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1.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 377-384, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176338

RESUMEN

The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of a live-video teaching tool on the performance of dental students in bending an orthodontic vestibular arch and to assess the students' perceptions of the technology. All 135 fourth-year dental students in the 2018 academic year at Hacettepe Dental School, Ankara, Turkey, were invited to participate in the study; after exclusions, the remaining 116 were randomly divided into two demonstration cohorts. These students had no prior experience bending an orthodontic wire. Cohort 1 (control, N=58) was shown a conventional live demonstration of the orthodontic bending of a vestibular arch, and Cohort 2 (experimental, N=58) was shown a live-video demonstration of the same procedure. Both cohorts saw the demonstration before beginning the exercise and were evaluated afterwards on their performance of the procedure. In addition, the students' perceptions of the demonstration techniques were collected with a questionnaire. The results did not show any significant differences in the students' bending scores between the control and experimental cohorts (p=0.767). The median values on the questionnaire indicated almost no statistically significant difference in responses between the cohorts. The only significant difference was that Cohort 1 had a higher percentage who answered "yes" they would like to rewatch the demonstration than did Cohort 2 (p=0.024). In this study, the live-video technique was found to be as effective as a conventional live demonstration for orthodontic practical education, suggesting that either technique could be used as an appropriate method for training in orthodontic wire bending.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Alambres para Ortodoncia , Estudiantes de Odontología , Estudios de Cohortes , Humanos , Facultades de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Grabación en Video
2.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 367-376, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176342

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of virtual reality to the conventional analogic training environment and show the complementarity of conventional techniques and virtual reality in the learning of dental students. All 88 first-year dental students at a dental school in France in early 2019 were randomly assigned to one of two groups: group 1 (n = 45) was assigned to cavity preparations on a haptic simulator (Virteasy) and group 2 (n = 43) was assigned to conventional practical work on plastic analogue teeth (Kavo). Following three training sessions, the students in group 1 took a final exam on the same plastic analogue teeth exercise. The results showed improvement in the drilling skill of both groups. The simulator-trained group (group 1) had similar results to the plastic analogue-trained group (group 2) in the final test on a plastic analogue tooth. In this study, virtual reality allowed an assessment based on objective criteria and reduced the subjectivity of evaluations conducted on plastic analogue teeth. Considering the saving of supervision and teaching time as well as the material gain offered by virtual reality, the learning methods of haptic simulators are educational options that should be considered by dental educators.


Asunto(s)
Preparación de la Cavidad Dental , Educación en Odontología , Entrenamiento Simulado , Competencia Clínica , Simulación por Computador , Francia , Humanos , Estudiantes de Odontología , Interfaz Usuario-Computador
3.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 336-342, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176348

RESUMEN

This study examined happiness and satisfaction as possible foundations for long-term well-being and resilience in dental education. Psychological research has found that respect, camaraderie, and trust help define well-being and that resilience is built with these supportive influences. The aims of this study were to assess if happiness and life satisfaction reported by one U.S. dental school's faculty, students, and alumni also enhanced their perceived well-being and resilience and to determine the factor that most affected the participants' happiness. Email and hard copy surveys were distributed in 2018 and 2019 to all 71 full-time preclinical and clinical faculty members, 572 students in all four years, and 143 alumni who graduated in 2018 (total N = 786). Overall, 471 responded; response rates by group were as follows: faculty 87.3% (N = 62), students 65.9% (N = 377), and graduates 22.4% (N = 32). Of the three groups, responding faculty members reported having the highest levels of happiness in life (92.0%) and job satisfaction (90.3%). In the highest percentage reported, 90.2% of D4 students reported that the level of trust and respect they received from clinical faculty members contributed most to their happiness. The lowest level of happiness among the groups (71.0%) was reported by the D2 students. These results suggested that perceived well-being translated to happiness among the participants in our study. More research is needed to understand the relationship among positive environments, well-being, and provider resilience in dental education.


Asunto(s)
Docentes de Odontología , Facultades de Odontología , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Felicidad , Humanos , Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Odontología
4.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 358-366, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176344

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to evaluate teeth prepared for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) restorations by senior dental students using recently developed rubrics. The rubrics used evaluation criteria based on four factors: retention or resistance form; marginal or internal adaption or manufacturing process; biology, esthetics, or durability of restorative material; and intraoral scanner impression. In academic year 2018-19, four faculty members used the rubrics to assess 111 first maxillary right premolars (tooth no. 4) prepared for lithium disilicate crowns and 223 second maxillary right premolars (tooth no. 5) and first maxillary right molars (tooth no. 3) prepared for monolithic zirconia partial fixed dental prostheses. The preparations had been performed on typodont teeth. The most common errors identified for tooth preparations were in the finish line quality (136 errors in 223 prostheses), a criterion that is crucial for quality CAD/CAM restorations. To prevent poorly fit CAD/CAM restoration preparations that result from an unacceptable finish line quality, students need to understand the rationale used to develop detailed rubrics and adhere to the defined critera.


