Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 41
Filtrar
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 924331, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36106161

RESUMEN

Background: The COVID-19 outbreak is no longer a pure epidemiological concern but a true digital infodemic. Numerous conflicting information and misinformation occupy online platforms and specifically social media. While we have lived in an infodemic environment for more than 2 years, we are more prone to feel overwhelmed by the information and suffer from long-term mental health problems. However, limited research has concentrated on the cause of these threats, particularly in terms of information processing and the context of infodemic. Objective: This study proposed and tested moderated mediation pathways from two types of health information behaviors (social media engagement and interpersonal communication) on information overload and mental health symptoms-long-term stress. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey between May and June of 2021 among the Malaysian public. The final sample size was 676 (N = 676). A conceptual model was built to guide the data analysis. We conducted structural equation modeling (SEM), moderation and mediation analyses to examine each direct pathway, moderating and mediating effects. Results: According to the pathway analysis, we found that, during the infodemic period, engaging COVID-19 information on social media positively associated with information overload, but interpersonal communication was negatively related to it. As the proximal outcome, there was also a positive association between information overload and the final outcome, perceived stress. The moderation analysis only reported one significant interaction: risk perception weakened the association between social media engagement and information overload. A conditional indirect effect was demonstrated and the indirect associated between social media engagement and perceived stress mediated through information overload was further moderated by COVID-19 risk perception. Conclusion: This research offers new grounds for understanding health information behaviors and their consequences in the COVID-19 infodemic. We particularly highlighted the distinct functions of health information behaviors in causing information overload, as well as the importance of personal health belief in this process. Our proposed model contributes to the strategies of developing health messaging strategies that may be utilized by public health researchers and health educators in the future.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Análisis de Mediación , COVID-19/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Infodemia , Salud Mental
3.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(9): 544-561, 2022 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36062247

RESUMEN

Objective: To compare and summarize the literature regarding infodemics and health misinformation, and to identify challenges and opportunities for addressing the issues of infodemics. Methods: We searched MEDLINE®, Embase®, Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews, Scopus and Epistemonikos on 6 May 2022 for systematic reviews analysing infodemics, misinformation, disinformation and fake news related to health. We grouped studies based on similarity and retrieved evidence on challenges and opportunities. We used the AMSTAR 2 approach to assess the reviews' methodological quality. To evaluate the quality of the evidence, we used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidelines. Findings: Our search identified 31 systematic reviews, of which 17 were published. The proportion of health-related misinformation on social media ranged from 0.2% to 28.8%. Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Instagram are critical in disseminating the rapid and far-reaching information. The most negative consequences of health misinformation are the increase of misleading or incorrect interpretations of available evidence, impact on mental health, misallocation of health resources and an increase in vaccination hesitancy. The increase of unreliable health information delays care provision and increases the occurrence of hateful and divisive rhetoric. Social media could also be a useful tool to combat misinformation during crises. Included reviews highlight the poor quality of published studies during health crises. Conclusion: Available evidence suggests that infodemics during health emergencies have an adverse effect on society. Multisectoral actions to counteract infodemics and health misinformation are needed, including developing legal policies, creating and promoting awareness campaigns, improving health-related content in mass media and increasing people's digital and health literacy.


Asunto(s)
Alfabetización en Salud , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Comunicación , Humanos , Infodemia , Revisiones Sistemáticas como Asunto
4.
Rev Esc Enferm USP ; 56: e20210421, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35994688

