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1.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 310, 2019 Aug 14.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31412864

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Traditionally, the training of medical laboratory science students has taken place in the laboratory and has been led by academic and pathology experts in a face-to-face context. In recent years, budgetary pressures, increasing student enrolments and limited access to laboratory equipment have resulted in reduced staff-student contact hours in medical laboratory science education. While this restructure in resources has been challenging, it has encouraged innovation in online blended learning. METHODS: Blended learning histology lessons were implemented in a face-to-face and e-Learning format in a medical laboratory science program to teach tissue morphology and technical procedures outside of the traditional laboratory classroom. Participating students were randomly allocated to either the 'video' group (n = 14) or the 'control' group (n = 14). After all students attempted the e-Learning lessons and viewed expert-led video recordings online, students demonstrated their hands-on practical skills in the laboratory. Technical skills, demonstration of safety awareness, and use of histology equipment was captured by video through first person 'point of view' recordings for the 'video' group only. The 'control' group performed the same activities but were not recorded. Prior to summative assessment, the 'video' group students had a digital resource portfolio that enabled them to review their skills, receive captured feedback and retain a visual copy of their recorded procedure. RESULTS: Results showed that students who participated in the online video format had statistically better practical examination scores and final grades compared to the control group. CONCLUSION: Findings from this study suggest that students are engaged and motivated when being taught in a blended learning format and respond positively to the use of video recordings with expert feedback for the initial learning of hands-on techniques. For the academic, developing a blended learning medical laboratory science program, which includes annotated virtual microscopy, video demonstrations, and online interactive e-Learning activities, provides an effective and economic approach to learning and teaching.


Asunto(s)
Educación Basada en Competencias/estadística & datos numéricos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Retroalimentación , Ciencia del Laboratorio Clínico/educación , Estudiantes de Medicina , Grabación en Video , Prácticas Clínicas , Competencia Clínica , Humanos , Motivación , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud
2.
Sensors (Basel) ; 19(14)2019 Jul 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31336686

RESUMEN

The constant innovation in new technologies and the increase in the use of computing devices in different areas of the society have contributed to a digital transformation in almost every sector. This digital transformation has also reached the world of education, making it possible for members of the educational community to adopt Learning Management Systems (LMS), where the digital contents replacing the traditional textbooks are exploited and managed. This article aims to study the relationship between the type of computing device from which students access the LMS and how affects their performance. To achieve this, the LMS accesses of students in a school comprising from elementary to bachelor's degree stages have been monitored by means of different computing devices acting as sensors to gather data such as the type of device and operating system used by the students.The main conclusion is that students who access the LMS improve significantly their performance and that the type of device and the operating system has an influence in the number of passed subjects. Moreover, a predictive model has been generated to predict the number of passed subjects according to these factors, showing promising results.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/instrumentación , Adolescente , Niño , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Computadores , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Instituciones Académicas , Teléfono Inteligente , Estudiantes
3.
PLoS One ; 14(1): e0210947, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30657782

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: To improve patient safety, educational interventions on all system levels, including medical school are necessary. Sound theoretical knowledge on elements influencing patient safety (such as error management or team work) is the basis for behavioral changes of health care professionals. METHODS: A controlled, quasi-experimental study with repeated measures was deployed. The intervention group participated in a mandatory e-learning course on patient safety (ELPAS) between October 2016 and December 2016. The control group did not receive any didactic session on patient safety. In both groups we measured technical knowledge and attitudes towards patient safety before the intervention (T0), directly after the intervention (T1) and one year after the intervention (T2). Participants were 309 third-year medical students in the intervention group and 154 first- and second-year medical students in the control group. RESULTS: Technical knowledge in the intervention group (but not the control group) improved significantly after the intervention and remained high after one year (F(2, 84) = 13.506, p < .001, η2 = .243). Students of the intervention group felt better prepared for safe patient practice, even one year after the intervention F(2, 85) = 6.743, p < .002, η2 = .137). There was no sustainable significant effect on attitudes towards patient safety. CONCLUSION: This study shows, that eLearning interventions can produce significant long-term effects on patient safety knowledge, however, the study did not show long-term effects on attitudes towards patient safety. Our study implies two potential developments for future research: e-learning might be used in combination with face-to-face sessions, or more intensive (in terms of frequency and duration) e-learning sessions may be needed to achieve lasting changes in attitude.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Seguridad del Paciente , Adolescente , Adulto , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Alemania , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Estudios Longitudinales , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudiantes de Medicina , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto Joven
4.
West J Emerg Med ; 21(1): 78-84, 2019 Dec 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31913823

