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1.
AANA J ; 89(1): 1-6, 2021 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33543706

RESUMEN

The expectation by colleagues that fellow clinicians deftly manage the stresses of practice often predisposes healthcare professionals involved in an adverse event to experience isolation, blame, and shame. The peer support model has since been recognized as an important component of institutional wellness and follows a well-described and structured method. Although peer support programs have traditionally been established to support caregivers involved in adverse medical events, the relevance and applicability of these programs have found substantial traction across broader crisis domains. Interventions, including peer support, help mitigate the 3 components of burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization (cynicism), and reduced efficacy.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Profesional , Enfermeras Anestesistas , Grupo Paritario , Humanos
3.
Mol Cell ; 81(3): 414-417, 2021 02 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33545055

RESUMEN

As part of our commitment to amplifying the voices of underrepresented scientists, we are publishing the insights and experiences of a panel of underrepresented scientists. In this piece, they discuss strategies to recruit underrepresented minority students to universities and careers in science. These are the personal opinions of the authors and may not reflect the views of their institutions.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/educación , Selección de Profesión , Diversidad Cultural , Grupos Minoritarios/educación , Selección de Personal , Investigadores , Estudiantes , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Humanos , Mentores , Grupo Paritario
4.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33406621

RESUMEN

School violence towards peers and teen dating violence are two of the most relevant behaviour problems in adolescents. Although the relationship between the two types of violence is well established in the literature, few studies have focused on mediators that could explain this empirical relationship. We departed from the evidence that relates anger, emotional distress and impaired empathy to teen dating violence and juvenile sexual offending, to explore the role of personal distress, i.e., a self-focused, aversive affective reaction to another's emotion associated with the desire to alleviate one's own, but not the other's distress; as a possible mechanism linking school violence towards peers and teen dating violence in a sample of Spanish adolescents. We also explored the prevalence of emotional and physical teen dating violence, both occasional and frequent, and the differences between boys and girls. A total of 1055 adolescents (49.2% boys and 50.8% girls) aged between 11 and 17 years (M = 14.06, SD = 1.34) who had had at least one romantic relationship within the last year, completed measures of school violence towards peers, teen dating violence, and personal distress. Statistical analyses revealed that occasional and frequent teen dating violence (both physical and emotional) was more frequent in girls than in boys, and that personal distress functioned as a partial mediator, with an overall model fit higher for boys than girls: in boys, partial mediation occurred for both physical and emotional teen dating violence; in girls, partial mediation occurred only for physical violence. The interpretation of the results is tentative given the novel nature of the study, and points to the evidence of the emotional costs of school violence and the importance of emotion and behavior regulation to undermine the social costs of personal distress.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente , Violencia de Pareja , Grupo Paritario , Distrés Psicológico , Violencia , Adolescente , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Instituciones Académicas
6.
J Surg Res ; 257: 169-177, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32835950

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Few opportunities exist for surgeons to receive technical skills feedback after training. Surgeons at hospitals within the Illinois Surgical Quality Improvement Collaborative were invited to participate in a peer-to-peer video-based coaching initiative focused on improving technical skills in laparoscopic right colectomy. We present a formative qualitative evaluation of a video-based coaching initiative. METHODS: Concurrent with the implementation of our video-based coaching initiative, we conducted two focus groups and 15 individual semistructured interviews with participants; all interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. A subset of surgeons participated in a group video-review session, which was observed by qualitative researchers. Transcripts and notes were analyzed using an organizational behavior framework adapted from executive coaching. RESULTS: Participation in the initiative was primarily motivated by the opportunity to learn from others and improve skills. Surgeons highlighted the value of self-video and peer-video assessment not only to learn new techniques but also for self-reflection and benchmarking. Barriers to participation included logistics (e.g. using the laparoscopic recording devices, coordinating schedules for peer coaching), time commitment, and a surgical culture that assumes the intent of coaching is to address deficiencies. CONCLUSIONS: Video-based peer-coaching provides a platform for surgeons to reflect, benchmark against peers, and receive personalized feedback; however, more work is needed to increase participation and sustain involvement over time. There is an opportunity to decrease logistical barriers and increase acceptability of coaching by integrating video-based coaching into existing surgical conferences and established continuous professional development efforts.