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To characterize and identify depressive symptoms, anxiety, and stress associated with the COVID-19 Infodemic in the elderly from São Paulo. METHOD: Exploratory and cross-sectional study with the elderly in the capital of São Paulo who had internet access. The sociodemographic profile, the COVID-19 infodemic, depressive symptoms, stress, and anxiety were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 411 older people participated in the study. There was a predominance of women (76.4%), with higher education (57.9%), using private health services, and with little income variation. Older people were more exposed to news or information about COVID-19 on the internet (45.3%), followed by television (34.5%), and radio (11.4%). The average stress was 19.96 points; 33.1% had anxiety, and 39.7% had depressive symptoms. The greater the number of people living with the elderly, the greater the stress (p = 0.001) and anxiety (p = 0.02). The hours of exposure to information on the internet led to stress (p = 0.001), depressive symptoms (p = 0.02), and anxiety (p = 0.02) in the elderly. CONCLUSION: During the pandemic, exposure to information on the internet triggered anxiety, stress, and depressive symptoms in the elderly. The findings highlight the need for multi and interdisciplinary interventions to mitigate such repercussions on the elderly's health.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Anciano , Ansiedad/epidemiología , Brasil/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Depresión/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Infodemia , Masculino , Salud Mental
5.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(8): e36085, 2022 08 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35839385

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Social media has changed the way we live and communicate, as well as offering unprecedented opportunities to improve many aspects of our lives, including health promotion and disease prevention. However, there is also a darker side to social media that is not always as evident as its possible benefits. In fact, social media has also opened the door to new social and health risks that are linked to health misinformation. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to study the role of social media bots during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: The Twitter streaming API was used to collect tweets regarding COVID-19 during the early stages of the outbreak. The Botometer tool was then used to obtain the likelihood of whether each account is a bot or not. Bot classification and topic-modeling techniques were used to interpret the Twitter conversation. Finally, the sentiment associated with the tweets was compared depending on the source of the tweet. RESULTS: Regarding the conversation topics, there were notable differences between the different accounts. The content of nonbot accounts was associated with the evolution of the pandemic, support, and advice. On the other hand, in the case of self-declared bots, the content consisted mainly of news, such as the existence of diagnostic tests, the evolution of the pandemic, and scientific findings. Finally, in the case of bots, the content was mostly political. Above all, there was a general overriding tone of criticism and disagreement. In relation to the sentiment analysis, the main differences were associated with the tone of the conversation. In the case of self-declared bots, this tended to be neutral, whereas the conversation of normal users scored positively. In contrast, bots tended to score negatively. CONCLUSIONS: By classifying the accounts according to their likelihood of being bots and performing topic modeling, we were able to segment the Twitter conversation regarding COVID-19. Bot accounts tended to criticize the measures imposed to curb the pandemic, express disagreement with politicians, or question the veracity of the information shared on social media.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , COVID-19/epidemiología , Brotes de Enfermedades , Humanos , Infodemia , Pandemias/prevención & control
7.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35805646

RESUMEN

Social media is used by the masses not only to seek health information but also to express feelings on an array of issues, including those related to health. However, there has been little investigation on the influence of expressing and receiving information in terms of health-related engagement on social media. Moreover, little is known of the cognitive mechanisms underlying the expression and reception of health information on information overload (IO) during an infectious disease outbreak. Guided by the Cognitive Mediation Model (CMM), this study proposes a conceptual model to understand the effects of receiving and expressing COVID-19 information on social media on IO. Using an online survey conducted in Malaysia, our results indicated that risk perception positively predicted the reception and expression of information which, in turn, was positively associated with perceived stress and IO. Additionally, perceived stress triggered IO, indicating that the greater the perceived stress from health information engagement, the higher the likelihood of one experiencing IO during the pandemic. We conclude that the CMM can be extended to study IO as an outcome variable. More studies in diverse health contexts need to be conducted to enhance the conceptualization and operationalization of IO in health information processing.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , COVID-19/epidemiología , Humanos , Infodemia , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35805691

