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1.
J Contemp Dent Pract ; 21(3): 249-252, 2020 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32434969

RESUMEN

AIM: The purpose of this study was to survey all United States Air Force (USAF) general dentists regarding their experience with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) while in a dental school. Dental school graduation year and location was compared to the type and amount of CAD/CAM training and clinical experience during dental school to better understand the differences and influence of this technology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey consisting of six questions was sent through e-mail to 546 general dentists in the AF Dental Corps in 2018 of which 306 replied (56% response rate). RESULTS: Dentists who graduated in 2005 or earlier and between 2006 and 2009 stated they did not receive CAD/CAM training in dental school, while more respondents in the group of graduation years 2014-2017 stated that they did receive training. About 11% of the respondents who graduated in 2014-2017 completed 6-10 restorations and 9% completed 11 or more restorations compared to the other year groups. More respondents who graduated from a dental school in the southwest and southeast regions of the United States reported completing more restorations compared to other school regions. CONCLUSION: Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing is now becoming a prevalent curriculum in US dental schools, both as a core requirement and an elective. Its training platforms varied from lectures and literature reviews to preclinical laboratory. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: More respondents in the groups of graduation years 2014-2017 had completed more CAD/CAM restorations compared to other year groups; however, most of the respondents did not feel their training was sufficient enough to use CAD/CAM technology independently.


Asunto(s)
Diseño Asistido por Computadora , Diseño de Prótesis Dental , Odontología Militar , Odontólogos , Humanos , Facultades de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
2.
J Dent Educ ; 84(6): 631-633, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32391578

RESUMEN

The recent 2019-novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV, also known as SARS-CoV-2) has caused >2,622,571 confirmed cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in >185 countries, and >182,359 deaths globally. More than 9000 healthcare workers have also been infected by 2019-nCoV. Prior to the present pandemic of COVID-19, there have been multiple large-scale epidemics and pandemics of other viral respiratory infections, such as seasonal flu, Spanish flu (H1N1), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and others. Dental professionals are at an increased risk for contracting these viruses from dental patients, as dental practice involves face-to-face communication with the patients and frequent exposure to saliva, blood, and other body fluids. Dental education can play an important role in the training of dentists, helping them to adopt adequate knowledge and attitudes related to infection control measures. The current dental curriculum does not cover infection control adequately, especially from airborne pathogens. Infection control education needs to be included in the dental curriculum itself, and students should be trained adequately to protect them and prevent the infection from disseminating even before they see their first patient.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Coronavirus , Brotes de Enfermedades , Educación en Odontología , Subtipo H1N1 del Virus de la Influenza A , Influenza Pandémica, 1918-1919 , Betacoronavirus , Historia del Siglo XX , Humanos , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral , Facultades de Odontología , Estudiantes de Odontología
3.
J Orthod ; 47(2): 129-139, 2020 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32338124

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To explore the experiences of mentoring higher-grade trainees amongst senior orthodontic trainers at Bristol Dental School. DESIGN: Qualitative study using interpretive methodology. SETTING: University of Bristol Dental School. PARTICIPANTS: Six consultant orthodontists, five of whom also have district general hospital experience. METHODS: One-to-one semi-structured interviews were undertaken on a purposeful sample of orthodontic trainers. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and Thematic Analysis was used to analyse the data. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged from the data were. They were: How to Mentor; Mentor-Mentee Pairings; Resources and Success; and Pitfalls of Mentoring. CONCLUSION: The present study revealed that senior trainers have a good understanding of the qualities of a mentor and appreciate the roles which mentors need to perform. They are altruistic in their motives, but would benefit from more time, organisational support and training to help them perform their duties better.


Asunto(s)
Tutoría , Humanos , Mentores , Investigación Cualitativa , Facultades de Odontología
5.
J Dent Educ ; 84(4): 478-485, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32314389

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of the Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) process and to assess its use as an admission tool to predict noncognitive traits associated with professional behavior during patient care in one cohort of dental students at a single U.S. dental school. Data were analyzed for the 95 candidates who matriculated and graduated as part of the 2017 graduating cohort at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. All MMI interviewees for one cycle of admissions rotated through ten stations: two traditional interview question stations and eight scenario stations measuring domains that included four questions scored on a five-point Likert scale. Generalizability theory analysis showed the MMI to have good reliability (G Coefficient of 0.74). Station reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) ranged from 0.88 to 0.92. MMI scores showed a positive significant correlation with students' scores on the Dental Admission Test and Perceptual Ability Test, D1 cumulative GPA, and D4 Patient Management grade. MMI scores positively correlated with professional behaviors relating to three domains-openness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability-thus demonstrating good predictive validity for measuring noncognitive traits associated with professionalism. This study found that the MMI was a reliable and valid tool that predicted key behavioral traits associated with professionalism in dental students.


