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1.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol ; 27(1): 60-71, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32352808

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: We examined ethnic-racial and gender identities and their relations to self-esteem and well-being among Cherokee early adolescents. We also explored gender differences in the significance to boys and girls of ethnic-racial and gender identities. METHOD: The sample consisted of 212 Cherokee 6th, 7th, and 8th grade girls and boys (Mage = 12.7 years). Adolescents completed survey measures of gender and ethnic-racial centrality, gender private regard, ethnic-racial private regard, ethnic-racial public regard, self-esteem, and three measures of well-being. RESULTS: Both genders reported high levels of the importance of being Cherokee to their identity (i.e., centrality), and strong positive attitudes toward being Cherokee (i.e., ethnic-racial private regard). Boys perceived gender as more important and more positive than girls. Among girls, ethnic-racial identity was more central and was viewed more positively than their gender identity. Mean levels of ethnic-racial and gender centrality did not differ for boys, nor did their reports of ethnic-racial and gender private regard. Youth's perceptions that others hold Cherokees in high regard (public regard) decreased across the grade levels. For both boys and girls, gender identity dimensions had stronger relations than ethnic-racial identity to psychosocial outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: For this sample of Cherokee adolescents, ethnic-racial identity held more prominence for girls than for boys, although aspects of gender identity were more strongly related to well-being for both genders. Results of the study indicate the significance of considering multiple identities in understanding identity development in American Indian adolescents. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Identidad de Género , Identificación Social , Adolescente , Grupos de Población Continentales , Grupos Étnicos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Autoimagen
2.
Orthop Clin North Am ; 52(1): 61-68, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33222985

RESUMEN

Professional identity formation (PIF) of medical students encompasses how students learn to think, do, and act as physicians. A key component of PIF is socialization, which includes mentoring. Mentoring influences students' career specialty choice, while providing a safe and nurturing environment to form their own professional identities. Mentoring of medical students by orthopedic surgeons may increase interest in the specialty. Suggestions for utilizing mentoring for the PIF of medical students and to increase diversity in orthopedics are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Tutoría , Ortopedia/educación , Autoimagen , Identificación Social , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Selección de Profesión , Competencia Clínica , Docentes Médicos/psicología , Humanos , Cirujanos Ortopédicos/psicología
3.
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol ; 27(1): 18-36, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32378929

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The present mixed-methods study examines allyship as a politicized collective identity and its associations with ethnic identity, personality traits, and sociopolitical engagement among IPPOC. METHOD: Participants in two samples in 2016 (n = 256) and 2017 (n = 305) completed measures of ally identity, ethnic identity, personality traits, and political engagement. RESULTS: Results indicate two factors of ally identity (ally beliefs and behaviors). Quantitative findings suggest a) ethnic identity exploration predicts ally beliefs and behaviors, b) extraversion predicts ally behaviors, while agreeableness and neuroticism predicts ally beliefs, and c) ally beliefs and behaviors predict awareness, while ethnic identity exploration predicts involvement in political action, even when personality traits are considered. Thematic analysis findings suggest IPPOC allies are politically engaged through social media, individual actions, protests, and civic engagement. CONCLUSIONS: Ethnic and ally identity provide different paths to sociopolitical awareness and involvement. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Grupos Étnicos , Pigmentación de la Piel , Humanos , Pueblos Indígenas , Política , Identificación Social
4.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0242604, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33347448

