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1.
J Clin Nurs ; 29(1-2): 75-84, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31512306

RESUMEN

AIM: To develop a substantive theoretical explanation that makes sense of the decision-making process that clinical instructors use to place students on a learning contract. BACKGROUND: Clinical instructors are challenged with the task of objectively evaluating students using subjective tools such as anecdotal notes, diaries, unstructured observations and verbal feedback from other nurses. Clinical instructors' assessment decisions have a considerable impact on a variety of key stakeholders, not least of all students. DESIGN: Grounded theory method and its heuristic tools including the logic of constant comparison, continuous memoing and theoretical sampling to serve conceptualisation were used in the process of data collection and analysis. METHODS: Seventeen individual semi-structured interviews with clinical instructors in one university in Western Canada were conducted between May 2016-May 2017. Data were analysed using open, axial and selective coding consistent with grounded theory methodology. The study was checked for the Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research (SRQR) criteria (See Appendix S1). FINDINGS: Three subcategories, "brewing trouble," "unpacking thinking" and "benchmarking" led to the study's substantive theoretical explanation. "Gut feeling" demonstrates how clinical instructors reason in their decision-making process to place a student on a learning contract. CONCLUSION: Placing a student on a learning contract is impacted by personal, professional and institutional variables that together shift the process of evaluation towards subjectivity, thus influencing students' competency. A system-level approach, focusing on positive change through implementing innovative assessment strategies, such as using a smart phone application, is needed to provide some degree of consistency and objectivity. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Making visible the objective assessments currently being done by clinical instructors has the potential to change organisational standards, which in turn impact patient and clinical outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Bachillerato en Enfermería/métodos , Docentes de Enfermería/psicología , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Canadá , Contratos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Teoría Fundamentada , Humanos , Intuición , Solución de Problemas , Investigación Cualitativa
2.
Rev Med Chil ; 147(6): 790-798, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Español | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31859833

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: A portfolio is a compilation of academic work that demonstrates student's knowledge, reflection and critical thinking. AIM: To describe the development and implementation of an undergraduate portfolio in the School of Medicine at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, its temporal evolution and its educational impact after 10 years of experience. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The development and implementation of a portfolio for 4th-year undergraduate medical student was analyzed. Its design, teaching and learning methodologies, results and perceptions of students and teachers were assessed. The educational impact was measured using Kirkpatrick's levels. RESULTS: A total of 1,320 students participated between 2007 and 2017, supported by six teachers and 190 assistant-students. The portfolio included clinical cases, narrative medicine, palliative care and evidence-based medicine (EBM). The overall student's perception was positive, highlighting the development of critical analysis, clinical reasoning and professionalism. The delivery of feedback and learning assessment, allowed students to obtain excellent grades. There were only two cases of plagiarism reported. Fifteen EBM articles and two books with 52 narrative medicine essays were published. The greatest organizational impact of this teaching innovation, was that it evolved to become an established and continuous assessment instrument in 10 consecutive years. CONCLUSIONS: This portfolio is a project with a high educational impact, with a favorable perception by students and tutors, excellent results related to grades, stimulating both scientific writing and reflective practice.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Chile , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Medicina , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Factores de Tiempo
3.
Orv Hetil ; 160(46): 1816-1820, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Húngaro | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31707819

RESUMEN

Basic life support (BLS) teaching by peer-educators to school-age students was studied by evaluating their effectiveness. BLS resuscitation was taught by the internationally accepted four-stage skill teaching approach. The effectiveness of the training was followed by sociological measuring instruments (n = 91). Compared to the students' previous knowledge and attitudes about resuscitation, an increased willingness to adapt to an unexpected situation can be observed besides acquiring a reproducible method of CPR. The findings did not show significant age differences. Sensitivity and technical training in lay resuscitation is a successful educational process. The applied peer-education model is suitable for transferring resuscitation knowledge and skills. Orv Hetil. 2019; 160(46): 1816-1820.


