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1.
BMC Psychol ; 9(1): 21, 2021 Feb 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33526085

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Psychological distress in University settings has grown and became a public health concern. In this context, contemplative practices such as mindfulness have been proposed as a strategy to help students on stress management. METHODS: Forty university students (20 female), aged between 18 to 30 years (mean = 24.15; SD = 3.56), with no previous experience with meditation or yoga were recruited at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte and randomized to a mindfulness training (MT) or active control (AC) groups. We analyzed measures of anxiety, affect, stress, as well as state and trait mindfulness in order to evaluate the effects of trait mindfulness and a brief mindfulness intervention in forty healthy young students. Participants were classified as Low (n = 27, females = 13) or High (n = 13, females = 7) Trait Mindfulness by k-means clustering and compared between them using Wilcoxon sum rank test. Furthermore, the sample was randomly allocated to an AC (n = 20, females = 10) or a MT (n = 20, females = 10) group, and mixed analysis of variance was performed to analyze the effect of interventions. The mechanisms and role of trait mindfulness in the intervention was assessed by a moderated mediation analysis. RESULTS: We found that High Trait individuals have lower anxiety trait, anxiety state and perceived stress levels. Only the MT group reduced their anxiety state and perceived stress after the intervention and increased their state mindfulness. Both groups reduced negative affect and cortisol, and no change was found in positive affect. Moderated mediation analysis showed that the training-induced change in state mindfulness mediated the increase in positive affect and the decrease in perceived stress and cortisol, regardless of trait mindfulness. For anxiety state the decrease only occurred in individuals with High Trait Mindfulness. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these results suggest that higher trait mindfulness is associated with low levels of psychological distress and that a brief mindfulness-based intervention seems to be useful to reduce distress measures in university students. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ReBEC, U1111-1194-8661. Registered 28 March 2017-Retrospectively registered, http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/RBR-7b8yh8.


Asunto(s)
Atención Plena , Psicoterapia Breve , Estrés Psicológico , Estudiantes , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estrés Psicológico/prevención & control , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Estudiantes/psicología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Resultado del Tratamiento , Universidades , Adulto Joven
2.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 7, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33520076

RESUMEN

Introduction: globally young people constitute one quarter of the population. They are the most vibrant and productive sector, but they are also prone to more risky sexual behaviour (RSB) with attendant negative consequences. In the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria, persistent conflicts and socioeconomic difficulty predisposes young people to risky conducts including RSB. The aim of this study is to explore the psychosocial correlates of risky sexual behaviour amongst students in the Niger Delta University, Bayelsa. Methods: we undertook a descriptive cross-sectional survey of students in the university. A multistage random sampling technique was used to recruit 400 students who completed a self-administered questionnaire. The data collected was analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results: out of the 400 students, 64.3% (257) engaged in RSB and 46.8% (187) were currently engaging in RSB. Rates of self-reported depression, suicidal ideation and attempt were 62.3% (249), 18.0% (72) and 14.3% (54) respectively. Independent correlates of RSB include being older than 19 years (aOR. 2.82; 95% C.I. 1.44 -5.51), male gender (aOR. 1.70; 95% C.I. 1.08-2.66), having depression (aOR. 1.83; 95% C.I. 1.15-2.92), being diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV (aOR. 2.08; 95% C.I. 1.12-3.86), and having been taught about condoms (aOR. 1.80; 95% C.I. 1.13-2.86). Conclusion: risky sexual behaviours have negative psychosocial and health implications. Regular and continuous health education targeted at young people is essential to reduce the social and health effects associated with RSB.