Asunto(s)
Profesionalismo , Facultades de Odontología , Humanos , Entrevistas como Asunto , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Criterios de Admisión Escolar , Estudiantes de Odontología
6.
J Dent Educ ; 84(4): 486-494, 2020 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32314392

RESUMEN

The aims of this study were to compare third-year dental students' satisfaction and level of learning in case-based learning (CBL) versus team-based learning (TBL) and the resources required in those two methodologies. Level of learning was assessed for both knowledge and application, and resources were defined as student and faculty time and rooms. In academic year 2018-19, all 68 third-year dental students in one U.S. dental school were enrolled in two sequential semester-long courses; the first used CBL, and the second used TBL. After each course, students and faculty facilitators completed surveys, and data from students' knowledge and application exams were collected. The student surveys asked students to report their satisfaction with the learning methodology (CBL or TBL); the faculty surveys asked the faculty facilitators to report the resources used for each methodology. Forty-five of 68 students (66%) consented to participate; however, a larger number of students completed surveys in the two semesters (69% for CBL and 87% for TBL). Fourteen of 16 (88%) faculty facilitators completed the CBL survey, and five of the six (83%) completed the TBL survey. Overall, the results showed that students' satisfaction was higher with CBL than TBL (Mann-Whitney U = 882.0; p<0.001), and students reported having a better understanding of concepts after CBL than TBL (U = 899.0; p<0.001). The students performed better on knowledge exam items in TBL than CBL (86% vs. 82%) but the same on application items (both 86%). Resource requirements for both methods were extensive, with TBL requiring fewer facilitators and rooms than CBL but requiring more time from both students (2.6 vs. 2.3 hours weekly) and faculty members (2.3 vs. 1.4 hours weekly). In this study, students preferred CBL to TBL but had higher knowledge scores in the TBL course. The resources needed for both CBL and TBL were said to be extensive, with infrastructure use higher for CBL but time for students and faculty higher for TBL.


Asunto(s)
Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Odontología , Docentes , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Facultades de Odontología
7.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 279-282, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32115710

RESUMEN

Population demographic shifts in the United States and Canada have led to an increasingly diverse postsecondary student population. However, the largely homogenous dental faculty in the United States and Canada does not reflect the rapidly changing student body and the diverse patient population academic dentistry has been called to serve. Therefore, recruitment and retention of diverse dental faculty in dental education must be a priority. Substantial evidence also indicates improved outcomes for faculty, students, and institutions when faculty diversity on campus is increased. Beyond the positive impact faculty diversity can deliver to the learning and working environments of an academic institution, a variety of regulatory bodies mandate good faith efforts to maintain a diverse faculty, including the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) standards for dental schools and dental therapy education programs. To assist its member institutions with answering the call for improved faculty diversity, the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) worked with its members to develop the ADEA Faculty Diversity Toolkit (ADEA FDT), a landmark evidence-based resource designed to assist dental education with the design and implementation of faculty recruitment and retention initiatives that can be tailored to their unique needs. This article provides an overview of the changing landscape of the United States and Canadian populations, shares the historic homogeneity of dental education faculty, provides an overview of some of the benefits associated with faculty diversity and highlights the challenges and barriers related to recruiting and retaining diverse faculty. Most importantly, it introduces the ADEA FDT and the need for dental schools and allied dental programs to use the Toolkit as a proactive resource in increasing and maintaining faculty diversity. Furthermore, it provides an overview of how to utilize and adapt the highlighted best practices and model programs to improve faculty diversity on their campuses.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Docentes de Odontología , American Dental Association , Canadá , Humanos , Facultades de Odontología , Estados Unidos
9.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 377-384, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176338

