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1.
Arch Esp Urol ; 72(9): 939-947, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés, Español | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31697255

RESUMEN

During their journey through the female reproductive tract to reach the oocyte in the ampulla of the fallopian tube, spermatozoa interact with substances and microorganisms that affect sperm quality, thus altering their fertilizing capacity. OBJECTIVES: To determine in vitro the effect of Streptococcus agalactiae, Klebsiella pneumoniae and their soluble factors on sperm parameters, and to evaluate the ability of human sperm to interact with and transport these bacteria. METHODS: The effects of S. agalactiae, K. pneumoniae and their soluble factors on the viability, sperm motility and functional sperm parameters were quantified. In addition, motile spermatozoa were incubated with decreasing concentrations of bacteria for one hour, washed and post-infection treatments were performed with trypsin and transport capacity was assessed by quantitative cultures. RESULTS: Incubation of spermatozoa with K. pneumoniae decreased progressive motility. The soluble factors of K. pneumoniae increased the number of necrotic spermatozoa and the soluble factors of S. agalactiae increased lipid peroxidation of the sperm membrane (p<0.05). A strong interaction between sperm and bacteria was observed in the transport assays even in washed trypsin-treated samples. CONCLUSION: Human spermatozoa act as vectors for infections, generating strong interactions with K. pneumoniae and S. agalactiae favoring their diffusion through the female reproductive tract. This interaction affects male fertility by altering progressive motility, increasing the number of necrotic cells and inducing apoptosis.


Asunto(s)
Espermatozoides , Infecciones Estreptocócicas , Streptococcus agalactiae , Femenino , Humanos , Klebsiella pneumoniae/aislamiento & purificación , Masculino , Motilidad Espermática , Espermatozoides/microbiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus agalactiae/aislamiento & purificación
2.
BMC Res Notes ; 12(1): 474, 2019 Aug 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31370850

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The Japanese Midwifery Association (JMA) guidelines allow midwives to manage group B Streptococcus (GBS)-positive women during pregnancy and labour at maternity homes. However, no guidelines exist to manage neonates born to GBS-positive women in Japan. We aimed to investigate the opinions of paediatricians regarding optimal management strategies for neonates born to GBS-positive women in maternity homes. A questionnaire was sent to paediatricians at 396 Japanese perinatal medical centres. We examined opinions regarding examinations and routine clinical tests for neonates born to GBS-positive women in maternity homes. RESULTS: Of 235 paediatricians, only 11.2% considered that paediatric examinations were unnecessary for neonates born to GBS-positive women in maternity homes. Moreover, 20.5%, 13.2%, and 11.1% of paediatricians considered culture test of the nasal cavity, serum C-reactive protein level analysis, and blood cell count analysis, respectively, necessary for neonates born to GBS-positive pregnant women with intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP), whereas 36.3%, 56.2%, and 40.6% of paediatricians considered these tests necessary in cases without IAP. The JMA guidelines had low penetration rates among paediatricians in Japan. To manage neonates born to GBS-positive women in maternity homes, midwives should engage with commissioned paediatricians in more detail and develop appropriate strategies to increase awareness and cooperation.


Asunto(s)
Transmisión Vertical de Enfermedad Infecciosa/prevención & control , Partería/ética , Pediatras/psicología , Complicaciones Infecciosas del Embarazo/terapia , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/terapia , Adulto , Profilaxis Antibiótica/métodos , Recuento de Células Sanguíneas , Manejo de la Enfermedad , Femenino , Maternidades , Humanos , Recién Nacido , Japón , Parto , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Embarazo , Complicaciones Infecciosas del Embarazo/diagnóstico , Complicaciones Infecciosas del Embarazo/microbiología , Estudios Retrospectivos , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/diagnóstico , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus agalactiae/efectos de los fármacos , Streptococcus agalactiae/crecimiento & desarrollo , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
3.
J Hosp Infect ; 103(1): 21-26, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31283948