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There are few data on the on the care experiences of pregnant women with rifampicin-resistant TB. OBJECTIVE: To describe the treatment journeys of pregnant women with RR-TB-including how their care experiences shape their identities-and identify areas in which tailored interventions are needed. METHODS: In this qualitative study in-depth interviews were conducted among a convenience sample from a population of pregnant women receiving treatment for RR-TB. This paper follows COREQ guidelines. A thematic network analysis using an inductive approach was performed to analyze the interview transcripts and notes. The analysis was iterative and a coding system developed which focused on the care experiences of the women and how these experiences affected their perceptions of themselves, their children, and the health care system in which treatment was received. RESULTS: Seventeen women were interviewed. The women described multiple challenges in their treatment journeys which required them to demonstrate sustained resilience (i.e. to "be brave"). Care experiences required them to negotiate seemingly contradictory identities as both new mothers-"givers of life"-and RR-TB patients facing a complicated and potentially deadly disease. In terms of their "pregnancy identity" and "RR-TB patient identity" that emerged as part of their care experiences, four key themes were identified that appeared to have elements that were contradictory to one another (contradictory areas). These included: 1) the experience of physical symptoms or changes; 2) the experience of the "mothering" and "patient" roles; 3) the experience of the care they received for their pregnancy and their RR-TB; and 4) the experience of community engagement. There were also three areas that overlapped with both roles and during which identity was negotiated/reinforced and they included: 1) faith; 2) socioeconomic issues; and 3) long-term concerns over the child's health. At times, the health care system exacerbated these challenges as the women were not given the support they needed by health care providers who were ill-informed or angry and treated the women in a discriminatory fashion. Left to negotiate this confusing time period, the women turned to faith, their own mothers, and the fathers of their unborn children. CONCLUSION: The care experiences of the women who participated in this study highlight several gaps in the current health care system that must be better addressed in both TB and perinatal services in order to improve the therapeutic journeys for pregnant women with RR-TB and their children. Suggestions for optimizing care include the provision of integrated services, including specialized counseling as well as training for health care providers; engagement of peer support networks; provision of socioeconomic support; long-term medical care/follow-up for children born to women who were treated for RR-TB; and inclusion of faith-based services in the provision of care.


Asunto(s)
Madres/psicología , Mujeres Embarazadas/psicología , Apoyo Social , Tuberculosis Resistente a Múltiples Medicamentos/psicología , Tuberculosis Pulmonar/psicología , Adulto , Antituberculosos/uso terapéutico , Coraje , Femenino , Humanos , Lactante , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/patogenicidad , Satisfacción del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos , Embarazo , Investigación Cualitativa , Rifampin/uso terapéutico , Identificación Social , Sudáfrica , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Tuberculosis Resistente a Múltiples Medicamentos/tratamiento farmacológico , Tuberculosis Resistente a Múltiples Medicamentos/microbiología , Tuberculosis Resistente a Múltiples Medicamentos/patología , Tuberculosis Pulmonar/tratamiento farmacológico , Tuberculosis Pulmonar/microbiología , Tuberculosis Pulmonar/patología
5.
Am Surg ; 86(10): 1337-1344, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33135426

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Gang-related tattoos may increase an individual's risk for violent victimization. We present our early experience using a physician-staffed tattoo removal initiative as 1 component of a violence prevention program. METHODS: Surgeons from our trauma department in partnership with a community advocacy group performed voluntary laser tattoo removal for individuals within our catchment area. Clients were asked to complete a voluntary, anonymous survey. This survey addressed tattoo acquisition, identified motives and goals for tattoo removal, and reported if those goals were met by the tattoo removal service. Issues involving gang affiliation and interpersonal violence were specifically queried. Results are listed as simple percentages. RESULTS: 81 of 122 (66%) program enrollees completed the survey. The average number of laser removal sessions at the time of questionnaire was 3 (range 1-15). 41% of respondents possessed gang or "crew" related tattoos. 22% of respondents possessed a tattoo related to an intimate partner who was gang affiliated. 21% of respondents desired tattoo removal for the motive of leaving gang affiliation with 94% of those respondents reporting success. 59% of respondents sought tattoo removal to improve employment opportunities with 81% of those respondents reporting success. 30% of respondents desired tattoo removal to improve personal safety or avoid violence with 80% of those respondents reporting success. CONCLUSION: Stated client goals for tattoo removal and their subjective reports of success achieving these goals demonstrate the possible effectiveness of laser tattoo removal as a tool to help clients avoid future violence and progress toward gang disengagement. Trauma departments should consider laser tattoo removal as part of future violence prevention initiatives.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Láser/métodos , Grupo Paritario , Tatuaje , Violencia/prevención & control , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Delincuencia Juvenil , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Identificación Social , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
6.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33092106