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: E-learning is widely used in medical education. To maximize the potential of E-learning tools, every effort should be made to encourage adoption by optimizing usability. We created Learning Moment (LM), a web-based application that integrates principles of asynchronous learning and learning portfolios into a platform on which students can document and share learning experiences that occur during clinical work. We sought to evaluate the usability of LM and identify features that optimize adoption by users. METHODS: We implemented LM in August 2016 at a busy, urban, tertiary care emergency department that hosts an emergency medicine residency, robust third and fourth year medical student clerkships as well as a physician assistant student rotation. We conducted a single-center, mix-methods study using the System Usability Scale (SUS) questionnaire and qualitative interviews. We sent e-mail invitations with subsequent reminders to all students who rotated in our emergency medicine clerkship from August 2016 to April 2017 to complete the SUS questionnaire anonymously and to participate in qualitative interviews. We employed purposive sampling to recruit students who used LM during their rotation to participate in our qualitative interviews. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 13 participants (10 individual interviews and one 3-person group interview) between January and March 2017 using an ethnographic approach and utilized a general inductive method to analyze and code for potential themes. RESULTS: Thirty of the seventy students invited to participate completed the SUS questionnaire (Response rate of 42.8%). The mean SUS score is 80.9 (SD 18.2, 80% CI 76.5 - 85.3). The internal consistency of the responses achieved the Cronbach's Alpha of 0.95. The participants stressed the importance of the following in the adoption of LM: maximal simplicity and usability, compatibility with learning preferences, and department-wide acceptance and integration. CONCLUSION: The overall perceived usability of LM was high. Our qualitative data revealed important implications for future designers to maximize adoption: include target users in every step of the design and development process to maximize simplicity and usability; build features that cater to a diversity of learning preferences; involve the entire department and find ways to incorporate the tool into the educational infrastructure and daily workflow.


Asunto(s)
Prácticas Clínicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación a Distancia/normas , Medicina de Emergencia/educación , Internado y Residencia , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Instrucción por Computador/normas , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicio de Urgencia en Hospital , Femenino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
5.
Clin Exp Optom ; 101(6): 771-777, 2018 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29895093

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The use of patient simulators in ophthalmic education appears limited. This study examines the effects of the addition of the 'Virtual Refractor' patient simulator learning activity into a short unit preparing students to determine the power of the spectacle lenses required by patients in a clinic. METHODS: Twenty-four year one optometry students were randomly assigned to either the simulator-intervention group (n = 12) or the non-intervention group. All students attended tutorials on refraction and the use of a refractor-head. Simulator-intervention students additionally attended a tutorial on the Virtual Refractor. All answered a questionnaire concerning time spent studying, perceived knowledge and confidence. Twenty-four short-sighted patients were recruited. Two refractions per student were timed and the accuracy compared with that of an experienced optometrist. RESULTS: Ten students from each group completed the study. Students who used the simulator were significantly (p < 0.05) more accurate at a clinical level (within 0.22 ± 0.22 DS, 95 per cent CI 0.12-0.32) than those who did not (within 0.60 ± 0.67 DS, 95 per cent CI 0.29-0.92) and 13 per cent quicker (4.7 minutes, p < 0.05). Students who used the simulator felt more knowledgeable (p < 0.05) and confident (p < 0.05), but had spent more time reading about refraction and practised on the Virtual Refractor at home for 5.7 ± 1.3 hours. CONCLUSION: The Virtual Refractor has many features of high-fidelity medical simulation known to lead to effective learning and it also offers flexible independent learning without a concomitant increase in the student time-burden. The improved accuracy and speed on first patient encounters found in this study validates the use of this patient simulator as a useful bridge for students early in training to successfully transfer theoretical knowledge prior to entering the consulting room. The translational benefits resulting from compulsory learning activities on a patient simulator can lead to reduced demands on infrastructure and clinical supervision.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación Médica/métodos , Enseñanza Mediante Simulación de Alta Fidelidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Optometría/educación , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Derivación y Consulta , Refracción Ocular/fisiología , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Pruebas de Visión/instrumentación
6.
Biomed Res Int ; 2018: 3196869, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30627548

