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2.
Home Health Care Serv Q ; 40(3): 218-230, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34292134

RESUMEN

In Japan, the mean time spent on preparing and administering medications each day for everyone in care facilities has been reported to be 163 min. Most caregivers that administer medications to the elderly in care facilities have reported that this responsibility is a burden. We developed a drug distribution support device (DDSD) for caregivers, which was then installed in a group home and a 3-month monitoring experiment was conducted. Caregivers then answered a questionnaire survey on medication management burden pre- and post-DDSD use. The caregivers reported no difficulties associated with medication distribution using DDSD. The DDSD reduced the daily dispensing duration by an average of 3.5 min. The questionnaire survey showed no differences in items related to the reduction of errors, and the Family Caregiver Medication Administration Hassles Scale showed no reduction of burden on caregivers. However, whether the DDSD reduces medication management burden remains undetermined.


Asunto(s)
Hogares para Grupos , Preparaciones Farmacéuticas , Anciano , Cuidadores , Humanos , Administración del Tratamiento Farmacológico , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 668214, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34055726

RESUMEN

Individuals living in congregate settings, including those in group homes, have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 and may be at increased risk of exposure or infection due to underlying illness. In mid-May 2020, local public health officials responded to an outbreak of COVID-19 among staff and residents associated with a multi-residential group home that provides care for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Samples were collected at 16 of the homes. In four of the homes all the residents tested positive, and in the remaining 12 houses where samples were collected, all residents tested negative. Of the 152 individuals tested, 15/58 (25.9%) residents and 27/94 (28.7%) staff were positive for SARS-CoV-2, including eight hospitalizations and four deaths. Phylogenetic analysis of genomes from this outbreak in the context of genomes from Northern Arizona shows that very few mutations separate the samples from this outbreak. A potential transmission network was developed to illustrate person-place epidemiologic linkages and further demonstrates the dynamic connections between staff and residents with respect to each group home location. Epidemiologic and genomic evidence correlate, and suggest that asymptomatic infected staff likely introduced and spread COVID-19 in this setting. Implementation of public health prevention measures alongside rapid genomic analysis can help guide policy development and guide management efforts to prevent and mitigate future outbreaks.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Hogares para Grupos , Adulto , Arizona/epidemiología , Brotes de Enfermedades , Genómica , Humanos , Casas de Salud , Filogenia , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33808617

RESUMEN

People with intellectual disability (ID) and extensive support needs experience poorer quality of life than their peers whose disability is not as severe. Many of them live in residential settings that limit community participation and prevent them from exercising control over their lives. This work analyzes the extent to which professional practices are aimed at promoting the right to community living for people with ID and extensive support needs, as well as the rights that are particularly linked to it, such as the right to habilitation and rehabilitation and the right to privacy. A specific questionnaire was designed and administered to 729 adults with intellectual disability (M = 37.05; DT = 12.79) living in different settings (family home, residential facilities and group homes). Measurement and structural models were estimated using exploratory structural equation modeling. Results obtained reveal that people with extensive support needs receive less support in terms of guaranteeing their right to independent living and privacy, especially when they live in disability-related services. This study highlights the need to implement and monitor, using valid and reliable indicators, mesosystem strategies that guarantee the right to live and participate in the community, especially for individuals with ID and extensive support needs.


Asunto(s)
Personas con Discapacidad , Discapacidad Intelectual , Adulto , Hogares para Grupos , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Instituciones Residenciales
5.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(2)2021 Feb 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33541952

RESUMEN

We examined whether Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) improves with routinising therapy for a patient with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) living in a group home. The patient exhibited symptoms of agitation, apathy, disinhibition, irritability and stereotyped behaviour. The care staff experienced long-term care burden and the patient was spending time idly. An occupational therapist, in collaboration with care staff, evaluated the patient and routinised the household chores included in IADL. Consequently, a routine of household chores was established, reducing behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia and long-term care burden, and the quality of life (QOL) of the patient improved. The results suggested that routinising IADL of the patient with FTD reduced long-term care burden and improved QOL of the patient.


