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2.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1844394, 2021 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33167822

RESUMEN

Calls to reform medical education recommend explicit training in professional identity formation to promote the development of humanistic, compassionate physicians. The authors report their experience offering The Physician Healer Track, a 500-contact-hour curricula integrated over 4 years, focusing on self-awareness, reflection, being-with-suffering, communication and professional identity development. The voluntary scholarly-concentration program comprises 4 years of monthly dinner meetings with faculty mentors, a two-month preceptorship in the first year, a one-month immersion course in MS4 and one elective. Training in mindfulness, cognitive behavioral therapy, nonviolent communication, motivational interviewing, spirituality in healthcare, wellness, equanimity, and 'being with suffering' is reinforced across all 4 years. Community building and reflection are integral to the training both in the monthly sessions and the immersion courses. Enrollment has grown from 26 students in the first year (11% of class) to a total of 258 students across our first 6 years (average of 20-26% of each class). Graduates in our first two cohorts of PHT have exceeded the numbers in the eight other scholarly concentrations offered at UTMB. Among students participating in the summer preceptorship, there has been less than 1% attrition. In serial assessments, students report continued growth in personal development, professional development, and the ability to empathize. Offering PHT has resulted in the growth of training for our medical residents, faculty, physical therapy students and the creation of a student healer association. Despite the demands on student's time, they are voluntarily participating in a challenging program of integrated training with the intention of keeping them connected to their humanity during the rigors of medical school training.


Asunto(s)
Comunicación , Educación Médica , Empatía , Humanidades , Atención Plena , Estudiantes de Medicina , Curriculum , Educación Médica/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina , Docentes , Humanismo , Humanidades/educación , Humanos , Mentores , Médicos , Facultades de Medicina , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología
4.
Soins ; 65(842): 51-54, 2020.
Artículo en Francés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32245560

RESUMEN

When medicine and humanities are dissociated and then reconciled, what is the meaning of "medical humanities" today? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the French system? At a time when the link between the humanities and medicine seems more distended than ever, ten recommendations for developing and changing the way future doctors look at things are presented.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica/organización & administración , Humanidades/educación , Francia , Humanos , Facultades de Medicina
6.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 140(3): 411-414, 2020.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32115562

RESUMEN

Over the past few decades, pharmacists' work has changed from product-centered tasks to patient-centered care. In response to such social changes and needs, the pharmacy education course was also extended from 4 to 6 years, and the importance of the humanities in the curriculum (e.g., medical psychology, medical ethics, and communication) is now recognized. The Model Core Curriculum for Pharmacy Education, 2013 version, described 10 professional competencies for pharmacists (professionalism, patient-oriented attitude, communication skills, interprofessional team care, basic sciences, medication therapy management, community health and medical care, research, lifelong learning, and education and training) and stated that the humanities are a foundation of pharmaceutical education. However, a report by the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan (2014) expressed concern that clinical practice was not connected with knowledge of the humanities. It is educationally meaningful when pharmacists who studied the humanities can then offer the best medical care to patients. In order to utilize knowledge of the humanities in the clinical setting, educators need to provide opportunities for active learning. Furthermore, the humanities are useful to help pharmacists acquire meta-cognition.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Farmacia , Humanidades/educación , Educación en Farmacia/tendencias , Ética Médica/educación , Humanos , Conocimiento , Metacognición , Psicología Médica/educación
9.
Acad Med ; 95(3): 401-410, 2020 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31348068

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To explore the structural, cultural, and interpersonal issues that may contribute to the inadvertent marginalization of medical students with social science and humanities (SSH) backgrounds. METHOD: Using the hidden curriculum as an analytic construct, the lead author interviewed 14 medical students with SSH backgrounds at the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine from February to October 2015. The authors analyzed the interview transcripts for common themes around positive and negative cultural, structural, and interpersonal dimensions of the socialization process. RESULTS: Participants reported barriers to applying to medical school: needing to complete prerequisite courses and to do well on an exam geared toward those with a strong science background (the Medical College Admission Test) and lacking an application cohort. Some participants felt they were not ideal candidates for medical school. Participants appreciated how their SSH backgrounds and associated skill sets shaped both their perspectives on patient care and their developing professional identities. However, they perceived that others largely deemed their previous training as irrelevant, and they felt marginalized in medical school by peers, instructors, and the curriculum. These experiences led both to self-censorship, which enabled them to seem to conform to normative behaviors, and to the pursuit of reaffirming elective experiences. CONCLUSIONS: The existing hidden curriculum inadvertently marginalizes SSH medical students; their experiences likely reflect the socialization experiences of other students from underrepresented backgrounds. Curricular and institutional reforms are imperative to shift the hidden curriculum toward one of epistemological inclusion that better supports students from nontraditional backgrounds.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/organización & administración , Humanidades/educación , Ciencias Sociales/educación , Socialización , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Ontario , Grupo Paritario , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
10.
Educ. med. (Ed. impr.) ; 20(6): 347-352, nov.-dic. 2019. tab
Artículo en Español | IBECS | ID: ibc-191841