Asunto(s)
Asunción de Riesgos , Conducta Sexual/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Nigeria , Factores de Riesgo , Factores Sexuales , Estudiantes/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades , Adulto Joven
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(3): e24056, 2021 Jan 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33546006

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: Few epidemiological studies have examined the relationship between earphone usage and hearing loss in adolescents. This study identified the prevalence of hearing loss in South Korean adolescents using representative national survey data and evaluated the relationship between earphone usage in a noisy environment and hearing loss. This study analyzed 532 subjects (12-19 years) who participated in a 2012 national survey and completed health and noise environment exposure questionnaires and pure tone audiometry (PTA) test. Hearing loss was defined as an average hearing threshold of 26 Decibel-A (dBA) or higher in PTA. The relationship between earphone usage and hearing loss was analyzed using a hierarchical logistic regression model. Adolescents who were exposed to high noise levels via headphones in a noisy environment had a hearing loss prevalence of 22.6% and adolescents who used earphones 80 minutes or more per day on average had the hearing loss prevalence of 22.3%. The results of the logistic regression analysis revealed that adolescents who used earphones in a noisy environment had a 4.5-fold higher risk of hearing loss and an 8.4 times higher risk of having a subjective hearing problem than those who did not use earphones (prevalence odds ratio (pOR) = 4.54, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.35-15.24; pOR = 8.39, 95% CI: 1.12-62.83, respectively). Additionally, adolescents who used earphones more than 80 minutes per day in a noisy environment had a 4.7 times higher risk of hearing loss than those who used them less than 80 minutes per day (pOR = 4.68, 95% CI: 1.08-20.22). Longitudinal studies are needed to provide evidence of causality between earphone usage and hearing loss.


Asunto(s)
Dispositivos de Protección de los Oídos/estadística & datos numéricos , Exposición a Riesgos Ambientales/análisis , Pérdida Auditiva/epidemiología , Ruido/efectos adversos , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Audiometría de Tonos Puros , Umbral Auditivo , Niño , Exposición a Riesgos Ambientales/efectos adversos , Femenino , Pérdida Auditiva/etiología , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Oportunidad Relativa , Prevalencia , República de Corea/epidemiología , Autoinforme , Factores de Tiempo , Adulto Joven
4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(6): 208-211, 2021 Feb 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33571175

RESUMEN

Approximately 41% of adults aged 18-24 years in the United States are enrolled in a college or university (1). Wearing a face mask can reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (2), and many colleges and universities mandate mask use in public locations and outdoors when within six feet of others. Studies based on self-report have described mask use ranging from 69.1% to 86.1% among adults aged 18-29 years (3); however, more objective measures are needed. Direct observation by trained observers is the accepted standard for monitoring behaviors such as hand hygiene (4). In this investigation, direct observation was used to estimate the proportion of persons wearing masks and the proportion of persons wearing masks correctly (i.e., covering the nose and mouth and secured under the chin*) on campus and at nearby off-campus locations at six rural and suburban universities with mask mandates in the southern and western United States. Trained student observers recorded mask use for up to 8 weeks from fixed sites on campus and nearby. Among 17,200 observed persons, 85.5% wore masks, with 89.7% of those persons wearing the mask correctly (overall correct mask use: 76.7%). Among persons observed indoors, 91.7% wore masks correctly. The proportion correctly wearing masks indoors varied by mask type, from 96.8% for N95-type masks and 92.2% for cloth masks to 78.9% for bandanas, scarves, and similar face coverings. Observed indoor mask use was high at these six universities with mask mandates. Colleges and universities can use direct observation findings to tailor training and messaging toward increasing correct mask use.


Asunto(s)
Máscaras/estadística & datos numéricos , Máscaras/normas , Salud Pública/legislación & jurisprudencia , Estudiantes/psicología , Universidades/legislación & jurisprudencia , Adolescente , /prevención & control , Humanos , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología , Adulto Joven
6.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 59, 2021 01 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407303