Asunto(s)
Reanimación Cardiopulmonar/educación , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Educación en Salud/métodos , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Reanimación Cardiopulmonar/normas , Promoción de la Salud , Humanos , Grupo Paritario , Instituciones Académicas
4.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 22(10): 1365-1371, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31607725

RESUMEN

Objective: Orofacial pain (OFP) is a unique group of dental conditions with focus on chronic nonodontogenic pain affecting mouth, jaws, and face. The aim of this study is to investigate the knowledge of dentists in Saudi Arabia toward OFP assessment. Materials and Methods: An English language questionnaire containing 20 close-ended questions was used to capture data. The questionnaire included diagnostic criteria and clinical symptoms and signs of various OFP conditions. It was distributed to general dental practitioners (GDP) and dental specialists in four major provinces in Saudi Arabia. Results: A total of 318 questionnaires were completed by 163 males and 155 females. Most participants were GDPs (193/318) and the remaining were specialists from different dental specialties. A majority of participants were not able to diagnose neuropathic OFP or neurovascular/vascular OFP conditions (33% and 28.6%, respectively). On the other hand, only 40.3% were confident enough to diagnose different types of temporomandibular disorders. The results also showed that graduates from non-Saudi programs had significantly higher self and knowledge assessment score (59.8% and 43.4%, respectively) compared with graduates from Saudi programs (39.9% and 22.6%, respectively). The dental specialists had higher self-assessment scores compared with GDPs (48% vs. 43.7%). Overall, there was a weak positive correlation between self-assessment and knowledge assessment (20.2%). Conclusion: This study demonstrates a higher OFP knowledge and confidence for dental specialists compared with GDPs. However, this difference does not necessarily translate into more competencies in clinical practice. Therefore, the implementation of OFP courses in dental schools' curricula may benefit future dentists and improve patients' care.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Odontólogos/psicología , Educación en Odontología , Dolor Facial/diagnóstico , Odontología General/educación , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Adulto , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Dolor Facial/etiología , Dolor Facial/fisiopatología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Neuralgia/diagnóstico , Dimensión del Dolor , Arabia Saudita , Facultades de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Trastornos de la Articulación Temporomandibular/complicaciones , Trastornos de la Articulación Temporomandibular/diagnóstico
6.
Med Educ Online ; 24(1): 1666537, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31532330

RESUMEN

Patients want empathetic physicians who listen and understand. How do you teach and measure empathy? Medical educators, including those inspired by Alan Alda, have turned to theater to teach skills in empathetic communication. Improvisation-informedcurriculum (medical improv) draws upon foundational actors training: deep listening, emotional understanding, connections, authenticity. Arating scale to measure the impact of medical improv on empathetic and clear communication does not exist. Objective: To develop aframework and instrument, the Empathy and Clarity Rating Scale (ECRS), for measuring communication elements used by actors and physicians, and pilot ECRS to test effectiveness of medical improv on first-yearstudents' communication skills. Design: Four medical schools collaborated. USMLE Step 2 Communication and Interpersonal Skills (CIS) domains were used as framework for discussion among three focus groups, each with clinicians, actors, communication experts, and community members with patient experience. Audiotaped discussions were transcribed; open coding procedures located emerging themes. The initial coding scheme was compared with the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) measure. ECRS content was aligned with CARE, CIS and focus group themes. Modified nominal processes were conducted to finalize the scale. We implemented procedures to establish content validity and interrater reliability. Final ECRS was used to study student performance across three levels of experience with medical improv. Results: The final ECRS was comprised of seven five-pointscale items. Narrative comments precede behaviorally anchored ratings: 5=desired, 1=ineffective, 2-4=developing based upon adjustment needed. Rater agreement across all items was 84%. There was asmall correlation between the ECRS and another measure interviewing (r=0.262, p=0.003). Students with advanced medical improv training outperformed those without (F=3.51, p=.042). Conclusion: Acommunication scale enlightened by experiences of actors, clinicians, scholars and patients has been developed. The ECRS has potential to detect the impact of medical improv on development of empathetic and clear communication.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Empatía , Relaciones Médico-Paciente , Competencia Profesional , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Proyectos Piloto , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados
7.
Presse Med ; 48(7-8 Pt 1): 780-787, 2019.
Artículo en Francés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31383383

RESUMEN

Interprofessional simulation-based education is effective for learning non-technical critical care skills and strengthening interprofessional team collaboration to optimize quality of care and patient outcome. Implementation of interprofessional simulation sessions in initial and continuing education is facilitated by a team of "champions" from each discipline/profession to ensure educational quality and logistics. Interprofessional simulation training must be integrated into a broader interprofessional curriculum supported by managers, administrators and clinical colleagues from different professional programs. When conducting interprofessional simulation training, it is essential to account for sociological factors (hierarchy, power, authority, interprofessional conflicts, gender, access to information, professional identity) both in scenario design and debriefing. Teamwork assessment tools in interprofessional simulation training may be used to guide debriefing. The interprofessional simulation setting (in-situ or simulation centre) will be chosen according to the learning objectives and the logistics.