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Whole genome sequencing (WGS) of Streptococcus pyogenes linked to invasive disease has been used to identify and investigate outbreaks. The clinical application of WGS in real-time for outbreak control is seldom employed. AIMS: A fatal case of bacteraemia at a national orthopaedic hospital prompted an outbreak investigation to identify carriers and halt transmission using real-time WGS. METHODS: Retrospective surveillance was conducted to identify patients with Streptococcus pyogenes infections in the last year. Upon contact tracing, four patients and 179 staff were screened for Streptococcus pyogenes carriage. All isolates identified were emm-typed. WGS was performed in real-time on a subset of isolates. FINDINGS: Twelve isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes from the index case, two patients and eight staff were identified. Six isolates were emm 1.0, including the index case and five staff isolates. The remaining isolates belonged to distinct emm types. WGS analysis was undertaken on the six emm 1.0 isolates. Five were indistinguishable by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, with 0 SNP distance, and one had one SNP difference, supporting the hypothesis of recent local transmission. All screen-positive healthcare workers were offered treatment with penicillin or clindamycin. No further cases were identified. CONCLUSION: The increased molecular discrimination of WGS confirmed the clustering of these cases and the outbreak was contained. This demonstrates the clinical utility of WGS in managing outbreaks of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes in real-time and we recommend its implementation as a routine clinical service.


Asunto(s)
Bacteriemia/epidemiología , Portador Sano/epidemiología , Infección Hospitalaria/epidemiología , Brotes de Enfermedades , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/epidemiología , Streptococcus pyogenes/clasificación , Secuenciación Completa del Genoma/métodos , Bacteriemia/microbiología , Portador Sano/microbiología , Portador Sano/transmisión , Infección Hospitalaria/microbiología , Infección Hospitalaria/transmisión , Transmisión de Enfermedad Infecciosa/prevención & control , Hospitales , Humanos , Epidemiología Molecular/métodos , Tipificación Molecular/métodos , Estudios Retrospectivos , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus pyogenes/genética , Streptococcus pyogenes/aislamiento & purificación
4.
Vet Microbiol ; 235: 71-79, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31282381

RESUMEN

Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS) is a commensal of the human intestinal tract and vagina and is also an opportunistic pathogen causing serious, potentially lethal, infections preferentially in newborns and in the elderly. In cattle, it is considered an udder-specific pathogen and a common cause of mastitis. Here we investigated the host specificity of GBS by examining their colonization at various anatomical sites in both cattle and humans, as well as the possible cross-species transmission in closed barn environments. We collected more than 800 swab samples from dairy cows and herdspersons at eight dairy farms in Denmark. GBS was isolated from 12% of the samples. The GBS strains (N = 105) were characterized by biochemical test, serology, and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Based on the PFGE patterns, 25 strains were selected for whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenetic analyses. The genomes were compared to each other and to a collection of publicly available GBS genomes. The study revealed that GBS clones were shared by cows and herdspersons. In phylogenetic analyses, these shared clones clustered with GBS strains from persons with no relation to farming. Horizontal cross-species transmission of the contagion in both directions was found to be highly likely within the same environment; thus, some cases of bovine mastitis are probably antrophonotic.


Asunto(s)
Bovinos/microbiología , Agricultores , Especificidad del Huésped , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología , Streptococcus agalactiae/genética , Animales , Industria Lechera , Dinamarca , Reservorios de Enfermedades/microbiología , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Mastitis Bovina/microbiología , Leche/microbiología , Faringe/microbiología , Filogenia , Recto/microbiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus agalactiae/aislamiento & purificación , Vagina/microbiología
5.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 146(2): 238-243, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31127871