RESUMEN

The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of a live-video teaching tool on the performance of dental students in bending an orthodontic vestibular arch and to assess the students' perceptions of the technology. All 135 fourth-year dental students in the 2018 academic year at Hacettepe Dental School, Ankara, Turkey, were invited to participate in the study; after exclusions, the remaining 116 were randomly divided into two demonstration cohorts. These students had no prior experience bending an orthodontic wire. Cohort 1 (control, N=58) was shown a conventional live demonstration of the orthodontic bending of a vestibular arch, and Cohort 2 (experimental, N=58) was shown a live-video demonstration of the same procedure. Both cohorts saw the demonstration before beginning the exercise and were evaluated afterwards on their performance of the procedure. In addition, the students' perceptions of the demonstration techniques were collected with a questionnaire. The results did not show any significant differences in the students' bending scores between the control and experimental cohorts (p=0.767). The median values on the questionnaire indicated almost no statistically significant difference in responses between the cohorts. The only significant difference was that Cohort 1 had a higher percentage who answered "yes" they would like to rewatch the demonstration than did Cohort 2 (p=0.024). In this study, the live-video technique was found to be as effective as a conventional live demonstration for orthodontic practical education, suggesting that either technique could be used as an appropriate method for training in orthodontic wire bending.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Alambres para Ortodoncia , Estudiantes de Odontología , Estudios de Cohortes , Humanos , Facultades de Odontología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Grabación en Video
10.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 350-357, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176346

RESUMEN

Technology has revolutionized the field of dentistry, and digital workflow has become commonplace in everyday dental practices. However, are future practitioners prepared to enter into an increasingly digitized world? The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which digital modalities were being taught to predoctoral dental students and used for patient care in dental schools throughout North America. A 35-question survey was sent in February 2019 to all 76 dental schools in the U.S. and Canada. After 90 days, 54 recorded responses were received, for a 71% response rate. Students were reported to be using CAD/CAM technology in 50 (93%) of the 54 responding schools. While almost all schools responding to the survey were using digital scanning, there was disparity among them in terms of the types and frequency of procedures for which digital impressions were utilized. This study found that the incorporation of CAD/CAM technology in predoctoral dental curricula varied widely. However, it was clear that the relative dearth of well-trained faculty members and the number of CAD/CAM units available to students limited its use. It is imperative that more emphasis is placed on the utilization of digital workflow in North American dental schools for future practitioners to practice contemporary restorative dentistry.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Facultades de Odontología , Canadá , Curriculum , Humanos , América del Norte , Atención al Paciente , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos , Flujo de Trabajo
11.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 336-342, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176348

RESUMEN

This study examined happiness and satisfaction as possible foundations for long-term well-being and resilience in dental education. Psychological research has found that respect, camaraderie, and trust help define well-being and that resilience is built with these supportive influences. The aims of this study were to assess if happiness and life satisfaction reported by one U.S. dental school's faculty, students, and alumni also enhanced their perceived well-being and resilience and to determine the factor that most affected the participants' happiness. Email and hard copy surveys were distributed in 2018 and 2019 to all 71 full-time preclinical and clinical faculty members, 572 students in all four years, and 143 alumni who graduated in 2018 (total N = 786). Overall, 471 responded; response rates by group were as follows: faculty 87.3% (N = 62), students 65.9% (N = 377), and graduates 22.4% (N = 32). Of the three groups, responding faculty members reported having the highest levels of happiness in life (92.0%) and job satisfaction (90.3%). In the highest percentage reported, 90.2% of D4 students reported that the level of trust and respect they received from clinical faculty members contributed most to their happiness. The lowest level of happiness among the groups (71.0%) was reported by the D2 students. These results suggested that perceived well-being translated to happiness among the participants in our study. More research is needed to understand the relationship among positive environments, well-being, and provider resilience in dental education.