Asunto(s)
Tutoría/métodos , Grupo Paritario , Cirujanos/educación , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Operativos/educación , Competencia Clínica , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Retroalimentación Formativa , Humanos , Masculino , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Investigación Cualitativa , Grabación en Video
7.
Orthop Clin North Am ; 52(1): 41-52, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33222983

RESUMEN

The growing epidemic of physician burnout suggests that a change is needed. Physician wellness is an ever-growing consideration, especially in orthopedic surgery, where the challenges to wellness are significant. This review provides many common sense wellness principles and solutions in four main components of wellness (physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual) interwoven with current research on the topic. Although directed to orthopedic surgeons, this guide can be applied to all physicians, because they are based on common human principles of wellness. Wellness is not created overnight, so wellness practices that increase the likelihood of experiencing wellness are encouraged.


Asunto(s)
Salud Mental , Cirujanos Ortopédicos/psicología , Agotamiento Profesional , Dieta Saludable , Emociones , Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Humanos , Meditación , Atención Plena , Cultura Organizacional , Grupo Paritario , Resiliencia Psicológica , Autoimagen , Sueño , Apoyo Social , Navegación Espacial , Espiritualismo , Estrés Psicológico
8.
Support Care Cancer ; 29(1): 145-154, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32323003

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Existing research indicates that physical activity (PA) is beneficial to men with prostate cancer (PCa). We examined the potential of a single-contact peer-support-based behavioural intervention to promote PA engagement in men treated for PCa. METHODS: A mixed methods design was employed, comprising a two-arm pragmatic trial and semi-structured interviews. The intervention was a 10-min PA-based presentation by a former patient, delivered in group seminars that are provided for patients as standard care. Seminars were alternately allocated to (a) cancer exercise specialist talk + patient speaker talk or (b) cancer exercise specialist talk only. Self-reported PA, exercise motivation, quality of life, fatigue and clinical and demographic characteristics were obtained from n = 148 (intervention: n = 69; control: n = 79) patients immediately prior to the seminar, and at follow-up ≈ 100 days later. Data were analysed using ANCOVA models and χ2 tests. Fourteen semi-structured interviews with intervention participants, which explored how the intervention was experienced, were analysed using a grounded theory-style approach. RESULTS: The intervention had no significant effect on quantitatively self-reported PA (p = 0.4). However, the intervention was statistically and clinically beneficial for fatigue (p = 0.04) and quality of life (p = 0.01). Qualitative analysis showed that the intervention was beneficial to psychological wellbeing and some participants had increased intention to engage in PA as a result of the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: A brief one-off PA-based presentation for men with PCa, delivered by a former patient alongside cancer exercise specialist advice, may result in clinically significant benefits to quality of life and may influence PA intention in certain individuals.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Prostatectomía/psicología , Neoplasias de la Próstata/cirugía , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Apoyo Social , Terapia Conductista , Consejo , Fatiga/psicología , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Motivación , Grupo Paritario , Proyectos Piloto , Autoinforme
9.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1843356, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33250037

RESUMEN

PROBLEM: Opportunities for self-directed learning were missing from our medical school curriculum in general and on our radiology electives specifically. Our objective was to explore the feasibility and benefits of using medical students in the development of our student-created teaching files. APPROACH: In 2018, a website was developed at our institution to support medical student radiology education and create a repository for the online publication of student-developed teaching cases. Students participating in radiology clerkships at our institution had an opportunity to submit case presentations for publication to our online teaching file following peer review. The medical students participated in the peer review process facilitated by the faculty director of radiology undergraduate medical education. The faculty member oversaw the training of new student editors and the development of a peer review guide. OUTCOMES: The peer review guide included goals of the teaching file project and direction regarding the peer review process. Student editors were trained using the peer review guide in conjunction with individual meetings with the faculty mentor. At twenty-four months, 82 student-developed cases had been published to the online teaching file following medical student peer review. The teaching file had garnered 3884 page views. NEXT STEPS: The medical student-led peer review process meets core competencies in self-directed learning. The authors plan to explore the application of peer-assisted learning theories to the editing and peer-review process.