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization prevalence and feasibility of intrapartum GBS screening/antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) in Cameroon, Africa. METHODS: Prospective cohort in the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Services network. Maternity providers collected anogenital swabs from consenting term women in labor for testing by a rapid GBS-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Positive tests (GBS+) resulted in initiation of intravenous ampicillin until delivery. Primary outcomes were GBS prevalence and proportion of GBS+ women receiving ampicillin before delivery and more than 4 hours before delivery. RESULTS: A total of 219 women were enrolled from January 10 to April 27, 2017. GBS prevalence was 12.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.9-16.7) with GBS+ women more likely to reside in urban areas (19.6% vs 9.7%, P=0.004). Of 27 GBS+ women, 19 (70.4%) received ampicillin before delivery and 14 (51.9%) 4 hours or longer before delivery. A median two doses of ampicillin (interquartile range [IQR] 1-5) were given and started at a median of 105 minutes (IQR 90-155) after swab collection and 20 minutes (IQR 10-45) after GBS result. Of the 8 women who did not receive ampicillin, 7 (87.5%) delivered before test results. CONCLUSION: A GBS IAP protocol is feasible in Cameroon and should be evaluated for widespread implementation in Cameroon and other low-income countries to decrease GBS-related morbidity.


Asunto(s)
Ampicilina/administración & dosificación , Antibacterianos/administración & dosificación , Profilaxis Antibiótica/métodos , Transmisión Vertical de Enfermedad Infecciosa/prevención & control , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/prevención & control , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Adulto , Camerún/epidemiología , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Recién Nacido , Trabajo de Parto , Tamizaje Masivo/métodos , Reacción en Cadena de la Polimerasa , Embarazo , Prevalencia , Estudios Prospectivos , Streptococcus agalactiae/aislamiento & purificación , Adulto Joven
7.
Microbiol Spectr ; 7(2)2019 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30977463

RESUMEN

Streptococci carrying serogroup C and G antigens, and in particular, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE), are emerging human pathogens that are increasingly isolated from patients with a myriad of infections that range from mundane to life-threatening. SDSE is microbiologically similar to Streptococcus pyogenes. These streptococci frequently cause infections of the throat and skin and soft tissues. Moreover, they may invade the bloodstream and disseminate widely to many deep tissue sites, including the endocardium. Life-threatening invasive infections due to SDSE, including the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, occur most frequently in patients with severe underlying medical diseases. Treatment with penicillin is adequate under most circumstances, but treatment failure occurs. SDSE may also be resistant to other antibiotic classes including tetracyclines, macrolides, and clindamycin. Most human infections caused by groups C and G streptococci are transmitted from person to person, but infections due to Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (and, rarely, to S. equi subsp. equi) are zoonoses. Transmission of these latter species occurs by animal contact or by contamination of food products and has been associated with the development of poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis. Members of the Streptococcus anginosus group, usually classified with the viridans group of streptococci, are associated with a variety of pyogenic infections.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones Estreptocócicas/epidemiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología , Streptococcus/aislamiento & purificación , Animales , Antibacterianos/farmacología , Antibacterianos/uso terapéutico , Farmacorresistencia Bacteriana/efectos de los fármacos , Glomerulonefritis/microbiología , Humanos , Faringitis/epidemiología , Faringitis/microbiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/tratamiento farmacológico , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus/clasificación , Streptococcus/patogenicidad , Zoonosis/epidemiología , Zoonosis/microbiología
8.
J Infect Public Health ; 12(4): 479-481, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30940481

RESUMEN

The review aimed to analyze the evidence of the correlation between universal screening for Streptococcus agalactiae colonization in pregnant women and early onset Group B neonatal infection. The research followed the descriptors "screening", "pregnancy", "Streptococcus agalactiae" and "neonatal infections" on the Pubmed, scielo and LILACS databases, for studies published in English between January 1st, 2008 and April 24th, 2018. A total of 200 articles were found, of which 198 were excluded. The present review presented some limiting factors, including the low number of studies selected, the difference of patients included, the risk profile of the populations and the results of the isolated studies, expressed in a significant difference between them. The statistical calculations were performed using secondary data. The meta-analysis revealed a Risk Ratio of 0.37 with a 95% of Confidence Interval, indicating a positive factor for the questioning of this review. However, should be understood as a trend, since a small amount of studies were found. More structured clinical studies are recommended to assess the impact of gestational screening for GBS and neonatal infection to better inform public health measures in gestational and neonatal health.