Asunto(s)
Actividades Cotidianas , Demencia Frontotemporal/terapia , Hogares para Grupos , Habituación Psicofisiológica , Calidad de Vida , Apatía , Femenino , Humanos , Genio Irritable , Cuidados a Largo Plazo , Persona de Mediana Edad
6.
Int J Law Psychiatry ; 74: 101649, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33418151

RESUMEN

This article investigates the lawfulness of isolating residents of care and group homes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many residents are mobile, and their freedom to move is a central ethical tenet and human right. It is not however an absolute right and trade-offs between autonomy, liberty and health need to be made since COVID-19 is highly infectious and poses serious risks of critical illness and death. People living in care and group homes may be particularly vulnerable because recommended hygiene practices are difficult for them and many residents are elderly, and/or have co-morbidities. In some circumstances, the trade-offs can be made easily with the agreement of the resident and for short periods of time. However challenging cases arise, in particular for residents and occupants with dementia who 'wander', meaning they have a strong need to walk, sometimes due to agitation, as may also be the case for some people with developmental disability (e.g. autism), or as a consequence of mental illness. This article addresses three central questions: (1) in what circumstances is it lawful to isolate residents of social care homes to prevent transmission of COVID-19, in particular where the resident has a strong compulsion to walk and will not, or cannot, remain still and isolated? (2) what types of strategies are lawful to curtail walking and achieve isolation and social distancing? (3) is law reform required to ensure any action to restrict freedoms is lawful and not excessive? These questions emerged during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and are still relevant. Although focussed on COVID-19, the results are also relevant to other future outbreaks of infectious diseases in care and group homes. Likewise, while we concentrate on the law in England and Wales, the analysis and implications have international significance.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19/epidemiología , Hogares para Grupos/ética , Hogares para Grupos/legislación & jurisprudencia , Casas de Salud/ética , Casas de Salud/legislación & jurisprudencia , Aislamiento de Pacientes/ética , Aislamiento de Pacientes/legislación & jurisprudencia , Inglaterra/epidemiología , Ética Médica , Humanos , Pandemias , Distanciamiento Físico , SARS-CoV-2 , Gales/epidemiología
7.
Med Health Care Philos ; 24(1): 113-125, 2021 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33398489

RESUMEN

This paper examines the prevalence of the ideal of "independence" in intellectual disability care in the Netherlands. It responds to a number of scholars who have interrogated this ideal through the lens of Michel Foucault's vocabulary of governmentality. Such analyses hold that the goal of "becoming independent" subjects people with intellectual disabilities to various constraints and limitations that ensure their continued oppression. As a result, these authors contend, the commitment to the ideal of "independence" - the "ethic of autonomy" - actually threatens to become an obstacle to flourishing in the group home. This paper offers an alternative analysis. It does so by drawing on a case study taken from an ethnographic study on group home life in the Netherlands. Briefly put, the disagreement stems from differing conceptualizations of moral life. Put in the vocabulary of moral anthropologist Cheryl Mattingly, the authors propose to approach the group home more from a "first-person" perspective rather than chiefly from a "third-person" perspective. They then draw on Mattingly to cast the group home as a "moral laboratory" in which the ethic of autonomy is not just reproduced but also enacted, and in which the terms of (in)dependence constantly get renegotiated in practice. What emerges is not only a new perspective on the workings of the "ethic of autonomy" in the group home, but also an argument about the possible limitations of the vocabulary of governmentality for analysing care practices.


Asunto(s)
Discapacidad Intelectual , Hogares para Grupos , Personal de Salud , Humanos , Laboratorios , Principios Morales , Autonomía Personal
8.
Community Ment Health J ; 57(6): 1164-1174, 2021 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33170422

