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1.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 6653967, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33521128

RESUMEN

3D printing technology is widely used in the field of implantable medical device in recent decades because of its advantages in high precision, complex structure, and high material utilization. Based on the characteristics of 3D printing technology, this paper reviews the manufacturing process, materials, and some typical products of 3D printing implantable medical devices and analyzes and summarizes the development trend of 3D printed implantable medical devices.


Asunto(s)
Impresión Tridimensional , Prótesis e Implantes , Diseño de Prótesis/métodos , Tecnología Farmacéutica/métodos , Materiales Biocompatibles , Prótesis Vascular , Cerámica , Humanos , Prótesis Articulares , Rayos Láser , Ortopedia , Polímeros/química , Stents
2.
Zhongguo Yi Liao Qi Xie Za Zhi ; 45(1): 52-56, 2021 Feb 08.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33522177

RESUMEN

It is well known that chitosan-based composites are widely used in implantable medical devices. The development of chitosan-based composite materials with different types was summarized in this paper, such as inorganic, organic and composite phases. Then, combined with the research focus, the development of 3D printing technology and chitosan-based composites was summarized. It was also pointed out that the existing problems in our research, which need to be solved urgently. At last, the development direction and broad application prospect of chitosan-based composites were prospected. And we look forward to providing reference for relevant research.


Asunto(s)
Quitosano , Materiales Biocompatibles , Impresión Tridimensional , Prótesis e Implantes
3.
Int J Prosthodont ; 34(1): 109-117, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33570526

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: To evaluate the reserved space quantity and printing accuracy of custom edentulous trays produced by two 3D printing methods (fused deposition modeling [FDM] and stereolithography apparatus [SLA]) and to compare them to traditional handmade (HM) methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The tissue surface data of maxillary and mandibular edentulous gypsum models were obtained through a 3D scanner to design the digital custom trays in Geomagic software. The custom trays were then printed with FDM and SLA technologies, and handmade custom trays were used as control. The scanned data of printing trays were registered with their digital data, and the printing errors were analyzed using the deviation analysis function. The distances between the tissue surface of gypsum models and the custom trays were measured in ImageWare and represented by 3D deviation. RESULTS: None of the six groups revealed a significant difference (P > .05) compared to the set value of 1.00 mm. In the SLA group, the deviation of the mandibular area was significantly closer to the set value than for the HM group (P < .05), while no significant difference was displayed between the other groups. For the printing error between the two 3D groups, the SLA method showed significantly less error and better stability (P < .001). CONCLUSION: 3D-printed custom trays can meet clinical needs in the adaptability of tissue surfaces, and SLA-printed trays revealed better precision and less error than the other two methods. Accordingly, the use of SLA technology to make a 3D-printed custom tray is expected to be promoted in clinical practice.


Asunto(s)
Boca Edéntula , Impresión Tridimensional , Humanos , Mandíbula , Maxilar , Programas Informáticos
4.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 857, 2021 02 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33558498

RESUMEN

Bacteria often live in diverse communities where the spatial arrangement of strains and species is considered critical for their ecology. However, a test of this hypothesis requires manipulation at the fine scales at which spatial structure naturally occurs. Here we develop a droplet-based printing method to arrange bacterial genotypes across a sub-millimetre array. We print strains of the gut bacterium Escherichia coli that naturally compete with one another using protein toxins. Our experiments reveal that toxin-producing strains largely eliminate susceptible non-producers when genotypes are well-mixed. However, printing strains side-by-side creates an ecological refuge where susceptible strains can persist in large numbers. Moving to competitions between toxin producers reveals that spatial structure can make the difference between one strain winning and mutual destruction. Finally, we print different potential barriers between competing strains to understand how ecological refuges form, which shows that cells closest to a toxin producer mop up the toxin and protect their clonemates. Our work provides a method to generate customised bacterial communities with defined spatial distributions, and reveals that micron-scale changes in these distributions can drive major shifts in ecology.