Asunto(s)
Educación a Distancia , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Educación Médica , Revisión por Pares , Curriculum , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Mentores , Grupo Paritario , Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina , Enseñanza
10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33322751

RESUMEN

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has adversely affected individuals' mental health. Social isolation as a result of social distancing during the pandemic potentially affects the associations among perceived available peer support, emotional well-being, and depression in university students. The present study examined the associations among university students' perceived available peer support, emotional well-being (as indicated negatively by loneliness and negative affects and positively by positive affects and hope), and depressive symptoms. During the third wave of the COVID-19 outbreak in July, 2020, 255 students at a public university in Hong Kong participated in an online-based survey that assessed their perceived available peer support, emotional well-being, and depressive symptoms. Results showed that perceived available peer support negatively contributed to depressive symptoms; both negative and positive indicators of emotional well-being mediated the association between perceived available peer support and depressive symptoms. Our results also suggested that university students showed signs of elevated depressive symptoms during the pandemic. Thus, our study advanced the theoretical understanding of university students' mental health in the time of a global pandemic. Our study also highlighted the practical needs for preventive efforts and accessible care to support the psychological and emotional needs of young people during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Depresión , Salud Mental , Apoyo Social , Estudiantes/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Hong Kong/epidemiología , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Grupo Paritario , Universidades , Adulto Joven
11.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0240680, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33373379

RESUMEN

Social ostracism triggers an increase in affiliative behaviours. One such behaviour is the rapid copying of others' facial expressions, called facial mimicry. Insofar, it remains unknown how individual differences in intrinsic affiliation motivation regulate responses to social ostracism during early development. We examined children's facial mimicry following ostracism as modulated by individual differences in the affiliation motivation, expressed in their attachment tendencies. Resistant and avoidant tendencies are characterized by high and low affiliation motivation, and were hypothesized to lead to facial mimicry enhancement or suppression towards an ostracizing partner, respectively. Following an ostracism manipulation in which children played a virtual game (Cyberball) with an includer and an excluder peer, mimicry of the two peers' happy and sad facial expressions was recorded with electromyography (EMG). Attachment was assessed via parent-report questionnaire. We found that 5-year-olds smiled to sad facial expressions of the excluder peer, while they showed no facial reactions for the includer peer. Neither resistant nor avoidant tendencies predicted facial mimicry to the excluder peer. Yet, securely attached children smiled towards the excluder peer, when sad facial expressions were displayed. In conclusion, these findings suggest a modulation of facial reactions following ostracism by early attachment.


Asunto(s)
Expresión Facial , Conducta Imitativa/fisiología , Relaciones Interpersonales , Apego a Objetos , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Preescolar , Electromiografía , Emociones/fisiología , Músculos Faciales/fisiología , Femenino , Humanos , Individualidad , Masculino , Motivación , Grupo Paritario , Juegos de Video/psicología
12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33374772

RESUMEN

This study uses canonical correlation analyses to explore the relationship between multiple predictors of school readiness (i.e., academic readiness, social readiness, and teacher-child relationship) and multiple temperamental traits using data from the second wave (age 54 months, n = 1226) of the longitudinal Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD; NICHD ECCRN 1993). This longitudinal study collected data on a large cohort of children and their families from birth through age 15. For academic readiness, only one temperamental constellation emerged, representing the construct of effortful control (i.e., high attentional focusing, high inhibitory control). For peer interactions, two significant constellations emerged: "dysregulated" (low inhibitory control, low shyness, and high activity), and "withdrawn" (high shyness, low inhibitory control, low attentional focusing). Finally, the analyses exploring child-teacher relationships revealed two significant constellations: "highly surgent" (high activity, low inhibitory control, low shyness) and "emotionally controlled" (low anger/frustration and high inhibitory control). Results of this study form a more nuanced exploration of relationships between temperamental traits and indicators of school readiness than can be found in the extant literature, and will provide the groundwork for future research to test specific hypotheses related to the effect temperamental constellations have on children's school readiness.