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: First-year students entering postsecondary education must navigate a new and complex academic and social environment. Research indicates that this transition and developmental period can be challenging and stressful - academically, emotionally and socially - and that mental health and wellbeing can be compromised. Additionally, mental health disorders can also compromise students' ability to successfully navigate this transition. In the COVID-19 pandemic, the incoming 2020 cohort of first-year students face heightened and new challenges. Most will have spent the conclusion of high school learning virtually, in quarantine, in an uncertain and difficult time, and are then experiencing their first year of university while living, learning and socializing off-campus, virtually and remotely. In response to COVID-19 and with an appreciation of the considerable stresses students face generally and particularly in 2020-21, and the potential effects on mental health and wellbeing, McMaster University, a mid-sized research intensive university with approximately 30,000 students, has developed an innovative program to support students, called Archway. This initiative has been developed to help to prevent and to intervene early to address common transitional issues students experience that can influence mental health and wellbeing, with the ultimate goals of increasing student connectedness, supports, and retention. METHODS: The current study will use a mixed-method design to evaluate Archway and gain a better understanding of the transition into first-year postsecondary for students who engage and participate in Archway at various levels. The study will not only help to determine the effect of this program for students during COVID-19, but it will help us to better understand the challenges of this transition more broadly. DISCUSSION: Findings have the potential to inform future efforts to support students and protect their mental health and wellbeing through the use of virtual and remote platforms and mechanisms that meet their increasingly diverse needs and circumstances.


Asunto(s)
Ajuste Emocional , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Salud Mental , Estudiantes/psicología , Logro , Canadá/epidemiología , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Investigación Cualitativa , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades
7.
Scand J Public Health ; 49(1): 114-122, 2021 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33406995

RESUMEN

As a large international consortium of 26 countries and 110 higher-education institutions (HEIs), we successfully developed and executed an online student survey during or directly after the initial peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 International Student Well-being Study (C19 ISWS) is a cross-sectional multicountry study that collected data on higher-education students during the COVID-19 outbreak in the spring of 2020. The dataset allows description of: (1) living conditions, financial conditions, and academic workload before and during the COVID-19 outbreak; (2) the current level of mental well-being and effects on healthy lifestyles; (3) perceived stressors; (4) resources (e.g., social support and economic capital); (5) knowledge related to COVID-19; and (6) attitudes toward COVID-19 measures implemented by the government and relevant HEI. The dataset additionally includes information about COVID-19 measures taken by the government and HEI that were in place during the period of data collection. The collected data provide a comprehensive and comparative dataset on student well-being. In this article, we present the rationale for this study, the development and content of the survey, the methodology of data collection and sampling, and the limitations of the study. In addition, we highlight the opportunities that the dataset provides for advancing social science research on student well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in varying policy contexts. Thus far, this is, to our knowledge, the first cross-country student well-being survey during the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in a unique dataset that enables high-priority socially relevant research.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Internacionalidad , Salud Mental , Estudiantes/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades , Adulto Joven
8.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(1): e23126, 2021 01 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33439853

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Since the COVID-19 outbreak was first reported, considerable attention has been drawn to mental health problems among college students. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among college students in different geographical areas of China during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A nationwide cross-sectional survey was conducted among Chinese college students of 16 provinces or municipalities from February 4 to 12, 2020. A web-based survey was adopted to collect information from these college students, including demographics, perceived risk of infection, attitudes toward the epidemic and its control, and mental health status. Anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire. Chi-square test was used to compare the percentage of perceived risk of infection and attitude toward COVID-19 among college students in different geographic locations. Binary logistic models were used to identify associations between geographic locations and mental health problems after controlling for covariates. RESULTS: A total of 11,787 participants were analyzed in this study (response rate: 79.7%). The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among college students was 17.8% (95% CI 17.1%-18.5%) and 25.9% (95% CI 25.1%-26.7%), respectively. After controlling for covariates, current residence area in Wuhan city was found to have a positive association with anxiety symptoms (odds ratio [OR] 1.37, 95% CI 1.11-1.68) and depressive symptoms (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.09-1.59). Similarly, college location in Wuhan city was found to have a positive association with anxiety symptoms (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.07-1.35) and depressive symptoms (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.36). History of residence in or travel to Wuhan city in the past month was also positively associated with anxiety symptoms (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.46-1.80) and depressive symptoms (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.35-1.63). Furthermore, the perceived risk of COVID-19 was higher among students whose college location and current residence area were in Wuhan city, and it was positively associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health problems among Chinese college students were widespread and geographically diverse. Our study results provide further insight for policymakers to develop targeted intervention strategies.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Encuestas Epidemiológicas , Internet , Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/psicología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Ansiedad/psicología , China/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Depresión/psicología , Brotes de Enfermedades , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Prevalencia , Universidades , Adulto Joven
9.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(4): 136-140, 2021 Jan 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33507890