RESUMEN

Studies of deaf individuals generally indicate higher levels of mental illness and negative mental health outcomes compared to the general population (Anglemyer and Crespi in JAMA 2018: 3285153, 2018; Dammeyer and Chapman in JAMA 52: 807-813, 2017; Fellinger et al. in JAMA 379: 17-23, 2012; Hall et al. in JAMA 52: 761-776, 2017; as reported by Leigh and Pollard (M. Marschark and P. Spencer (eds) Oxford handbook of deaf studies, language and education, Oxford University Press, UK 2003); Landsberger et al. in JAMA 45, 42-51, 2014; Pollard in JAMA 39, 147-160, 1994). The purpose of this study is to understand the demographic variables, psychiatric symptoms, functioning, resilience, and recovery in a sample of 11,703 deaf adults. The de-identified dataset was provided by Beacon Health Options and Maryland Behavioral Health Administration and includes information about deaf adult consumers of public behavioral health services. Findings revealed that compared to hearing consumers in the dataset, deaf consumers were less likely to live in independent housing. They were more likely to live in structured community housing, such as group homes, or be homelessness. They had higher rates of arrests and incarcerations, higher proportion of unemployment, and higher rates of cigarette smoking. Deaf participants had lower rates of substance use. Deaf women in this sample reported significantly more difficulty in managing their psychiatric symptoms than deaf men. Deaf people of color had lower levels of psychiatric dysfunction, lower resilience, and greater recovery compared to white participants, which was inconsistent with other studies of people of color. Younger participants had significantly more difficulty with psychiatric symptoms and functioning than those in the older groups. Those who were 31-55 years old had higher resilience than those who were older than 56 years old. The author offers several recommendations for further research of the mental health of deaf populations, especially round race, age, and gender.


Asunto(s)
Hogares para Grupos , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Adulto , Femenino , Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Lenguaje , Masculino , Maryland , Persona de Mediana Edad
9.
Med Anthropol ; 40(2): 155-168, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32852230

RESUMEN

What expectations about the mind do people with intellectual disabilities depart from? A dominant argument maintains that their mental dependence troubles liberal relations premised upon a myth of autonomy. By analyzing the centrality of persuasion in a home for adults with intellectual disabilities in the UK, I ask instead about the psychological assumptions made by relationships of care. Persuasion aims to cultivate, not their independence from care but rather, a recognition of their dependence upon it. Persuasive care's repeated failure suggests an alternative answer to the question: people with intellectual disabilities are too independent-minded for this form of dependence.


Asunto(s)
Antropología Médica , Estado Funcional , Discapacidad Intelectual , Autonomía Personal , Adulto , Femenino , Hogares para Grupos , Servicios de Atención de Salud a Domicilio , Humanos , Discapacidad Intelectual/etnología , Discapacidad Intelectual/terapia , Comunicación Persuasiva , Política , Reino Unido
10.
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil ; 34(1): 149-163, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32812319

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The ageing of people with intellectual disabilities, with associated morbidity like dementia, calls for new types of care. Person-centred methods may support care staff in providing this, an example being Dementia Care Mapping (DCM). DCM has been shown to be feasible in ID-care. We examined the experiences of ID-professionals in using DCM. METHODS: We performed a mixed-methods study, using quantitative data from care staff (N = 136) and qualitative data (focus-groups, individual interviews) from care staff, group home managers and DCM-in-intellectual disabilities mappers (N = 53). RESULTS: DCM provided new insights into the behaviours of clients, enabled professional reflection and gave new knowledge and skills regarding dementia and person-centred care. Appreciation of DCM further increased after the second cycle of application. CONCLUSION: DCM is perceived as valuable in ID-care. Further assessment is needed of its effectiveness in ID-care with respect to quality of care, staff-client interactions and job performance.


Asunto(s)
Demencia , Discapacidad Intelectual , Anciano , Envejecimiento , Demencia/terapia , Grupos Focales , Hogares para Grupos , Humanos , Discapacidad Intelectual/terapia , Atención Dirigida al Paciente
11.
Am J Emerg Med ; 46: 550-555, 2021 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33279330