Asunto(s)
Relaciones Interpersonales , Grupo Paritario , Estudiantes/psicología , Temperamento , Adolescente , Ira , Niño , Preescolar , Frustación , Humanos , Inhibición Psicológica , Estudios Longitudinales , Instituciones Académicas , Timidez
14.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc73, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33364352

RESUMEN

Objectives: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, medical curricula face major challenges. This also applies to mentoring programs, where face-to-face meetings are considered essential. Methods: The LMU Munich medical faculty mentoring program (MeCuM-Mentor) adapted to counteract the unforeseen pause of conventional course formats and associated uncertainty of many students. We here present an approach to transform the established large scale or group mentoring events of our program into online formats. Three projects are presented as examples: 1. HowTo Klink (HK), mainly informative in nature and with peer-mentoring character, 2. FacharztDuell (FAD) and 3. "Auf ein Gespräch mit... (AEGM)", both with a focus on career counseling. Results: Initial evaluations show a similarly high participation rate and a high level of satisfaction among the participating students. Students' evaluation of whether the projects presented should take place in presence or in online format has so far shown no clear trend. Conclusion: Prospective studies are necessary to investigate the effectiveness of these online formats and analyse differences in participant behaviour. The extent to which online mentoring can replace classic mentoring functions has to be discussed anew.


Asunto(s)
Docentes Médicos/organización & administración , Tutoría/organización & administración , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Orientación Vocacional/organización & administración , Comportamiento del Consumidor , Curriculum , Humanos , Pandemias , Grupo Paritario , Estudios Prospectivos
15.
GMS J Med Educ ; 37(7): Doc78, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33364357

RESUMEN

Background: In the innovative seminar "Peer-support and Patient Competence", which was conceived as a face to face course, we teach various concepts of patient competence and invite patients to report about their illness experience and peer-group activities. Method: Implementation of a face to face course into a virtual format via video conference. Result: Despite concerns regarding the sensitive topic and technical challenges, the conversion of the seminar with interactive character, which was originally designed in a face-to-face format, into a virtual one was successful. Both lecturers and participants experienced the seminar as satisfactory. Conclusion: In times of Covid-19, this virtual course experience can encourage colleagues to restructure their face to face seminars into innovative and virtual teaching formats.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Grupo Paritario , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Comunicación por Videocoferencia/organización & administración , Enfermedad Crónica , Educación Médica , Humanos , Motivación
16.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs ; 81(6): 725-730, 2020 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33308400

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: It is well established that college students increase their drinking when they leave home. This study examined changes in drinking as a result of campus closure due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), focusing on the influence of living situation. METHOD: A sample of 312 college students (mean age = 21.2 years; 62% female; 67% White) responded to an online survey regarding their drinking behavior before and after university closures because of COVID-19. Those participants who lived with peers pre-closure and moved home to live with parents post-closure were compared with those who remained living with peers or remained living with parents in terms of changes in frequency and quantity of drinking. RESULTS: A comparison of pre- to post-closure drinking indicated significant decreases in the typical number of drinks per week (from 11.5 to 9.9) and maximum drinks per day (from 4.9 to 3.3) and a slight increase in typical drinking days per week (from 3 to 3.2). Patterns of change significantly varied across groups. Those who moved from peers to parents showed significantly greater reductions in drinking days (from 3.1 to 2.7), number of drinks per week (from 13.9 to 8.5), and maximum drinks in one day (from 5.4 to 2.9) than those who remained living with peers or with parents. In contrast, the latter two groups significantly increased their frequency (from 3.0 to 3.7 days and 2.0 to 3.3 days, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Participants reduced their quantity of drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic. Returning to live with parents during emerging adulthood may be protective for heavy drinking.


