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2.
Acad Med ; 96(1): 11-12, 2021 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33394649
3.
Acad Med ; 96(1): 12, 2021 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33394650
4.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1857322, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33327877

RESUMEN

Many challenges could occur that result in the need to handle an increase in the number of medical student clinical placements, such as curricular transformations or viral pandemics, such as COVID 19. Here, we describe four different institutions' approaches to addressing the impact of curricular transformation on clerkships using an implementation science lens. Specifically, we explore four different approaches to managing the 'bulge' as classes overlap in clerkships Curriculum leaders at four medical schools report on managing the bulge of core clinical placements resulting from reducing the duration of the foundational sciences curriculum and calendar shifts for the respective clerkship curriculum. These changes, which occurred between 2014 and 2018, led to more students being enrolled in core clinical rotations at the same time than occurred previously. Schools provided respective metrics used to evaluate the effectiveness of their bulge management technique. These data typically included number of students affected in each phase of their curricular transformation, performance on standardized examinations, and student and faculty feedback. Not all data were available from all schools, as some schools are still working through their 'bulge' or are affected by COVID-19. There is much to be learned about managing curricular transformations. Working on such endeavors in a learning collaborative such as the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education Initiative provided support and insights about how to survive, thrive and identifying lessons learned during curricular transformation.


Asunto(s)
Prácticas Clínicas , Curriculum , Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Humanos
5.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1841406, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33119431

RESUMEN

The use of recorded video in medical education is increasing. Video material may be assigned before scheduled sessions to create a flipped classroom. Here, the instructor may lead a session that is organized for discussion, interpretation, and reflection of the previewed content. We established conditions that lead to increased student participation and engagement with prerecorded content for a medical genetics section in a first-year medical school basic sciences integrated course. Preliminary analysis of an asynchronous video-based pre-professional program directed the design of video material to support a first semester medical genetics course. We compared student participation in, and opinion of, a flipped-classroom session based on written vs. video presentation of material. Student opinion was surveyed with audience response devices (clickers). Shorter videos that were created specifically for the course were preferred by students compared to recordings of previously delivered lectures. Students preferred videos to assigned reading material and consistent scheduling throughout the teaching semester increased student participation. Presentation of medical school content with previously recorded video material can be a useful teaching tool if properly implemented.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Facultades de Medicina , Grabación en Video , Humanos , Estudiantes , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
6.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1844394, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33167822

RESUMEN

Calls to reform medical education recommend explicit training in professional identity formation to promote the development of humanistic, compassionate physicians. The authors report their experience offering The Physician Healer Track, a 500-contact-hour curricula integrated over 4 years, focusing on self-awareness, reflection, being-with-suffering, communication and professional identity development. The voluntary scholarly-concentration program comprises 4 years of monthly dinner meetings with faculty mentors, a two-month preceptorship in the first year, a one-month immersion course in MS4 and one elective. Training in mindfulness, cognitive behavioral therapy, nonviolent communication, motivational interviewing, spirituality in healthcare, wellness, equanimity, and 'being with suffering' is reinforced across all 4 years. Community building and reflection are integral to the training both in the monthly sessions and the immersion courses. Enrollment has grown from 26 students in the first year (11% of class) to a total of 258 students across our first 6 years (average of 20-26% of each class). Graduates in our first two cohorts of PHT have exceeded the numbers in the eight other scholarly concentrations offered at UTMB. Among students participating in the summer preceptorship, there has been less than 1% attrition. In serial assessments, students report continued growth in personal development, professional development, and the ability to empathize. Offering PHT has resulted in the growth of training for our medical residents, faculty, physical therapy students and the creation of a student healer association. Despite the demands on student's time, they are voluntarily participating in a challenging program of integrated training with the intention of keeping them connected to their humanity during the rigors of medical school training.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Educación Médica , Empatía , Humanidades , Atención Plena , Estudiantes de Medicina , Curriculum , Educación Médica/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Docentes , Humanismo , Humanidades/educación , Humanos , Mentores , Médicos , Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
7.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1847243, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33200975

