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1.
Codas ; 32(1): e20180204, 2020.
Artículo en Portugués, Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31851209

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: to translate and culturally adapt, for Brazil, the battery of tests "Evaluación de los procesos lectores - PROLEC-SE-R", for students of Elementary School cycle II, and Senior High School. METHODS: The following stages of translation and cultural adaptation were followed: (1) Translation; (2) Synthesis of translations; (3) Back-translation; (4) Evaluation by specialist committee; (5) Pilot study: Undertaken in a sample of 70 students, 10 from each school year, in two sessions; and (6) Evaluation and appreciation of all the reports written by the researcher and specialist committee. RESULTS: modifications to the tests of PROLEC-SE-R are not necessary as indicated in the pilot study, both in the collective and individual version. The procedure received good acceptance by the evaluated students and there were no complaints or reports of difficulty in understanding the tests and instructions. CONCLUSION: the procedure is appropriate for the Brazilian reality and can be used to evaluate Elementary School II and Senior High School students. A standardization study is necessary in a representative sample of the population.


Asunto(s)
Comparación Transcultural , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Lectura , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Traducciones , Adolescente , Brasil , Niño , Comprensión , Humanos , Pruebas del Lenguaje , Estudiantes
3.
Br J Nurs ; 28(22): 1478-1484, 2019 Dec 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31835941

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: the Nursing and Midwifery Council has emphasised that its recently introduced standards for student supervision and assessment aim to 'ensure that no one gets onto the register who shouldn't be there'. A key element in achieving this is the new practice assessor role, implemented to bolster practical assessment processes. AIM: to identify the key personal characteristics of robust practice assessors who are prepared to fail underperforming students. METHOD: a national study, using a grounded theory approach. Thirty-one nurses were interviewed about their experiences of failing students in practice-based assessments. FINDINGS: robust practical assessors have a 'core of steel', characterised as having five key features: solidarity, tenacity, audacity, integrity and dependability. CONCLUSION: organisations should base their selection of practice assessors on how strongly they exhibit these five characteristics. Designating all current mentors as new practice assessors, when it is known that often they are reluctant to fail, could perpetuate failure to fail.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Enfermería/organización & administración , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Mentores/psicología , Enfermeras y Enfermeros/psicología , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Humanos , Investigación en Educación de Enfermería , Investigación en Evaluación de Enfermería , Investigación Cualitativa , Reino Unido
4.
Curr Urol Rep ; 20(12): 85, 2019 Nov 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31781975

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: One of the major functions of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) is to accredit all approved residency programs. This accreditation system is based on both common and program-specific requirements that form the foundation of all ACGME-accredited training programs. Embedded within the program requirements are the essential elements of the Competencies and Milestones. In this review article, we hope to provide the reader with an overview of the current Milestones and a preview of what lies ahead. RECENT FINDINGS: Milestones for resident education were implemented approximately 7 years ago. The milestones were intended to create a logical trajectory of professional growth which could be measured and tracked for each sub-specialty. However, substantial variability in both content and developmental progression was seen in many specialties. The ACGME has been actively reviewing the Milestones to insure that there exists harmony across all specialties. Much has been learned about the milestones since their implementation. As educators, we need to provide a robust and reproducible system for all to use. The future of resident education, Milestones 2.0, will provide the necessary groundwork for a more user friendly system that will allow adequate evaluation of our trainees.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Internado y Residencia/normas , Urología/educación , Urología/normas , Acreditación/normas , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Urología/tendencias
5.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 39: 37-44, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31377679

RESUMEN

Portfolios are used in midwifery education to provide students with a central place to store their accumulative evidence of clinical experience for initial registration in Australia. Portfolio formats can be paper-based or electronic. Anecdotal discussion between midwifery students in Queensland debated the best format to document the requirements for the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC) standard 8.11. Midwifery students using paper-based portfolios envisioned that an ePortfolio would be streamline, simple, safe to use, and able to be used anywhere with WIFI, while some students using an ePortfolio expressed a desire to have a paper-based portfolio as a hard copy. This situation called for evidence of a comparison to resolve the debate. The aim of this study was to investigate midwifery students' experiences of the benefits and challenges between paper-based and ePortfolios when compiling evidence to meet the requirements for initial registration as a midwife in Australia (ANMAC, 2014).