Asunto(s)
Escherichia coli/citología , Impresión Tridimensional , Colicinas/biosíntesis , Escherichia coli/genética , Genotipo , Microbiota
5.
J Vis Exp ; (167)2021 01 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33522507

RESUMEN

The cardiovascular system is a key player in human physiology, providing nourishment to most tissues in the body; vessels are present in different sizes, structures, phenotypes, and performance depending on each specific perfused tissue. The field of tissue engineering, which aims to repair or replace damaged or missing body tissues, relies on controlled angiogenesis to create a proper vascularization within the engineered tissues. Without a vascular system, thick engineered constructs cannot be sufficiently nourished, which may result in cell death, poor engraftment, and ultimately failure. Thus, understanding and controlling the behavior of engineered blood vessels is an outstanding challenge in the field. This work presents a high-throughput system that allows for the creation of organized and repeatable vessel networks for studying vessel behavior in a 3D scaffold environment. This two-step seeding protocol shows that vessels within the system react to the scaffold topography, presenting distinctive sprouting behaviors depending on the compartment geometry in which the vessels reside. The obtained results and understanding from this high throughput system can be applied in order to inform better 3D bioprinted scaffold construct designs, wherein fabrication of various 3D geometries cannot be rapidly assessed when using 3D printing as the basis for cellularized biological environments. Furthermore, the understanding from this high throughput system may be utilized for the improvement of rapid drug screening, the rapid development of co-cultures models, and the investigation of mechanical stimuli on blood vessel formation to deepen the knowledge of the vascular system.


Asunto(s)
Vasos Sanguíneos/crecimiento & desarrollo , Neovascularización Fisiológica , Ingeniería de Tejidos/métodos , Andamios del Tejido/química , Actinas/metabolismo , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Movimiento Celular , Células Cultivadas , Técnicas de Cocultivo , Células Endoteliales/efectos de los fármacos , Fibronectinas/farmacología , Técnica del Anticuerpo Fluorescente , Humanos , Impresión Tridimensional , Imagen de Lapso de Tiempo
6.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 1031, 2021 02 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33589620

RESUMEN

The application of physical stimuli to cell cultures has shown potential to modulate multiple cellular functions including migration, differentiation and survival. However, the relevance of these in vitro models to future potential extrapolation in vivo depends on whether stimuli can be applied "externally", without invasive procedures. Here, we report on the fabrication and exploitation of dynamic additive-manufactured Janus scaffolds that are activated on-command via external application of ultrasounds, resulting in a mechanical nanovibration that is transmitted to the surrounding cells. Janus scaffolds were spontaneously formed via phase-segregation of biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactide (PLA) blends during the manufacturing process and behave as ultrasound transducers (acoustic to mechanical) where the PLA and PCL phases represent the active and backing materials, respectively. Remote stimulation of Janus scaffolds led to enhanced cell proliferation, matrix deposition and osteogenic differentiation of seeded human bone marrow derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) via formation and activation of voltage-gated calcium ion channels.


Asunto(s)
Plásticos Biodegradables/farmacología , Mecanotransducción Celular , Células Madre Mesenquimatosas/efectos de los fármacos , Poliésteres/farmacología , Andamios del Tejido , Plásticos Biodegradables/química , Regeneración Ósea/genética , Huesos/citología , Huesos/metabolismo , Canales de Calcio Activados por la Liberación de Calcio/fisiología , Diferenciación Celular/efectos de los fármacos , Línea Celular , Proliferación Celular/efectos de los fármacos , Humanos , Células Madre Mesenquimatosas/citología , Células Madre Mesenquimatosas/metabolismo , Poliésteres/química , Impresión Tridimensional , Ingeniería de Tejidos/métodos , Ondas Ultrasónicas
7.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(6): e24636, 2021 Feb 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33578582