Asunto(s)
Docentes de Odontología , Facultades de Odontología , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Felicidad , Humanos , Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Odontología
12.
J Dent Educ ; 84(3): 323-328, 2020 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32176350

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to develop and test the reliability of an instrument to evaluate the quality of clinical teaching among dental school faculty. Fourth-year dental students' perspectives on effective clinical teaching were first collected in focus group meetings. An 11-item questionnaire to assess seven domains of clinical teaching was developed based on the collected student perspectives and a medical model. All 374 third- and fourth-year dental students at one U.S. dental school in 2015 were invited to evaluate four clinical instructors whom they felt were strong role models and four clinical instructors whom they felt would benefit from constructive criticism. The survey was completed by 139 students (37.2% response rate); they evaluated 96 dental instructors. The results showed that the survey demonstrated strong internal reliability, with Cronbach's alpha values of >0.95 for each of the seven domains. In addition, there was significant agreement between groups: the interclass correlation (ICC) ranged from 0.97 to 0.99. These results suggest that the clinical faculty evaluation instrument developed in this study is a reliable method that can be used to evaluate dental faculty members. This system can be a valuable guide for clinical faculty members and administrators in assessing and improving clinical teaching effectiveness.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Docentes de Odontología , Humanos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Facultades de Odontología , Estudiantes de Odontología , Enseñanza
13.
PLoS One ; 15(3): e0230182, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32163487

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: How dental education influences students' dental and dentofacial esthetic perception has been studied for some time, given the importance of esthetics in dentistry. However, no study before has studied this question in a large sample of students from all grades of dental school. This study sought to fill that gap. The aim was to assess if students' dentofacial esthetic autoperception and heteroperception are associated with their actual stage of studies (grade) and if autoperception has any effect on heteroperception. METHODS: Between October 2018 and August 2019, a questionnaire was distributed to 919 dental students of all 5 grades of dental school at all four dental schools in Hungary. The questionnaire consisted of the following parts (see also the supplementary material): 1. Demographic data (3 items), Self-Esthetics I (11 multiple- choice items regarding the respondents' perception of their own dentofacial esthetics), Self-Esthetics II (6 Likert-type items regarding the respondents' perception of their own dentofacial esthetics), and Image rating (10 items, 5 images each, of which the respondents have to choose the one they find the most attractive). Both the self-esthetics and the photo rating items were aimed at the assessment of mini- and microesthetic features. RESULTS: The response rate was 93.7% (861 students). The self-perception of the respondents was highly favorable, regardless of grade or gender. Grade and heteroperception were significantly associated regarding maxillary midline shift (p < 0.01) and the relative visibility of the arches behind the lips (p < 0.01). Detailed analysis showed a characteristic pattern of preference changes across grades for both esthetic aspects. The third year of studies appeared to be a dividing line in both cases, after which a real preference order was established. Association between autoperception and heteroperception could not be verified for statistical reasons. CONCLUSION: Our findings corroborate the results of most previous studies regarding the effect of dental education on the dentofacial esthetic perception of students. We have shown that the effect can be demonstrated on the grade level, which we attribute to the specific curricular contents. We found no gender effect, which, in the light of the literature, suggests that the gender effect in dentofacial esthetic perception is highly culture dependent. The results allow no conclusion regarding the relation between autoperception and heteroperception.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología/normas , Estudiantes de Odontología/psicología , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Hungría , Labio/fisiología , Masculino , Maxilar/fisiología , Facultades de Odontología/estadística & datos numéricos , Autoimagen , Sonrisa/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
15.
Rev. ADM ; 77(1): 11-16, ene.-feb. 2020. ilus, tab, graf
Artículo en Español | LILACS | ID: biblio-1087826

RESUMEN

Introducción: La epidemiología sobre alteraciones en tejidos blandos bucales es limitada cuando se compara con caries, enfermedades periodontales y maloclusiones, por lo que su estudio representa un paso adelante en la odontología más allá de los dientes. Objetivo: Describir la prevalencia de las lesiones bucales en tejido blando encontradas en la Clínica de Estomatología de la Facultad de Odontología de la ULA, del 2015 al 2018, con la finalidad de proporcionar una fuente de datos actualizada, que oriente a una mejor prevención y oportuno diagnóstico. Material y métodos: Se realizó una investigación descriptiva, documental, retrospectiva y multivariable. Resultados: De 1,000 fichas clínicas estudiadas, las patologías más frecuentes fueron: lengua saburral (50.6%), queilitis (33.4%), traumatismo de la mucosa de los carrillos (27.6%), várices linguales (18.3%), anquiloglosia (13.7%) y agrandamiento de rugas palatinas (11.7%). La zona con mayor alteración fue la lengua (92.1%), mientras que el paladar fue la menos afectada (29%). De los hábitos predisponentes a la formación de lesiones, el mordisqueo de mucosa fue el más común (16.5%). En cuanto a los factores locales asociados, una higiene oral regular/ deficiente resultó el principal (53.8%). Conclusión: La educación del paciente sigue siendo considerada la clave para disminuir la aparición de patologías y su evolución a entidades más graves (AU)