RESUMEN

INTRODUCCIÓN: Los avances biomédicos de los últimos 2 siglos han tenido una repercusión importante en la sociedad. Sin embargo, la docencia de esta relación mutua en el ámbito universitario es una tarea pendiente. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se describe las características de la asignatura Biomedicina, sociedad y cultura dirigida a presentar la interacción de la biomedicina con la historia, la economía, la sociología y la cultura a los estudiantes de máster. Se presentan los resultados de los 3 primeros años (2015-2017) de su impartición mediante un cuestionario de evaluación cualitativo tipo Likert de 5 puntos para los aspectos generales del curso y cuantitativo para el interés de los diversos temas (0-5), que completaron los estudiantes. RESULTADOS: La cursaron 51 estudiantes. La mayoría (89%) provenía de estudios biomédicos. Los estudiantes expresaron con puntuaciones máximas (totalmente de acuerdo) que la asignatura había cumplido sus expectativas, que la recomendarían y que había aumentado sus conocimientos sobre la relación entre biomedicina y aspectos sociales y culturales. Los temas de mayor interés fueron los aspectos históricos (4,5 ± 0,6), las implicaciones sociológicas (4,6 ± 0,7) y las consideraciones bioéticas (4,5 ± 0,6), y el menos valorado fue los aspectos culturales (3,9 ± 1,0). DISCUSIÓN: La asignatura descrita puede contribuir de forma importante a que los graduados comprendan cómo se ejerce la relación mutua entre ciencia biomédica y elementos sociales. Materias similares pueden ayudar a la contextualización de los avances científicos en un área tan sensible como es la biomedicina


INTRODUCTION: Biomedical progress in the last two centuries has had a significant effect on society. However, the teaching on the mutual relationship between bioscience and society is still lacking in most universities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A description is presented on the characteristics of the subject Biomedicine, society and culture. This is devoted to introduce, the interaction of biomedicine with history, economy, sociology, and culture, to graduate students of masters programs. The evaluation of the first three years (2015-2017) of the experience is reported. Student beliefs and opinions were evaluated by means of a questionnaire that used a five point Likert type scale for the agreement with some statements, and a quantitative scale (zero to five) for their opinion with the contents of the subject. RESULTS: The questionnaire on the experience was completed by 51 students. Most of them (89%) were graduates of biomedical disciplines. They gave the highest score (Fully agree) to the statements that the subject had fulfilled their expectations, that they would recommend it to other students, and the fact that the subject had increased their knowledge on the mutual relationship between biomedicine and social and cultural factors. The topics that they scored the highest were historical aspects (4.5 ± 0.6), sociological implications (4.6 ± 0.7) and bioethical considerations (4.5 ± 0.6), whereas the lowest was cultural aspects (3.9 ± 1.0) DISCUSSION: The subject described here may contribute to enhancing the understanding of the importance of a mutual relationship between biomedicine and society by postgraduate students. Similar initiatives may help in establishing the context of scientific progress in an important area such biomedicine


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Educación Médica/tendencias , Humanidades/educación , Cultura , Sociología/educación , Ciencias Sociales/educación , Evaluación Educacional , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
11.
PLoS One ; 14(11): e0225837, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31774867

RESUMEN

As research teams are increasingly comprised of members from multiple disciplines, ranging from the physical sciences, life sciences, social and behavioral sciences to the arts and humanities, it is important to revisit how research is conducted at several levels. Coupled with the national concern over rigor and reproducibility in research, it is therefore crucial to ensure that all members of such multidisciplinary teams view the need for ethics in the conduct of research in similar ways. Towards this end, Wayne State University developed a course in the Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) which was mandatory for all its 1500 doctoral students across all disciplines in its 75 PhD programs. We found that student perceptions of the validity, applicability and usefulness of the course varied by discipline. This was in spite of iterative changes made to the course by faculty in those disciplines to make the content palatable to all. The findings show that more work needs to be done to fully incorporate the needs of social sciences and humanities disciplines in a comprehensive university course. This is especially important as these students become members of large multidisciplinary research teams in order to uphold the highest levels of rigor, reproducibility and ethics.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum/normas , Ética en Investigación/educación , Humanidades/educación , Disciplinas de las Ciencias Naturales/educación , Ciencias Sociales/educación , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Universidades
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 410, 2019 Nov 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31703743