RESUMEN

Given the emerging tobacco landscape, dual use of cigarettes and e-cigarettes has increased among young adults, but little is known about its associated factors. Peer crowds, defined as macro-level connections between individuals with similar core values (e.g., "Hip Hop" describing a group that prefers hip hop music and values strength, honor, and respect), are a promising way to understand tobacco use patterns. We examined associations between peer crowds and tobacco use patterns by using data from a cross sectional survey of 1340 young adults in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2014. Outcomes were the past 30-day use of: neither cigarettes nor e-cigarettes; cigarettes but not e-cigarettes; e-cigarettes but not cigarettes; and both cigarettes and e-cigarettes. Peer crowds included Hipster, Hip Hop, Country, Partier, Homebody, and Young Professional. Multinomial regression analysis indicated that peer crowds were significantly associated with different tobacco use patterns. Compared to Young Professionals, Hip Hop and Hipster crowds were more likely to dual use; Hipsters were more likely to use e-cigarettes only, and Country participants were more likely to smoke cigarettes only. These findings suggest that tobacco control campaigns and cessation interventions should be tailored to different young adult peer crowds and address poly-tobacco use.


Asunto(s)
Sistemas Electrónicos de Liberación de Nicotina , Grupo Paritario , Identificación Social , Productos de Tabaco , Vapeo , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Masculino , San Francisco/epidemiología , Uso de Tabaco , Adulto Joven
7.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0241227, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33125438

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Do we always do what others do, and, if not, when and under what conditions do we do so? In this paper we test the hypothesis that mimicry is moderated by the mere knowledge of whether the source is a member of the same social category as ourselves. METHODS: We investigated group influence on mimicry using three tasks on a software platform which interfaces with mobile computing devices to allow the controlled study of collective behaviour in an everyday environment. RESULTS: Overall, participants (N = 965) were influenced by the movements of confederates (represented as dots on a screen) who belonged to their own category in both purposive and incidental tasks. CONCLUSION: Our results are compatible with collective level explanations of social influence premised on shared social identification. This includes both a heuristic of unintended mimicry (the acts of group members are diagnostic of how one should act), and communication of affiliation (based on a desire to make one's group cohesive). The results are incompatible with traditional 'contagion' accounts which suggest mimicry is automatic and inevitable. The results have practical implications for designing behavioural interventions which can harness the power of copying behaviour, for example in emergency evacuations.


Asunto(s)
Relaciones Interpersonales , Programas Informáticos , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Niño , Femenino , Procesos de Grupo , Humanos , Conducta Imitativa , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Identificación Social , Adulto Joven
8.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33086738

RESUMEN

It has been well documented that both risk perception and group identification are related to psychosocial well-being. However, their combined effect has rarely been analyzed. We examined the combined effect of perceived risk associated with COVID-19 infection at work and work community identification on psychosocial well-being (i.e., frequency of stress symptoms) among health care and social sector workers in Finland (N = 1 279). Data were collected via an online questionnaire in June 2020 and analyses of covariance were conducted. Perceived COVID-19 infection risk at work was classified into high, medium and low risk. In total, 41% of participants reported a high risk. After all background variables were included, participants who reported high perceived infection risk and low work community identification reported stress symptoms more often than those who reported high perceived risk and high identification (p = 0.010). Similarly, the former differed significantly from all other comparison groups (medium and low risk, p < 0.001), being the most stressed. We found that perceived infection risk and work community identification were not related to each other. Our conclusion is that high work community identification can buffer employee stress when faced with a high perceived health risk. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, work organizations with a high infection risk should advance the possibility of employees' identification with their work community.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Personal de Salud/psicología , Enfermedades Profesionales/virología , Estrés Laboral/epidemiología , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Trabajadores Sociales/psicología , Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Finlandia/epidemiología , Humanos , Enfermedades Profesionales/epidemiología , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Identificación Social
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33053738