RESUMEN

This study evaluates how medical students rate the different types of teaching materials and methods available as well as possible gender-specific differences in the use of such materials. In this descriptive, cross-sectional study a questionnaire with short, one-dimensional questions with a 4-step Likert scale was developed by a presurvey within 493 students (4th year) at a University Medical School (January-December 2015). The anonymous survey was performed from July 2016 to February 2017 with 252 students within an orthopaedic surgery course at University Medical School. After exclusion of (1) nonnative speakers and (2) incomplete forms, 233 samples were included. Practical education was regarded as the most important (n=160/68.7%) teaching method followed by Internet research (n=147/63.1%) as the most important teaching material, while traditional frontal teaching (n=19/8.2%) and e-books (n=11/4.7%) ranked last. The evaluation of gender-specific differences in the use of teaching materials showed that female students prefer to highlight text (p<0.0001) as well as a trend to Internet research (p=0.053) and small-group teaching (p=0.057). Despite some gender-specific differences, traditional learning methods retain their importance besides new learning possibilities such as Internet research.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Internet/provisión & distribución , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Curriculum/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Hábitos , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Masculino , Caracteres Sexuales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Enseñanza/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
7.
Nurs Res ; 67(1): 43-48, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29240659

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Measuring engagement and other reactions of patients and health professionals to e-health and e-learning interventions remains a challenge for researchers. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using a wireless electroencephalography (EEG) device to measure affective (anxiety, enjoyment, relaxation) and cognitive (attention, engagement, interest) reactions of patients and healthcare professionals during e-health or e-learning interventions. METHODS: Using a wireless EEG device, we measured patient (n = 6) and health professional (n = 7) reactions during a 10-minute session of an e-health or e-learning intervention. The following feasibility and acceptability indicators were assessed and compared for patients and healthcare professionals: number of eligible participants who consented to participate, reasons for refusal, time to install and calibrate the wireless EEG device, number of participants who completed the full 10-minute sessions, participant comfort when wearing the device, signal quality, and number of observations obtained for each reaction. The wireless EEG readings were compared to participant self-rating of their reactions. RESULTS: We obtained at least 75% of possible observations for attention, engagement, enjoyment, and interest. EEG scores were similar to self-reported scores, but they varied throughout the sessions, which gave information on participants' real-time reactions to the e-health/e-learning interventions. Results on the other indicators support the feasibility and acceptability of the wireless EEG device for both patients and professionals. DISCUSSION: Using the wireless EEG device was feasible and acceptable. Future studies must examine its use in other contexts of care and explore which components of the interventions affected participant reactions by combining wireless EEG and eye tracking.