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: To explore the accuracy and security of 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology combined with guide plates in the preoperative planning of thoracic tuberculosis and the auxiliary placement of pedicle screws during the operation. METHODS: Retrospective analysis was performed on the data of 60 cases of thoracic tuberculosis patients treated with 1-stage posterior debridement, bone graft fusion, and pedicle screw internal fixation in the Department of Orthopedics, Zhejiang Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine Integrated Hospital from March 2017 to February 2019. There were 31 males and 29 females; age: 41 to 52 years old, with an average of (46.6 ±â€Š2.0) years old. According to whether 3D printing personalized external guide plates are used or not, they are divided into 2 groups: 30 cases in 3D printing group (observation group), and 30 cases in pedicle screw placement group (control group). A 1:1 solid model of thoracic spinal tuberculosis and personalized pedicle guide plates was created using the 3D printing technology combined with guide plates in the observation group. Stability and accuracy tests were carried out in vitro and in vivo. 30 patients in the control group used conventional nail placement with bare hands. The amount of blood loss, the number of fluoroscopy, the operation time, and the occurrence of adverse reactions related to nail placement were recorded. After the operation, the patients were scanned by computed tomography to observe the screw position and grade the screw position to evaluate the accuracy of the navigation template. All patients were followed up for more than 1 year. Visual Analogue Scale scores, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein were evaluated before surgery, 6 months after surgery, and 12 months after surgery. RESULTS: Sixty patients were followed up for 6 to 12 months after surgery. One hundred seventy-five and 177 screws were placed in the 3D printing group and the free-hand placement group, respectively. The rate of screw penetration was only 1.14% in the 3D-printed group (all 3 screws were grade 1) and 6.78% in the free-hand nail placement group (12 screws, 9 screws were grade 1 and 3 screws were grade 2). The difference was statistically significant (P = .047). The operation time of the 3D printing group ([137.67 ±â€Š9.39] minutes), the cumulative number of intraoperative fluoroscopy ([4.67 ±â€Š1.03] times), and the amount of intraoperative blood loss ([599.33 ±â€Š83.37] mL) were significantly less than those in the manual nail placement group ([170.00 ±â€Š20.48] minutes, [9.38 ±â€Š1.76] times, [674.6 ±â€Š83.61] mL). The differences were statistically significant (P < .05). There was no significant difference in VAS score and Oswestry disability index score between the 2 groups of patients before operation, 3 and 6 months after operation (P > .05). CONCLUSION: The 3D printing technology combined with guide plate is used in thoracic spinal tuberculosis surgery to effectively reduce the amount of bleeding, shorten the operation time, and increase the safety and accuracy of nail placement.


Asunto(s)
Tornillos Óseos , Fusión Vertebral , Vértebras Torácicas , Tuberculosis de la Columna Vertebral/cirugía , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Impresión Tridimensional , Estudios Retrospectivos , Tomografía Computarizada por Rayos X , Tuberculosis de la Columna Vertebral/diagnóstico por imagen
9.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 500, 2021 01 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33479251

RESUMEN

Scaffolds with gradients of physico-chemical properties and controlled 3D architectures are crucial for engineering complex tissues. These can be produced using multi-material additive manufacturing (AM) techniques. However, they typically only achieve discrete gradients using separate printheads to vary compositions. Achieving continuous composition gradients, to better mimic tissues, requires material dosing and mixing controls. No such AM solution exists for most biomaterials. Existing AM techniques also cannot selectively modify scaffold surfaces to locally stimulate cell adhesion. A hybrid AM solution to cover these needs is reported here. A dosing- and mixing-enabled, dual-material printhead and an atmospheric pressure plasma jet to selectively activate/coat scaffold filaments during manufacturing were combined on one platform. Continuous composition gradients in both 2D hydrogels and 3D thermoplastic scaffolds were fabricated. An improvement in mechanical properties of continuous gradients compared to discrete gradients in the 3D scaffolds, and the ability to selectively enhance cell adhesion were demonstrated.


Asunto(s)
Regeneración/fisiología , Ingeniería de Tejidos/métodos , Andamios del Tejido/química , Cicatrización de Heridas/fisiología , Adhesión Celular , Células Cultivadas , Materiales Biocompatibles Revestidos/química , Humanos , Impresión Tridimensional , Microtomografía por Rayos X/métodos
10.
Anal Chim Acta ; 1147: 30-37, 2021 Feb 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33485583