Asunto(s)
Transmisión Vertical de Enfermedad Infecciosa/prevención & control , Tamizaje Masivo , Complicaciones Infecciosas del Embarazo/diagnóstico , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/diagnóstico , Profilaxis Antibiótica , Bases de Datos Factuales , Femenino , Humanos , Recién Nacido , Tamizaje Neonatal , Embarazo , Complicaciones Infecciosas del Embarazo/microbiología , Salud Pública , Factores de Riesgo , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus agalactiae
9.
BJOG ; 126(11): 1347-1353, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30734508

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of maternal group B streptococcus (GBS) colonisation by racial group. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Antenatal clinics in London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust. POPULATION: Pregnant women. METHODS: Group B streptococcus (GBS) colonisation status was recorded during a screening programme for the prevention of invasive early-onset GBS infection. Information regarding age, address, ethnicity, parity, mode of delivery, body mass index (BMI), and diabetes was routinely collected. Data were analysed by multivariable analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Association between GBS colonisation and putative risk factors. RESULTS: Overall, 29.1% (1836/6309) of the women were colonized with GBS. Multivariable analysis showed significantly higher colonisation among women of black African origin (39.5%; OR = 1.57) compared with white British women (27.4%), and lowest colonisation in women of South Asian origin (23.3%; OR = 0.8). Higher parity (≥2) was associated with higher colonisation (35.3%), with the odds of colonisation over 40% higher than for nulliparous women. Increasing BMI was associated with an incremental rise in colonisation from 23 to 35%. Colonisation was not associated with age, season or mode of testing. CONCLUSION: This study identified high maternal GBS colonisation rates in a racially and socially diverse population. The highest rates were seen in women of black African origin and also with higher parity and BMI. Further research is needed to understand the relationship between these factors and rectovaginal colonisation. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Study of group B streptococcus colonisation in pregnant women in London shows highest rates in black African women and those with high BMI and parity.


Asunto(s)
Grupos Étnicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Transmisión Vertical de Enfermedad Infecciosa/prevención & control , Complicaciones Infecciosas del Embarazo/epidemiología , Mujeres Embarazadas , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/epidemiología , Streptococcus agalactiae/patogenicidad , Adolescente , Adulto , Índice de Masa Corporal , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Londres/epidemiología , Masculino , Tamizaje Masivo , Persona de Mediana Edad , Embarazo , Factores de Riesgo , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/prevención & control , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Adulto Joven
12.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 25(3): 529-537, 2019 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30602121

RESUMEN

The incidence of scarlet fever in England and Wales is at its highest in 50 years. We estimated secondary household risk for invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) disease within 60 days after onset of scarlet fever. Reports of scarlet fever in England during 2011-2016 were matched by residential address to persons with laboratory-confirmed iGAS infections. We identified 11 iGAS cases in ≈189,684 household contacts and a 60-day incidence rate of 35.3 cases/100,000 person-years, which was 12.2-fold higher than the background rate (2.89). Infants and contacts >75 years of age were at highest risk. Three cases were fatal; sepsis and cellulitis were the most common manifestations. Typing for 6 iGAS cases identified emm 1.0 (n = 4), emm 4.0 (n = 1), and emm 12.0 (n = 1). Although absolute risk in household contacts was low, clinicians assessing household contacts should be aware of the risk to expedite diagnosis and initiate life-saving treatment.