Asunto(s)
Cuidados Críticos/métodos , Educación Médica/métodos , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Grupo de Atención al Paciente , Entrenamiento Simulado , Competencia Clínica , Cuidados Críticos/normas , Curriculum/normas , Educación Médica/normas , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Ciencia de la Implementación , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/normas , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/organización & administración , Entrenamiento Simulado/normas
8.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 77(4): 429-435, 2019 Aug 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31418704

RESUMEN

Training in biology, pharmacy and medicine are essential in laboratory medicine in faculty and especially with recent residency modifications. Active learning improves critical thinking and is an essential component of health education. Interactive assessment systems for the interactive participation of students have emerged. Recently, many offers of audience response system (ARS) accessible by personal electronic devices such as smartphone, tablet or computer are available. These systems seem to be an effective teaching innovation according to students. We aimed to evaluate three pedagogical tools during real school lectures in order to be able to select them according to the needs: Votar, Socrative and Wooclap. Methods: Three connected participation tools will be tested during teaching at Lille University, faculty of pharmacy by 3 different teachers. 75 fifth-year pharmacy students divided into 2 groups of students will have attended at least one session using each of the systems studied. After lessons, an online questionnaire with 9 questions was submitted to students on their interest in each system. Questions measured student perception using a 1 to 10 scale. Results and discussion: 62 of 75 students completed online surveys and were included in the study. According students, ARS by smartphone or computer improve their education. Favorite application seems to be Socrative and Wooclap. This study provides student perception comparison of ARS. To complete, additional studies are needed to establish their efficacy after several month.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Entrenamiento Simulado , Interfaz Usuario-Computador , Teléfono Celular , Educación Médica/métodos , Educación Médica/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Humanos , Invenciones , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/normas , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Realidad Virtual
9.
Med Educ Online ; 24(1): 1649959, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31438809

RESUMEN

Curricular revision efforts have resulted in learner-centered programs that value content integration and active learning. Yet, less attention has been placed on assessment methods that are learner-centered and promote assessment for learning. The use of context rich short answer question (CR-SAQ) exams in the preclinical years of medical school was evaluated to determine if this format aligns with the criteria for assessment for learning. Medical students and preclinical faculty members were sent a survey comprised of closed and open-ended questions about their experience using CR-SAQ exams. Data were analyzed using a mixed-method design. Open-ended responses were evaluated using thematic analysis within the framework of criteria for assessment for learning. A total of 274 students (94%) and 24 faculty (75%) completed the survey. Fifty four percent of students reported preferring a CR-SAQ exam format over multiple choice questions (MCQ) format. Quantitative data and qualitative comments by students supported that CR-SAQ exams aligned with criteria for assessment for learning, including acceptability, authenticity, educational effect, and the cueing effect. Student concerns included preparation for USMLE Step 1 exam, as well as the validity and reproducibility of CR-SAQ assessments. Faculty largely agreed with the benefits of the CR-SAQ, but were concerned about feasibility, acceptability and reproducibility. The CR-SAQ exam format assessment strategy supports assessment for learning in an undergraduate medical education setting. Both benefits and drawbacks of this method are presented, however students and faculty describe a broader impact that this assessment method has on their development as a physician.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Estudiantes de Medicina , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
10.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 408-413, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31408381

RESUMEN

Faculty dissatisfaction with diminishing levels of student engagement in lifestyle medicine sessions prompted this exploratory project that compared differences in students' substantive engagement in medical preclinical and clinical level lifestyle medicine sessions. The preclinical and clinical level sessions had the same learning objectives and learning tasks, properly aligned with that level of student learning, but were offered in different learning formats, either traditional classroom approaches or technology-enhanced approaches. At the preclinical level, we transferred a nonmandatory, face-to-face session to a nonmandatory, fully online session. At the clinical level, we introduced two novel technology tools. We utilized Zoom technologies, which afforded students the ability to access the session from anywhere, and employed Hickey's use of "promoting" student submissions as one method for increasing student-student interaction during the synchronous session. We used indicators of behavioral engagement of Henrie et al. (Henrie CR, Halverson LR, Graham CR. Comput Educ 90: 36-53, 2015) as the framework for determining applicable engagement behaviors, including attendance, assignment completion, interactions (responding/feedback/endorsements), and the quality of (and faculty satisfaction with) the face-to-face and/or online interactions. We expected to observe higher levels of engagement behaviors in the technology-enhanced approach and found that to be the case at both the preclinical and clinical levels, in both mandatory/nonmandatory and synchronous/asynchronous formats. However, it was the increase in both the level and substance of the students' interactions in the technology-enhanced sessions that provided surprising results. A review of the sessions with enhanced engagement highlight the role of student autonomy, a construct with strongly established associations to student motivation and engagement.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación Médica/métodos , Tecnología Educacional/métodos , Docentes Médicos/psicología , Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Instrucción por Computador/tendencias , Educación Médica/tendencias , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Tecnología Educacional/tendencias , Humanos
13.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 397-400, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31408385