RESUMEN

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted in-person learning in the United States, with approximately one half of all students receiving online-only instruction since March 2020.* Discontinuation of in-person schooling can result in many hardships (1) and disproportionately affects families of lower socioeconomic status (2). Current evidence suggests that transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12) schools might not significantly contribute to COVID-19 spread nationwide (3). During August 31-November 29, 2020, COVID-19 cases, spread, and compliance with mask use were investigated among 4,876 students and 654 staff members who participated in in-person learning in 17 K-12 schools in rural Wisconsin. School-attributable COVID-19 case rates were compared with rates in the surrounding community. School administration and public health officials provided information on COVID-19 cases within schools. During the study period, widespread community transmission was observed, with 7%-40% of COVID-19 tests having positive results. Masking was required for all students and staff members at all schools, and rate of reported student mask-wearing was high (>92%). COVID-19 case rates among students and staff members were lower (191 cases among 5,530 persons, or 3,453 cases per 100,000) than were those in the county overall (5,466 per 100,000). Among the 191 cases identified in students and staff members, one in 20 cases among students was linked to in-school transmission; no infections among staff members were found to have been acquired at school. These findings suggest that, with proper mitigation strategies, K-12 schools might be capable of opening for in-person learning with minimal in-school transmission of SARS-CoV-2.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Instituciones Académicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Niño , Preescolar , Conducta Cooperativa , Humanos , Máscaras/estadística & datos numéricos , Salud Pública/legislación & jurisprudencia , Población Rural/estadística & datos numéricos , Maestros/psicología , Maestros/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/psicología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Wisconsin/epidemiología
10.
Work ; 68(1): 69-75, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33427709

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The school is one of the most critical social, educational, and training institutions and the main pillar of education in society. Education and, consequently, educational environments have the highest effect on the mentality, development, growth, welfare, concentration, performance, and learning efficiency of students. OBJECTIVES: The present study aimed to examine the effects of environmental ergonomics on the learning and cognition of pre-school students during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study was carried out as a review article using some keywords, namely "children", "learning", "pre-school", "COVID-19", "ergonomics", and "environmental factors". Scopus, PubMed, Science Direct and Web of Science were searched to find related articles. RESULTS: Factors like color, form, and layout of classrooms, lighting and ventilation, interior decoration, and educational equipment are effective in creating interest and motivation for students to learn. CONCLUSIONS: A review of these articles showed that the presence of ergonomics in educational spaces for children increases the quality of learning and reduces stress and anxiety, and by observing health protocols, a healthy and safe environment can be provided for students.


Asunto(s)
Ergonomía/normas , Instituciones Académicas/normas , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , /prevención & control , Ergonomía/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Pandemias/prevención & control , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Instituciones Académicas/organización & administración , Instituciones Académicas/estadística & datos numéricos
11.
Work ; 68(1): 45-67, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33459679

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The sanitary emergency due to COVID-19 virus obliged people to face up several changes in their everyday life becauseWorld Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines and countries' Health Systems imposed lockdown of activities and social distancing to flatten the infection curve. One of these rapid changes involved students and professors that had to turn the traditional "in presence" classes into online courses facing several problems for educational delivery. OBJECTIVES: This work aimed to investigate the factors that affected both teaching/learning effectiveness and general human comfort and wellbeing after the sudden transition from classrooms to eLearning platforms due to COVID-19 in Italy. METHODS: A workshop, involving students and experts of Human Factors and Ergonomics, has been performed to identify aspects/factors that could influence online learning. Then, from workshop output and literature studies, a survey composed of two questionnaires (one for students and one for teachers) has been developed and spread out among Italian universities students and professors. RESULTS: 700 people answered the questionnaires. Data have been analysed and discussed to define the most important changes due to the new eLearning approach. Absence of interactions with colleagues and the necessity to use several devices were some of the aspects coming out from questionnaires. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows an overview of factors influencing both teaching/learning effectiveness and general human comfort and wellbeing. Results could be considered as a basis for future investigation and optimization about the dependencies and correlations among identified factors and the characteristics of the products/interaction/environment during eLearning courses.