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Lack of mental health resources, such as inpatient psychiatric beds, has increased frequency and duration of boarding for mental health patients presenting to U.S. emergency departments (EDs). The purpose of this study is to describe characteristics of mental health patients with an ED length of stay of one week or longer and to identify barriers to their disposition. METHODS: This study was conducted in an academic ED in which emergency psychiatric evaluations and care are provided by a Psychiatric Emergency Services (PES) team contained within the Department of Emergency Medicine. Prolonged boarding was defined as an ED length of stay of 7 days or more. Pediatric, adult, and geriatric mental health patients with prolonged ED boarding from January 1 to August 31, 2019 were included. This study includes prospective data collection of the boarding group and retrospective identification and data collection of a comparison group of non-barding patients over the same 8-month period to compare patient characteristics and outcomes for each group. RESULTS: Between January 1 and August 31, 2019, the PES team completed 2,745 new assessments of mental health patients, of whom 39 met criteria for prolonged ED boarding. The following characteristics were associated with boarding: child (8%), male (64%), having Medicaid (49%) or both Medicaid and Medicare (18%), and having either a neurodevelopmental (15%) or neurocognitive disorder (15%) with a median stay of 18 days. Barriers to discharge included being declined from all state inpatient psychiatric hospitals (69%), declined from community living environments (21%), or declined from both (10%). The most common ED non-boarding patients were: Caucasian (64%), have a diagnosis of unspecified mental disorder (including suicidal ideation) or other specified mental disorder (59%) and have private insurance (42%) with a median stay of 1 day. CONCLUSION: In this study of mental health patients with prolonged ED stays, the primary barrier to disposition was the lack of patient acceptance to inpatient psychiatric hospitals, community settings, or other housing. Early identification of potential prolonged boarding, quality treatment and care for those patients, and effective case management, may resolve the ongoing challenges of boarding within the ED.


Asunto(s)
Ocupación de Camas , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital , Hospitalización , Trastornos Mentales , Transferencia de Pacientes , Adolescente , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Anciano , Instituciones de Vida Asistida , Niño , Preescolar , Servicios de Urgencia Psiquiátrica , Femenino , Hogares para Grupos , Capacidad de Camas en Hospitales , Hospitales Psiquiátricos , Hospitales Provinciales , Vivienda , Humanos , Lactante , Masculino , Medicaid , Medicare , Persona de Mediana Edad , Trastornos del Humor , Trastornos Neurocognitivos , Trastornos del Neurodesarrollo , Alta del Paciente , Trastornos Psicóticos , Estudios Retrospectivos , Esquizofrenia , Factores Sexuales , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Estados Unidos , Adulto Joven
13.
Am Psychol ; 75(9): 1376-1388, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33382320

RESUMEN

In today's world of global migration and urbanization, millions of children are separated from parents. Their mental health and future competences as citizens depend on the quality of care from foster parents and group home staff in nonparental care settings. Caregivers are challenged by poor work conditions, too many children, and a lack of knowledge about care for traumatized children. How can our profession match this challenge by upscaling interventions? Digital designs for applications of psychology are growing, recently accelerated by the COVID-19 crisis. From 2008, the author developed a blended learning intervention. In partnerships with nongovernmental organizations and government agencies, care recommendations from an international network of researchers are transformed into start-up seminars for staff, followed by a 6-month online classroom education. Students learn and practice how to train local caregiver groups in attachment-based care, using training sessions developed in local languages, adjusted to culture. At present, the author's Fairstart Foundation educated 500 staff from partners in 26 countries, who have trained the caregivers of some 40,000 children. The theoretical, logistic and technical steps from research to daily caregiver-child practices are described, to inspire discussions of how online designs and international partnerships may benefit underserved populations. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores/educación , Cuidado del Niño , Niño Abandonado , Educación a Distancia , Cuidados en el Hogar de Adopción , Hogares para Grupos , Desarrollo de Programa , Trauma Psicológico/enfermería , Formación del Profesorado , Adulto , COVID-19 , Niño , Cuidado del Niño/métodos , Cuidado del Niño/organización & administración , Cuidado del Niño/normas , Cuidado del Niño/estadística & datos numéricos , Niño Abandonado/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación a Distancia/organización & administración , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Cuidados en el Hogar de Adopción/métodos , Cuidados en el Hogar de Adopción/organización & administración , Cuidados en el Hogar de Adopción/estadística & datos numéricos , Hogares para Grupos/organización & administración , Hogares para Grupos/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Cooperación Internacional , Colaboración Intersectorial , Desarrollo de Programa/métodos , Desarrollo de Programa/normas , Desarrollo de Programa/estadística & datos numéricos , Formación del Profesorado/métodos , Formación del Profesorado/organización & administración , Formación del Profesorado/estadística & datos numéricos
14.
Child Abuse Negl ; 109: 104702, 2020 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32891971