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Documentación/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Partería/educación , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Bachillerato en Enfermería , Humanos , Queensland
6.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 77(4): 429-435, 2019 Aug 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31418704

RESUMEN

Training in biology, pharmacy and medicine are essential in laboratory medicine in faculty and especially with recent residency modifications. Active learning improves critical thinking and is an essential component of health education. Interactive assessment systems for the interactive participation of students have emerged. Recently, many offers of audience response system (ARS) accessible by personal electronic devices such as smartphone, tablet or computer are available. These systems seem to be an effective teaching innovation according to students. We aimed to evaluate three pedagogical tools during real school lectures in order to be able to select them according to the needs: Votar, Socrative and Wooclap. Methods: Three connected participation tools will be tested during teaching at Lille University, faculty of pharmacy by 3 different teachers. 75 fifth-year pharmacy students divided into 2 groups of students will have attended at least one session using each of the systems studied. After lessons, an online questionnaire with 9 questions was submitted to students on their interest in each system. Questions measured student perception using a 1 to 10 scale. Results and discussion: 62 of 75 students completed online surveys and were included in the study. According students, ARS by smartphone or computer improve their education. Favorite application seems to be Socrative and Wooclap. This study provides student perception comparison of ARS. To complete, additional studies are needed to establish their efficacy after several month.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Entrenamiento Simulado , Interfaz Usuario-Computador , Teléfono Celular , Educación Médica/métodos , Educación Médica/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Humanos , Invenciones , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/normas , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/normas , Estudiantes de Medicina , Estudiantes de Farmacia , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Realidad Virtual
7.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4): 412-419, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31440335

RESUMEN

Background: Internal medicine (IM) residency programs receive information about applicants via academic transcripts, but studies demonstrate wide variability in satisfaction with and usefulness of this information. In addition, many studies compare application materials to only 1 or 2 assessment metrics, usually standardized test scores and work-based observational faculty assessments. Objective: We sought to determine which application materials best predict performance across a broad array of residency assessment outcomes generated by standardized testing and a yearlong IM residency ambulatory long block. Methods: In 2019, we analyzed available Electronic Residency Application Service data for 167 categorical IM residents, including advanced degree status, research experience, failures during medical school, undergraduate medical education award status, and United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores. We compared these with post-match residency multimodal performance, including standardized test scores and faculty member, peer, allied health professional, and patient-level assessment measures. Results: In multivariate analyses, USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) scores were most predictive of performance across all residency performance domains measured. Having an advanced degree was associated with higher patient-level assessments (eg, physician listens, physician explains, etc). USMLE Step 1 scores were associated with in-training examination scores only. None of the other measured application materials predicted performance. Conclusions: USMLE Step 2 CK scores were the highest predictors of residency performance across a broad array of performance measurements generated by standardized testing and an IM residency ambulatory long block.


Asunto(s)
Evaluación Educacional/normas , Medicina Interna/educación , Internado y Residencia , Licencia Médica/normas , Rendimiento Laboral/normas , Competencia Clínica/normas , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Humanos
8.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(4 Suppl): 118-124, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31428268

RESUMEN

Background: Group discussion of resident performance is an emerging assessment approach in postgraduate medical education. However, groups do not necessarily make better decisions than individuals. Objective: This study examined how group meetings concerning the assessment of residents take place, what information is shared during the meetings, and how this influences program directors' judgment of resident performance. Methods: In 2017, the researchers observed 10 faculty group meetings where resident performance was discussed and interviewed the program directors within a month after the meetings. We used a thematic framework analysis to identify themes from the transcribed meetings and interviews. Results: The information shared by group members during the meetings had 2 aims: (1) forming a judgment about the residents, and (2) faculty development. Most group members shared information without written notes, most discussions were not structured by the program director, the major focus of discussions was on residents with performance concerns, and there was a lack of a shared mental model of resident performance. The program directors who benefited most from the meetings were those who thought group members were engaged and summarized the information after every discussion. Conclusions: Unstructured discussions and a lack of a shared mental model among group members impede effective information sharing about resident performance with a developmental approach. Structured discussions with an equal amount of discussion time for every resident and creating a shared mental model about the purpose of the discussions and the assessment approach could enhance use of a developmental approach to assessing resident performance.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Docentes Médicos , Internado y Residencia , Desarrollo de Personal , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Humanos , Juicio
9.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(4): 443-450, 2019 Dec 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31460774