Asunto(s)
Adaptación Marginal Dental , Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Diseño Asistido por Computador , Coronas , Porcelana Dental , Humanos , Estudiantes de Odontología
5.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 343-349, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176345

RESUMEN

Little research exists on reciprocal learning, a type of peer-assisted learning in which students act concurrently as both teacher and learner in small groups. The aims of this pilot study were to assess the feasibility of using case-based reciprocal learning with dental students and to assess its impact on students' satisfaction and perceived clinical reasoning, educational value, and use of evidence-based dentistry. In this quasi-experimental mixed methods study conducted in 2018, small-group sessions led by a third-year dental student were designed to expose second-year students to clinical portfolios prior to clinical rotations, promote evidence-based dentistry, and improve students' clinical critical thinking skills by having them work in small groups to teach and learn from each other. After the intervention, all 76 students in the sessions were invited to complete a survey with 11 Likert-scale items and six open-response questions assessing their engagement in learning, perceived educational value, and perceived quality of facilitation associated with reciprocal learning. Sixty-five students completed the surveys for a response rate of 86%. Among the survey respondents, 87.7% agreed/strongly agreed that the small groups facilitated enhanced learning, and 66.2% agreed/strongly agreed that they learned the material better because they had to teach it to their peers. Also, 74.6% agreed/strongly agreed that their clinical critical thinking improved, and 92.3% agreed/strongly agreed that they felt better prepared to complete a patient portfolio once they reach clinic. This study found that reciprocal learning had favorable outcomes in terms of students' perceptions of learning. The students reported that the small groups enhanced their learning, improved their comfort in asking questions in small groups, and exposed them to a variety of clinical situations.


Asunto(s)
Grupo Paritario , Estudiantes de Odontología , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Proyectos Piloto , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
6.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 329-335, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176349

RESUMEN

The aims of this study were to determine the convergence angles of posterior teeth prepared by dental students at the University of Toronto for lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (LDGC) CAD/CAM crowns and to investigate their effect on loss of retention rate. A total of 280 preparations for posterior monolithic LDGC CAD/CAM crowns were performed on 270 patients (169 women and 101 men). Crowns were cemented with RelyX Unicem and Calibra Universal resin cements. Mesial, distal, and angle of convergence were measured on the bitewing radiographs. Cemented crowns were followed for up to six years. Data were analyzed for tooth type and location and for operator experience. The results showed the majority of convergence angles were greater than the recommended guidelines but fell within a clinically acceptable range (20 to 24 degrees). However, angles of convergence for mandibular molar preparations were highest (28.06±5.50 degrees), while maxillary premolars exhibited the lowest values (24.72±6.59 degrees). No significant difference was found between the results of dental students and foreign-trained dentists. Over a six-year observation period, only two crowns lost retention. The findings of this study indicated that ideal taper angles were impractical and difficult to achieve in clinical education settings.


Asunto(s)
Coronas , Estudiantes de Odontología , Cerámica , Diseño Asistido por Computador , Porcelana Dental , Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Ensayo de Materiales
7.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 323-328, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176350

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to develop and test the reliability of an instrument to evaluate the quality of clinical teaching among dental school faculty. Fourth-year dental students' perspectives on effective clinical teaching were first collected in focus group meetings. An 11-item questionnaire to assess seven domains of clinical teaching was developed based on the collected student perspectives and a medical model. All 374 third- and fourth-year dental students at one U.S. dental school in 2015 were invited to evaluate four clinical instructors whom they felt were strong role models and four clinical instructors whom they felt would benefit from constructive criticism. The survey was completed by 139 students (37.2% response rate); they evaluated 96 dental instructors. The results showed that the survey demonstrated strong internal reliability, with Cronbach's alpha values of >0.95 for each of the seven domains. In addition, there was significant agreement between groups: the interclass correlation (ICC) ranged from 0.97 to 0.99. These results suggest that the clinical faculty evaluation instrument developed in this study is a reliable method that can be used to evaluate dental faculty members. This system can be a valuable guide for clinical faculty members and administrators in assessing and improving clinical teaching effectiveness.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Docentes de Odontología , Humanos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Facultades de Odontología , Estudiantes de Odontología , Enseñanza
8.
Bull Tokyo Dent Coll ; 61(1): 27-36, 2020 Mar 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32074585

