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1.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33799417

RESUMEN

Ensuring access to healthcare is critical to prevent illnesses and deaths from COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 cases in health systems that have deteriorated during the pandemic. This study aims to map the existing literature on healthcare access after the appearance of COVID-19 using an ontological framework. This will help us to formalize, standardize, visualize and assess the barriers to and drivers of access to healthcare, and how to continue working towards a more accessible health system. A total of 131 articles are included and considered for mapping in the framework. The results were also compared to the World Health Organization guidelines on maintaining essential health services to determine the overlapping and nonoverlapping areas. We showed the benefits of using ontology to promote a systematic approach to address healthcare problems of access during COVID-19 or other pandemics and set public policies. This systematic approach will provide feedback to study the existing guidelines to make them more effective, learn about the existing gaps in research, and the relationship between the two of them. These results set the foundation for the discussion of future public health policies and research in relevant areas where we might pay attention.


Asunto(s)
Instituciones de Salud , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Humanos , Pandemias
2.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33799752

RESUMEN

Companies operate in a competitive and changing environment requiring increasingly effective and efficient management strategies. Lean is a proven philosophy in the industrial sector having helped companies to adapt to rapid market changes; to economic, technical, and social complexities; and to customer needs. For this reason, companies in the service sector are adopting Lean to improve their service management and to achieve economic, social, and environmental sustainability. This paper presents a model which uses Lean tools to facilitate the introduction of Lean in the management of primary care centers. The results show the implementation of Lean improved primary care center management, achieved stated objectives, and demonstrated faster adaptation to environmental needs and changes. The Lean philosophy developed and applied in the primary care center proved useful at a professional level facilitating developmental changes and prompting lasting improvements by developing a sustainable work culture.


Asunto(s)
Prestación de Atención de Salud , Mejoramiento de la Calidad , Eficiencia Organizacional , Instituciones de Salud , Atención Primaria de Salud
3.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249133, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33793611

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Several research efforts have evaluated the impact of various factors including a) socio-demographics, (b) health indicators, (c) mobility trends, and (d) health care infrastructure attributes on COVID-19 transmission and mortality rate. However, earlier research focused only on a subset of variable groups (predominantly one or two) that can contribute to the COVID-19 transmission/mortality rate. The current study effort is designed to remedy this by analyzing COVID-19 transmission/mortality rates considering a comprehensive set of factors in a unified framework. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We study two per capita dependent variables: (1) daily COVID-19 transmission rates and (2) total COVID-19 mortality rates. The first variable is modeled using a linear mixed model while the later dimension is analyzed using a linear regression approach. The model results are augmented with a sensitivity analysis to predict the impact of mobility restrictions at a county level. Several county level factors including proportion of African-Americans, income inequality, health indicators associated with Asthma, Cancer, HIV and heart disease, percentage of stay at home individuals, testing infrastructure and Intensive Care Unit capacity impact transmission and/or mortality rates. From the policy analysis, we find that enforcing a stay at home order that can ensure a 50% stay at home rate can result in a potential reduction of about 33% in daily cases. CONCLUSIONS: The model framework developed can be employed by government agencies to evaluate the influence of reduced mobility on transmission rates at a county level while accommodating for various county specific factors. Based on our policy analysis, the study findings support a county level stay at home order for regions currently experiencing a surge in transmission. The model framework can also be employed to identify vulnerable counties that need to be prioritized based on health indicators for current support and/or preferential vaccination plans (when available).