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: By learning medical humanities, medical students are expected to shift from handling the diseases only to seeing a whole sick person. Therefore, understanding medical students' learning process and outcomes of medical humanities becomes an essential issue of medical education. Few studies have been conducted to explore factors surrounding medical students' learning process and outcomes of medical humanities. The objectives were: (1) to investigate the relationships between medical students' conceptions of learning and strategies to learning; and (2) to examine the relationships between students' strategies to learning and learning outcomes for medical humanities. METHODS: We used the modified Approaches to Learning Medicine (mALM) questionnaire and Conceptions of Learning Medicine (COLM) questionnaire to measure the medical students' strategies to learning and conceptions of learning respectively. The learning outcome of medical humanities was measured using students' weighted grade in a medical humanities course. The confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to validate the COLM and mALM questionnaires, in which construct validity and reliability were assessed. Pearson's correlation was used to examine the relationships among the factors of COLM, mALM, and the weighted grade. Path analysis using structural equation modeling technique (SEM) was employed to estimate the structural relationships among the COLM, mALM, and the weighted grade. RESULTS: Two hundred and seventy-five first-year medical students consented to participate in this study. The participants adopting surface strategies to learning were more likely to have unsatisfactory learning outcome (ß = - 0.14, p = .04). The basic-level conception of "Preparing for Testing" was negatively (ß = - 0.19, p < .01) associated with deep strategies of learning, and positively (ß = 0.48, p < .01) associated with surface strategies of learning (ß = 0.50, p < .01). The basic-level conception of "Skills Acquisition" was positively associated with deep strategies of learning (ß = 0.23, p < .01). CONCLUSION: Medical educators should wisely employ teaching strategies to increase students' engagement with deep and self-directed learning strategies, and to avoid using surface learning strategies in the medical humanities course in order to achieve better learning outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Humanidades/educación , Aprendizaje , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adolescente , Adulto , Curriculum , Educación Médica , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
13.
Indian J Med Ethics ; 4(3): 194-197, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31727612

RESUMEN

The field of Medical Humanities, shaped by a belief in the vitality of interdisciplinary and non-hierarchical conversations across disciplines, would only be sustainable if both components of the field - 'medical' and 'humanities' were given equal validity and weightage. The challenge for any exploration of Medical Humanities within the medical curriculum would be to take seriously the methodology and scholarship of the Humanities and its millennia-rich study of health, illness, mortality and human wellbeing. While Humanities has to work within the parameters of medical education, there needs to be more clarity on how to locate and explore subjects from the Humanities in this educational process. The Medical Council of India has made various forays in engaging with the issue. While the previous regulations (1997, last updated in 2017) were non-committal and insufficiently specific, the new guidelines of 2018 do not contain a single inclusion of the word 'Humanities'. Further, the only overture to all the non-medical components have been ossified under the umbrella of AETCOM (Attitude, Ethics and Communication) with prefabricated topics. Both curricular formulations are deeply inadequate: the earlier formulation was lost in vagueness, and the new is instrumental. This revised emphasis on capsules of information, rather than the epistemological approaches that have informed the interplay of Medicine and Humanities means the disappearing act of any possibility of a genuine engagement with the ethos of Medical Humanities. This article attempts to address this invisibility of the Humanities in contemporary formulations of medical syllabi and pedagogy in India.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/normas , Humanidades/educación , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/ética , India
14.
EMBO Rep ; 20(12): e48830, 2019 12 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31663234

RESUMEN

Medical teaching must include new knowledge and technologies and how these affect patient care. The Medical Humanities can contribute to a more holistic and caring view of health and disease.


Asunto(s)
Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Humanidades/educación , Curriculum/tendencias , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/tendencias , Salud Holística/educación , Humanos , Facultades de Medicina
15.
Enferm Clin ; 29 Suppl 2: 357-361, 2019 09.
Artículo en Inglés, Español | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31375385