RESUMEN

Students from three undergraduate programs at James Cook University, Queensland, Australia, studying combined first-year anatomy and physiology courses, showed different academic achievement in physiology. Physiotherapy students were more active and social when completing learning tasks and achieved significantly higher grades in physiology compared with students enrolled in Sport and Exercise Science and Occupational Therapy programs. To promote academic engagement and achievement by all three groups, discussion questions, case studies, and study guides were included. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of using these modified resources to promote active learning, enhance academic social interactions, and provide a supportive learning environment. The occupational therapy students showed increased academic achievement (from 57.9 to 66.5%) following implementation of the new resources, but there was no change in the already high-performing physiotherapy students (73.1%) and, more concerningly, the sport and exercise science students (from 54.6 to 56.7%). Fewer sport and exercise science students had prior learning in chemistry (30.4% of participants) and also spent little time outside class studying (8 h/wk), compared with the physiotherapy cohort (70.0% chemistry; 13 h/wk studying). Findings of this research demonstrate that creating a supportive and active learning environment are important factors in promoting the learning of physiology for some cohorts. Background knowledge, academic self-regulatory skills, and the experience of teaching staff are factors that must be considered when endeavoring to increase student academic achievement. Future studies should examine the effect of students' academic self-regulation and the use of remedial chemistry classes when learning physiology.


Asunto(s)
Éxito Académico , Anatomía/educación , Fisiología/educación , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud , Adolescente , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/normas , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Universidades/normas , Adulto Joven
10.
Nurse Educ Today ; 81: 19-25, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31306850

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Historically nursing and midwifery students have reported difficulty understanding the concept-based science underpinning the interactions between drugs and their targets. This knowledge is crucial for the administration and monitoring of the therapeutic and adverse effects of medications. Immersive three-dimensional technology is reported to enhance understanding of complex scientific concepts but the physical effects of motion sickness may limit its use. OBJECTIVES: This project compared the effectiveness of three-dimensional immersive visualisation technology with two-dimensional visualisation technology as a teaching method to improve student understanding of a pharmacological concept, and to assess levels of student discomfort and satisfaction associated with the experience. DESIGN: Traditional lecture content and presentation about drug-receptor binding was followed by exposure to either a two- or three-dimensional artifact visualising ß-adrenoceptor binding. Two student groups were compared by type of exposure: Group 1 watched the artifact via a three-dimensional immersive facility and Group 2 on a wide, two-dimensional screen. SETTINGS: School of Nursing and Midwifery in a regional university in Southeast Queensland, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred and two second year undergraduate nursing and midwifery students. METHODS: The study used mixed methods methodology. Pre- and post- testing of student knowledge was collected using five multiple-choice questions. A post-intervention survey elicited students' self-assessed perceptions of discomfort and satisfaction with the learning experience. RESULTS: The three-dimensional immersive learning experience was comparable to the two-dimensional experience in terms of satisfaction and comfort but resulted in statistically significant improvements in post-test scores. CONCLUSIONS: The three-dimensional experience improved understanding when compared to two-dimensional viewing, satisfied students leaning needs, and caused minimal discomfort. The results are encouraging in terms of using three-dimensional technology to enhance student knowledge of pharmacological concepts necessary for competency in medication management.


Asunto(s)
Interacciones de Drogas/fisiología , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Conocimiento , Partería/educación , Farmacología/educación , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Realidad Virtual , Competencia Clínica , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Farmacología/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas
11.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 72(3): 788-794, 2019 Jun 27.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31269147

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the contribution of debriefing after clinical simulations for nursing students. METHOD: Quantitative study, conducted with 35 nursing students who participated in five clinical simulation scenarios with planned debriefings based on the model of the National League Nursing/Jeffries Simulation Theory. After the fifth scenario, students answered the Debriefing Evaluation Scale associated with the Simulation. RESULTS: The items evaluated involved the psychosocial, cognitive, and affective values, and within a scale from one to five, the highest mean was found in cognitive value with 4.23 (±0.56) points, then in psychosocial value with 3.77 (±0.53), and finally in affective value with 3.71 (±0.63) points. CONCLUSION: The debriefing conducted after the clinical simulation scenarios was a reflective exercise that contributed to the student integrating multiple knowledges in affective, cognitive and psychosocial values, and thus develop the competencies required.