RESUMEN

The confinement imposed by measures to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic may in the short and medium term have psychological and psychosocial consequences affecting the well-being and mental health of individuals. This study aims to explore the role played by group membership and social and personal identities as coping resources to face the experience of the COVID-19 confinement and radical disruption of social, work, family and personal life in a sample of 421 people who have experienced a month of strict confinement in the Region of Madrid. Our results show that identity-resources (membership continuity/new group memberships, and personal identity strength) are positively related to process-resources (social support and perceived personal control), and that both are related to better perceived mental health, lower levels of anxiety and depression, and higher well-being (life satisfaction and resilience) during confinement. These results, in addition to providing relevant information about the psychological consequences of this experience, constitute a solid basis for the design of psychosocial interventions based on group memberships and social identity as coping resources.


Asunto(s)
Adaptación Psicológica , Infecciones por Coronavirus/prevención & control , Pandemias/prevención & control , Neumonía Viral/prevención & control , Identificación Social , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Apoyo Social , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Humanos , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología
12.
J Adolesc Health ; 67(5): 662-670, 2020 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32943294

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Physical distancing measures to combat the spread of the novel coronavirus have presented challenges for the mental health and well-being of college students. As campus activities ceased, student-athletes abruptly became isolated from teammates and were no longer able to participate in sport activities that are often central to their identity as an athlete. However, student-athletes who have supportive social connections with teammates during this pandemic may maintain their athletic identity to a greater extent and report better mental health. The present study examined how student-athletes' mental health was associated with teammate social support, connectedness, and changes to athletic identity from before to during COVID-19. METHOD: A sample of 234 student-athletes completed surveys before COVID-19 physical distancing (February 2020), with 135 (63% female) participating in a follow-up in the month following school closures (April 2020). Path models estimated the effects of teammate social support and connectedness (during COVID-19), as well as changes in athletic identity on indices of mental health. RESULTS: Considering all path models tested, student-athletes who received more social support and reported more connectedness with teammates reported less dissolution of their athletic identity and-in most models-reported better mental health and well-being. Indirect effects indicated that student-athletes' change in athletic identity mediated the effects of teammate social support on psychological well-being and depression symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to advancing theory on how small groups relate to mental health, these findings demonstrate the value in remaining socially connected with peers and maintaining role identities during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Asunto(s)
Atletas/psicología , Infecciones por Coronavirus/psicología , Salud Mental , Neumonía Viral/psicología , Identificación Social , Aislamiento Social/psicología , Deportes/psicología , Femenino , Humanos , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Pandemias , Grupo Paritario , Apoyo Social , Estudiantes/psicología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Universidades , Adulto Joven
13.
J Youth Adolesc ; 49(11): 2175-2189, 2020 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32955702

RESUMEN

Racial socialization is an important predictor of wellbeing among Black youth. Scholars have theorized that Black girls could benefit from gendered racial socialization or messages about being Black girls. However, this has not been examined empirically. The current study investigates the role of general and gendered racial socialization and racial identity attitudes on depressive symptoms among 287 Black girls between the ages of 13-17 (Mage = 15.4) in the U.S. Path analysis results demonstrated that general and gendered racial socialization about pride were directly associated with positive feelings about being Black which were negatively associated with depressive symptoms. Oppressive messages about Black women were related to negative feelings about being Black and more depressive symptoms. The implications of general and gendered racial socialization on the psychological wellbeing of Black girls are discussed.