RESUMEN

Social accountability (SA) is an obligation for medical schools in meeting the priority health concerns of the communities they serve. To measure the integration of SA principles into medical curricula, suitable tools are needed. This study developed and validated an inventory to assess SA values within the existing case scenarios used in problem-based learning (PBL) curricula. The Delphi technique was employed to develop and validate the new inventory. The validation used expert opinion and calculated the content validity using content validity indices (CVIs). The initial draft (Draft 0) was formulated with 25 open-ended questions. Following expert evaluation, Draft 1 had 22 closed-ended questions and the mean ratings, according to the experts, were as follows: relevance, 3.33-4.83; importance (3.5-4.8); clarity (3.33-4.83); and simplicity (3:00-4.67). Draft 2 had 19 questions. After a further round of rating and analysis, a final draft was prepared, consisting of 17 items, with CVI scores ≥ 0.8 and 100% overall satisfaction. Using this inventory tool will help health professions schools to translate SA indicators into curricular activities by identifying the gaps in their PBL curricula. Deficiencies can be either in the type of case scenarios used or the triggers embedded in the individual case scenarios, subsequently leading to the development of PBL case scenarios that address real health social needs. A revision and rewriting of the problem case scenarios to incorporate SA will be the next step.


Asunto(s)
Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Facultades de Medicina , Responsabilidad Social , Curriculum , Humanos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos
8.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1843356, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33250037

RESUMEN

PROBLEM: Opportunities for self-directed learning were missing from our medical school curriculum in general and on our radiology electives specifically. Our objective was to explore the feasibility and benefits of using medical students in the development of our student-created teaching files. APPROACH: In 2018, a website was developed at our institution to support medical student radiology education and create a repository for the online publication of student-developed teaching cases. Students participating in radiology clerkships at our institution had an opportunity to submit case presentations for publication to our online teaching file following peer review. The medical students participated in the peer review process facilitated by the faculty director of radiology undergraduate medical education. The faculty member oversaw the training of new student editors and the development of a peer review guide. OUTCOMES: The peer review guide included goals of the teaching file project and direction regarding the peer review process. Student editors were trained using the peer review guide in conjunction with individual meetings with the faculty mentor. At twenty-four months, 82 student-developed cases had been published to the online teaching file following medical student peer review. The teaching file had garnered 3884 page views. NEXT STEPS: The medical student-led peer review process meets core competencies in self-directed learning. The authors plan to explore the application of peer-assisted learning theories to the editing and peer-review process.


Asunto(s)
Educación a Distancia , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Educación Médica , Revisión por Pares , Curriculum , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Mentores , Grupo Paritario , Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Enseñanza
10.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0243958, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33338045

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Due to the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), school openings were postponed worldwide as a way to stop its spread. Most classes are moving online, and this includes medical school classes. The authors present their experience of running such online classes with offline clinical clerkship under pandemic conditions, and also present data on student satisfaction, academic performance, and preference. METHODS: The medical school changed every first-year to fourth-year course to an online format except the clinical clerkship, clinical skills training, and basic laboratory classes such as anatomy lab sessions. Online courses were pre-recorded video lectures or live-streamed using video communication software. At the end of each course, students and professors were asked to report their satisfaction with the online course and comment on it. The authors also compared students' academic performance before and after the introduction of online courses. RESULTS: A total of 69.7% (318/456) of students and 35.2% (44/125) of professors answered the questionnaire. Students were generally satisfied with the online course and 62.2% of them preferred the online course to the offline course. The majority (84.3%) of the students wanted to maintain the online course after the end of COVID-19. In contrast, just 13.6% of professors preferred online lectures and half (52.3%) wanted to go back to the offline course. With the introduction of online classes, students' academic achievement did not change significantly in four subjects, but decreased in two subjects. CONCLUSIONS: The inevitable transformation of medical education caused by COVID-19 is still ongoing. As the safety of students and the training of competent physicians are the responsibilities of medical schools, further research into how future physicians will be educated is needed.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Prácticas Clínicas , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/tendencias , Rendimiento Académico , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Internet , Satisfacción en el Trabajo , Pandemias , República de Corea , Facultades de Medicina , Programas Informáticos , Estudiantes de Medicina
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 516, 2020 Dec 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33371878