Asunto(s)
Electroencefalografía/estadística & datos numéricos , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Telemedicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios de Factibilidad , Humanos , Proyectos Piloto , Automanejo/estadística & datos numéricos
8.
Nurse Educ Today ; 61: 112-119, 2018 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29197263

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The academic electronic medical record (AEMR) system is applied with the expectation that nursing students will be able to attain competence in healthcare decision-making and nursing informatics competencies. However, there is insufficient evidence regarding the advantage of applying mobile devices to clinical practicum. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to examine the effect of an experiment that introduced a mobile AEMR application for undergraduate nursing students in their practicum. METHODS: A quasi-experimental design was used. The subjects were 75 third-year nursing students enrolled in clinical practicum and were divided into an experimental (practicum with AEMR) and a control (conventional practicum) group. Nursing informatics competencies, critical thinking disposition, and satisfaction with clinical practicum were measured before and after the clinical practicum for each group. The usability of the AEMR application was also examined for the experimental group after the experiment. RESULTS: After the experiment, the experimental group showed a significant increase in the informatics knowledge domain of nursing informatics competencies in the post-test. The difference in critical thinking between the experimental and control groups was not statistically significant. Regarding satisfaction with the clinical practicum, the experimental group exhibited a significantly higher level of satisfaction in "preparation of a diagnostic test or laboratory test and understanding of the results" and "nursing intervention and documentation" than the control group. Students who participated in the practicum using the AEMR application considered it useful. CONCLUSIONS: The AEMR application was an effective educational method for practicing the immediate documentation of students' observations and interventions and was available at the patients' bedsides. To improve critical thinking, it is necessary to apply a variety of approaches when solving clinical problems.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Registros Electrónicos de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Aplicaciones Móviles/estadística & datos numéricos , Preceptoría , Estudiantes de Enfermería/psicología , Competencia Clínica , Computadoras de Mano , Bachillerato en Enfermería , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Informática Aplicada a la Enfermería , Adulto Joven
9.
Anat Sci Educ ; 11(5): 461-470, 2018 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29205947

RESUMEN

Allied health professionals concur that a sound knowledge of practical gross anatomy is vital for the clinician, however, human anatomy courses in allied health programs have been identified as high-risk for attrition and failure. While anatomists and clinicians agree that learning anatomy via human cadaveric instruction is the preferred method, students vary in their reaction to the cadaveric learning experience and have differing levels of anatomy self-efficacy. This study investigated whether student self-efficacy had an effect on student usage of supplemental instructional videos and whether the use of videos had an impact on student self-efficacy and/or learning. Anatomy self-efficacy differed based on gender and prior performance. Student usage of the videos varied widely and students with lower self-efficacy were more inclined to use the resources. The provision of the videos did not improve overall cohort performance as compared to a historical cohort, however, those students that accessed all video sets experienced a greater normalized learning gain compared to students that used none or one of the four sets of videos. Student reports and usage patterns indicate that the videos were primarily used for practical class preparation and revision. Potentially, the videos represent a passive mode of teaching whereas active learning has been demonstrated to result in greater learning gains. Adapting the videos into interactive tutorials which will provide opportunity for feedback and the development of students' self-evaluation may be more appropriate. Anat Sci Educ 11: 461-470. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.


Asunto(s)
Anatomía Regional/educación , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Autoeficacia , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adulto , Estudios de Cohortes , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Extremidad Superior/anatomía & histología , Adulto Joven
10.
Am J Speech Lang Pathol ; 27(1): 71-81, 2018 02 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29121195

RESUMEN

Purpose: This study provides a framework for understanding the range and diversity of simulation use, along with the benefits and challenges to the growth of simulation in university programs in communication sciences and disorders (CSD) across the United States. Method: A web-based questionnaire was developed and deployed to educators in undergraduate and graduate speech-language pathology and audiology programs in the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association EdFind database (N = 309). Responses from 44% (n = 136) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association-accredited CSD programs were analyzed. Results: Overall, 51% (n = 69) of respondents reported using simulations in clinical education. Of the 5 categories of health care simulation, programs most often employed standardized patients and/or computer-based simulations. Barriers to using simulations included a lack of knowledge, limited financial resources, undertrained faculty, and little guidance from accrediting bodies. A significant number of respondents (n = 66) agreed with the statement that simulated experiences could account for up to 25% of required direct clinical hours in speech-language pathology and audiology. Conclusions: Results of this study suggest an emerging acceptance of simulations as a method of augmenting clinical education within CSD programs. Expanding educational efforts and increasing opportunities for faculty training are essential in realizing the full potential of future professionals using simulations in CSD. Supplemental Material: https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5576296.