Asunto(s)
Depresión , Socialización , Adolescente , Afroamericanos , Femenino , Identidad de Género , Humanos , Identificación Social
14.
Int J Psychol ; 55(5): 779-788, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32940935

RESUMEN

School belonging is pivotal in enabling sustained task engagement, yet minorities' belonging is contingent on the intergroup context. From a social identity approach, discrimination experiences elicit identity threat, undermining school belonging. Conversely, a positive diversity climate may shield belonging through protecting minority identities. This study addresses minority school belonging and task engagement from the interplay of identity threat and protection in diverse classrooms. We hypothesise that a positive diversity climate can buffer minority disengagement in response to discrimination by protecting school belonging. Drawing on Turkish and Moroccan minority samples (N = 1050) in 274 diverse classrooms in 52 Belgian secondary schools, we test multilevel models with school belonging as mediating process connecting minorities' engagement to the interplay of discrimination experiences with perceived diversity climate. Minority youth who experienced discrimination from teachers reported less school belonging, which in turn predicted lower task engagement. Conversely, minority perceptions of a positive diversity climate predicted more belonging. Moreover, perceived diversity climate buffered minority engagement against personal experiences of discrimination through protecting school belonging. Whereas discrimination experiences undermined minority school belonging and task engagement, minority perceptions of a positive diversity climate protected belonging and engagement against discrimination.


Asunto(s)
Grupos Minoritarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Identificación Social , Adolescente , Niño , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Racismo
15.
Acad Med ; 95(12S Addressing Harmful Bias and Eliminating Discrimination in Health Professions Learning Environments): S51-S57, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32889920

RESUMEN

In 2015, the Pritzker School of Medicine experienced increasing student interest in the changing sociopolitical landscape of the United States and the interaction of these events with student and patient identity. To address this interest, an Identity and Inclusion Steering Committee was formed and formally charged with "providing ongoing direction for programs and/or curricula at Pritzker that support an inclusive learning environment and promote respectful and effective communication with diverse patients and colleagues around issues of identity." The authors describe this committee's structure and steps taken by the committee to create an inclusive community of students at Pritzker characterized by learning through civil discourse. Initiatives were guided by a strategy of continuous quality improvement consisting of regular iterative evaluation, ongoing school-wide engagement, and responsiveness to issues and concerns as they emerged. Data collected over the committee's 4-year existence demonstrate significant improvement in students' sense of inclusion and respect for different perspectives on issues related to identity, such as access to health care, racialized medicine, safe spaces, and nursing labor strikes. The authors discuss several principles that support the development of an inclusive community of students as well as challenges to the implementation of such programming. They conclude that a strategy of continuous quality improvement guided by values of social justice, tolerance, and civil discourse can build community inclusion and enhance medical training for the care of diverse patient populations.


Asunto(s)
Educación Médica/tendencias , Identificación Social , Desarrollo de Personal/métodos , Educación Médica/métodos , Educación Médica/normas , Humanos , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Aprendizaje
16.
Agora (Rio J.) ; 23(2): 35-43, maio-ago. 2020.
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS, Index Psicología - Revistas técnico-científicas | ID: biblio-1130808

RESUMEN

Resumo: Entendendo a monogamia como dispositivo contingencial, analisa-se sua capacidade de influenciar os processos de constituição da identidade e as formas de identificação dos sujeitos. A partir das elaborações de Heinz Lichtenstein sobre as origens da identidade humana, incluímos a monogamia, ou alguns traços presentes neste arranjo, na unidade mãe-bebê, supondo que o estatuto hegemônico da monogamia revela algo de sua ligação com a situação antropológica fundamental descrita por Laplanche. Assim, traços do arranjo monogâmico seriam transmitidos à criança em seu estado de "órgão" da mãe e, enquanto pontos constitutivos da identidade, seriam compulsivamente repetidos com o objetivo de manter a coesão desta identidade.


Abstract: With the understanding that monogamy is a contingent device, the paper intends to analyze its ability to influence the processes of identity constitution of the subjects. From Heinz Lichtenstein's elaborations on the origins of human identity, we include monogamy, or some traits present in this arrangement, in the mother-infant unit, supposing that the hegemonic status of monogamy reveals some of its connection with the fundamental anthropological situation described by Laplanche. Thus, traces of the monogamous arrangement would be transmitted to the child in its "organ" state and would be compulsively repeated as constitutive points of identity, in order to maintain the cohesion of this identity.