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: This study estimated the prevalence of and the correlation between sleep quality and levels of stress among college students. METHOD: Design of this study is analytical with the cross-sectional approach. There are 450 college students who participated and chosen by a stratified random sampling technique in the University of Indonesia. A self-administrated questionnaire is distributed to assess sleep quality used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the stress level by used the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). The study samples came from three clusters are health, science and technology, and social humanities. RESULT: The result is analyzed using Chi-square test and showed a significant relationship between sleep quality and level of stress among Students of the University of Indonesia (p=0.001; α=0.05). Students are with poor sleep quality 4.7 times more likely to have higher stress than students who have a good sleep quality. CONCLUSION: The results showed that poor sleep quality most widely owned by a grove social humanities have strong relationship with cluster and stress level. Students with poor sleep quality 4.7 times more likely to have higher stress than students who have a good sleep quality. Stress experienced due to poor sleep quality ratings. This research recommend to applied stress management in order to increase sleep quality.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/psicología , Sueño/fisiología , Estrés Psicológico/psicología , Estudiantes/psicología , Distribución de Chi-Cuadrado , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Encuestas Epidemiológicas , Humanidades/educación , Humanidades/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Indonesia/epidemiología , Masculino , Ciencia/educación , Ciencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Trastornos del Inicio y del Mantenimiento del Sueño/epidemiología , Estrés Psicológico/epidemiología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Tecnología/educación , Tecnología/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades , Adulto Joven
17.
Acad Med ; 94(10): 1422-1424, 2019 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31299677

RESUMEN

Trust is a complex phenomenon that resists easy definition, but it is easily recognizable, or rather its absence is impossible to miss. The author draws inspiration from the #MedsWeCanTrust movement to advocate for #MedicineWeCanTrust. Trust can be seen as a "soft," "tender-minded," optimistic condition fighting for survival in a "hard," "tough-minded," or jaundiced medicine. Modern medicine is traditionally patriarchal, individualistic, and resistant to encouraging democratic, collaborative habits as it socializes its young into hierarchical structures or eats them whole. Yet trust is a health intervention and essential for the innovative expansion of medical culture as it encourages authentic democracy, interprofessional clinical teamwork, and patient-centeredness. Increases in trust lead to greater tolerance of uncertainty, one of the primary goals of medical education. Recent curriculum development work has shown that the medical humanities offer a superb delivery mechanism for ensuring democratic habits in medicine that align with social justice agendas, key to addressing links between social inequalities and compromised physical and mental health. Where lack of trust is associated with cynicism in doctors, increasing trust loosens dependence upon suffocating control mechanisms. This allows medicine to take on the moral concerns and uncertainties of an adulthood that also promises emotional warmth, guidance, support, and improved communication between colleagues and with patients. Medicine must embrace trust as the matrix of health care, and the medical humanities can educate for values such as tolerance of uncertainty and ambiguity as a basis for engendering trust.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica , Humanidades/educación , Confianza , Curriculum , Decepción , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Humanos , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Relaciones Médico-Paciente
19.
Intern Emerg Med ; 14(7): 1013-1017, 2019 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31227997

RESUMEN

The relation between philosophy and biomedicine has been reassessed and rethought in the last few years: on the one hand, philosophy of science has paid increasing attention to actual modes of biomedical research and clinical practice; on the other, classes in philosophy, and more generally, in the humanities, have started entering medical curricula. However, the role of philosophy in medical education is not yet unanimously recognized, with situations differing significantly in various national and international contexts. In line with the tradition in Italy and other countries of reflecting on clinical methodology and with the recent initiatives at the crossroads between medicine and philosophy, this contribution aims to argue for the mutual relevance of medicine and philosophy in educational processes, and to suggest some possible forms of implementation of their interactions.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica/tendencias , Humanidades/educación , Humanidades/tendencias , Humanos , Italia
20.
Acad Med ; 94(8): 1108-1114, 2019 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31094728

RESUMEN

The role of the humanities in medical education remains a topic of dynamic debate in medical schools of high-income countries. However, in most low- and middle-income countries, the medical humanities are less topical and rarely even have a place in the curriculum. Reasons for this dearth include inadequate resources to support such programs coupled with misapprehension of the role and significance of the humanities in medical education.In this article, the authors argue that the humanities have a vital role to play in the low-resource settings of African medical education. They discuss the complexities of the continent's sociohistorical legacies, in particular the impact of colonization, to provide contexts for conceptualizing humanities programs in African schools. They outline the challenges to developing and implementing such programs in the continent's underresourced medical schools and present these as four specific conundrums to be addressed. As a general guide, the authors then suggest four nonprescriptive content domains that African medical schools might consider in establishing medical humanities programs.The goal is to jump-start a crucial and timely discussion that will open the way for the feasible implementation of contextually congruent humanities programs in the continent's medical schools, leading to the enhanced education, training, and professional development of its graduating physicians.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación Médica/métodos , Humanidades/educación , África , Países en Desarrollo , Recursos en Salud , Humanos
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