Asunto(s)
Consumo de Alcohol en la Universidad/psicología , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/psicología , Características de la Residencia , Estudiantes/psicología , Universidades , Adolescente , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/epidemiología , Consumo de Bebidas Alcohólicas/tendencias , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Grupo Paritario , Cuarentena/psicología , Cuarentena/tendencias , Características de la Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades/tendencias , Adulto Joven
17.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 512, 2020 Dec 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33327947

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Ultrasound education is propagated already during medical school due to its diagnostic importance. Courses are usually supervised by experienced faculty staff (FS) with patient bedside examinations or students among each other but often overbooked due to limited FS availability. To overcome this barrier, use of teaching videos may be advantageous. Likewise, peer teaching concepts solely with trained student tutors have shown to be feasible and effective. The aim was to evaluate 1) objective learning outcomes of a combined video-based, student-tutor (ViST) as compared to a FS-led course without media support, 2) acceptance and subjective learning success of the videos. METHODS: Two ultrasound teaching videos for basic and advanced abdominal ultrasound (AU) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were produced and six students trained as tutors. Fourth-year medical students (N = 96) were randomized to either the ViST- or FS course (6 students per tutor). Learning objectives were defined equally for both courses. Acquired practical basic and advanced ultrasound skills were tested in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) using modified validated scoring sheets with a maximum total score of 40 points. Acceptance and subjective learning success of both videos were evaluated by questionnaires based on Kirkpatrick's evaluation model with scale-rated closed and open questions. RESULTS: 79 of 96 medical students completed the OSCE and 77 could be finally analyzed. There was no significant difference in the mean total point score of 31.3 in the ViST (N = 42) and 32.7 in the FS course (N = 35, P = 0.31) or in any of the examined basic or advanced ultrasound skill subtasks. Of the 42 ViST participants, 29 completed the AU and 27 the TTE video questionnaire. Acceptance and subjective learning success of both videos was rated positively in 14-52% and 48-88% of the rated responses to each category, respectively. Attendance of either the student or faculty tutor was deemed necessary in addition to the videos. CONCLUSIONS: A ViST versus FS teaching concept was able to effectively teach undergraduate students in AU and TTE, albeit acceptance of the teaching videos alone was limited. However, the ViST concept has the potential to increase course availability and FS resource allocation.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Enseñanza , Ultrasonografía , Competencia Clínica , Curriculum , Ecocardiografía , Evaluación Educacional , Docentes Médicos , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Tutoría , Motivación , Grupo Paritario , Estudios Prospectivos , Método Simple Ciego , Estudiantes de Medicina , Grabación en Video
18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33348636

RESUMEN

(1) Purpose: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) possibly emerges as well as remits in adolescence. To explore the development and transition of NSSI, this study examined the association between a wide range of interpersonal and intrapersonal predictors of NSSI initiation and cessation. (2) Methods: Chinese adolescents (N = 913) completed self-reported surveys at baseline and at a six-month follow-up. The sample included 625 adolescents who reported no NSSI and 288 adolescents who reported engagement in NSSI at baseline. (3) Results: Among the adolescents without NSSI at baseline, 24.3% engaged in NSSI at follow-up (NSSI initiation group). Among the adolescents with NSSI at baseline, 33.3% reported no NSSI at follow-up (NSSI cessation group). Loneliness, beliefs about adversity, problem behavior, and prosocial behavior were the significant factors in predicting subsequent NSSI initiation. None of the potential predicting factors were associated with subsequent NSSI cessation. (4) Conclusions: These results indicate the importance of intrapersonal factors in Chinese culture, which could be used to identify at-risk adolescents and to design interventions.