RESUMEN

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the impact of anxiety and quality of sleep on quality of life (QOL) in undergraduate dental students. A total of 141 students were enrolled. All were required to answer the following questionnaires: the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) subscale state (S) (STAI-S); the Sleep Assessment Questionnaire (SAQ); and the simplified World Health Organization Quality of Life survey (WHO QOL-bref). The statistical analysis included univariate and bivariate analyses and Poisson regressions. The mean age of the participants was 22.9 (SD=5.2) years; 81.6% were women, and 37.6% studied during the morning shift. The mean STAI-S score was 50.3 (SD=9.4). Sleep problems, classified as "always" or "frequently", were reported by 11.3% and 18.4% of the sample, respectively. Quality of life had a mean score of 13.2 (SD=2.0). The STAI-S and SAQ scores showed a significant association with all WHOQOL-bref dimensions (p<0.05). Analyses performed using multivariate regression and the highest STAI-S score (RR=1.46, 95%CI=1.03-2.06) and SAQ (RR=1.39, 95%CI=1.02-1.90) demonstrated significant sleep problems, even when other variables were controlled to prevent confounding biases. In conclusion, the dental students evaluated showed high levels of anxiety and sleep disorders impacting on QOL.


Asunto(s)
Calidad de Vida , Universidades , Adulto , Ansiedad , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Sueño , Estudiantes de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
9.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 143-150, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043586

RESUMEN

In the U.S., the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) requires that dental schools use competency-based assessments and standardized levels of proficiency to ensure that students are prepared for patient care after graduation. No such comprehensive standardized preclinical testing is required in the CODA standards. The aim of this study was to determine the use of preclinical competency assessments for students transitioning from preclinical to clinical education in North American dental schools and respondents' perceptions of the need for standardization in preclinical testing. An electronic survey was sent to the academic deans of all 76 U.S. and Canadian dental schools in July 2018 asking if the school used competency exams to assess preclinical students prior to entering patient care and, if so, about the type of tests and disciplines tested, student remediation, and reasons for revisions. The survey also asked for the respondents' perspectives on potential preclinical assessment standardization. Respondents from 28 U.S. and two Canadian schools participated in the survey, for a 39.5% response rate. The majority (92.3%) of respondents said their school considered preclinical competency assessments to be good indicators of students' readiness for transitioning into patient care, yet 40.0% reported their schools had no comprehensive preclinical testing, and 13.8% had no preclinical testing in endodontics, periodontics, prosthetics, or restorative dentistry. Regarding type of comprehensive preclinical assessment used, 71.4% reported using typodont-based exams, 46.4% used written comprehensive exams, and 42.9% used objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs); respondents could select all that applied on this item. Of the respondents whose schools had preclinical competency assessments, 72.4% had a review mechanism in place to evaluate its effectiveness. Overall, this study found that 60% of the participating schools had some form of preclinical testing, but there were no agreed-upon competencies to determine preclinical dental students' readiness for safe patient care in their clinical education.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Facultades de Odontología , Canadá , Curriculum , Humanos , Estudiantes de Odontología , Estados Unidos
10.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 135-142, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043588

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a blended learning model with a flipped classroom approach in a clinical dental education setting based on student performance and perceptions. Comparisons were made between blended learning and traditional methods for all fourth-year dental students in two consecutive cohorts in a conservative dentistry course at a dental school in Jordan. The 2016-17 cohort (control group) consisted of 364 students taught with conventional methods. The 2017-18 cohort (study group) consisted of 253 students taught with blended learning using a flipped classroom method. Performance measures were two exams (online and written), two assignments, inclinic quizzes, and clinical assessment. The study also assessed the number of posts made by students in the study group on an online discussion forum. The results showed that the study group students had significantly better performance on all assessments than the control group students. The students' overall grades in the blended learning cohort were an average 7.25 points higher than in the control cohort. Students who participated in the online forum also had better performance in the course: one participation correlated with 0.697 standard deviations higher score. Overall, students' perceptions were positive and supported the adoption of a blended learning model in the course. These results showing improved student performance provide support for blended learning and use of an online discussion forum.