Asunto(s)
Audiología/educación , Trastornos de la Comunicación/diagnóstico , Educación Profesional/métodos , Simulación de Paciente , Patología del Habla y Lenguaje/educación , Competencia Clínica , Trastornos de la Comunicación/terapia , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Bases de Datos Factuales , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estados Unidos
11.
Anat Sci Educ ; 11(5): 471-477, 2018 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29236359

RESUMEN

Blended learning has become increasingly common in higher education. Recent findings suggest that blended learning achieves better student outcomes than traditional face-to-face teaching in gross anatomy courses. While face-to-face content is perceived as important to learning there is less evidence for the significance of online content in improving student outcomes. Students enrolled in a second-year anatomy course from the physiotherapy (PT), exercise physiology (EP), and exercise science (ES) programs across two campuses were included (n = 500). A structural equation model was used to evaluate the relationship of prior student ability (represented by grade in prerequisite anatomy course) and final course grade and whether the relationship was mediated by program, campus or engagement with the online elements of the learning management system (LMS; proportion of documents and video segments viewed and number of interactions with discussion forums). PT students obtained higher grades and were more likely to engage with online course materials than EP and ES students. Prerequisite grade made a direct contribution to course final grade (P < 0.001) but was also mediated by engagement with LMS videos and discussion forums (P < 0.001). Student learning outcomes in a blended anatomy course can be predicted the by level of engagement with online content. Anat Sci Educ 11: 471-477. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.


Asunto(s)
Rendimiento Académico/estadística & datos numéricos , Anatomía/educación , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación a Distancia/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/psicología , Curriculum , Empleos en Salud/educación , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Estudios Retrospectivos , Estudiantes del Área de la Salud/estadística & datos numéricos
12.
Am J Surg ; 215(1): 196-199, 2018 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28173937

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: We examined the types of technology used by medical students in clinical clerkships, and the perception of technology implementation into the curriculum. METHODS: An online survey about technology use was completed prior to general surgery clinical clerkship. Types of devices and frequency/comfort of use were recorded. Perceptions of the benefits and barriers to technology use in clerkship learning were elicited. RESULTS: 125/131 (95.4%) students responded. Most students owned a smart phone (95.2%), tablet (52.8%), or both (50%); 61.6% spent > 11 h/week learning on a device at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine for educational purposes. Technology use was seen as beneficial by 97.6% of students. Classes that used technology extensively were preferred by 54% of students, although 47.2% perceived decreased faculty/classmate interaction. CONCLUSIONS: Students use mobile technology to improve how they learn new material, and prefer taking classes that incorporate information technology. However, in-person/blended curricula are preferable to completely online courses.


Asunto(s)
Prácticas Clínicas/métodos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Curriculum , Cirugía General/educación , Internet/estadística & datos numéricos , Percepción , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Baltimore , Prácticas Clínicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Computadoras de Mano/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Aplicaciones Móviles/estadística & datos numéricos , Teléfono Inteligente/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
13.
Gerontol Geriatr Educ ; 39(2): 132-143, 2018.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27050439