Asunto(s)
Salud del Niño/normas , Educación a Distancia/normas , Cuarentena/tendencias , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Transferencia de Experiencia en Psicología/fisiología , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , /transmisión , Salud del Niño/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Italia , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Cuarentena/métodos , Estudiantes/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades/organización & administración , Universidades/estadística & datos numéricos
12.
Global Health ; 17(1): 15, 2021 01 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33494769

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has made unprecedented impact on the psychological health of university students, a population vulnerable to distress and mental health disorders. This study investigated psychiatric symptoms (anxiety, depression, and traumatic stress) during state-enforced quarantine among university students in China (N = 1912) through a cross-sectional survey during March and April 2020. RESULTS: Psychiatric symptoms were alarmingly prevalent: 67.05% reported traumatic stress, 46.55% had depressive symptoms, and 34.73% reported anxiety symptoms. Further, 19.56% endorsed suicidal ideation. We explored risk and protective factors of psychological health, including demographic variables, two known protective factors for mental health (mindfulness, perceived social support), four COVID-specific factors (COVID-19 related efficacy, perceived COVID-19 threat, perceived COVID-19 societal stigma, COVID-19 prosocial behavior) and screen media usage. Across symptom domains, mindfulness was associated with lower symptom severity, while COVID-19 related financial stress, perceived COVID-19 societal stigma, and perceived COVID-19 threat were associated with higher symptom severity. COVID-19 threat and COVID-19 stigma showed main and interactive effects in predicting all mental health outcomes, with their combination associated with highest symptom severity. Screen media device usage was positively associated with depression. Female gender and COVID-19 prosocial behavior were associated with higher anxiety, while COVID-19 self-efficacy associated with lower anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest high need for psychological health promotion among university students during the COVID-19 pandemic and inform an ecological perspective on the detrimental role of stigma during an emerging infectious disease outbreak. Interventions targeting multi-level factors, such as promoting mindfulness and social support at individual and interpersonal levels while reducing public stigma about COVID-19, may be particularly promising. Attending to the needs of disadvantaged groups including those financially impacted by COVID-19 is needed.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Trastornos Mentales/epidemiología , Pandemias , Cuarentena/psicología , Estudiantes/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Ansiedad/epidemiología , China/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Factores Protectores , Factores de Riesgo , Trastornos de Estrés Traumático/epidemiología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades , Adulto Joven
13.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 7, 2021 01 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33505866

RESUMEN

Background: Pandemic confinement of COVID-19 may influence dietary behaviors and physical activity, and increases the risk of stress, especially among adolescents. This increases the subsequent risk of degenerative diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, etc., which can lead to a higher risk of death. This study aims to evaluate the effect of confinement on the weight load, physical activity and dietary behavior of higher education students during the period of confinement. Methods: Data was collected by an anonymous online questionnaire with 406 students. Physical activity was evaluated with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. A reference score of the National Nutrition and Health Program (PNNS-GS) was used to determine the dietary habits. Stress appreciation was assessed by using a psychological instrument known as the "Perceived Stress Scale" provided by Mind Garden. Results: More than a quarter of the students were overweight or obese. During the confinement of COVID-19, most of the students suffered from nutritional disorders, only one-third were moderately physically active, and the majority of students were at risk of stress. Multivariate analysis showed that the concept of threat of Stress increases the risk of weight gain at a risk level of 2.4 [95% CI 1.09-5.43], low physical activity increases the risk level to 1.9 [95% CI 1.18-3.04]. However, a balanced diet is protective against the occurrence of weight gain (ORa = 0.30, [95% CI 0.15-0.61]). Conclusion: The study showed that confinement appeared to contribute to weight gain and those students were more sedentary than active with unhealthy eating behaviors. Understanding these behaviors during COVID-19 confinement will help public health authorities implement future policies on recommendations when new pandemics arrive and confinement policies are implemented.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Ejercicio Físico , Conducta Alimentaria , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Aumento de Peso , Adolescente , Índice de Masa Corporal , Estudios Transversales , Dieta , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Marruecos/epidemiología , Obesidad/epidemiología , Factores Protectores , Conducta Sedentaria , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Estudiantes/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33401567

