs 4th year]), course of study (aOR 4.69, 95% CI 2.06 to 10.68 ["allied health" vs "clinical medicine"]) and religion (aOR 5.39, 95% CI 1.40 to 20.71 ["non-Muslim" vs "Muslim"]). Similarly, accidental exposure was independently predicted by respondents' sex (aOR 2.55, 95% CI1.36 to 4.75 ["female" vs "male"]), age (aOR 2.54, 95% CI 1.06 to 6.15 ["25-29" vs "20-24" years]), ethnicity (aOR 2.15, 95% CI1.10 to 5.14 ["others" vs "Hausa/Fulani"]), course of study (aOR 0.06, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.38 ["allied health" vs "clinical medicine"]), and previous PEP training (aOR 0.39, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.78 ["no" vs "yes"]). CONCLUSION: One in four clinical students reported exposure to BBF. Most students expressed a positive attitude toward PEP, but knowledge and uptake of PEP was sub-optimal. We recommend strengthening training curricula for infection control and prevention and enhancing protocols for timely post-exposure evaluation and follow up for all exposure incidents.


Asunto(s)
Líquidos Corporales/virología , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Exposición Profesional/prevención & control , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Humanos , Masculino , Nigeria , Exposición Profesional/efectos adversos , Profilaxis Posexposición/métodos , Prevalencia , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
14.
Rev Col Bras Cir ; 47: e20202530, 2020 Sep 04.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32901707

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: simulation based teaching is a powerful tool in medical education, allowing hands on practice under a controlled environment and with repeated maneuvers. Central venous access venipuncture is one of the most frequent procedures carried out in the hospital setting, due to its various clinical indications and, when performed with the help of ultrasonography, the risk of adverse events is minimized. Aim: to develop, to describe and to test a porcine model that simulates the central venous access puncture aided by ultrasonography. METHOD: a low cost porcine model was developed to train medical students and residents on central venous access guided by ultrasonography. Both students and medical residents underwent a theoretical training regarding the model, followed by a hands-on training session. Afterwards, the participants assessed the model by answering a questionnaire. RESULTS: there were 51 participants. The average score regarding the similarity between the model and the human anatomy was 9.15. When the characteristics were separately assessed, the mean scores regarding the similarity of the vessels, anatomic disposition and ultrasonographic characteristics as well as the venipuncture were, respectively, 9.27; 9.31; 9.54 and 8.86. CONCLUSION: The model was approved and considered appropriate for the training of central venous venipuncture by all the participants. Furthermore, it is a low cost, simple and reproducible model, that presents high similarity with the human anatomy. Therefore, it may be used as an aid to train people on ultrasonography guided central venous access.


Asunto(s)
Catéteres Venosos Centrales , Educación Médica , Entrenamiento Simulado , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Ultrasonografía Intervencional/métodos , Animales , Humanos , Modelos Animales , Porcinos
15.
Tokai J Exp Clin Med ; 45(3): 117-120, 2020 Sep 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32901898

RESUMEN

Background; Until 2018, the Breast and Endocrine surgery had no student calendar. A questionnaire survey was conducted on how students felt by creating a weekly schedule of individual students from 2019. METHOD: 6th-year elective courses, targeted at students who selected Breast and Endocrine surgery clinical clerkship. The schedule clarifies the contents of the training as follows; outpatient visits, small group study (preparation for graduation and national exams including mammography reading), simulator training, and surgery. The questionnaire adopted an anonymous five-point evaluation method (5; I think very much; 4; Somewhat I think; 3; Normal; 2; Somewhat I don't think; 1; I don't think), and provided a free text box. The following seven questions were asked; A. I was able to send a good training, B. I was useful for studying national and graduation exams, C. Time constraints were appropriate, D. I could fully experience surgery, E. Appropriately experienced outpatients, F. Assignments (presented at conference) appropriate, G. I was interested in Breast and Endocrine surgery. RESULTS: Average values were A. 4.7, B. 4.9, C. 4.6, D. 4.9, E. 4.8, F. 4.7, G. 4.7. However, C and F received low ratings of 1 and 2. In the free text box, there were favorable opinions such as the fact that it was good to prepare for the national examination and that reading mammography was helpful. Conversely, there were some negative opinions, such as a time spent outpatient was too long, a difference in enthusiasm among the instructors, and a hope to see more at the first visit and to cope with the procedure. DISCUSSION: Preparing a weekly calendar of individual students generally yielded satisfactory results, but also highlighted the potential for future improvements in clinical clerkship.