Asunto(s)
Prestación de Atención de Salud , Demografía/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Factores Socioeconómicos , /mortalidad , Prestación de Atención de Salud/organización & administración , Prestación de Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Instituciones de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Política de Salud , Humanos , Factores de Riesgo , Estados Unidos
4.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0247463, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33657621

RESUMEN

The risk of overwhelming hospitals from multiple waves of COVID-19 is yet to be quantified. Here, we investigate the impact of different scenarios of releasing strong measures implemented around the U.S. on COVID-19 hospitalized cases and the risk of overwhelming the hospitals while considering resources at the county level. We show that multiple waves might cause an unprecedented impact on the hospitals if an increasing number of the population becomes susceptible and/or if the various protective measures are discontinued. Furthermore, we explore the ability of different mitigation strategies in providing considerable relief to hospitals. The results can help planners, policymakers, and state officials decide on additional resources required and when to return to normalcy.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Política de Salud/tendencias , Hospitalización/tendencias , Prestación de Atención de Salud/tendencias , Instituciones de Salud/tendencias , Hospitalización/estadística & datos numéricos , Hospitales/tendencias , Humanos , Modelos Estadísticos , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
5.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248420, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33705480

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a highly transmittable virus that continues to disrupt livelihoods, particularly those of low-income segments of society, around the world. In Ethiopia, more specifically in the capital city of Addis Ababa, a sudden increase in the number of confirmed positive cases in high-risk groups of the community has been observed over the last few weeks of the first case. Therefore, this study aims to assess knowledge, practice and associated factors that can contribute to the prevention of COVID-19 among high-risk groups in Addis Ababa. METHODS: A cross-sectional in person survey (n = 6007) was conducted from 14-30 April, 2020 following a prioritization within high-risk groups in Addis Ababa. The study area targeted bus stations, public transport drivers, air transport infrastructure, health facilities, public and private pharmacies, hotels, government-owned and private banks, telecom centers, trade centers, orphanages, elderly centers, prison, prisons and selected slum areas where the people live in a crowded areas. A questionnaire comprised of four sections (demographics, knowledge, practice and reported symptoms) was used for data collection. The outcomes (knowledge on the transmission and prevention of COVID-19 and practice) were measured using four items. A multi variable logistic regression was applied with adjustment for potential confounding. RESULTS: About half (48%, 95% CI: 46-49) of the study participants had poor knowledge on the transmission mode of COVID-19 whereas six out of ten (60%, 95% CI: 58-61) had good knowledge on prevention methods for COVID-19. The practice of preventive measures towards COVID-19 was found to be low (49%, 95% CI: 48-50). Factors that influence knowledge on COVID-19 transmission mechanisms were female gender, older age, occupation (health care and grocery worker), lower income and the use of the 8335 free call centre. Older age, occupation (being a health worker), middle income, experience of respiratory illness and religion were significantly associated with being knowledgeable about the prevention methods for COVID-19. The study found that occupation, religion, income, knowledge on the transmission and prevention of COVID-19 were associated with the practice of precautionary measures towards COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The study highlighted that there was moderate knowledge about transmission modes and prevention mechanisms. Similarly, there was moderate practice of measures that contribute towards the prevention of COVID-19 among these priority and high-risk communities of Addis Ababa. There is an urgent need to fill the knowledge gap in terms of transmission mode and prevention methods of COVID-19 to improve prevention practices and control the spread of COVID-19. Use of female public figures and religious leaders could support the effort towards the increase in awareness.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Etiopía/epidemiología , Femenino , Instituciones de Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Áreas de Pobreza , Prisiones , Instalaciones Públicas , Factores de Riesgo , Transportes , Adulto Joven
6.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211004289, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33771056

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: A contributing factor to racial and ethnic disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic may be the accessibility and acceptability of COVID-19 testing. Previous studies found that access to testing has not been equitable across several sociodemographic indicators. This study documents the preferred testing locations and examines differences across sociodemographic factors with a specific focus on race and ethnicity. METHODS: This study includes a primary analysis of cross-sectional data using a self-administered digital survey distributed to Arkansas residents using ARresearch, a volunteer research participant registry. The survey had 1288 responses, and 1221 met eligibility criteria for inclusion in the survey. Participants provided sociodemographic information and were asked to select up to 3 preferred testing locations from 12 options. Chi-square tests assessed differences in testing site preference across relevant sociodemographic groups. RESULTS: Participants preferred drive-through clinics as their top location for COVID-19 testing, with 55% reporting this was their preferred method of testing. This pattern was consistent across all comparison groups (ie, age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, insurance status). Significant differences in testing location preference were observed across age, race and ethnicity, and education, with the most differences observed across race and ethnicity. CONCLUSION: This study reveals that race and ethnicity are important to consider when deciding where to offer COVID-19 testing. The preferences for testing locations among the most vulnerable demographics will be used to develop targeted responses aimed at eliminating disparities in COVID-19 in Arkansas.