RESUMEN

Simple, low-cost, and sensitive new platforms for electrochemical immunosensors for virus detection have been attracted attention due to the recent pandemic caused by a new type of coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). In the present work, we report for the first time the construction of an immunosensor using a commercial 3D conductive filament of carbon black and polylactic acid (PLA) to detect Hantavirus Araucaria nucleoprotein (Np) as a proof-of-concept. The recognition biomolecule was anchored directly at the filament surface by using N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride and N-Hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS). Conductive and non-conductive composites of PLA were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), revealing around 30% w/w of carbon in the filament. Morphological features of composites were obtained from SEM and TEM measurements. FTIR measurement revealed that crosslinking agents were covalently bonded at the filament surface. Electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used for the evaluation of each step involved in the construction of the proposed immunosensor. The results showed the potentiality of the device for the quantitative detection of Hantavirus Araucaria nucleoprotein (Np) from 30 µg mL-1 to 240 µg mL-1 with a limit of detection of 22 µg mL-1. Also, the proposed immunosensor was applied with success for virus detection in 100x diluted human serum samples. Therefore, the PLA conductive filament with carbon black is a simple and excellent platform for immunosensing, which offers naturally carboxylic groups able to anchor covalently biomolecules.


Asunto(s)
Anticuerpos Antivirales/inmunología , Inmunoensayo/métodos , Proteínas de la Nucleocápside/inmunología , Impresión Tridimensional , Anticuerpos Inmovilizados/química , Anticuerpos Inmovilizados/inmunología , /virología , Espectroscopía Dieléctrica , Electrodos , Hantavirus/aislamiento & purificación , Hantavirus/metabolismo , Infecciones por Hantavirus/diagnóstico , Infecciones por Hantavirus/virología , Humanos , Inmunoensayo/instrumentación , Límite de Detección , Proteínas de la Nucleocápside/sangre , Hollín/química
11.
Quintessence Int ; 52(2): 104-110, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33433076

RESUMEN

Objective: To describe how to perform, in a simple manner, a digital wax-up with ?open source software for a clinical application involving direct ?composit?e resin restorations. Report: The clinical technique described presents a simple and highly predictable way of performing direct restorations with the help of a digital wax-up made with ?open source software. ?It uses an open source digital tooth library? to reestablish a more harmonious smile architecture, specifically of teeth that were worn due to parafunction, and restored with direct composite resin restorations.
Conclusions: Thanks to the technology that was used in this case, fast, affordable and accurate results c?ould be obtained. In addition, digital files can be stored, saving material, time, and space, and allowing identical replication of the work either virtually or printed at any time, if needed. (Quintessence Int 2021;52:104-110; doi: 10.3290/j.qi.a45426)

.


Asunto(s)
Resinas Compuestas , Sonrisa , Restauración Dental Permanente , Humanos , Impresión Tridimensional , Programas Informáticos , Flujo de Trabajo
12.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(1)2021 Jan 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33431475

RESUMEN

Scaphoid fractures, if deemed operative, can often be treated successfully by headless compression screw fixation. Unfortunately, some patients go on to develop a scaphoid fracture non-union with screw loosening, bone resorption, bone deformity and carpal malalignment. To assist surgeons in managing these difficult cases, specifically designed scaphoid fracture plates have recently been introduced. We present a case of a scaphoid fracture non-union with retained screws and bone loss that was effectively treated by volar plate fixation using a three-dimensional (3D) printed model to assist with restoration of scaphoid morphology and implant positioning. Before surgery, 3D preoperative planning using a surface registration technique and a 3D printer was performed. Referring to the 3D-printed reduced model facilitated the prediction of gaps after reduction and helped decide the implant position and screw directions. Carpal alignment parameters gradually improved by 1 year postoperatively.


Asunto(s)
Placas Óseas , Tornillos Óseos , Fijación Interna de Fracturas/instrumentación , Fracturas no Consolidadas/cirugía , Hueso Escafoides/lesiones , Adulto , Fijación Interna de Fracturas/métodos , Fracturas no Consolidadas/diagnóstico por imagen , Humanos , Masculino , Impresión Tridimensional
13.
J Chromatogr A ; 1638: 461820, 2021 Feb 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33453654

RESUMEN

In recent years, a trend toward utilizing open access resources for laboratory research has begun. Open-source design strategies for scientific hardware rely upon the use of widely available parts, especially those that can be directly printed using additive manufacturing techniques and electronic components that can be connected to low-cost microcontrollers. Open-source software eliminates the need for expensive commercial licenses and provides the opportunity to design programs for specific needs. In this review, the impact of the "open-source movement" within the field of chemical separations is described, primarily through a comprehensive look at research in this area over the past five years. Topics that are covered include general laboratory equipment, sample preparation techniques, separations-based analysis, detection strategies, electronic system control, and software for data processing. Remaining hurdles and possible opportunities for further adoption of open-source approaches in the context of these separations-related topics are also discussed.