Asunto(s)
Mama/cirugía , Calendarios como Asunto , Prácticas Clínicas , Educación Médica/métodos , Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
16.
Korean J Med Educ ; 32(3): 223-229, 2020 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32894923

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Clinical rotations of medical students across the world have inevitably been affected due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The aims of this study were to explore medical students' perception on the school's response and management of clinical rotation during the COVID-19 pandemic and on how it had affected the quality of their education. METHODS: An online questionnaire was distributed to third year medical students at one institution whose clinical rotations re-started during the pandemic. The questions asked about the students' satisfaction with the school's policy and feelings of safety, and the impact of COVID-19 on clinical learning. RESULTS: The students' perception on the school's response to the pandemic was mixed. Re-commencement of the clinical rotations and procurement of personal protective equipment was positive but a third of students still felt unsafe. The decreased number of hospital patients did not seem to have impacted their overall clinical education with praise on the role of the supervising physicians. Seventy-six-point seven percent of students conferred the positive educational opportunities on medical professionalism presented to them only as the clinical rotation during the ongoing pandemic. CONCLUSION: Our observations on the re-commencement of clerkship during this pandemic may help equip medical institutions on future public health crisis.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Betacoronavirus , Prácticas Clínicas/métodos , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Humanos , República de Corea , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
17.
Tex Med ; 116(8): 34, 2020 Aug 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32866275

RESUMEN

Medical schools typically have predictable schedules. The timing of lectures, clerkships, exams, and even extracurricular activities tend to follow in the same grooves year after year. Students can reliably block out even minor events months ahead of time and be confident they'll take place. All that changed with COVID-19. Since March, when the pandemic began closing down schools, businesses, and other institutions across the state, figuring out what comes next in medical school has been anything but predictable.


Asunto(s)
Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/organización & administración , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Facultades de Medicina , Estrés Psicológico/etiología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Betacoronavirus , Agotamiento Psicológico/psicología , Competencia Clínica , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Transmisión de Enfermedad Infecciosa/prevención & control , Humanos , Innovación Organizacional , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Facultades de Medicina/ética , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Facultades de Medicina/tendencias , Enseñanza/ética , Enseñanza/psicología , Texas/epidemiología , Incertidumbre
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(33): e21484, 2020 Aug 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32871994

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of humanistic care and psychological counseling (HCPC) on psychological disorders (PD) in medical students after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. METHODS: We will search randomized controlled trials or case-controlled studies of HCPC on PD in medical students after COVID-19 outbreak in the following electronic databases: PUBMED/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, AMED, WANGFANG, and CNKI. The time is restricted from the construction of each database to the present. All process of study selection, data collection, and study quality evaluation will be carried out by two independent authors. Any different opinions will be solved by a third author through discussion. We will employ RevMan 5.3 software to conduct statistical analysis. RESULTS: This study will provide a better understanding of HCPC on PD in medical students after COVID-19 outbreak. CONCLUSIONS: This study may offer strong evidence for clinical practice to treat PD in medical students after COVID-19 outbreak. STUDY REGISTRATION: CRD42020193199.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Consejo/métodos , Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Psicoterapia/métodos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Femenino , Humanismo , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos Mentales/psicología , Pandemias , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Proyectos de Investigación , Revisiones Sistemáticas como Asunto , Adulto Joven
20.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(6): 649-656, 2020 Jun 28.
Artículo en Inglés, Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32879121

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To understand medical students' mental health, professional pride, and intention to work in the front-line during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and provide a reference for psychological intervention. METHODS: We used the depression-anxiety-stress scale and self-designed questionnaire on professional pride, intention to work in the front-line and the extent of family support. Medical students from 4 medical schools in Fujian and Hunan were investigated. Their mental health status, professional pride and first-line work willingness with different characteristics were compared, and the influential factors for professional pride and first-line work willingness were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 266 valid questionnaires were collected. During the pandemic, there were significant differences in the proportion of depressed students among different college and universities, majors and stages (P<0.05), and the professional pride was significantly different (P<0.001). Medical students with different mental health status showed significant differences in professional pride (P<0.01). Marriage, pressure and extent of family support were the influential factors for their professional pride (P<0.05). The latter two were also influential factors for their intention to work in the front-line (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the pandemic, students from college and nursing have relatively better mental health and higher professional pride. The professional pride is low in medical students who married, with abnormal stress or low family support. The intention to work in front-line is decreased in students with abnormal stress or low family support.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Salud Mental , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Betacoronavirus , China , Familia , Humanos , Intención , Pandemias , Profesionalismo , Apoyo Social , Estrés Psicológico , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
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