RESUMEN

There are no validated instruments to date that have examined the students' perceptions of externally and internally controlling teaching practices in physical education (PE). Grounded in self-determination theory, the objective of this research was to provide validity and reliability evidence of the Controlling Teaching Scale for Physical Education (CTS-PE) to assess the external and internal faces of controlling teaching in PE through two sequential studies. In Study 1 (n = 241 students), an exploratory factor analysis revealed an eight-item two-factor solution (four items per factor). In Study 2 (n = 968 students), a confirmatory factor analysis supported the eight-item two-factor correlated model (i.e., externally and internally controlling teaching) that was invariant across gender. Reliability coefficients indicated an acceptable level of reliability for the two factors of the CTS-PE. A structural equation modelling showed that externally and internally controlling teaching behaviours positively predicted need frustration, and negatively need satisfaction. The current study gathered evidence to consider the CTS-PE as a valid and reliable instrument to assess students' perceptions of PE teachers' externally and internally controlling teaching behaviours. The CTS-PE provides PE teachers with deeper insights into the negative psychological experiences associated with externally and internally controlling teaching behaviours in PE.


Asunto(s)
Educación y Entrenamiento Físico , Estudiantes , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Humanos , Psicometría , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Estudiantes/psicología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos
15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33401574

RESUMEN

The college years provide an important window of opportunity for the implementation of preventive efforts, especially with respect to smoking, problematic drinking, and obesity. Targeting of individuals at high risk of adopting those health behaviors might increase the effectiveness of those efforts, yet little is known about possible criteria for targeting and their ability to predict the adoption of risky health behaviors. Human capital theory predicts that more risk-averse individuals are more likely to invest in their health capital and should therefore be less likely to engage in risky health behaviors. Building on this theoretical prediction, this study uses a simple one-item measure of risk attitude and examines its ability to predict the Alameda Seven health behaviors in a sample of college students in the Republic of Korea. Unlike previous research, it also controls for personality traits and cognitive ability. Experimental data were gathered and analyzed using regression analysis. The risk measure predicted the probability of smoking and reporting higher stress levels, with no correlations found for the other health behaviors, suggesting that replication studies using larger samples should be carried out to analyze if these findings persist.


Asunto(s)
Conductas de Riesgo para la Salud , Adolescente , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , República de Corea , Medición de Riesgo/métodos , Estudiantes/psicología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades , Adulto Joven
16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33401384

RESUMEN

This study aimed to examine the effects of three-months of classroom-based Brain Breaks Physical Activity Solution (Brain Breaks®) on attitudes toward physical activity levels of primary school children in Henan Province, China. The participants were 704 children enrolled in grades 3-5 who were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. The experimental group participated in Brain Breaks® video intervention for 3-5 min daily, at low-to-moderate intensity for three consecutive months. The control group resumed their normal routine. The children's attitudes in both groups towards physical activity (PA) were evaluated using the self-reported Attitudes toward Physical Activity Scale (APAS), before and after the intervention. The effects of the intervention on APAS scores were analyzed using mixed model analysis of variance with Time as within-subject, and Group as between-subject factors. The analysis revealed evidence in support of the positive effect of classroom video interventions such as Brain Break on children's attitudes toward importance, fun, and trying to do their personal best in physical activity. Also revealed was the important role the teacher plays in this process.