Asunto(s)
Cromatografía/economía , Cromatografía/métodos , Costos y Análisis de Costo , Electroquímica , Impresión Tridimensional , Refractometría , Programas Informáticos
14.
J Vis Exp ; (167)2021 01 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33491677

RESUMEN

Cancer microenvironment has a significant impact on the progression of the disease. In particular, hypoxia is the key driver of cancer survival, invasion, and chemoresistance. Although several in vitro models have been developed to study hypoxia-related cancer pathology, the complex interplay of the cancer microenvironment observed in vivo has not been reproduced yet owing to the lack of precise spatial control. Instead, 3D biofabrication approaches have been proposed to create microphysiological systems for better emulation of cancer ecology and accurate anticancer treatment evaluation. Herein, we propose a 3D cell-printing approach to fabricate a hypoxic cancer-on-a-chip. The hypoxia-inducing components in the chip were determined based on a computer simulation of the oxygen distribution. Cancer-stroma concentric rings were printed using bioinks containing glioblastoma cells and endothelial cells to recapitulate a type of solid cancer. The resulting chip realized central hypoxia and aggravated malignancy in cancer with the formation of representative pathophysiological markers. Overall, the proposed approach for creating a solid-cancer-mimetic microphysiological system is expected to bridge the gap between in vivo and in vitro models for cancer research.


Asunto(s)
Progresión de la Enfermedad , Dispositivos Laboratorio en un Chip , Neoplasias/patología , Impresión Tridimensional , Hipoxia Tumoral , Línea Celular Tumoral , Supervivencia Celular , Colágeno/farmacología , Simulación por Computador , Criopreservación , Dimetilpolisiloxanos/química , Células Endoteliales/patología , Células Endoteliales de la Vena Umbilical Humana/metabolismo , Humanos , Concentración de Iones de Hidrógeno , Células del Estroma/patología , Microambiente Tumoral
16.
Clin Anat ; 34(1): 108-114, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32681805

RESUMEN

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had enormous effects on anatomy education. During the pandemic, students have had no access to cadavers, which has been the principal way to learn anatomy since the 17th century. As it is difficult to predict future access to cadavers for students or in-person classes, anatomy educators are encouraged to revisit all possible teaching methods in order to develop innovations. Here, we review anatomy education methods to apply to current and future education.


Asunto(s)
Anatomía/educación , Cadáver , Disección , Educación a Distancia , Invenciones , Impresión Tridimensional , Realidad Virtual , Educación Médica/métodos , Humanos , Plastinación , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Enseñanza , Materiales de Enseñanza , Grabación en Video
17.
Water Res ; 188: 116497, 2021 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33075598

RESUMEN

Over the past decade, 3D printing or additive manufacturing (AM) technology has seen great advancement in many aspects such as printing resolution, speed and cost. Membranes for water treatment experienced significant breakthroughs owing to the unique benefits of additive manufacturing. In particular, 3D printing's high degree of freedom in various aspects such as material and prototype design has helped to fabricate innovative spacers and membranes. However, there were conflicting reports on the feasibility of 3D printing, especially for membranes. Some research groups stated that technology limitations today made it impossible to 3D print membranes, but others showed that it was possible by successfully fabricating prototypes. This paper will provide a critical and comprehensive discussion on 3D printing specifically for spacers and membranes. Various 3D printing techniques will be introduced, and their suitability for membrane and spacer fabrication will be discussed. It will be followed by a review of past studies associated with 3D-printed spacers and membranes. A new category of additive manufacturing in the membrane water industry will be introduced here, known as hybrid additive manufacturing, to address the controversies of 3D printing for membrane. As AM technology continues to advance, its possibilities in the water treatment is limitless. Some insightful future trends will be provided at the end of the paper.