Asunto(s)
Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Odontología , Curriculum , Educación en Odontología , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Facultades de Odontología
11.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 166-175, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043589

RESUMEN

Various preclinical methodologies have been adopted by dental and oral health programs to develop student competence in administering dental local anesthetics (LA). Student-to-student practice is the most common preclinical training method. However, manikin simulation models have been introduced to avoid possible complications and ethical concerns with student-to-student injections. In 2017, the methodology was changed in the Bachelor of Oral Health program at The University of Sydney School of Dentistry in Australia from student-to-student practice to manikin simulation models. The aim of this study was to compare the students' learning experience, perceived confidence, and anxiety in giving their first injections to patients in these two preclinical training methods. A mixed-methods cohort design was used to compare the 2016 (n = 42) and 2017 (n = 32) oral health students' experiences and perceptions and evaluate students' clinical experience after commencing LA practice on patients. Students completed a questionnaire about their perceived level of confidence and anxiety before and after their first LA to a child and an adult for both infiltration and inferior alveolar nerve b lock (IANB) injections. Focus groups were conducted to further investigate the students' experience. The results showed that the perceived confidence and anxiety of the two cohorts did not differ significantly from each other. Although students found it difficult to transition into clinical practice without having experienced LA themselves, the manikin simulation practice provided a safe learning platform that avoided ethical and legal concerns. These findings support the use of manikin simulation models as an alte rnative method for dental local anesthetic preclinical training.


Asunto(s)
Anestésicos Locales , Estudiantes de Odontología , Adulto , Anestesia Local , Australia , Niño , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Inyecciones , Enseñanza
12.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 157-165, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043590

RESUMEN

Reflection involves taking the time to deeply consider a past situation and examine areas of weakness or confusion. It allows identification of learning needs and the development of an action plan to improve future experiences. The aim of this study was to assess second-year dental students' ability to reflect in writing on a clinical rotation when prompted with a guided reflection template. The 76 second-year dental students enrolled in a periodontics clinical rotation course at one U.S. dental school in 2016-17 completed two reflective writing exercises during the semester. A total of 144 journals (after excluding incomplete journals) were analyzed individually by two evaluators following a rubric developed by Kember. This rubric combined Mezirow's seven levels of reflection into four categories: Habitual Action (HA), Understanding (U), Reflection (R), and Critical Reflection (CR). The first two categories are examples of non-reflective thoughts, and the latter two are reflective. The two sets of journals were also compared. On average, the journals contained 0.2% HA, 15.9% U, 73.8% R, and 10.1% CR, averaging 16.1% non-reflective thoughts and 83.9% reflective thoughts. Comparison of the students' first journal submissions to their second showed that the first journals averaged a higher percentage of reflective thought than the second journals: 85.2% vs. 82.7%, respectively. However, the first journals showed a lower average percentage of critical reflection than the second journals: 9.3% vs. 11.3%, respectively. Overall, a high degree of reflection was found in these students' journals after rotation in periodontics clinic, suggesting that reflective journaling can serve as a useful learning exercise to promote continual improvement during clinical training.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes de Odontología , Escritura , Comprensión , Humanos , Aprendizaje
13.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 27-33, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977086

RESUMEN

There is limited information about what dental students know about the risks and effects of e-cigarettes, and there is even less information regarding their attitudes about e-cigarettes. The aim of this study was to assess dental students' knowledge, education, and attitudes regarding e-cigarettes and their confidence in discussing e-cigarettes with patients. All fourth- to sixth-year students registered at the King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentistry were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study conducted during a three-week period in December 2018. The focus was a comparison of never versus ever e-smokers ("ever" meaning current or former e-smokers). The response rate was 38.7% (193/498). Among the responding students, 43.2% (n=83) had ever used an e-cigarette, and 11 (5.7%) reported being current users. Almost 95% (n=183) of the total participants said they did not feel confident about their e-cigarette education in dental school. Students who had ever used an e-cigarette said they were more confident discussing e-cigarettes with patients than did students who had never used them and also demonstrated greater belief that e-cigarettes lower the risk of cancer for patients who use them as an alternative to smoking traditional cigarettes (p<0.001). This study provides evidence of a gap in dental students' attitudes and knowledge regarding e-cigarettes, making it necessary to integrate e-cigarette education into future curricula.