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has been accompanied by a massive infodemic. Yet limited studies have quantified the impact of the COVID-19 infodemic on vaccine hesitancy. This study examined the effect of perceived information overload (IO) and misinformation on vaccine willingness and uptake within a cross-national context. It also investigated how trust in multiple institutions affected vaccine outcomes and moderated the relationship between the infodemic and vaccine attitude and behavior. A cross-national online survey of residents, representative of the general population aged ≥18 in six Asian and Western jurisdictions, was conducted in June 2021. The results showed that perceived IO was positively associated with COVID-19 vaccine willingness and uptake. Belief in misinformation was negatively associated with vaccine willingness and uptake. Institutional trust may increase vaccine willingness and uptake. Moreover, trust in the government and civil societies tended to strengthen the positive effect of IO and reduce the negative impact of misinformation on vaccine willingness and uptake. The relationship between belief in misinformation and getting vaccinated against COVID-19 was unexpectedly stronger among those with a higher level of trust in healthcare professionals. This study contributes to a better understanding of the main and interactive effect of the infodemic and institutional trust on vaccine outcomes during a pandemic.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Vacunas , COVID-19/epidemiología , COVID-19/prevención & control , Vacunas contra la COVID-19/uso terapéutico , Humanos , Infodemia , Pandemias , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud , Confianza , Vacilación a la Vacunación
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35805766

RESUMEN

Accurately predicting the number of severe and critical COVID-19 patients is critical for the treatment and control of the epidemic. Social media data have gained great popularity and widespread application in various research domains. The viral-related infodemic outbreaks have occurred alongside the COVID-19 outbreak. This paper aims to discover trustworthy sources of social media data to improve the prediction performance of severe and critical COVID-19 patients. The innovation of this paper lies in three aspects. First, it builds an improved prediction model based on machine learning. This model helps predict the number of severe and critical COVID-19 patients on a specific urban or regional scale. The effectiveness of the prediction model, shown as accuracy and satisfactory robustness, is verified by a case study of the lockdown in Hubei Province. Second, it finds the transition path of the impact of social media data for predicting the number of severe and critical COVID-19 patients. Third, this paper provides a promising and powerful model for COVID-19 prevention and control. The prediction model can help medical organizations to realize a prediction of COVID-19 severe and critical patients in multi-stage with lead time in specific areas. This model can guide the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other clinic institutions to expand the monitoring channels and research methods concerning COVID-19 by using web-based social media data. The model can also facilitate optimal scheduling of medical resources as well as prevention and control policy formulation.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , COVID-19/epidemiología , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Humanos , Infodemia , SARS-CoV-2 , Estados Unidos
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(7): e38332, 2022 Jul 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35839380

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused not only a disease epidemic but also an infodemic. Due to the increased use of the internet and social media, along with the development of communication technology, information has spread faster and farther during the COVID-19 infodemic. Moreover, the increased choice of information sources has made it more difficult to make sound decisions regarding information. Although social media is the most common source of misinformation, other forms of media can also spread misinformation. However, the media sources used by people with high health literacy and COVID-19 knowledge to obtain information are unclear. Furthermore, the association between the use of multiple information sources and health literacy or COVID-19 knowledge is ill-defined. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine the following 3 aspects regarding the COVID-19 infodemic: (1) the relationship between health literacy, COVID-19 knowledge, and the number of information sources used; (2) the impact of media use on health literacy; and (3) the impact of media use on COVID-19 knowledge. METHODS: An online cross-sectional study was conducted in November 2021. Participants were 477 individuals aged 20-69 years. After obtaining consent to participate in the study, participants were asked about sociodemographic indicators, sources of health-related information, health literacy, and COVID-19 knowledge. Sources of health-related information were categorized into 4 types: mass media, digital media, social media, and face-to-face communication. The Spearman rank correlation test was conducted to determine the relationship between health literacy, the number of correct answers to COVID-19 knowledge, and the number of information sources used. Multiple regression analysis was conducted with health literacy and the number of correct answers as dependent variables, the 4 media types as independent variables, and age and sex as adjustment variables. RESULTS: Mass media was the most frequently used source of information, followed by digital media, face-to-face communication, and social media. Social media use was significantly higher among individuals aged 20-29 years than among other age groups. Significant positive correlations were found between health literacy, the number of positive responses to COVID-19 knowledge, and the number of information sources used. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that health literacy is associated with access to information from digital media and face-to-face communication. Additionally, COVID-19 knowledge was associated with access to information from mass media, digital media, and face-to-face communication. CONCLUSIONS: Health literacy and COVID-19 knowledge could be improved using diverse information sources, especially by providing opportunities to use digital media and face-to-face communication. Furthermore, it may be important to improve health literacy and provide accurate knowledge about COVID-19 to young adults.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Alfabetización en Salud , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , COVID-19/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Infodemia , Internet , Japón , Pandemias , Adulto Joven
12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35682334