Asunto(s)
Conducta del Adolescente/psicología , Relaciones Interpersonales , Soledad/psicología , Conducta Autodestructiva/etnología , Conducta Autodestructiva/psicología , Adolescente , Conducta del Adolescente/etnología , China/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Estudios Prospectivos , Factores de Riesgo , Conducta Autodestructiva/epidemiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
19.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(12): e2030090, 2020 12 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33320267

RESUMEN

Importance: The vast majority of older adults desire to age in their communities, and it is not clear what helps them be successful at aging in place. Objective: To investigate the comparative effectiveness of community-designed and community-implemented peer-to-peer (P2P) support programs vs standard community services (SCS) to promote health and wellness in at-risk older adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: This comparative effectiveness study involved a longitudinal cohort of adults aged 65 years and older conducted between 2015 and 2017. The setting was 3 communities in which community-based organizations delivered P2P services to older adults in California, Florida, and New York. Participants in the P2P group and in the SCS group were matched at enrollment into the study according to age, sex, and race/ethnicity at each site. Data analysis was performed from October 2018 to May 2020. Exposures: P2P support was provided by trained older adult volunteers in the same community. They provided support targeted at the needs of the older adult they served, including transportation assistance, check-in calls, social activities, help with shopping, and trips to medical appointments. Main Outcomes and Measures: Rates of hospitalization, urgent care (UC) and emergency department (ED) use, and a composite measure of health care utilization were collected over 12 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 503 participants were screened, 456 participants were enrolled and had baseline data (234 in the SCS group and 222 in the P2P group), and 8 participants had no follow-up data, leaving 448 participants for the main analysis (231 in the SCS group and 217 in the P2P group; 363 women [81%]; mean [SD] age, 80 [9] years). Participants in the P2P group more often lived alone, had lower incomes, and were more physically and mentally frail at baseline compared with the SCS group. After adjusting for propensity scores to account for baseline differences between the 2 groups, there was a statistically significant higher rate of hospitalization in the P2P group than in the SCS group (0.68 hospitalization per year vs 0.44 hospitalization per year; risk ratio, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.14-2.07; P = .005) during the 12 months of observation. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in the rates of ED or UC visits or composite health care utilization over the 12 months of the study. Conclusions and Relevance: P2P support was associated with higher rates of hospitalization but was not associated with other measures of health care utilization. Given that this is not a randomized clinical trial, it is not clear from these findings whether peer support will help older adults age in place, and the topic deserves further study.


Asunto(s)
Redes Comunitarias , Vida Independiente/estadística & datos numéricos , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Sistemas de Apoyo Psicosocial , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Atención Ambulatoria/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios de Cohortes , Redes Comunitarias/organización & administración , Redes Comunitarias/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigación sobre la Eficacia Comparativa , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Hospitalización/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Estados Unidos
20.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(5): 555-569, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33231520

RESUMEN

Local peer observation of teaching is considered an important mechanism for instructors to improve the quality and effectiveness of their teaching, but there is an absence of uniformity to establish a best practice for this process in veterinary curricula. The Regional Teaching Academy (RTA) of the Consortium of Western Colleges of Veterinary Medicine is comprised of educational advocates from five western veterinary colleges with a common goal of enhancing the quality and effectiveness of education in veterinary medical curricula. Members of the RTA recognized this deficit in best practices for local peer observation (LPO) and formed a working group called "Local Peer Observation of Teaching." The goal was to meet a critical need for the enhancement of individual teaching skills by using a scholarly approach to develop robust methods for peer observation of teaching. Two rubric-based instruments were developed: one for large-group/didactic settings, and the second for small-group/clinical settings. Each is accompanied by pre- and post-observation worksheets which are considered instrumental to success. Results of a qualitative survey of instrument users' experiences are shared. Both observers and observees view the experiential learning from faculty peer colleagues very positively and the meaningful feedback is appreciated and incorporated by observees. Suggestions for implementation of the peer observation process are discussed, considering strengths and challenges. The purpose of this article is to describe in depth, the development process and output of the efforts of the Local Peer Observation of Teaching working group as a potential best practice guideline for peer observation.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Veterinaria , Animales , Curriculum , Docentes , Humanos , Grupo Paritario , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Enseñanza
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