Introduction: Epidemiological studies on soft tissue alterations in the mouth are limited when compared with caries, periodontal diseases and malocclusions, so their study represents a step forward in dentistry beyond the teeth. Objective: To describe the prevalence of soft tissue oral lesions found in the Stomatology Clinic of the ULA School of Dentistry, from 2015 to 2018, in order to provide an up-to-date data source, to guide better prevention and timely diagnosis. Material and methods: A descriptive and documentary, retrospective and multivariable research was carried out. The statistical package IBM SPSS Statistics v 23 was applied for the analysis. Results: 1,000 clinical records studied, the most frequent pathologies were: saburral tongue (50.6%), cheilitis (33.4%), traumatism of the cheek mucosa (27.6%), lingual varices (18.3%), ankyloglossia (13.7%) and enlargement of palatal rugas (11.7%). The tongue was the most affected (92.1%), while the palate was the least affected (29%). Of the predisposing habits to the formation of lesions, mucosal nipping was the most common (16.5%). Regarding the associated local factors, a regular / deficient oral hygiene was the main one (53.8%). Conclusion: Patient education is still considered the key to diminish not only the appearance of pathologies but their evolution to more serious entities (AU)


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Adolescente , Adulto , Persona de Mediana Edad , Enfermedades de la Boca/clasificación , Enfermedades de la Boca/epidemiología , Mucosa Bucal/lesiones , Facultades de Odontología , Estomatitis Aftosa/epidemiología , Lengua Fisurada/epidemiología , Hábitos Linguales , Lengua Vellosa/epidemiología , Leucoplasia Bucal/epidemiología , Queilitis/epidemiología , Epidemiología Descriptiva , Análisis Estadístico , Estudios Retrospectivos , Colombia , Úlceras Bucales/epidemiología , Distribución por Edad y Sexo , Glositis Migratoria Benigna/epidemiología , Macroglosia/epidemiología
16.
Rev. ADM ; 77(1): 17-21, ene.-feb. 2020. tab, graf
Artículo en Español | LILACS | ID: biblio-1087830

RESUMEN

La caries es una infección que afecta a cualquier persona sin importar edad, género o clase social. Es importante enfocar la atención odontológica a pacientes de tercera edad ya que tienden a un crecimiento anual de 3.8% de la población mexicana. Actualmente, se han realizado campañas de salud bucal para esta población; a pesar de los múltiples esfuerzos realizados para la prevención y erradicación de dicha enfermedad existe un descuido en los tratamientos para pacientes de la tercera edad, lo cual puede favorecer la pérdida de dientes. El objetivo del estudio fue determinar la prevalencia y severidad de caries en adultos mayores en la clínica de odontología de la Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla (UPAEP). Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo; se revisaron 345 expedientes de pacientes de tercera edad del 2017 al 2018, que asistieron por primera vez a consulta. Se obtiene la prevalencia y severidad a través del índice CPOD (cariados, perdidos y obturados). La prevalencia de dientes cariados fue 79%; se obtuvo un CPOD de 18.63 (alto riesgo). Se concluye el implementar medidas preventivas que impacten en mayor dimensión a la caries, para su disminución o erradicación en pacientes geriátricos (AU)


Caries is an infection that affects anyone regardless of their age, gender or social class. It is, however, important to focus dental care on elderly patients as that part of the Mexican population is growing at 3.8% annually. Currently, oral health campaigns have been carried out for this population, but despite the multiple efforts undertaken for prevention and eradication of the disease, treatment for elderly patients is often overlooked. The consequence of this lack of treatment can be the loss of teeth. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence and severity of caries in elderly patients at the dental clinic of the Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla (UPAEP). A descriptive, retrospective study was carried out where the records of 345 elderly, first-time patients were reviewed for the 2017-2018 period. The prevalence and severity of caries was determined using the DMFT index (decay, missing, filled). The prevalence of carious teeth was 79% with a DMFT of 18.63 indicating high risk. We conclude that preventive measures should be implemented to impact and decrease caries in geriatric patients (AU)