Asunto(s)
Escarlatina/epidemiología , Escarlatina/transmisión , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/epidemiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus pyogenes , Niño , Preescolar , Inglaterra/epidemiología , Composición Familiar , Femenino , Historia del Siglo XXI , Humanos , Incidencia , Lactante , Masculino , Estudios Retrospectivos , Medición de Riesgo , Factores de Riesgo , Escarlatina/historia , Escarlatina/microbiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/historia , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología
13.
J Hosp Infect ; 101(3): 320-326, 2019 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29577990

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The clinical manifestations of group A streptococcus (GAS) (Streptococcus pyogenes) are diverse, ranging from asymptomatic colonization to devastating invasive disease. Maternity-related clusters of invasive GAS (iGAS) infection are complex to investigate and control, especially if recurrent. AIM: To investigate three episodes of emm 75 GAS/iGAS infection in maternity patients at one hospital site over a four-year period (two with monophyletic ancestry). METHODS: The episodes are described, together with whole-genome sequence (WGS) isolate analyses. Single nucleotide polymorphism differences were compared with contemporaneous emm 75 genomes. FINDINGS: Over the four-year study period, seven mothers had emm 75 GAS/iGAS and one mother had emm 3 iGAS (in year 4) (subsequently discounted as linked). Three (clinical/screening samples) of the seven babies of emm-75-positive mothers and three screened healthcare workers were positive for emm 75 GAS. WGS similarity suggested a shared ancestral lineage and a common source transmission, but directionality of transmission cannot be inferred. However, the findings indicate that persistence of a particular clone in a given setting may be long term. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational health procedures were enhanced, staff were screened, and antibiotic therapy was provided to GAS-positive staff and patients. The definitive source of infection could not be identified, although staff-patient transmission was the most likely route. The pattern of clonal GAS transmission over the four-year study period suggests that long-term persistence of GAS may have occurred.


Asunto(s)
Brotes de Enfermedades , Transmisión de Enfermedad Infecciosa , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/epidemiología , Streptococcus pyogenes/clasificación , Streptococcus pyogenes/aislamiento & purificación , Secuenciación Completa del Genoma , Adulto , Análisis por Conglomerados , Femenino , Genotipo , Personal de Salud , Maternidades , Humanos , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Epidemiología Molecular , Tipificación Molecular , Madres , Polimorfismo de Nucleótido Simple , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus pyogenes/genética
14.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 25(2): 248.e1-248.e7, 2019 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29783026

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Multiple invasive group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections were reported to public health by a skilled nursing facility (facility A) in Illinois between May 2014 and August 2016. Cases continued despite interventions including antibiotic prophylaxis for all residents and staff. Two other geographically close facilities reported contemporaneous outbreaks of GAS. We investigated potential reasons for ongoing transmission. METHODS: We obtained epidemiologic data from chart review of cases and review of facility and public health records from previous investigations into the outbreak. Infection control practices at facility A were observed and evaluated. Whole genome sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis was performed on available isolates from the three facilities. RESULTS: From 2014 to 2016, 19 invasive and 60 noninvasive GAS infections were identified at facility A occurring in three clusters. Infection control evaluations during clusters 2 and 3 identified hand hygiene compliance rates of 14% to 25%, appropriate personal protective equipment use in only 33% of observed instances, and deficient wound-care practices. GAS isolates from residents and staff of all three facilities were subtype emm89.0; on phylogenetic analysis, facility A isolates were monophyletic and distinct. CONCLUSIONS: Inadequate infection control and improper wound-care practices likely led to this 28-month-long outbreak of severe infections in a skilled nursing facility. Whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis suggested that intrafacility transmission of a single highly transmissible GAS strain was responsible for the outbreak in facility A. Integration of genomic epidemiology tools with traditional epidemiology and infection control assessments was helpful in investigation of a facility-wide outbreak.


Asunto(s)
Brotes de Enfermedades , Casas de Salud , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus pyogenes/genética , Anciano , Biología Computacional , Humanos , Control de Infecciones , Faringitis/microbiología , Filogenia , Infecciones Urinarias/microbiología , Infección de Heridas/microbiología
17.
BMC Pediatr ; 18(1): 378, 2018 11 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30501616