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Many children and youth living in residential units have experienced multiple traumas that may result in challenging behaviors. Among a range of professional responses, staff may use restraint, seclusion and time-out to manage these behaviors. OBJECTIVE: To enhance our understanding of these restrictive interventions in residential units as a means of improving professional practices involving children and youth in out-of-home care. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Administrative data were used. Restrictive intervention data for 324 children and youth (29 units) over a 6-month period were extracted. METHODS: Latent profile analysis was used to identify subgroups of children and youth with distinct restrictive intervention profiles. Children and youth in these profiles were compared on individual (age, sex, ethnic group, length of stay in unit, reasons for services) and environmental characteristics (unit type, type of services, specialized designation). RESULTS: Restrictive interventions, especially time-outs, were frequent (5136 interventions; 69% time-outs), yet approximately half of the sample did not experience any. Restraints, seclusions and time-outs differed in frequency, duration and reason for use. A two-profile model was favored for children and youth who were subjected to restrictive interventions (classification accuracy = 94%). Children and youth in these two profiles differed from each other, and from those not subjected to restrictive interventions, on numerous individual and environmental characteristics. CONCLUSION: The use of restrictive interventions is frequent, and attention should be paid to individual and environmental risk factors identified in this study (i.e., being a boy, non-Caucasian, taken into care for neglect, and having a longer stay in unit).


Asunto(s)
Hogares para Grupos/estadística & datos numéricos , Aislamiento de Pacientes/métodos , Tratamiento Domiciliario/métodos , Restricción Física/métodos , Adolescente , Niño , Preescolar , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Aislamiento de Pacientes/psicología , Aislamiento de Pacientes/estadística & datos numéricos , Quebec , Tratamiento Domiciliario/estadística & datos numéricos , Restricción Física/psicología , Restricción Física/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32796588

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate perceptions of staff about the promotion of physical activity (PA) in selected group residences of Hong Kong (HK), some of which had experienced a multi-component PA program. METHOD: Focus group interviews with nineteen staff members from four group homes (two of which received the program) were conducted. FINDINGS: A SWOT analysis provided important insights into residential staff views about key influences on the quality of PA programs for residents with intellectual disabilities (ID). Positive (strengths and opportunities) and negative (weaknesses and threats) influences were identified. They were associated with characteristics of residents, staff, and group residence. Increasing age and low motivation are impediments to PA engagement of adults with ID. Staff competence and prior unsuccessful experience in promoting PA are also implicated. CONCLUSION: The PA program quality is mediated by the quality of staff interpersonal interactions with their clients and their commitment in encouraging such adults with ID to join and persistent in PA as well as staff seeking external resources and support as well as using initiative to adapt PA promotion activities in their specific group residential context.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico , Hogares para Grupos , Discapacidad Intelectual , Adulto , Grupos Focales , Personal de Salud , Hong Kong , Humanos
16.
Disabil Health J ; 13(4): 100969, 2020 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32600948

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) may be at higher risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: To describe COVID-19 outcomes among people with IDD living in residential groups homes in the state of New York and the general population of New York State. METHODS: Data for people with IDD are from a coalition of organizations providing over half of the residential services for the state of New York, and from the New York State Department of Health. Analysis describes COVID-19 case rates, case-fatality, and mortality among people with IDD living in residential group homes and New York State through May 28, 2020. RESULTS: People with IDD living in residential group homes were at greater risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes: case rates - 7,841 per 100,000 for people with IDD compared to 1,910 for New York State; case-fatality - 15.0% for people with IDD compared to 7.9% for New York State; and mortality rate - 1,175 per 100,000 for people with IDD compared to 151 per 100,000 for New York State. Differences in cases and mortality rate were confirmed across regions of the state, but case-fatality rate was only higher for people with IDD in and around the New York City region. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 appears to present a greater risk to people with IDD, especially those living in congregate settings. A full understanding of the severity of this risk will not be possible until US states begin publicly sharing all relevant data they have on COVID-19 outcomes among this population.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Discapacidades del Desarrollo/virología , Personas con Discapacidad , Discapacidad Intelectual/virología , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Infecciones por Coronavirus/mortalidad , Femenino , Hogares para Grupos , Humanos , Masculino , New York/epidemiología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/mortalidad , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil ; 33(6): 1284-1295, 2020 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32462757