RESUMEN

Mini Geriatric E-Learning Modules (Mini-GEMs) are short, focused, e-learning videos on geriatric medicine topics, hosted on YouTube, which are targeted at junior doctors working with older people. This study aimed to explore how these resources are accessed and used. The authors analyzed the viewing data from 22 videos published over the first 18 months of the Mini-GEM project. We conducted a focus group of U.K. junior doctors considering their experiences with Mini-GEMS. The Mini-GEMs were viewed 10,291 times over 18 months, equating to 38,435 minutes of total viewing time. The average viewing time for each video was 3.85 minutes. Learners valued the brevity and focused nature of the Mini-GEMs and reported that they watched them in a variety of settings to supplement clinical experiences and consolidate learning. Watching the videos led to an increase in self-reported confidence in managing older patients. Mini-GEMs can effectively disseminate clinical teaching material to a wide audience. The videos are valued by junior doctors due to their accessibility and ease of use.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador , Geriatría , Cuerpo Médico de Hospitales/educación , Recursos Audiovisuales/normas , Recursos Audiovisuales/estadística & datos numéricos , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Geriatría/educación , Geriatría/métodos , Humanos , Capacitación en Servicio/métodos
14.
Int J Behav Med ; 25(1): 17-29, 2018 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28730402

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to review the literature as this relates to theoretical perspectives of adherence to web-based interventions, drawing upon empirical evidence from the fields of psychology, business, information technology and health care. METHODS: A scoping review of the literature utilising principles outlined by Arksey and O'Malley was undertaken. RESULTS: Several relevant theoretical perspectives have emerged, eight of which are charted and discussed in this review. These are the Internet Intervention Model, Persuasive Systems Design, the 'PERMA' framework, the Support Accountability Model, the Model of User Engagement, the Technology Acceptance Model, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of IT and the Conceptual Model of User Engagement. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the review indicate that an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating a range of technological, environmental and individual factors, may be needed in order to comprehensively explain user adherence to web-based interventions.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Adhesión a Directriz/estadística & datos numéricos , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Difusión de la Información/métodos , Internet/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Humanos , Cooperación del Paciente/estadística & datos numéricos
15.
Int J Med Inform ; 107: 1-10, 2017 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29029684

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: E-learning web environments, including the new TELMA platform, are increasingly being used to provide cognitive training in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) to surgeons. A complete validation of this MIS e-learning platform has been performed to determine whether it complies with the three web quality dimensions: usability, content and functionality. METHODS: 21 Surgeons participated in the validation trials. They performed a set of tasks in the TELMA platform, where an e-MIS validity approach was followed. Subjective (questionnaires and checklists) and objective (web analytics) metrics were analysed to achieve the complete validation of usability, content and functionality. RESULTS: The TELMA platform allowed access to didactic content with easy and intuitive navigation. Surgeons performed all tasks with a close-to-ideal number of clicks and amount of time. They considered the design of the website to be consistent (95.24%), organised (90.48%) and attractive (85.71%). Moreover, they gave the content a high score (4.06 out of 5) and considered it adequate for teaching purposes. The surgeons scored the professional language and content (4.35), logo (4.24) and recommendations (4.20) the highest. Regarding functionality, the TELMA platform received an acceptance of 95.24% for navigation and 90.48% for interactivity. CONCLUSIONS: According to the study, it seems that TELMA had an attractive design, innovative content and interactive navigation, which are three key features of an e-learning platform. TELMA successfully met the three criteria necessary for consideration as a website of quality by achieving more than 70% of agreements regarding all usability, content and functionality items validated; this constitutes a preliminary requirement for an effective e-learning platform. However, the content completeness, authoring tool and registration process required improvement. Finally, the e-MIS validity methodology used to measure the three dimensions of web quality in this work can be applied to other clinical areas or training fields.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Cirugía General/educación , Internet/estadística & datos numéricos , Aprendizaje , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Mínimamente Invasivos/educación , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Médicos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
16.
Breastfeed Med ; 12(10): 629-636, 2017 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28926281