Asunto(s)
Sistemas Electrónicos de Liberación de Nicotina , Estudios Transversales , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Arabia Saudita , Estudiantes de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades
14.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 57-61, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977088

RESUMEN

The aims of this study were to describe patient utilization of an urgent care clinic (UCC) in a dental school for one year and to assess dental students' perceptions of the benefits of training in this clinic. Aggregate clinic data from July 3, 2017, through July 6, 2018, were used to determine number of patients, number of new patients, number of new patients who elected to transfer their primary dental care to the university, number who were seen for a follow-up, and service/clinic to which each patient was referred. Student evaluations were used to determine the benefits students perceived in their training in the UCC. Results showed that 1,674 patients were seen in the UCC during the study period. Of these, 67% were new patients, and 53% of these new patients opted to transfer their primary dental care to the university. An average of 7.03 patients were treated per day, and 2.48 new patients per day were generated for the predoctoral student clinic. The most common referrals were to oral surgery (37%), endodontics (30%), and the predoctoral dental clinic (28%). Among these patients, 39% scheduled follow-up appointments, and the attendance rate was 69%. About 80% of eligible students (40/50) completed the questionnaire, and many provided optional comments. Over 80% of the responding students responded favorably regarding the learning experiences and assessments during the UCC rotation. This study found that establishment of the UCC increased the pool of patients and provided students the necessary experiences in triaging and treating dental emergencies.


Asunto(s)
Facultades de Odontología , Estudiantes de Odontología , Instituciones de Atención Ambulatoria , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Educación en Odontología , Humanos
15.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 22-26, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977091

RESUMEN

Empathy is the fundamental substructure of moral behavior. Skillful clinicians may not necessarily be successful dentists if they do not have sufficient empathy. The aim of this study was to assess the level of empathy among dental students at King Abdulaziz University with an emphasis on the effect of gender and study level. A cross-sectional study was carried out among third- to sixth-year dental students of King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. A validated, self-administered Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Care Provider Student Version was distributed in academic year 2016-17 to all 380 students in the third to sixth years. A total of 300 students responded, for a response rate of 78.9%. The results showed that the students' mean empathy score was 84.84±11.28 on a range from 20 to 140. The fifth- and sixth-year students had higher scores than the third- and fourth-year students although the differences were not statistically significant. The mean empathy score of women students was significantly higher (p<0.001) than that of men students, and the women demonstrated significantly better perspective-taking (p<0.001) than the men. This study found that the students were empathetic and had a sense of moral obligation although their mean empathy score was not as high as expected. Integrating empathic, ethical, and professional elements into the dental curriculum is needed.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes de Odontología , Estudiantes de Medicina , Estudios Transversales , Empatía , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Arabia Saudita , Universidades
16.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 44-50, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977097

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of live-video and video demonstration methods in training dental students in orthodontic emergency applications. A total of 105 fifth-year dental students at a dental school in Turkey participated in the study in 2018. A pretest was given to the students to evaluate their level of knowledge about band cementing and re-bonding of brackets. Subsequently, two clinical applications were demonstrated with either live-video or video demonstration. During the live-video demonstration, the lecturer gave information about the steps of the procedure while performing the clinical application on the patient using a camera attached to the loupes. The students were able to see the process on the screens. During the video demonstration, previously recorded videos of those clinical applications were shown, and information was given to students in a classroom. On the next day, posttests were given to the students. The posttest also asked students to give their opinions about both methods. The results showed that the mean posttest scores on the video demonstration were significantly higher than on the live-video demonstration. However, no significant difference between the demonstration methods was found with regard to increase of scores from pre- to posttest. Most students preferred use of the two demonstrations together for education in the clinical orthodontics lecture. This study found that the two demonstration methods had comparable effects on increasing students' level of knowledge. However, from the students' perspective, the two should be used together to achieve the highest effect.


Asunto(s)
Ortodoncia , Educación en Odontología , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Estudiantes de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Grabación en Video
17.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 34-43, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977101

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dental students' faculty group leader in clinic, intended postgraduate training, and clinic schedule on their clinical performance. This retrospective study used de-identified transcript data from the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine Classes of 2013, 2014, and 2015, a total of 238 students. The impact factors analyzed were the assigned faculty member who served as clinical group leader and mentor; area of students' intended postgraduate training; and variations in timing of students' summer clinic assignments and vacations. Clinical performance, consistent with the school's graduation criteria, was measured with summative assessments (completion of competencies); completion of care for patients assigned (case completions); and overall patient encounter rate. The results showed that group leader assignment correlated with significant differences among students in completion of cases (p=0.001), competencies completed (p<0.001), and patient encounter rate (p=0.018). Students who intended to pursue general practice residencies and prosthodontics specialty training completed fewer cases than students pursuing other types of postgraduate training (p<0.001). Students who had full-time clinic in June and vacation later in the summer of their third- to fourth-year transition completed more cases (p<0.001), completed more competencies (p=0.008), and had more patient visits (p=0.012) than those who had full-time clinic later in the summer. There were significant correlations among case completions, completion of competencies, and patient encounter rate. Overall, this study found that the students' intended postgraduate training, clinic schedules, and faculty mentors influenced their progress in clinical training and should be taken into consideration in student evaluation and patient care.