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated that social media can impact society both positively (e.g., keeping citizens connected and informed) and negatively (e.g., the deliberate spreading of misinformation). This study aims to examine the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between official social media accounts and the infodemic, experienced during the first wave of COVID-19 in China. A theoretical model is proposed to examine how official social media accounts affected the infodemic during this period. In total, 1398 questionnaire responses were collected via WeChat and Tencent QQ, two leading Chinese social media platforms. Data analysis was conducted using Partial Lease Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM), moderation effect analysis, and mediation effect analysis. Results indicate that the Information Quality (IQ) of Official social media accounts (ß = -0.294, p < 0.001) has a significant negative effect on the infodemic. Mediation effect analysis revealed that both social support (ß = -0.333, 95% Boot CI (-0.388, -0.280)) and information cascades (ß = -0.189, 95% Boot CI (-0.227, -0.151)) mediate the relationship between IQ and the infodemic. Moderation effect analysis shows that private social media usage (F = 85.637, p < 0.001) positively moderates the relationship between IQ and the infodemic, while health literacy has a small negative moderation effect on the relationship between IQ and the infodemic. Our findings show that, in the context of Chinese media, official social media accounts act as a major source of information for influencing the infodemic through increasing social support and reducing information cascades for citizens.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Adulto , COVID-19/epidemiología , China/epidemiología , Humanos , Infodemia , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Health Commun ; 37(12): 1520-1533, 2022 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35505456

RESUMEN

This study quantitatively examines whether health literacy can reduce belief in COVID-19 misinformation and conspiracy theories. Conducting path and cluster analyses on survey data collected from 1,488 adults in Japan in 2021, we found that while health literacy reduces people's belief about COVID-19 and vaccination misinformation, it has no direct effect on their belief in COVID-19 conspiracy theories. That said, the results also highlighted the importance of health literacy. It is found that even though high health literacy does not guarantee a low degree of conspiracy beliefs, low health literacy is associated with high susceptibility to both misinformation and conspiracy theories. Moreover, people who relied more on social media than mass media for COVID-19 news and reported on having been more severely affected by the pandemic were found to be more likely to have lower health literacy and higher belief in misinformation and conspiracy theories. Based on the findings, we discussed ways to enhance health literacy research and promotion in Japan.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Alfabetización en Salud , Adulto , COVID-19/epidemiología , Humanos , Infodemia , Japón/epidemiología , SARS-CoV-2
14.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0267022, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35587480

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has been characterized by a social media "infodemic": an overabundance of information whose authenticity may not always be guaranteed. With the potential to lead individuals to harmful decisions for the society, this infodemic represents a severe threat to information security, public health and democracy. In this paper, we assess the interplay between the infodemic and specific aspects of the pandemic, such as the number of cases, the strictness of containment measures, and the news media coverage. We perform a comparative study on three countries that employed different managements of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020-namely Italy, the United Kingdom, and New Zealand. We first analyze the three countries from an epidemiological perspective to characterize the impact of the pandemic and the strictness of the restrictions adopted. Then, we collect a total of 6 million posts from Facebook to describe user news consumption behaviors with respect to the reliability of such posts. Finally, we quantify the relationship between the number of posts published in each of the three countries and the number of confirmed cases, the strictness of the restrictions adopted, and the online news media coverage about the pandemic. Our results show that posts referring to reliable sources are consistently predominant in the news circulation, and that users engage more with reliable posts rather than with posts referring to questionable sources. Furthermore, our modelling results suggest that factors related to the epidemiological and informational ecosystems can serve as proxies to assess the evolution of the infodemic.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , COVID-19/epidemiología , Ecosistema , Humanos , Infodemia , Nueva Zelanda/epidemiología , Pandemias/prevención & control , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , SARS-CoV-2 , Reino Unido/epidemiología
15.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 35, 2022 05 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35525924