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The re-introduction of medical students into healthcare systems struggling with the COVID-19 pandemic raises concerns as to whether they will be supported when confronted with death and dying patients in resource-limited settings and with reduced support from senior clinicians. Better understanding of how medical students respond to death and dying will inform educationalists and clinicians on how to best support them. METHODS: We adopt Krishna's Systematic Evidence Based Approach to carry out a Systematic Scoping Review (SSR in SEBA) on the impact of death and dying on medical students. This structured search process and concurrent use of thematic and directed content analysis of data from six databases (Split Approach) enhances the transparency and reproducibility of this review. RESULTS: Seven thousand six hundred nineteen were identified, 149 articles reviewed and 52 articles included. The Split Approach revealed similar themes and categories that correspond to the Innate, Individual, Relational and Societal domains in the Ring Theory of Personhood. CONCLUSION: Facing death and dying amongst their patients affect how medical students envisage their personhood. This underlines the need for timely, holistic and longitudinal support systems to ensure that problems faced are addressed early. To do so, there must be effective training and a structured support mechanism.


Asunto(s)
Muerte , Personeidad , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , /mortalidad , Curriculum , Humanos , Pandemias , Proyectos de Investigación , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Apoyo Social
12.
Bol. méd. postgrado ; 36(2): 7-20, dic.2020. tab, ilus
Artículo en Español | LILACS, LIVECS | ID: biblio-1117892

RESUMEN

El presente estudio fue realizado para desarrollar una reflexión crítica acerca de la formación médica en la Venezuela del siglo XXI, interpretando realidades y consecuencias desde las voces de médicos expertos y jóvenes graduados formados en la Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado (UCLA). Es un estudio desde el paradigma cualitativo en la modalidad crítica interpretativa, la ruta metodológica fue la hermenéutica crítica y el análisis crítico del discurso. Se utilizó el muestreo intencional y la entrevista para recopilar la narrativa de los actores sociales, categorizándola e interpretándola contrastando voces de actores, teóricos y el autor como instrumento heurístico. Los resultados indican que la formación médica socializa el paradigma biomédico cuantitativo como opción única y válida en la producción de conocimiento y en el mundo académico, con un enfoque evolucionista, organicista, positivista y racional que fragmenta al ser humano. Esta formación académica se cumple en un sistema educativo dual: las universidades autónomas y la universidad bolivariana revolucionaria, con profundas diferencias entre ellas que generan perfiles de egresados contradictorios. La formación del futuro médico implica desarrollar el saber, el saber hacer, saber ser profesional y saber convivir. En conclusión, la formación médica debe cumplirse en centros universitarios calificados y certificados; sus egresados deben ser de alto perfil científico, tecnológico y humanístico los cuales deben dar respuestas pertinentes y oportunas a los problemas de salud de la población venezolana(AU)


This study was conducted to develop a reflective critic about medical training in Venezuela in the 21st century interpreting thoughts from the voices of expert doctors and young graduates from the Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado (UCLA). This is a qualitative sociocritical study using critical hermeneutics and critical analysis of speech. Intentional sampling and interviewing was used to collect the narrative of the medical professionals. The results shows that medical training socializes the quantitative biomedical paradigm as the only valid option in the production of knowledge and in the academic world, with an evolutionist, organicist, rational and positivist approach, which divides the human being in parts. In Venezuela, a dual educational system exists: autonomous universities and the Bolivarian University with deep differences between them, which generate conflicting graduate profiles. Training of the future doctors implies developing medical knowledge, the know-how, learning how to be a professional and coexist with others. In conclusion, medical training must be performed in qualified and certified university centers; their graduates should have high scientific, technological and humanistic profiles which will allow them to provide pertinent and timely answers to the health problems of the Venezuelan population(AU)


Asunto(s)
Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Medicina General , Venezuela , Programas de Estudio , Historia de la Medicina
13.
Eur. j. anat ; 24(6): 507-512, nov. 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | IBECS | ID: ibc-196144

RESUMEN

The Coronavirus disease was declared a pandemic this year, causing an impact on medical education. Following the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations, Universities around the world implemented social distancing and the use of online platforms. Anatomists lead medical students, most of which are part of Generation Z. Different technological tools have been used in the gross anatomy course in combination with face-to-face classes, but now are forced to move exclusively online. The Human Anatomy Department in the Medical School of the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo León (UANL) implemented asynchronous sessions as a short-term resolution, transformed to synchronous sessions as the pandemic progressed. It is important to consider the adaptability of the student, the near-peer teacher, and academic staff, with the creation of innovative ideas to facilitate the learning for the student and to maintain the quality of the course. Their role in this modality should be assessed, as it may change medical education and the way to teach in the future for the new generation of medical students. Professors' roles are changing and it is necessary to adapt to new situations