Asunto(s)
Psicoanálisis , Identificación Social , Matrimonio
17.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(35): 21185-21193, 2020 09 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32817487

RESUMEN

Group divisions are a continual feature of human history, with biases toward people's own groups shown in both experimental and natural settings. Using a within-subject design, this paper deconstructs group biases to find significant and robust individual differences; some individuals consistently respond to group divisions, while others do not. We examined individual behavior in two treatments in which subjects make pairwise decisions that determine own and others' incomes. In a political treatment, which divided subjects into groups based on their political leanings, political party members showed more in-group bias than Independents who professed the same political opinions. However, this greater bias was also present in a minimal group treatment, showing that stronger group identification was not the driver of higher favoritism in the political setting. Analyzing individual choices across the experiment, we categorize participants as "groupy" or "not groupy," such that groupy participants have social preferences that change for in-group and out-group recipients, while not-groupy participants' preferences do not change across group context. Demonstrating further that the group identity of the recipient mattered less to their choices, strongly not-groupy subjects made allocation decisions faster. We conclude that observed in-group biases build on a foundation of heterogeneity in individual groupiness.


Asunto(s)
Grupos Étnicos/psicología , Identificación Social , Percepción Social , Actitud , Sesgo , Conducta de Elección , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Política , Conducta Social
18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32751346

RESUMEN

This paper was part of a large study that aimed to explore determinants of increased suicides among African youths in South Australia. As part of this larger study, narratives from participants indicated that identity crisis could be a potential determinant of suicide. This paper reports on how African youths negotiate and form identity in Australia. A qualitative inquiry was undertaken with 31 African youths using a focus group and individual interviews. Data analysis was guided by a framework for qualitative research. These youths negotiated multiple identities, including those of race, gender, ethnicity and their origin. 'Freedom and opportunity', 'family relationships', 'neither belonging here nor there' and 'the ability to cope against the paradox of resourcefulness in Australia' appeared to be important themes in negotiating individual identities. An opportunity was used to acknowledge privileges available in Australia relative to Africa. However, the extent to which individuals acted on these opportunities varied, affecting a person's sense of purpose, identity formation and belonging in Australia. The loss of social networks following migration, and cultural differences between African and Australian societies, shaped the experience of belonging and identity formation. These findings are crucial as they indicate the need for policies and practices that consider experiences of youths as they form their identity in Australia. Further studies with large numbers of participants are needed to explore these issues further among African youths in Australia.


Asunto(s)
Negociación , Identificación Social , Suicidio , Adulto , África , Australia , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Investigación Cualitativa , Australia del Sur , Suicidio/psicología , Adulto Joven
19.
Acad Med ; 95(8): 1128, 2020 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32740385
20.
J Med Imaging Radiat Sci ; 51(4): 528-530, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32847721

RESUMEN

The value of professional identity is an interesting territory to explore, relative to working in interprofessional teams and collaborative communities The collaborative opportunities provided to health care workers during COVID-19 pandemic is a rare opportunity to underscore the silent yet significant identity of radiologic technologists as professionals. Historically and prior to the pandemic, the role of radiologic technologists remains unfamiliar, if not unrecognized in the Philippine healthcare industry. The 'alliedness' of this health care professional group is an evolving entity that can no longer be overlooked. The central and indispensable role played by radiologic technologists (RTs) invites meaningful discussion and debate among peers and researchers, to better describe the professional identity and role of the RT as an indispensable member of the interprofessional team. Specific recommendations are offered to improve recognition of RTs and their professional identity within the healthcare system.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Personal de Salud/psicología , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Rol Profesional/psicología , Radiología/métodos , Identificación Social , Humanos , Grupo de Atención al Paciente , Filipinas
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