Asunto(s)
Impresión Tridimensional , Purificación del Agua , Membranas
18.
Anal Chem ; 93(3): 1523-1528, 2021 01 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33326206

RESUMEN

One of the most important challenges in the field of microfluidics is the rapid fabrication of microchips with complex topologies. Although the processing method of microfluidic chips has made brilliant achievements in the past 20 years, almost all traditional processing methods still face huge obstacles in the production of complex topologies and three-dimensional microchannel. Nowadays, the main methods of manufacturing microfluidic chips such as numerical control microprocessing, laser ablation, inkjet printing, photolithography, dry etching, and lithography, galvanoformung and abformung (LIGA) technology are not only inapplicable to the complex topological structure and the rapid processing of three-dimensional microfluidic chips but also rely on expensive processing equipment, complex manufacturing process, and low yield. To solve the problems of these traditional processing methods, we propose a low-cost methodology to obtain a microfluidic chip by sewing the chip pipe to the substrate with an embroidery machine as low as $6. Compared with the above-mentioned traditional microprocessing technologies, the new chip processing technology proposed by us does not involve professional microprocessing equipment and professional skills. Therefore, this new chip processing technology can significantly improve the efficiency of microprocessing.


Asunto(s)
Dispositivos Laboratorio en un Chip , Reacción en Cadena de la Polimerasa , Impresión Tridimensional , Animales , Bovinos , Papel , Albúmina Sérica Bovina/química
19.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf ; 207: 111458, 2021 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33254383

RESUMEN

Nanotechnology has increasing applications in numerous markets, particularly in additive processing (3D printing) and manufacturing, which is important for consumer products, medical devices, construction, and general research and development across many other industries. Nanomaterials are desirable in many products due to their unique properties, but those same properties have made evaluating the risk and regulation of these materials challenging. For risk-based regulations, new applications and nanomaterials should be assessed for both human and environmental hazards and exposure to ensure protection. In general, many risk assessments to date have focused on the non-nano versions of chemicals. The lack of guidance on assessing the hazard and exposure of nanomaterials in 3D printing is apparent, and these areas of assessment are actively being evaluated. Industry in most cases will now need to provide specific additional information for assessing the risk of nanomaterials in 3D printing. This review paper focuses on the use of nanomaterials in 3D printing for industrial and manufacturing applications, summarizes the current literature on human health and safety related to 3D printing and inhalation exposure, and the regulations relating to 3D printing in the U.S., Canada, and Europe for this industry.


Asunto(s)
Política Ambiental/legislación & jurisprudencia , Nanotecnología , Impresión Tridimensional , Canadá , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Industrias , Nanoestructuras , Medición de Riesgo
20.
Biochim Biophys Acta Gen Subj ; 1865(1): 129734, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32956750

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The investigation of the interactions between cells and active materials is pivotal in the emerging 3D printing-biomaterial application fields. Here, lipidomics has been used to explore the early impact of alginate (ALG) hydrogel architecture (2D films or 3D printed scaffolds) and the type of gelling agent (CaCl2 or FeCl3) on the lipid profile of human fibroblasts. METHODS: 2D and 3D ALG scaffolds were prepared and characterized in terms of water content, swelling, mechanical resistance and morphology before human fibroblast seeding (8 days). Using a liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole-tandem mass spectrometry approach, selected ceramides (CER), lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC), lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) and free fatty acids (FFA) were analyzed. RESULTS: The results showed a clear alteration in the CER expression profile depending of both the geometry and the gelling agent used to prepare the hydrogels. As for LPCs, the main parameter affecting their distribution is the scaffold architecture with a significant decrease in the relative expression levels of the species with higher chain length (C20 to C22) for 3D scaffolds compared to 2D films. In the case of FFAs and LPAs only slight differences were observed as a function of scaffold geometry or gelling agent. CONCLUSIONS: Variations in the cell membrane lipid profile were observed for 3D cell cultures compared to 2D and these data are consistent with activation processes occurring through the mutual interactions between fibroblasts and ALG support. These unknown physiologically relevant changes add insights into the discussion about the relationship between biomaterial and the variations of cell biological functions.


Asunto(s)
Alginatos/química , Fibroblastos/metabolismo , Metabolismo de los Lípidos , Andamios del Tejido/química , Alginatos/metabolismo , Materiales Biocompatibles/química , Materiales Biocompatibles/metabolismo , Células Cultivadas , Ceramidas/análisis , Ceramidas/metabolismo , Fibroblastos/química , Humanos , Lípidos/análisis , Impresión Tridimensional
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