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Group B Streptococcus (GBS) that asymptomatically colonizing the recto-vaginal area of women is the most important cause of neonatal colonization. There is paucity of evidence about newborn colonization with GBS in Ethiopia. Thus, this study was aimed to determine the prevalence of newborn colonization with GBS, antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates and associated risk factors at the University of Gondar Referral Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia METHODS: A prospective cross sectional study was conducted from December 2016 to November 2017. A total of 1,155 swabs from nasal, ear and umbilical areas of the newborns were collected from the 385 newborns. Identifications of the isolates and antibiotic susceptibility testing were done by using conventional methods. RESULTS: Sixty two (16.1%, 95% CI: 12.2% - 20%) of the newborns were colonized by GBS. Seven percent of the total specimens were positive for GBS. The antibiotics susceptibility rates of GBS (average of the three body sites tested) were 95.1%, 89.6%, 88.9%, 85.7%, 85.3%, 81.3%, 76.9%, 76.1%, 73.8%, and 34.4% to ampicillin, penicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, vancomycin, azitromycin, erythromycin, clindamycin, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline, respectively. A multilogistic regression analyses were shown that the newborns that were from mothers whose education status was below tertiary level, and newborns from mothers who were: being employed, being nullipara and multigravida were at risk for colonization with GBS. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of neonatal colonization with GBS was higher than it was reported in three decades ago in Ethiopia. Ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, vancomycin and azithromycin were identified as the drug of choice next to ampicillin and penicillin.


Asunto(s)
Farmacorresistencia Bacteriana , Pruebas de Sensibilidad Microbiana , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/tratamiento farmacológico , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología , Streptococcus agalactiae/efectos de los fármacos , Antibacterianos/uso terapéutico , Portador Sano , Estudios Transversales , Escolaridad , Empleo , Etiopía , Femenino , Hospitales Universitarios , Humanos , Recién Nacido , Madres/psicología , Paridad , Embarazo , Complicaciones Infecciosas del Embarazo/diagnóstico , Estudios Prospectivos , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/diagnóstico , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus agalactiae/aislamiento & purificación
18.
J Med Microbiol ; 67(11): 1551-1559, 2018 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30265233

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is one of the major pathogens in severe materno-neonatal infections. We aimed to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of GBS isolates causing infections in 45 maternal and 50 neonatal subjects, collected from eight healthcare centres in mainland China over the period 2010- 2017. METHODOLOGY: The phenotypic and genotypic features of the GBS isolates, including capsular polysaccharide (cps) serotypes, pilus island (PI) genes and antibiotic resistance profiles and genes, were characterized by both conventional and molecular methods. The clonal relationship between these strains was investigated using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). RESULTS: Of the 95 isolates, the predominant serotypes were III (51, 53.7 %), V (13, 13.7 %) and Ib (13, 13.7 %). All GBS strains carried at least one pilus island, with 32.6 % carrying PI-2b and 67.4 % PI-2a, singly or in combination. The most frequently-detected pilus island pattern was the combination of PI-1 and PI-2a, accounting for 56.8 % (54 isolates), followed by PI-1 combined with PI-2b (28, 29.5 %), PI-2a (10, 10.5 %) and PI-2b (3, 3.2 %). The strains were classified into 17 individual sequence types, and further clustered into six clonal complexes (CCs). A high prevalence of CC17/PI-1 and PI-2b (17, 34.0 %) was detected in 50 GBS isolates causing neonatal infections. No strain was resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, ceftriaxone or vancomycin, whereas 78.9, 76.8 and 81.5 % were resistant to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our study highlights the high genotypic diversity of GBS strains causing materno-neonatal infections, and the CC17/PI-1 and PI-2b sublineages should be noted in neonatal infections.


Asunto(s)
Transmisión Vertical de Enfermedad Infecciosa , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología , Streptococcus agalactiae/clasificación , Streptococcus agalactiae/genética , Adulto , Antibacterianos/farmacología , Proteínas Bacterianas/genética , China/epidemiología , Farmacorresistencia Bacteriana Múltiple , Femenino , Fimbrias Bacterianas/genética , Variación Genética , Genotipo , Humanos , Recién Nacido , Madres , Tipificación de Secuencias Multilocus , Fenotipo , Polisacáridos Bacterianos/genética , Embarazo , Prevalencia , Serogrupo , Serotipificación , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/epidemiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus agalactiae/efectos de los fármacos , Streptococcus agalactiae/aislamiento & purificación
19.
Sci Rep ; 8(1): 13358, 2018 09 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30190575