Asunto(s)
Evaluación Educacional/normas , Retroalimentación , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/normas , Estudiantes de Enfermería/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Brasil , Competencia Clínica/normas , Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios Transversales , Bachillerato en Enfermería/métodos , Bachillerato en Enfermería/normas , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino
12.
Med Educ Online ; 24(1): 1620544, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31184288

RESUMEN

PROBLEM: This study used the principles of feedback in a faculty development curriculum to enable clinical teachers to conduct objective structured teaching exercises for performance assessment. INTERVENTION: the Flanders System of Interaction Analysis (FIA) was given to analysis of the data collected from a particular situation, to videotapes of simulated clinical teaching skills. CONTEXT: The Sparse K-Means clustering method, one-way ANOVA and post hoc tests were employed to cluster the most commonly used skills by teachers and compare the features of different clusters were then discussed. OUTCOME: The evaluation method employed in this study can be extended to more teaching methods and skills. LESSONS LEARNED: that through teaching observation, clinical teaching skills and reflection teaching can be improved.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Docentes Médicos/organización & administración , Retroalimentación Formativa , Enseñanza/organización & administración , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino
13.
Pediatrics ; 144(1)2019 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31213520

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Global health (GH) offerings by pediatric residency programs have increased significantly, with 1 in 4 programs indicating they offer a GH track. Despite growth of these programs, there is currently no widely accepted definition for what comprises a GH track in residency. METHODS: A panel of 12 pediatric GH education experts was assembled to use the Delphi method to work toward a consensus definition of a GH track and determine essential educational offerings, institutional supports, and outcomes to evaluate. The panelists completed 3 rounds of iterative surveys that were amended after each round on the basis of qualitative results. RESULTS: Each survey round had 100% panelist response. An accepted definition of a GH track was achieved during the second round of surveys. Consensus was achieved that at minimum, GH track educational offerings should include a longitudinal global child health curriculum, a GH rotation with international or domestic underserved experiences, predeparture preparation, preceptorship during GH electives, postreturn debrief, and scholarly output. Institutional supports should include resident salary support; malpractice, evacuation, and health insurance during GH electives; and a dedicated GH track director with protected time and financial and administrative support for program development and establishing partnerships. Key outcomes for evaluation of a GH track were agreed on. CONCLUSIONS: Consensus on the definition of a GH track, along with institutional supports and educational offerings, is instrumental in ensuring consistency in quality GH education among pediatric trainees. Consensus on outcomes for evaluation will help to create quality resident and program assessment tools.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum/normas , Salud Global/educación , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Pediatría/educación , Técnica Delfos , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Salud Global/normas , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/normas , Pediatría/normas , Estados Unidos
14.
Korean J Med Educ ; 31(2): 115-124, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31230434

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The spotter's (objectively structured practical examination) is an assessment tool which is widely used to test the practical knowledge of anatomy extensively. In Indian context it is used as an inclusive model in the gross anatomy practical examination and the marks allotted to it varies. The traditional spotter examination often has been blamed for only incorporating the initial levels of revised Bloom's taxonomy. This study retrospectively analysed the pre-professional spotter's examination score and tested its efficacy in terms of reliability, internal consistency, validity, educational impact, and resource intensiveness. METHODS: The summative data of student's score on four different days of unrepeated spotter's examination and final theory examination score was collected and tabulated. These four group of students acted as independent cohorts. The difficulty index (DI), point biserial correlation (PBC), Cronbach α (CA) and descriptive statistics of each cohort were calculated. Revised bloom taxonomy rating was applied to spotter's. RESULTS: We found heterogenous distribution of spotter's in each cohort according to DI. The PBCs and CA of each cohort were acceptable. The majority of spotter's tested the cognitive and comprehension domain of revised bloom's taxonomy. There was nonsignificant difference between mean scores of cohorts but we found low positive significant correlation between theory and spotter's score. CONCLUSION: We concluded that the construct of spotter's was reliable, internally consistent, had fair validity, variable educational impact, and sustainable resource intensiveness. We propose urgent redesigning of spotter's to include higher level of taxonomy to comply with emerging curricular changes.