RESUMEN

Twenty-eight undergraduate students in a health sciences program volunteered for an exercise in the history of examinations. They had completed a second-year course in anatomy and physiology in which they studied modern texts and took standard contemporary exams. For this historical "experiment," students studied selected chapters from two 19th century physiology texts (by Foster M. A Textbook of Physiology, 1895; and Broussais FJV. A Treatise on Physiology Applied to Pathology, 1828). They then took a 1-h-long exam in which they answered two essay-type questions set by Thomas Henry Huxley for second-year medical students at the University of London in 1853 and 1857. These were selected from a question bank provided by Dr. P. Mazumdar (University of Toronto). A questionnaire probed their contrasting experiences. Many wrote thoughtful, reflective comments on the exercise, which not only gave them an insight into the difficulties faced by students in the past, but also proved to be a valuable learning experience (average score: 8.6 ± 1.6 SD).


Asunto(s)
Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Empleos en Salud/educación , Fisiología/educación , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud , Humanos , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología
14.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 414-422, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31408387

RESUMEN

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different metacognitive interventions on knowledge and regulation of cognition, as well as academic performance (i.e., exam and final grades) in three sections of an undergraduate human anatomy and physiology course. All targeted classes were randomly assigned to one of three groups (reflection practice, passive acquisition of knowledge, and collaborative learning), and the interventions were implemented after exam 1. A pre- and posttest survey was administered during the semester (during week 2 and after exam 2), and exam and final course grades were collected at the end of the semester. The final sample included 129 students. A significant interaction of group and time was observed for knowledge of cognition: it increased in the reflection practice group, did not change in the collaborative learning group, and it decreased in the passive acquisition of knowledge. The interventions did not produce any significant interactions or main effects on regulation of cognition, exam scores, or final grades. Along with more research on metacognition in physiology education contexts, it is recommended to further examine the ways in which such data can be collected, as self-report measures only tell part of the story.


Asunto(s)
Rendimiento Académico/psicología , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Empleos en Salud/educación , Metacognición , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Enseñanza/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Metacognición/fisiología
16.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 339-344, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31305148

RESUMEN

Physiology is one of the major foundational sciences for the medical curriculum. This discipline has proven challenging for students to master due to ineffective content acquisition and retention. Preliminary data obtained from a survey completed by "low-performance" students (those maintaining a grade average below the passing mark of 70%) at Morehouse School of Medicine reported that students lacked the ability to adequately recognize and extract important physiological concepts to successfully navigate multiple-choice assessments. It was hypothesized that a specially designed, small-group, active learning, physiology in-course enrichment program would minimize course assessment failure rates by enhancing the ability of low-performance students to effectively identify important course content, successfully perform on multiple-choice assessments, and, thereby, improve overall course performance. Using self-report surveys, study skills and test-taking deficiencies limiting successful comprehension of course material and examination performance were identified. Mini-quiz assessments and assignments in formulating multiple-choice examination questions were given to help students recognize and solidify core concepts and improve test-taking ability. Lastly, self-report surveys evaluated the effectiveness of the enrichment program on overall course performance. Results showed a marked improvement in student confidence levels with regards to approaching multiple-choice assessments, and a significant improvement in grades achieved in the physiology component of the first-year curriculum, as 100% of participants achieved a final passing grade average of ≥70%. It was concluded that students became more proficient in identifying, understanding, and applying core physiological concepts and more successful in mastering multiple-choice questions.


Asunto(s)
Rendimiento Académico/psicología , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Fisiología/educación , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Programas de Autoevaluación/métodos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
17.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 345-349, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31305152

RESUMEN

A small private online course (SPOC) supports blended learning on a small scale, enabling students to have a more comprehensive and deeper learning experience. It also provides instructors with a flexible and feasible model to better understand the students' learning needs and to supervise students' learning behaviors. In this study, we adopted SPOC flipped classroom blended teaching in the physiology course for clinical undergraduate students of Kunming Medical University. Compared with the control group [lecture-based learning (LBL)], the SPOC flipped classroom method significantly increased the scores of students in the preclass test (65.13 ± 12.45 vs. 53.46 ± 8.09, SPOC vs. LBL) and postclass test (80.43 ± 14.29 vs. 69.01 ± 12.81, SPOC vs. LBL), which is induced by students' increased interest in self-learning. More importantly, the significant difference between the preclass scores of the two groups suggested that the video lecture-based preview is more effective than the textbook-based preview. The study indicated that the SPOC flipped classroom was effective in enhancing the examination scores of students, reflecting an improved learning efficiency and a deeper understanding of the knowledge. In summary, the flipped classroom based on SPOC improves learning outcomes compared with LBL and has a wide application in the learning of basic medical courses.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Fisiología/educación , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Programas de Autoevaluación/métodos
18.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 276(10): 2953-2956, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31317322