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In April 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) Information Network for Epidemics produced an agenda for managing the COVID-19 infodemic. "Infodemic" refers to the overabundance of information-including mis- and disinformation. In this agenda it was pointed out the need to create a competency framework for infodemic management (IM). This framework was released by WHO on 20th September 2021. This paper presents the WHO framework for IM by highlighting the different investigative steps behind its development. METHODS: The framework was built through three steps. Step 1 included the preparatory work following the guidelines in the Guide to writing Competency Framework for WHO Academy courses. Step 2 was based on a qualitative study with participants (N = 25), identified worldwide on the basis of their academic background in relevant fields of IM or of their professional experience in IM activities at the institutional level. The interviews were conducted online between December 2020 and January 2021, they were video-recorded and analyzed using thematic analysis. In Step 3, two stakeholder panels were conducted to revise the framework. RESULTS: The competency framework contains four primary domains, each of which comprised main activities, related tasks, and knowledge and skills. It identifies competencies to manage and monitor infodemics, to design, conduct and evaluate appropriate interventions, as well as to strengthen health systems. Its main purpose is to assist institutions in reinforcing their IM capacities and implementing effective IM processes and actions according to their individual contexts and resources. CONCLUSION: The competency framework is not intended to be a regulatory document nor a training curriculum. As a WHO initiative, it serves as a reference tool to be applied according to local priorities and needs within the different countries. This framework can assist institutions in strengthening IM capacity by hiring, staff development, and human resources planning.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Infodemia , COVID-19/epidemiología , Curriculum , Humanos , Desarrollo de Personal , Organización Mundial de la Salud
17.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266705, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35446865

RESUMEN

The uncontrolled spread of (mis)information, news and propaganda related to COVID 19 created an 'infodemic' leading to panic and unscientific practices among the mass. With the largest number of internet users in the world, India has witnessed a steep rise in the number of people seeking information on social media related to COVID-19, which reached a staggering 22.3 million by March, 2020. This study aimed to evaluate the trend of COVID-19 associated food and nutrition news search by Indian internet users between 27th January 2020 to 30th June 2021 (time period between the first detected COVID-19 case and the end of the second wave in India) and its impact on their perceptions and practices. The association between the change in Relative Search Volume (RSV) on Google Trends (GT) of 34 popularly searched keywords classified by the researchers under 5 different categories-"Immunity", "Eating behavior", "Food safety", "Food scares and concerns" and "Covid scare" showed a steep rise in search for immunity boosters, vitamin supplement brands "ayush kadha (ayurvedic decoction) during the first wave (April- August 2020). With a brief period of decline in the search trend, it again hiked correspondingly with the growing number of positive cases during the second wave in India. An online survey conducted on adult Indian internet users (n = 572) reported high (71.9%) consumption of Vitamin C rich fruits as well as Vitamin C (68.2%) and Zinc (61.4%) supplements to boost immunity. Traditional Indian spices like ginger and garlic were used by 62.9% and 50.9% respondents respectively. Most respondents reported to rely on social media for gathering COVID-19 associated tips for boosting immunity, however those with history of COVID-19 infection reported to rely more on doctors and health professionals for information. This study highlights the need of media and health literacy to advocate for the use of health information cautiously.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Adulto , Ácido Ascórbico , COVID-19/epidemiología , Humanos , Infodemia , Internet , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Public Health Rep ; 137(3): 449-456, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35238241