Asunto(s)
Rendimiento Académico , Anatomía/educación , Curriculum , Educación Médica , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Medicina , Clasificación , Cognición , Comprensión , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Humanos , India , Conocimiento , Aprendizaje/clasificación , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Estudios Retrospectivos , Enseñanza
15.
Korean J Med Educ ; 31(2): 147-157, 2019 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31230437

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Test equating studies in medical education have been conducted only for high-stake exams or to compare two tests given in a single course. Based on item response theory, we equated computer-based test (CBT) results from the basic medical education curriculum at the College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea and evaluated the validity of using fixed passing scores. METHODS: We collected 232 CBTs (28,636 items) for 40 courses administered over a study period of 9 years. The final data used for test equating included 12 pairs of tests. After test equating, Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were utilized to identify changes in item difficulty between previous tests and subsequent tests. Then, we identified gaps between equated passing scores and actual passing scores in subsequent tests through an observed-score equating method. RESULTS: The results of Wilcoxon rank-sum tests indicated that there were no significant differences in item difficulty distribution by year for seven pairs. In the other five pairs, however, the items were significantly more difficult in subsequent years than in previous years. Concerning the gaps between equated passing scores and actual passing scores, equated passing scores in 10 pairs were found to be lower than actual passing scores. In the other two pairs, equated passing scores were higher than actual passing scores. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the item difficulty distributions of tests taught in the same course during successive terms can differ significantly. It may therefore be problematic to use fixed passing scores without considering this possibility.


Asunto(s)
Rendimiento Académico , Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Universidades , Computadores , Humanos , República de Corea
16.
Br J Educ Psychol ; 89(3): 456-467, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31243770

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The International Performance Assessments of Learning (iPAL) project developed a framework for the construction of performance assessments for testing critical thinking, which proposes structuring them around a problem situation that sets an authentic (i.e., real-life-like) problem-solving task for the test-taker. Its critical thinking construct - which reflects the dominant conception of critical thinking - focuses on assessment and use of information, of arguments, and of consequences, and on communication. However, it fails to acknowledge that perspectives on a problem situation are systemically articulated in networks and derive from worldviews, which should also be critically examined. AIMS: We aim to elaborate on the iPAL framework and enhance its critical thinking construct, incorporating a new facet of perspective analysis. We also intend to show what design considerations the construction of a performance assessment appropriate for this task entails. DEVELOPMENT: Based on Werner Ulrich's Critical Systems Heuristics, which provides a systemic way of analysing perspectives about a problem situation, we argue the need to introduce perspective analysis in the critical thinking construct, and we discuss the considerations necessary for designing critical thinking performance assessments that test perspective analysis skills: about the kind of problem situation the test-taker will face and about the expectations she may have about her task or role in that problem situation. We illustrate how performance assessments of this kind can be constructed by means of an example of an actual test.


Asunto(s)
Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Pensamiento , Rendimiento Académico , Adulto , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Heurística , Humanos , Estudiantes , Universidades , Adulto Joven
17.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 317-323, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31246509

RESUMEN

Prelaboratory tasks are used to facilitate learning and introduce and provide context for laboratory work. The application of first-person perspective (FPP) technology may provide interesting new approaches to providing prelaboratory preparation. However, there is limited knowledge as to whether this perspective is useful or enjoyable for students preparing for laboratory tasks. The purpose of this study was to examine whether prelaboratory preparation, utilizing the FPP technique, was enjoyable and led to improvements in laboratory task-specific self-efficacy in comparison to the traditional text-only (TO) style. We observed that the FPP group found the style to be generally more enjoyable, entertaining, and generally fun compared with the TO group (5.3 ± 0.2 and 2.7 ± 0.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that the FPP group had a greater laboratory task-specific self-efficacy than their counterparts in the TO group, following the prelaboratory preparation (93.6 ± 1.6 and 83.5 ± 3.2, respectively, P < 0.05). We did not find any differences in scenario-based self-efficacy between the FPP and the TO group. Taken together, our data support the use of FPP videos as a novel, refreshing approach to prelaboratory preparation that builds self-efficacy in students performing laboratory tasks.