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Research has shown that there is variability in quality of life (QOL) outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities who live in group homes. The aim was to examine dimensions of group home culture as predictors of QOL outcomes. METHOD: The Group Home Culture Scale (GHCS) was used to measure staff perceptions of culture in 23 group homes. QOL data were available from 98 people with intellectual disabilities. Multilevel modelling was used to examine the associations between the GHCS subscales and four QOL-dependent variables. RESULTS: Of the GHCS subscales, Effective Team Leadership and Alignment of Staff with Organizational Values significantly predicted residents' engagement in activities. Supporting Well-Being significantly predicted residents' community involvement. None of the GHCS subscales significantly predicted domestic participation and choice making. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that strategies to improve Effective Team Leadership and Supporting Well-Being dimensions of culture may contribute to enhancing certain QOL outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Discapacidad Intelectual , Calidad de Vida , Hogares para Grupos , Humanos , Liderazgo
18.
Trop Doct ; 50(3): 194-198, 2020 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32380905

RESUMEN

Data concerning the burden of parasites among populations living in overcrowded circumstances have paramount importance for the success of interventions aimed at eliminating such disease. A cross-sectional study was therefore conducted from February to May 2019 among 217 children at child centres in Bahir Dar city. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and stool samples were processed for parasitological investigation.A total of 53 (24.4%) children were infected with at least a single species of intestinal parasite. Giardia lamblia (7.8%) was the most frequent, followed by Hymenolepis nana (6%). Children with untrimmed fingernails (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.422, P = 0.027) were significantly more prone to infection. Similarly, children with no habit of hand washing after soil contact (AOR = 2.752, P = 0.014) or after defecation (AOR = 3.087, P = 0.026) were significantly associated with parasitic infection. The prevalence of intestinal parasites at child centres in Bahir Dar is of public health importance; therefore, control programmes should target these children.


Asunto(s)
Hogares para Grupos/estadística & datos numéricos , Parasitosis Intestinales/epidemiología , Parasitosis Intestinales/parasitología , Animales , Niño , Preescolar , Estudios Transversales , Etiopía/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Parásitos/clasificación , Parásitos/aislamiento & purificación , Prevalencia , Factores de Riesgo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
19.
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil ; 33(6): 1210-1220, 2020 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32367679

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Problem behaviours are common among people with intellectual disabilities (ID), but psychometrically evaluated instruments for assessing such behaviours are scarce. The present study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Intellectual Disability (NPI-ID). METHOD: We assessed 108 residents with intellectual disabilities living in group-homes using the NPI-ID, which included the 12 symptoms of the original NPI-Nursing Home and two supplementary symptoms: self-injurious behaviour and impulsive risk-taking behaviour. RESULTS: The NPI-ID showed adequate internal consistency (α = 0.76) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.88). Exploratory factor analysis revealed five factors accounting for 64.1% of the variance. Cluster analysis revealed that residents were clustered in three groups with distinctly different symptom profiles. CONCLUSIONS: The psychometric properties were satisfactory, supporting the use of the NPI-ID as a screening tool for people with intellectual disabilities. Additional research is needed to further evaluate the utility of the NPI-ID among people with intellectual disabilities.


Asunto(s)
Discapacidad Intelectual , Adulto , Hogares para Grupos , Humanos , Casas de Salud , Psicometría , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados
20.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 58(6): 18-29, 2020 Jun 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32286663

RESUMEN

Children living in foster care group homes are more likely to have physical, mental, and social health problems due to parental abuse, neglect, and family breakdown. The purpose of the current study was to develop and apply the urban forest-based health promotion program on children living in group homes in Korea to investigate its effects on perceived health, psychological health, and connectedness to nature. Eight children (mean age = 12.13 [SD = 1.25] years) from three group homes participated in the study. The intervention was conducted individually for each group home once per week for 8 weeks. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed. Participants showed significant improvement in restoration. Six themes were identified that reflect participants' experience and the effectiveness of the urban forest-based health promotion program. This program may be considered a possible intervention to promote children's psychosocial health and connectedness to nature. Continuous efforts are needed to further examine the program's effectiveness. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 58(6), 18-29.].


Asunto(s)
Salud del Niño/estadística & datos numéricos , Bosques , Hogares para Grupos , Promoción de la Salud , Salud Mental , Naturaleza , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Autoinforme , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
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