Asunto(s)
Actitud , Ejercicio Físico , Instituciones Académicas , Estudiantes , Niño , China , Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Instituciones Académicas/organización & administración , Estudiantes/psicología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos
17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33401720

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: While physical activity has been reported to positively affect stress and sleep quality, less is known about the potential relationships among them. The present study aimed to investigate the mediating effect of stress on the association between physical activity and sleep quality in Chinese college students, after controlling for age, nationality, and tobacco and alcohol use. PARTICIPANTS: The sample comprised 6973 college students representing three Chinese universities. METHODS: Physical activity, perceived stress, and sleep quality were respectively measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF), Perceived Stress Scale-10 Items (PSS-10), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). RESULTS: Mediating effects of perceived stress on the association between physical activity and sleep quality were observed in males and females, with 42.4% (partial mediating effect) and 306.3% (complete mediating effect) as percentages of mediation, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of this study may provide some suggestions that physical activity could improve sleep by aiding individuals in coping with stress and indicate that stress management might be an effective non-pharmaceutical therapy for sleep improvement.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico , Sueño/fisiología , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Estudiantes/psicología , Adulto , China/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades
19.
BMC Psychol ; 9(1): 4, 2021 Jan 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407920

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Internet addiction is a common problem in university students and negatively affects cognitive functioning, leads to poor academic performance and engagement in hazardous activities, and may lead to anxiety and stress. Behavioral addictions operate on a modified principle of the classic addiction model. The problem is not well investigated in Ethiopia. So the present study aimed to assess the prevalence of internet addiction and associated factors among university students in Ethiopia. OBJECTIVES: Main objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of internet addiction among University Students in Ethiopia. METHODS: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among Wollo University students from April 10 to May 10, 2019. A total of 603 students were participated in the study using a structured questionnaire. A multistage cluster sampling technique was used to recruit study participants. A binary logistic regression method was used to explore associated factors for internet addiction and variables with a p value < 0.25 in the bivariate analysis were fitted to the multi-variable logistic regression analysis. The strength of association between internet addiction and associated factors was assessed with odds ratio, 95% CI and p value < 0.05 in the final model was considered significant. RESULTS: The prevalence of internet addiction (IA) among the current internet users was 85% (n = 466). Spending more time on the internet (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 10.13, 95% CI 1.33-77.00)), having mental distress (AOR = 2.69, 95% CI 1.02-7.06), playing online games (AOR = 2.40, 95% CI 1.38-4.18), current khat chewing (AOR = 3.34, 95% CI 1.14-9.83) and current alcohol use (AOR = 2.32, 95% CI 1.09-4.92) were associated with internet addiction. CONCLUSIONS: The current study documents a high prevalence of internet addiction among Wollo University students. Factors associated with internet addiction were spending more time, having mental distress, playing online games, current khat chewing, and current alcohol use. As internet addiction becomes an evident public health problem, carrying out public awareness campaigns may be a fruitful strategy to decrease its prevalence and effect. Besides to this, a collaborative work among stakeholders is important to develop other trendy, adaptive, and sustainable countermeasures.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Estudiantes/psicología , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Etiopía/epidemiología , Humanos , Prevalencia , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades
20.
Public Health ; 190: 37-41, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33338901

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: This work aimed to investigate WG (WG)-related knowledge, attitudes, practices (KAPs) and factors affecting WG consumption among college students in Chongqing, China. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was performed among 2500 students from six universities using a self-administered questionnaire. METHODS: The chi-squared test and binary logistic regression were used for data analysis. RESULTS: Only 14.7% of the participants were aware of WG, 57.1% supported the consumption of WG, and only 8.5% consumed WG regularly in the last month. Participants with poor knowledge of WG were about 2 times more likely to not concern about chronic diseases (CDs) than concern about CDs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.241, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.030-4.877). Women were less likely to have a poor attitude to WG compared with men (OR = 0.682, 95% CI, 0.529-0.878), whereas women were more likely to have a poor WG practice (OR = 2.335, 95% CI, 1.327-4.111). CONCLUSIONS: Although results showed low levels of WG knowledge and practices, this study still supports positive attitudes to acquire WG-related knowledge among college students in Chongqing, China.


Asunto(s)
Conducta Alimentaria , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Granos Enteros , Adolescente , Adulto , China , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Factores Socioeconómicos , Estudiantes/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades , Adulto Joven
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