Asunto(s)
Actitud , Grupos de Población Continentales , Grupos Étnicos , Instituciones de Salud , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Arkansas , Comportamiento del Consumidor , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Disparidades en el Estado de Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Pandemias , Adulto Joven
11.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248272, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33690704

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease, which caused by a novel coronavirus. The disease disrupts health systems and resulting in social, political, and economic crises. Health professionals are in front of this pandemic and always work in a high-risk environment. The best prevention for COVID-19 is avoiding exposure to the virus. Some studies reported health professional's practice of precautionary measures for COVID-19. Nevertheless, a few have identified factors affecting. As such, this study aimed to fill those research gaps in the study setting. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 428 health professionals involved from the public health facilities of the Gamo zone, southern Ethiopia. A simple random sampling method employed, and the data collected by the interviewer-administered Open Data Kit survey tool and observational checklist. The data analyzed in Stata version 15, and a binary logistic regression model used to identify factors. In this study, a statistically significant association declared at P< 0.05. RESULTS: In this study, 35.3% (95%CI: 30.7%, 39.8%) of health professionals' had a good practice on precautionary measures for the COVID-19 pandemic. Use hand sanitizer or wash hands continuously with soap and water (68.9%), cover nose and mouth with a tissue during sneezing or coughing (67.3%), and use facemask in crowds (56.8%) were the most common practice reported by study participants. Marital status, being married (AOR = 1.84, 95%CI: 1.06, 3.18), good knowledge on the COVID-19 pandemic (AOR = 2.02, 95%CI: 1.02, 3.18), and positive attitude towards precautionary measures for the COVID-19 were factors showed significant association with the practice. CONCLUSIONS: The magnitude of good practice of precautionary measures for the COVID-19 pandemic among health professionals was low. As such, different interventions to improve the knowledge and attitude of health professionals in the health care system are highly needed to boost the practice and to advance service delivery.


Asunto(s)
/psicología , Personal de Salud/psicología , Equipo de Protección Personal/tendencias , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Etiopía/epidemiología , Femenino , Instituciones de Salud , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Conocimiento , Masculino , Máscaras/tendencias , Pandemias/prevención & control , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
12.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249214, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33770120

RESUMEN

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus. Despite strong efforts that have been taking place to control the pandemic globally, the virus is on the rise in many countries. Hence, this study assessed the maternal health care services utilization amidst the COVID-19 pandemic in West Shoa zone, Central Ethiopia. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 844 pregnant women or those who gave birth in the last 6 months before the study. A multi-stage sampling technique was used to select the study participants. The data were collected through face-to-face interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire. Logistic regressions were performed to identify the presence of significant associations, and an adjusted odds ratio with 95%CI was employed for the strength and directions of association between the independent and outcome variables. A P-value of <0.05 was used to declare statistical significance. The prevalence of maternal health service utilization during the COVID-19 pandemic was 64.8%. The odds of maternal health service utilization was higher among mothers who had primary (AOR = 2.16, 95%CI: 1.29-3.60), secondary (AOR = 1.97, 95%CI: 1.13-3.44), and college and above education (AOR = 2.89, 95%CI: 1.34-6.22) than those who could not read and write. Besides, mothers who did travel 30-60 minutes (AOR = 0.37, 95%CI: 0.23-0.59) and 60-90minutes (AOR = 0.10, 95%CI: 0.05-0.19) to reach the health facility had a lower odds of maternal health service utilization than those who did travel <30 minutes. Moreover, mothers who earn 1000-2000 (AOR = 3.10, 95%CI: 1.73-5.55) and > 2000 birrs (AOR = 2.66 95%CI: 1.52-4.64) had higher odds of maternal health service utilization than those who earn <500 birrs. Similarly, the odds of utilizing maternal health service were higher among mothers who did not fear COVID-19 infection (AOR = 2.79, 95%CI: 1.85-4.20), who had not had to request permission from husband to visit the health facility (AOR = 7.24, 95%CI: 2.65-19.75), who had practicedCOVID-19 prevention measure (AOR = 5.82, 95%CI: 3.87-8.75), and used face mask (AOR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.28-3.31) than their counterpart. Empowering mothers and creating awareness on COVID-19 preventionis recommended to improve maternal health service utilization during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Asunto(s)
/patología , Instituciones de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicios de Salud Materna/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , /virología , Estudios Transversales , Escolaridad , Etiopía/epidemiología , Femenino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Máscaras , Oportunidad Relativa , Pandemias , Embarazo , Clase Social , Adulto Joven
13.
Georgian Med News ; (310): 192-199, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Ruso | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33658431