Asunto(s)
Técnicas de Laboratorio Clínico/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Autoeficacia , Estudiantes/psicología , Universidades , Técnicas de Laboratorio Clínico/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Humanos , Universidades/normas
18.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 306-316, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31246510

RESUMEN

The National License Examination step 1 (NLE1), which tests basic medical sciences knowledge in Thailand, is considered to be tough and stressful for medical students due to the large amount of content. This study aimed to determine factors influencing the NLE1 score (NLE1S). The NLE1S, academic achievement, and class attendance were obtained officially. Other factors, including study habits, were obtained via a questionnaire, with 81.97% (241/294) being returned. Students were divided into four groups according to the central passing score and Z-score of the NLE1S, including the fail (<52%; n = 13), low-pass (52 to <70%; n = 121), high-pass (70 to <80%; n = 89), and excellent (≥80%; n = 18) groups. Men had higher NLE1S (P < 0.001) and comprehensive examination scores (P < 0.001) than women. Students with high motivation to study medicine had higher NLE1S. Daily preparation time (h/day) was lower, but stress was higher, in the fail group. In the excellent group, internet for academic use and achievement of study targets were higher; internet for nonacademic use, instance of absence, and stress were lower; and check-in time was earlier. The NLE1S had strong positive correlations with the comprehensive examination score and academic achievement during preclinical studies. By setting the NLE1S as a dependent variable in multivariate regression analyses, models of significant interactions were observed by setting behavioral factors, the comprehensive examination score, and academic achievement during a regular class as independent variables. Thus exhibiting good study habits and showing good academic performance throughout preclinical studies should be encouraged among students to achieve a good NLE1S.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Licencia Médica , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/normas , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Femenino , Humanos , Licencia Médica/normas , Masculino , Tailandia , Adulto Joven
20.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 217, 2019 Jun 17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31208418

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Rwanda is the only African country to use the pediatric International In-Training Examination (I-ITE). The objectives of this study were to use the scores from the I-ITE to outline the baseline level of knowledge of Rwandan residents entering the pediatric residency and the trends in knowledge acquisition from 2012 to 2018, during the Human Resources for Health (HRH) Program, an education partnership between the Rwanda Ministry of Health and a consortium of US universities. METHODS: A retrospective descriptive analysis of the I-ITE exam scores, taken by all Rwandan pediatric residents for five of the six academic years of the study period. Individual resident scores were weighted using the non-Rwandan I-ITE sites to minimise confounding from annual variations in exam difficulty. Statistical analysis included descriptives with ANOVA to compare variation in annual mean scores. RESULTS: Eighty-four residents took 213 I-ITE exam sittings over the five exam cycles. The mean weighted I-ITE score of all residents increased from 34% in 2013 to 49% (p < 0.001) in 2018. The 32-point gap between the mean US-ITE and Rwandan I-ITE score in 2012-2013 was reduced to a 16-point gap in 2017-2018. First year resident (PG1) scores, which likely reflect the knowledge level of undergraduate medical students entering the residency program, increased from 34.8 to 44.3% (p = 0.002) between 2013 and 2018. CONCLUSIONS: The I-ITE is an independent, robust tool, measuring both learners and the institutional factors supporting residents. This is the first study to demonstrate that the I-ITE can be used to monitor resident knowledge acquisition in resource-limited settings, where assessment of resident knowledge can be a major challenge facing the academic medicine community. The significant increase in I-ITE scores between 2012 and 18 reflects the substantial curricular reorganisation accomplished through collaboration between Rwandan and US embedded faculty and supports the theory that programs such as HRH are highly effective at improving the quality of residency programs and undergraduate medical education.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Internado y Residencia , Pediatría/educación , Recursos Humanos , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/normas , Humanos , Medicina Interna/educación , Licencia Médica , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Estudios Retrospectivos , Rwanda
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