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Breastfeeding training has a crucial role in increasing healthcare professionals' attitudes and in improving professional support for breastfeeding. The collaboration between the Italian National Institute of Health, UNICEF, and the Local Health Authority of Milan has led to the development of an online course on lactation and infant feeding practices. AIM: To assess if the course was effective in improving healthcare professionals' attitudes and practices (APs). METHODS: We conducted a prestudy-poststudy, comparing users' APs before (T0) and after (T1) the course through a 20-item questionnaire. Changes in APs were analyzed using paired t-test. Lower mean differences indicated more positive attitudes and more frequent professional practices favoring breastfeeding. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 15.0. RESULTS: The course had 26,009 registrants and was successfully completed by 91.3% of users. The dropout rate was 8.7%. The final cohort was composed of 15,004 participants. The course improved attitudes, while minor changes were observed on practices (p < 0.05). Mean total attitude scores were 2.4 at T0 and 1.9 at T1, while mean total practice scores were 2.2 and 2.1, respectively. The main effects regarded the use of medications during breastfeeding (3.02 ± 1.29 at T0 and 1.88 ± 1.08 at T1) and the self-reported compliance with the International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes (2.29 ± 1.24 at T0, 2.03 ± 1.21 at T1). CONCLUSION: The noninteractive, high-coverage e-learning approach seems to be a useful tool for improving awareness and positive attitudes toward breastfeeding among healthcare professionals.


Asunto(s)
Actitud del Personal de Salud , Lactancia Materna , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación Médica Continua , Personal de Salud/educación , Servicios de Salud Materno-Infantil , Adulto , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Italia , Masculino , Servicios de Salud Materno-Infantil/normas , Embarazo
17.
Rofo ; 189(11): 1076-1085, 2017 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28934808

RESUMEN

Purpose New teaching formats are required to implement competency-based teaching in radiology teaching. Therefore, we have established and evaluated two practical competency-based radiological courses. Materials and Methods The courses were held in a multimedia room with 25 computers and a professional DICOM viewer. Students were taught basic image analysis and presented clinical cases with a DICOM viewer under supervision of an instructor using desktop monitoring software. Two courses (elective course and obligatory course) were evaluated by the students (n = 160 and n = 100) and instructors (n = 9) using an anonymized online survey. Results Courses were evaluated positively by the students and instructors. From the perspective of the students, the courses increased understanding of cross-sectional anatomy (elective/obligatory course: 97 %/95 %) and radiologic findings (97 %/99 %). Furthermore, the course increased the students' interest in radiology (61 %/65 %). The students considered this way of teaching to be relevant to their future occupation (92 % of students in the obligatory course). The higher incidence of teacher-student interaction and the possibility of independent image analysis were rated positively. The majority of instructors did not observe increased distractibility due to the computers (67 %) or notice worse preparation for MC tests (56 %). However, 56 % of instructors reported greater preparation effort. Conclusion Practical competency-based radiological teaching using a DICOM viewer is a feasible innovative approach with high acceptance among students and instructors. It fosters competency-based learning as proposed by the model curriculum of the German Radiological Society (DRG) and the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM). Key Points · Practical competency-based radiological teaching is highly accepted by students and instructors.. · Students report improved understanding of imaging anatomy and radiological findings.. · Interactive case presentation with a DICOM viewer fosters competency-based learning.. Citation Format · Koestner W, Otten W, Kaireit T et al. Competency-Based Teaching in Radiology - Implementation and Evaluation of Interactive Workstation-Based Learning to Apply NKLM-Based Content. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 1076 - 1085.


Asunto(s)
Educación Basada en Competencias/métodos , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Radiología/educación , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Interfaz Usuario-Computador , Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación Basada en Competencias/estadística & datos numéricos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Diagnóstico por Imagen/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Alemania , Enseñanza
18.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 25: 96-103, 2017 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28575755

RESUMEN

To record the variation of perceptions of midwifery faculty in terms of the possibilities and challenges related to the completion of their first online master's level programme in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Somaliland. The informants included in this phenomenongraphical focus group study were those well-educated professional women and men who completed the master's program. The informant perceived that this first online master's level programme provided tools for independent use of the Internet and independent searching for evidence-based information, enhanced professional development, was challenge-driven and evoked curiosity, challenged professional development, enhanced personal development and challenged context-bound career paths. Online education makes it possible for well-educated professional women to continue higher education. It furthermore increased the informants' confidence in their use of Internet, software and databases and in the use of evidence in both their teaching and their clinical practice. Programmes such as the one described in this paper could counter the difficulties ensuring best practice by having a critical mass of midwives who will be able to continually gather contemporary midwifery evidence and use it to ensure best practice. An increase of online education is suggested in South-central Somalia and in similar settings globally.