RESUMEN

The purpose of the article is to reveal the essence and specific features of control and supervisory activities as means for preventing and detecting offenses in the health care sector on the basis of existing theoretical concepts and approaches. The research materials were political and legal opinion journalism, works of national scholars, analytical materials, reference publications, Internet resources and Ukrainian legislation regulating control and supervisory activities in the health care sector. The methodological basis of the article was formed by a set of general scientific (dialectical, etc.) and special (system and structural, structural and logical analysis, synthesis, etc.) methods of scientific cognition. It has been concluded that the main ways of ensuring the rule of law in the health care sector are control and supervision, which are distinguished in a number of characteristics, in particular, the subjects and the results of implementing both types of activities. State control in the health care sector carried out by state authorities (Ministry of Health, State Medical Service, National Health Service of Ukraine), and public supervision carried out by the representatives of the public in the health care sector (supervisory boards at health care institutions, the Council of Public Control under the National Health Service of Ukraine, etc.) have been characterized. The objects of state control and objects of public supervision in the health care sector in Ukraine have been specified and analyzed.


Asunto(s)
Sector de Atención de Salud , Medicina Estatal , Prestación de Atención de Salud , Instituciones de Salud , Humanos , Ucrania
15.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 237, 2021 Mar 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33663410

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers are usually the first responders during outbreaks and are instrumental in educating the populace about the prevention of different diseases and illnesses. The aim of this study was to assess the association between healthcare workers' characteristics and knowledge, attitudes and practices toward Zika virus. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study that collected data from healthcare workers at 3 medical facilities using a validated self-administered questionnaire between July 2017 - September 2017. Logistic regression models were used to examine the association between sociodemographic and knowledge, attitudes, and practices. RESULTS: A total of 190 healthcare workers were analyzed. Of these, 60, 72.6 and 64.7% had good knowledge, positive attitudes, and good practices toward Zika virus, respectively. Healthcare workers without a formal degree were less likely to have good knowledge of Zika virus (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0:49; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.24-0.99) compared to those with a formal degree. Reduced odds for positive attitude towards Zika virus were observed in healthcare workers with low income as compared to those with high income (AOR = 0.31; 95% CI =0.13-0.75). Being younger than 40 years old was associated with poor Zika virus practices (AOR = 0:34; 95% CI = 0.15-0.79). CONCLUSIONS: Significant association between healthcare workers' sociodemographic characteristics and Zika virus knowledge, attitudes and practices were observed. Public health interventions that seek to increase Zika virus awareness should aim to train healthcare workers who are younger, without formal degree and those earning low income.