Asunto(s)
Facultades de Odontología , Estudiantes de Odontología , Competencia Clínica , Educación en Odontología , Docentes de Odontología , Humanos , Estudios Retrospectivos
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(1): e18470, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31895779

RESUMEN

The appropriate approach to dental patients, developed during the course of dentists' training, is a prerequisite for the holistic treatment of patients. Empathy is an important component of such an approach. This study aimed to determine the levels of empathy among students of dentistry at different stages in their training.The Jefferson Scale of Empathy - Health Profession Students Version was used to conduct the research, and 100 dental students (66 female and 34 male) ranging from first to fifth year participated in the survey. The scale contained 20 questions, with a possible score interval between 20 and 140. A higher score indicates increased ability to express empathy.The level of empathy among dentistry students increased from the first and second to fourth years, where it reached its maximum. During the fifth year, a decrease in levels of empathy was observed.The increase in empathy during the dental course may be correlated with the growth of clinical practice during the subsequent years of study. A slight decrease in empathy in the fifth-year students may be due to the curricular focus on performing procedures, with students having to meet a set target in order to finish the course.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Empatía , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Adulto , Educación en Odontología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Atención Dirigida al Paciente/métodos , Polonia , Distribución por Sexo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
19.
Gerodontology ; 37(1): 87-92, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31943327

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Ageism is a major barrier for age-appropriate care. The aim of this study was to translate and perform a preliminary validation of an ageism scale for dental students (ASDS) in Brazil (ASDS-Braz). METHODS: The 27-item original ageism scale was translated from English into Brazilian Portuguese. A panel of five Brazilian dental educators revised the scale to establish content validity. The translated version was completed by 156 dental students in the Federal University of Pelotas in Brazil. Principal component analysis, internal consistency reliability and discriminant validity were estimated. RESULTS: All items in the Brazilian Portuguese version received a content validity index score ≥0.80 indicating that they were relevant to the topic. The principal component analysis produced a 12-item scale with three components that accounted for 51% of the overall variance. The first component contained six items associated with a negative view of older adults; the second component contained three items dealing with the complexity of providing care for older adults; and the third component contained three items associated with a positive view of older people. Discriminant validity did not show any differences related to demographic factors, the semester of studies and history of living with older people. CONCLUSIONS: The preliminary validation of the ASDS-Braz produced a 12-item scale with three components with acceptable validity and reliability. Future research in a larger, multi-institutional sample is now warranted.


Asunto(s)
Ageísmo , Estudiantes de Odontología , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Brasil , Humanos , Psicometría , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 5-12, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977099

RESUMEN

Prolonged and static postures among dental workforce personnel may lead to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). The aim of this study was to determine whether feedback involving photography and self-assessment would improve dental educators' postures and accuracy of ergonomic self-assessment. This study used a randomized control design. The Modified-Dental Operator Posture Assessment Instrument (M-DOPAI) was used for all ergonomic evaluations over a four-week period at one U.S. dental school. At week 1, all 30 participating dental educators were photographed and completed an M-DOPAI without viewing the photographs. In weeks 2 and 3, the educators in the control group (N=15) completed an M-DOPAI without any additional photographs. The educators in the training group (N=15) had additional photographs taken and used the photographs to complete an ergonomic self-assessment with the principal investigator. From week 1 to week 4, the ergonomics training utilizing photography resulted in improvements in the dental educators' ergonomic scores but not the accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. All participants strongly agreed it was important for both dental students and dentists to understand proper ergonomics, properly apply proper ergonomics, and have accurate ergonomic self-assessment skills in clinical practice. Although these dental educators valued ergonomic principles, they lacked training in applying these principles with dental students. Without additional training in ergonomics and self-assessment, the development of these skills in dental students will be affected.


Asunto(s)
Retroalimentación , Enfermedades Musculoesqueléticas , Enfermedades Profesionales , Concienciación , Ergonomía , Humanos , Postura , Autoevaluación , Estudiantes de Odontología
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