No disponible


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Anatomía/educación , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Betacoronavirus , Docentes/organización & administración , Educación Médica/métodos , Anatomía/organización & administración , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , México/epidemiología , Universidades/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina
14.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 396, 2020 Oct 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33129295

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic prompted the pediatric department at King Abdulaziz University to continue students' educational activities by offering courses online that utilized web video conferencing (WVC). Given the uncertainties of WVC educational quality and the challenge of shifting to an online environment, this study aimed to evaluate student satisfaction with the teaching quality of case-based discussion (CBD) sessions conducted through WVC. METHODS: One hundred sixty-two undergraduate medical students in pediatrics completed the reduced Students' Evaluation of Educational Quality (SEEQ) survey with a five-point Likert scale over 5 weeks. The WVC CBD sessions were facilitated by 50 faculty members. RESULTS: 82% of respondents were highly satisfied with the WVC CBD session's teaching quality. The majority agreed that the sessions were intellectually challenging, that the instructors were dynamic, and encouraged students to participate. No statistically significant correlation was found between student satisfaction and technical issues (r = 0.037, p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: WVC teaching had an overall positive outcome on student satisfaction, and teaching quality relied on teaching, cognitive, and social presence rather than technology. However, technology remains an important platform that supports teachers' educational activities. Thus, implementing a blended pediatric course to augment future course delivery is optimal.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Comunicación por Videocoferencia/organización & administración , Betacoronavirus , Humanos , Pandemias , Satisfacción Personal , Arabia Saudita , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
15.
Rev Med Suisse ; 16(713): 2104-2107, 2020 Nov 04.
Artículo en Francés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33146959

RESUMEN

Gender bias in medicine negatively interfere with the medical care of both men and women, which can lead to risks for patients as well as health inequalities. Unisanté has launched a pilot project to integrate reflexivity by students at the Medical School of the University of Lausanne on the influence of gender in clinical practice, using an electronic portfolio. The clinical vignettes presented and discussed in this article illustrate this reflective work and the main biases and stereotypes encountered: pain management, assessment of the psychosocial context, management of domestic violence, screening for chlamydia infection and discussion of a contraceptive method.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Medicina , Sexismo , Estudiantes de Medicina , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Proyectos Piloto , Facultades de Medicina , Suiza
17.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 400, 2020 Nov 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33138818

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: COVID - 19 pandemic pressured medical schools globally to shift to Distance learning (DL) as an alternative way to ensure that the content delivered is satisfactory for student progression. AIM OF THE WORK: This work aims at mapping priorities for post-COVID planning for better balance between distance learning and face to face learning. METHODS: This qualitative study aimed to develop a model for utilizing DL using The Polarity Approach for Continuity and Transformation (PACT)™. A virtual mapping session was held with 79 faculty from 19 countries. They worked in small groups to determine upsides and downsides of face-to-face and DL subsequently. An initial polarity map was generated identifying five tension areas; Faculty, Students, Curriculum, Social aspects and Logistics. A 63-item assessment tool was generated based on this map, piloted and then distributed as a self-administered assessment. The outcomes of this assessment were utilized for another mapping session to discuss warning signs and action steps to maintain upsides and avoid downsides of each pole. RESULTS: Participants agreed that face-to-face teaching allows them to inspire students and have meaningful connections with them. They also agreed that DL provides a good environment for most students. However, students with financial challenges and special needs may not have equal opportunities to access technology. As regards social issues, participants agreed that face-to-face learning provides a better chance for professionalism through enhanced team-work. Cognitive, communication and clinical skills are best achieved in face-to-face. Participants agreed that logistics for conducting DL are much more complicated when compared to face-to-face learning. Participants identified around 10 warning signs for each method that need to be continuously monitored in order to minimize the drawbacks of over focusing on one pole at the expense of the other. Action steps were determined to ensure optimized use of in either method. CONCLUSION: In order to plan for the future, we need to understand the dynamics of education within the context of polarities. Educators need to understand that the choice of DL, although was imposed as a no-alternative solution during the COVID era, yet it has always existed as a possible alternative and will continue to exist after this era. The value of polarity mapping and leveraging allows us to maximize the benefit of each method and guide educators' decisions to minimize the downsides for the good of the learning process.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/organización & administración , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Innovación Organizacional , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigación Cualitativa , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
18.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 23(10): 1462-1469, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33047707