Asunto(s)
Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Personal de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Virus Zika , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Instituciones de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Oportunidad Relativa , San Kitts y Nevis/epidemiología , Factores Socioeconómicos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Infección por el Virus Zika/epidemiología
16.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 447, 2021 03 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33673813

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, governments, health experts, and ethicists have proposed guidelines about ICU triage and priority access to a vaccine. To increase political legitimacy and accountability, public support is important. This study examines what criteria beyond medical need are deemed important to be perceived of priority COVID-19 healthcare access. METHOD: Two conjoint experiments about priority over ICU treatment and early COVID-19 vaccination were implemented in a probability-based sample of 1461 respondents representative of the Netherlands. Respondents were asked who should receive treatment out of two fictitious healthcare claimants that differed in in age, weight, complying with corona policy measures, and occupation, all randomly assigned. Average marginal coefficient effects are estimated to assess the relative importance of the attributes; attributes were interacted with relevant respondent characteristics to find whether consensus exists in this relative ranking. RESULTS: The Dutch penalize those not complying with coronavirus policy measures, and the obese, but prioritize those employed in 'crucial' sectors. For these conditions, there is consensus among the population. For age, young people are prioritized for ICU treatment, while the middle-aged are given priority over a vaccine, with younger respondents favoring healthcare for elderly claimants, while older respondents favor support for young cohorts. CONCLUSION: People who have no control over their social risk and are able to reciprocate to society are considered as more deserving of priority of COVID-19 healthcare. Our findings provide fair support for the implemented ethical guidelines about ICU-treatment and COVID-19 vaccines.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Cuidados Críticos/normas , Prestación de Atención de Salud/normas , Instituciones de Salud/normas , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/normas , Vacunación/normas , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Consenso , Cuidados Críticos/estadística & datos numéricos , Prestación de Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Instituciones de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Países Bajos , Pandemias , Guías de Práctica Clínica como Asunto , Vacunación/estadística & datos numéricos
18.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(10): 342-345, 2021 Mar 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33705366

RESUMEN

The World Health Organization and national guidelines recommend HIV testing and counseling at tuberculosis (TB) clinics for all patients, regardless of TB diagnosis (1). Population-based HIV Impact Assessment (PHIA) survey data for 2015-2016 in Malawi, Zambia, and Zimbabwe were analyzed to assess HIV screening at TB clinics among persons who had positive HIV test results in the survey. The analysis was stratified by history of TB diagnosis* (presumptive versus confirmed†), awareness§ of HIV-positive status, antiretroviral therapy (ART)¶ status, and viral load suppression among HIV-positive adults, by history of TB clinic visit. The percentage of adults who reported having ever visited a TB clinic ranged from 4.7% to 9.7%. Among all TB clinic attendees, the percentage who reported that they had received HIV testing during a TB clinic visit ranged from 48.0% to 62.1% across the three countries. Among adults who received a positive HIV test result during PHIA and who did not receive a test for HIV at a previous TB clinic visit, 29.4% (Malawi), 21.9% (Zambia), and 16.2% (Zimbabwe) reported that they did not know their HIV status at the time of the TB clinic visit. These findings represent missed opportunities for HIV screening and linkage to HIV care. In all three countries, viral load suppression rates were significantly higher among those who reported ever visiting a TB clinic than among those who had not (p<0.001). National programs could strengthen HIV screening at TB clinics and leverage them as entry points into the HIV diagnosis and treatment cascade (i.e., testing, initiation of treatment, and viral load suppression).


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por VIH/diagnóstico , Instituciones de Salud , Tamizaje Masivo/estadística & datos numéricos , Tuberculosis/terapia , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/tratamiento farmacológico , Infecciones por VIH/epidemiología , Encuestas de Atención de la Salud , Humanos , Malaui/epidemiología , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Tuberculosis/epidemiología , Adulto Joven , Zambia/epidemiología , Zimbabwe/epidemiología
19.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 272, 2021 Mar 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33736610