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To present the utility of a smartphone-enabled otoscope as a teaching adjunct in pre-clinical otoscopy training. METHODS: 60 pre-clinical medical students were randomized into either a control group using a conventional otoscope or an experimental group using a smartphone-enabled otoscope. Participants in each group were trained to use their assigned device and were given time to practice on a colleague's ear. Participants then completed a questionnaire indicating their ability to visualize anatomical landmarks of the middle ear as well as their confidence in performing a middle ear examination using their device. RESULTS: Compared to participants using the conventional otoscope, significantly more students using the smartphone-enabled otoscope identified the umbo (93% versus 63%, P = 0.005), the short process of the malleus (67% versus 33%, P = 0.008), the cone of light (100% versus 70%, P = 0.001), and the pars flaccida (60% versus 33%, P = 0.03). Furthermore, participants who used the smartphone-enabled otoscope reported significantly increased confidence in performing otoscopy compared to those who used a conventional otoscope (4.1 ± 0.7 versus 2.8 ± 0.9, P < 0.001). Finally, participants rated the smartphone-enabled otoscope as an excellent teaching aid for otoscopy training. CONCLUSION: The smartphone-enabled otoscope serves as a valuable teaching tool for pre-clinical otoscopy education. After using the device, pre-clinical students were more confident in performing a middle ear examination and in identifying important anatomical landmarks of the middle ear.


Asunto(s)
Técnicas de Diagnóstico Otológico/instrumentación , Oído Medio , Otolaringología/educación , Otoscopios , Otoscopía/métodos , Teléfono Inteligente , Adulto , Oído Medio/anatomía & histología , Oído Medio/diagnóstico por imagen , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Enseñanza
19.
PLoS Biol ; 17(7): e3000359, 2019 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31318869

RESUMEN

Our first two experiments on adapting a high-structure course model to an essentially open-enrollment university produced negative or null results. Our third experiment, however, proved more successful: performance improved for all students, and a large achievement gap that impacted underrepresented minority students under traditional lecturing closed. Although the successful design included preclass preparation videos, intensive active learning in class, and weekly practice exams, student self-report data indicated that total study time decreased. Faculty who have the grit to experiment and persevere in making evidence-driven changes to their teaching can reduce the inequalities induced by economic and educational disadvantage.


Asunto(s)
Logro , Curriculum/normas , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Estudiantes/psicología , Universidades , Empatía , Docentes/psicología , Docentes/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos
20.
Sao Paulo Med J ; 137(2): 193-200, 2019 Jun 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31314881

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There are plenty of options for evaluating medical students and medical residents' clinical skills. Objective structured clinical evaluations (OSCEs) have emerged as a powerful and reliable tool for assessing multiple cognition domains of clinical expertise. In the same way as OSCEs have emerged to assess clinical skills, objective structured teaching evaluations (OSTEs) have come to light as promising and unbiased interventions for evaluating the act of clinical teaching. DESIGN AND SETTING: Narrative review developed at Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil. METHODS: We searched the literature regarding OSTEs using the MEDLINE (via PubMed) and LILACS (viaBiblioteca Virtual em Saude) databases. The SciELO library was also searched for Brazilian papers. Systematic reviews, reviews and randomized controlled trials specifically assessing how OSTEs performed in relation to development of academic staff and medical residents were then selected. RESULTS: Our search retrieved 178 papers, of which 40 were considered eligible for intensive review. Most of the studies selected reported positive effects from OSTE activities. However, there was little quantitative data to gauge the impact of OSTEs on improvement of teaching skills. CONCLUSIONS: Considering that OSCEs have become a widely used tool for assessing medical students' and residents' clinical skills, it is high time to incorporate OSTEs for evaluating teaching skills in Brazil. Encouraging data to support implementation of this assessment tool in this country is available from abroad. The net benefit from this would possibly encompass medical students, residents and academic staff, through bringing awareness about the importance of excelling in teaching skills.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Educación Médica , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Internado y Residencia , Estudiantes de Medicina , Humanos , Enseñanza
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