RESUMEN

Background: Educational environment (EE) affects transfer/acquisition of knowledge and skills needed in training medical students. Evaluation of EE by students is paramount to rating the EE of a medical school as well as evaluate effects of interventions. Assessing EE of medical schools is a current global trend. Objectives: : To evaluate EE at the new medical school of the Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University Teaching Hospital Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria; calculate the total and subscale (Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure) DREEM scores and assess differences in these scores amongst the different classes, age groups, and sexes. Methodology: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study using census survey. We administered DREEM questionnaire to 4th, 5th, and 6th year medical students in the 2018/2019 academic session after ethical approval from Health Research and Ethics Committee (HREC). Data entry and analysis done using SPSS. ANOVA was used for association between level of study, age group, and total DREEM/Subscale scores. Test for association between sex and mean subscale/total score was done using independent sample t-test. P value <0.05 was adjudged significant. Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was calculated. Results: Of 206 students, 185 filled in the questionnaire. Total DREEM score was 119.66, Students' perception of teachers 26.74, Students' academic self Perception 21.94, Students' Perception of Learning 30.75, Students' Social Self Perception 15.04, Students' Perception of Atmosphere 25.26. Three items scored above 3 while 11 items scored ≤2. Fourth year students significantly scored higher than others for all subscale and total DREEM score. No significant associations between age or gender and subscale or total DREEM scores. Cronbach's alpha for all scores was 0.91. Conclusions: The EE was not excellent but "more positive than negative." Improvements are necessary in all domains of DREEM to ensure better quality of the educational environment.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Autoimagen , Medio Social , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Nigeria , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Enseñanza , Universidades
19.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(10): e22161, 2020 10 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33118935

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Owing to an increase in digital technologies in health care, recently leveraged by the COVID-19 pandemic, physicians are required to use these technologies appropriately and to be familiar with their implications on patient care, the health system, and society. Therefore, medical students should be confronted with digital health during their medical education. However, corresponding teaching formats and concepts are still largely lacking in the medical curricula. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to introduce digital health as a curricular module at a German medical school and to identify undergraduate medical competencies in digital health and their suitable teaching methods. METHODS: We developed a 3-week curricular module on digital health for third-year medical students at a large German medical school, taking place for the first time in January 2020. Semistructured interviews with 5 digital health experts were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using an abductive approach. We obtained feedback from the participating students and lecturers of the module through a 17-item survey questionnaire. RESULTS: The module received overall positive feedback from both students and lecturers who expressed the need for further digital health education and stated that the field is very important for clinical care and is underrepresented in the current medical curriculum. We extracted a detailed overview of digital health competencies, skills, and knowledge to teach the students from the expert interviews. They also contained suggestions for teaching methods and statements supporting the urgency of the implementation of digital health education in the mandatory curriculum. CONCLUSIONS: An elective class seems to be a suitable format for the timely introduction of digital health education. However, a longitudinal implementation in the mandatory curriculum should be the goal. Beyond training future physicians in digital skills and teaching them digital health's ethical, legal, and social implications, the experience-based development of a critical digital health mindset with openness to innovation and the ability to assess ever-changing health technologies through a broad transdisciplinary approach to translate research into clinical routine seem more important. Therefore, the teaching of digital health should be as practice-based as possible and involve the educational cooperation of different institutions and academic disciplines.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Telemedicina , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Retroalimentación , Alemania , Humanos , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
Med Ref Serv Q ; 39(4): 406-410, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33085947

RESUMEN

Collaboration between several College of Medicine departments, including the library, resulted in a creation of a new service for faculty during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. By combining efforts, support for teaching online became a united effort and much less daunting for faculty, who could consult one group for online teaching support, rather than three or four different entities. The resulting endeavor led to a website FAQ and consulting email address that is accessible to all faculty to provide focused and timely technology and education assistance to faculty.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Infecciones por Coronavirus , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Tecnología Educacional/organización & administración , Docentes Médicos/educación , Bibliotecas Médicas/organización & administración , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Facultades de Medicina/organización & administración , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Curriculum , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios de Casos Organizacionales , Pennsylvania
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