RESUMEN

Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a gram-positive bacterial pathogen in pigs which can cause serious infections in human including meningitis, and septicaemia resulting in serious complications. There were discrepancies between different data and little is known concerning associated risk factors of S. suis. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to investigate on S. suis infection risk factors in human. We searched eight relevant databases using the MeSH terms "Streptococcus suis" OR "Streptococcus suis AND infection" limited in human with no time nor language restriction. Out of 4,999 articles identified, 32 and 3 studies were included for systematic review and meta-analysis respectively with a total of 1,454 Streptococcus suis cases reported. S. suis patients were generally adult males and the elderly. The mean age ranged between 37 to 63 years. Meningitis was the most common clinical manifestation, and deafness was the most common sequelae found among survivors followed by vestibular dysfunction. Infective endocarditis was also noted as among the most common clinical presentations associated with high mortality rate in a few studies. Meta-analyses categorized by type of control groups (community control, and non-S. suis sepsis) were done among 850 participants in 3 studies. The combined odd ratios for studies using community control groups and non-S. Suis sepsis as controls respectively were 4.63 (95% CI 2.94-7.29) and 78.00 (95% CI 10.38-585.87) for raw pork consumption, 4.01 (95% CI 2.61-6.15) and 3.03 (95% CI 1.61-5.68) for exposure to pigs or pork, 11.47, (95% CI 5.68-23.14) and 3.07 (95% CI 1.81-5.18) for pig-related occupation and 3.56 (95% CI 2.18-5.80) and 5.84 (95% CI 2.76-12.36) for male sex. The results were found to be significantly associated with S. suis infection and there was non-significant heterogeneity. History of skin injury and underlying diseases were noted only a small percentage in most studies. Setting up an effective screening protocol and public health interventions would be effective to enhance understanding about the disease.


Asunto(s)
Endocarditis/epidemiología , Meningitis Bacterianas/epidemiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/epidemiología , Streptococcus suis , Adulto , Factores de Edad , Animales , Endocarditis/microbiología , Endocarditis/prevención & control , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Meningitis Bacterianas/microbiología , Meningitis Bacterianas/prevención & control , Meningitis Bacterianas/transmisión , Persona de Mediana Edad , Factores de Riesgo , Factores Sexuales , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/prevención & control , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Porcinos
20.
J Clin Microbiol ; 56(10)2018 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30068536

RESUMEN

Streptococcus zooepidemicus is an emerging and opportunistic zoonotic pathogen which plays an important role in the development of severe and life-threatening diseases and is potentially capable of triggering large glomerulonephritis outbreaks. Between December 2012 and February 2013, 175 cases of glomerulonephritis were confirmed in the town of Monte Santo de Minas, MG, Brazil. During the outbreak, 19 isolates of S. zooepidemicus were recovered, 1 from ice cream, 2 from the oropharynx of food handlers, and 16 from patients affected by acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN). All S. zooepidemicus isolates involved in the outbreak amplified the same sequence of the hypervariable region of the SzP protein (SzPHV5) and presented indistinguishable banding patterns with high similarity (>99%) to each other by the repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) technique. Inspection programs on the milk supply chain should be strengthened and continuously encouraged so that the health of consumers is preserved.


Asunto(s)
Brotes de Enfermedades , Glomerulonefritis/epidemiología , Glomerulonefritis/microbiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/epidemiología , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/microbiología , Streptococcus equi/aislamiento & purificación , Adulto , Animales , Proteínas Bacterianas/genética , Técnicas Bacteriológicas , Brasil/epidemiología , ADN Bacteriano/genética , Femenino , Microbiología de Alimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Leche/microbiología , Reacción en Cadena de la Polimerasa , Infecciones Estreptocócicas/transmisión , Streptococcus equi/clasificación , Streptococcus equi/genética
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