Asunto(s)
Educación a Distancia/métodos , Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería , Docentes de Enfermería/educación , Aprendizaje , Partería/educación , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Curriculum , Enfermería Basada en la Evidencia , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Masculino , Embarazo , Somalia , Desarrollo de Personal/métodos
19.
Med Educ Online ; 22(1): 1338504, 2017.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28621242

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: e-Learning resources have become increasingly popular in medical education; however, there has been scant research on faculty perceptions and use of these resources. OBJECTIVE: To investigate medical faculty's use of e-learning resources and to draw on practical implications for fostering their use of such resources. DESIGN: Approximately 500 full-time faculty members in 35 medical schools across the nation in South Korea were invited to participate in a 30-item questionnaire on their perceptions and use of e-learning resources in medical education. The questionnaires were distributed in both online and paper formats. Descriptive analysis and reliability analysis were conducted of the data. RESULTS: Eighty faculty members from 28 medical schools returned the questionnaires. Twenty-two percent of respondents were female and 78% were male, and their rank, disciplines, and years of teaching experience all varied. Participants had positive perceptions of e-learning resources in terms of usefulness for student learning and usability; still, only 39% of them incorporated those resources in their teaching. The most frequently selected reasons for not using e-learning resources in their teaching were 'lack of resources relevant to my lectures,' 'lack of time to use them during lectures,' and 'was not aware of their availability.' CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates a gap between medical faculty's positive perceptions of e-learning resources and their low use of such resources. Our findings highlight the needs for further study of individual and institutional barriers to faculty adoption of e-learning resources to bridge this gap.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Docentes Médicos/psicología , Adulto , Anciano , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Actitud hacia los Computadores , Instrucción por Computador/tendencias , Femenino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Percepción , República de Corea , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
20.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 208(6): 1256-1261, 2017 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28301204

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to assess the short-term impact of adding an interactive simulator to a medical student radiology clerkship. We hypothesized that transitioning students from passive observers to active participants in the reading room would create an appealing and effective learning experience for the current generation of students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An interactive workstation that provided diagnostic simulations of 84 cases selected to maximize exposure to important diagnoses in musculoskeletal (MSK) radiology was created. From February 2015 through July 2016, 83 students on the radiology elective rotated through MSK: 40 in the traditional observational role and 43 with the MSK simulator. At the end of the rotation, all students completed general radiology and MSK-based competency examinations. The students who used the interactive workstation completed a survey about their experience. RESULTS: MSK competency scores were significantly better for students who rotated with the interactive workstation compared with students in the traditional observational role (mean scores, 71% and 51%, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no difference in end-of-rotation general competency scores between the groups (mean, 86% and 85%; p = 0.32). Ninety-one percent of students reported the simulator had at least a moderately positive impact on their radiology experience. All students (100%) reported that learning was improved and recommended establishing workstations for other subspecialties. Twenty-one percent of students reported that their experience using the simulator had a positive impact on considering radiology as a career choice. CONCLUSION: Using a reading room-based diagnostic radiology case simulator improves medical student learning, enables self-directed learning, and improves overall experience on the radiology clerkship, positively impacting consideration of radiology as a career.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación Médica/métodos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Interpretación de Imagen Asistida por Computador , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Enseñanza , Interfaz Usuario-Computador , Adulto , Curriculum , Femenino , Enseñanza Mediante Simulación de Alta Fidelidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Missouri
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