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Índice CPO , Cuidado Dental para Ancianos , Caries Dental/patología , Caries Dental/epidemiología , Facultades de Odontología , Epidemiología Descriptiva , Estudios Transversales , Análisis Estadístico , Estudios Retrospectivos , Susceptibilidad a Caries Dentarias , Distribución por Edad y Sexo , México
18.
J Dent Educ ; 84(5): 534-542, 2020 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32064617

RESUMEN

Operationalizing faculty contributions in ways that align with organizational mission can be difficult, particularly when monetizing effort. Conventional compensation methods may result in faculty effort going undefined, resulting in more subjectivity in recognition and compensation. Inequities lead to faculty marginalization, fragmentation, decreased motivation, and attrition. Dental faculty retirements are expected to increase, as 81% of men and 19% of women faculty aged 60 years and older in 2015-2016. We present opposing perspectives on the use of educational value units (EVUs) in academic dentistry. The first viewpoint articulates that such models improve recruitment and retention by objectifying (a) faculty performance measurement, (b) academic productivity improvements, and (c) compensation determination. The counterpoint suggests EVUs are deterrents to faculty retention due to challenges with objectively quantifying performance measures, a potential inherent bias linked to gender, and the undervaluing of teaching quality or collaborative practices.


Asunto(s)
Docentes de Odontología , Facultades de Odontología , Anciano , Eficiencia , Docentes Médicos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad
19.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 151-156, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043584

RESUMEN

Early clinical exposure (ECE), defined as any interaction with patients prior to the portion of the curriculum when den- tal students spend most of their time at school as a primary provider, is a growing trend in curriculum reform across U.S. dental schools in the 21st century. The aims of this study were to characterize the types of ECE implementation in U.S. dental schools and determine if ECE correlated with earlier clinical competency assessments. In September 2018, the academic deans of all 66 U.S. dental schools were invited to respond to an eight-item electronic survey about ECE at their schools. Representatives of 40 schools submitted complete responses, for a response rate of 60.6%. Among the respondents, 85% reported their schools started their principal clinical experience (PCE), the portion of the curriculum when students spend most of their time as the primary provider for patients, during the last quarter of Year 2 or the first quarter of Year 3. Respondents at all 40 schools reported offering some form of ECE as part of the formal curriculum, with shadowing and performing dental prophylaxis the most commonly of- fered types. No statistically significant associations were found between specific types of ECE and related Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) clinical standards for both formative and summative assessments. Although U.S. dental schools have been incorporating more ECE into their curricula over the past decade, these findings suggest that it has not led to earlier clinical competency assessments.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Facultades de Odontología , Curriculum , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
20.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 143-150, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043586

RESUMEN

In the U.S., the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) requires that dental schools use competency-based assessments and standardized levels of proficiency to ensure that students are prepared for patient care after graduation. No such comprehensive standardized preclinical testing is required in the CODA standards. The aim of this study was to determine the use of preclinical competency assessments for students transitioning from preclinical to clinical education in North American dental schools and respondents' perceptions of the need for standardization in preclinical testing. An electronic survey was sent to the academic deans of all 76 U.S. and Canadian dental schools in July 2018 asking if the school used competency exams to assess preclinical students prior to entering patient care and, if so, about the type of tests and disciplines tested, student remediation, and reasons for revisions. The survey also asked for the respondents' perspectives on potential preclinical assessment standardization. Respondents from 28 U.S. and two Canadian schools participated in the survey, for a 39.5% response rate. The majority (92.3%) of respondents said their school considered preclinical competency assessments to be good indicators of students' readiness for transitioning into patient care, yet 40.0% reported their schools had no comprehensive preclinical testing, and 13.8% had no preclinical testing in endodontics, periodontics, prosthetics, or restorative dentistry. Regarding type of comprehensive preclinical assessment used, 71.4% reported using typodont-based exams, 46.4% used written comprehensive exams, and 42.9% used objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs); respondents could select all that applied on this item. Of the respondents whose schools had preclinical competency assessments, 72.4% had a review mechanism in place to evaluate its effectiveness. Overall, this study found that 60% of the participating schools had some form of preclinical testing, but there were no agreed-upon competencies to determine preclinical dental students' readiness for safe patient care in their clinical education.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Odontología , Facultades de Odontología , Canadá , Curriculum , Humanos , Estudiantes de Odontología , Estados Unidos
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