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant global public health problem. China has the second highest TB burden in the world. With a growing TB population with diabetes mellitus (DM), the TB control system faces mounting challenges. To date, evidence remains inconclusive regarding the association between TB-DM co-morbidity and delayed diagnosis of TB patients. This study aims to assess the diagnostic delay of TB patients with known DM and identify the factors associated with this delay. METHODS: Data was collected from China's Tuberculosis information management system in two counties of Zhejiang province, China. Patient delay, health system delay and total diagnostic delay are defined as follows: 1) the interval between the onset of TB symptoms and first visit to any health facility; 2) from the first visit to the health facility to the confirmed TB diagnosis in the designated hospital; 3) the sum of patient and health system's respective delays. Comparison of these delays was made between TB patients with and without DM using Mann-Whitney U test and Chi-square test. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing delays among TB patients with DM. RESULTS: Of 969 TB patients, 67 (7%) TB patients had DM co-morbidity. Compared with TB patients without DM, TB patients with DM experienced significantly shorter health system delays (p < 0.05), and there was a significantly lower proportion of patients whose health system delayed> 14 days (7.0% vs. 18%, p < 0.05). However, no significant difference was observed between both patient categories regarding patient delay and total diagnostic delay. The multivariate regression analysis suggested that TB patients with DM who were aged < 60 years (AOR = 3.424, 95%CI: 1.008-11.627, p < 0.05) and non-severe cases (AOR = 9.725, 95%CI: 2.582-36.626, p < 0.05) were more likely to have a total diagnostic delay of> 14 days. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that DM does not contribute to further diagnostic delay as expected. Instead, we observed significantly improved health system delay among TB patients with DM. The findings indicate the importance of early screening and diagnosis for TB among diabetic patients and of strengthening the integrated control and management of TB and diabetic programs.


Asunto(s)
Comorbilidad , Diagnóstico Tardío , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiología , Tuberculosis/diagnóstico , Adulto , Anciano , Distribución de Chi-Cuadrado , China , Femenino , Instituciones de Salud , Hospitales , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Morbilidad , Estudios Retrospectivos , Tuberculosis/epidemiología
20.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0247639, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33647034

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus-19 is a global health challenge and need an immediate action. Thus, understanding client's knowledge about SARS-COV2 causes, roots of transmissions, and prevention strategies are urgently warranted. Although there were global studies reported knowledge and preventive practices of COVID-19, but the information is not representative and inclusive for Ethiopia. Thus, the current study is done to identify the knowledge and the prevention strategies for COVID-19 among clients in South Wollo, Ethiopia. METHODS: An institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted from May 21 to 30, 2020 among clients seeking service in Dessie town health facilities. A total of 81 clients were included from the selected health facilities with simple random sampling technique. We developed measuring tools by adopting from World Health Organization and center for disease prevention recommendation manual for assessing service providers' knowledge and preventive practices. For data entry Epi-data 3.1 version was employed and further data management and analysis was performed using STATA Version 14. Student T-test and one way ANOVA were computed to see the mean difference in knowledge and practice between and among the group. Chi-square test was also done to portray the presence of association between different co-variants with client's knowledge and preventive practices. RESULTS: Findings of the study showed that more than half (56.8%) of the participants had good knowledge about its symptoms, way of spread and prevention of the virus. Furthermore, 65.4% of clients demonstrated five or more preventive practice measures of COVID-19. The mean preventive practice score with standard deviation was (4.75±1.28 from 6 components). In the current study, knowledge had no significant difference among sex, education status, and monthly income. However, COVID-19 transmission knowledge was significantly higher among urban residents. Thus, clients who were knowledgeable about way of transmission and symptoms of COVID-19 had significantly higher COVID-19 preventive practice. CONCLUSION: Our findings revealed that clients' knowledge and preventive practice of COVID-19 were not optimal. Clients with good knowledge and urban residents had practiced better prevention measures of the pandemic, signifying that packages and programs directed in enhancing knowledge about the virus is useful in combating the pandemic and continuing safe practices.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Administración de Instituciones de Salud , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Pandemias/prevención & control , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Demografía , Etiopía , Femenino , Instituciones de Salud/normas , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Población Urbana/estadística & datos numéricos
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