RESUMEN

The World Health Organization has identified excessive COVID-19 pandemic-related information as a public health crisis, calling it an "infodemic." Social media allows misinformation to spread quickly and outcompete scientifically grounded information delivered via other methods. Dear Pandemic is an innovative, multidisciplinary, social media-based science communication project whose mission is to educate and empower individuals to successfully navigate the overwhelming amount of information circulating during the pandemic. This mission has 2 primary objectives: (1) to disseminate trustworthy, comprehensive, and timely scientific content about the pandemic to lay audiences via social media and (2) to promote media literacy and information-hygiene practices, equipping readers to better manage the COVID-19 infodemic within their own networks. The volunteer team of scientists publishes 8-16 posts per week on pandemic-relevant topics. Nearly 2 years after it launched in March 2020, the project has a combined monthly reach of more than 4 million unique views across 4 social media channels, an email newsletter, and a website. We describe the project's guiding principles, lessons learned, challenges, and opportunities. Dear Pandemic has emerged as an example of a promising new paradigm for public health communication and intervention. The contributors deliver content in ways that are personal, practical, actionable, responsive, and native to social media platforms. The project's guiding principles are a model for public health communication targeting future infodemics and can bridge the chasm between the scientific community and the practical daily decision-making needs of the general public.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Comunicación en Salud , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , COVID-19/epidemiología , Humanos , Infodemia , Pandemias
19.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e31088, 2022 Mar 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35103601

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Although timely and accurate information during the COVID-19 pandemic is essential for containing the disease and reducing mental distress, an infodemic, which refers to an overabundance of information, may trigger unpleasant emotions and reduce compliance. Prior research has shown the negative consequences of an infodemic during the pandemic; however, we know less about which subpopulations are more exposed to the infodemic and are more vulnerable to the adverse psychological and behavioral effects. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine how sociodemographic factors and information-seeking behaviors affect the perceived information overload during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also investigated the effect of perceived information overload on psychological distress and protective behavior and analyzed the socioeconomic differences in the effects. METHODS: The data for this study were obtained from a cross-national survey of residents in 6 jurisdictions in Asia in May 2020. The survey targeted residents aged 18 years or older. A probability-based quota sampling strategy was adopted to ensure that the selected samples matched the population's geographical and demographic characteristics released by the latest available census in each jurisdiction. The final sample included 10,063 respondents. Information overload about COVID-19 was measured by asking the respondents to what extent they feel overwhelmed by news related to COVID-19. The measure of psychological distress was adapted from the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 (DSM-5). Protective behaviors included personal hygienic behavior and compliance with social distancing measures. RESULTS: Younger respondents and women (b=0.20, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.26) were more likely to perceive information overload. Participants self-perceived as upper or upper-middle class (b=0.19, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.30) and those with full-time jobs (b=0.11, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.17) tended to perceive higher information overload. Respondents who more frequently sought COVID-19 information from newspapers (b=0.12, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.14), television (b=0.07, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.09), and family and friends (b=0.11, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.14) were more likely to feel overwhelmed. In contrast, obtaining COVID-19 information from online news outlets and social media was not associated with perceived information overload. There was a positive relationship between perceived information overload and psychological distress (b=2.18, 95% CI 2.09 to 2.26). Such an association was stronger among urban residents, full-time employees, and those living in privately owned housing. The effect of perceived information overload on protective behavior was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings revealed that respondents who were younger, were female, had a higher socioeconomic status (SES), and had vulnerable populations in the household were more likely to feel overwhelmed by COVID-19 information. Perceived information overload tended to increase psychological distress, and people with higher SES were more vulnerable to this adverse psychological consequence. Effective policies and interventions should be promoted to target vulnerable populations who are more susceptible to the occurrence and negative psychological influence of perceived information overload.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Distrés Psicológico , Adolescente , COVID-19/epidemiología , COVID-19/prevención & control , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Infodemia , Pandemias , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA
...