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1.
Urology ; 135: 28-31, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31628969

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To address information overload for trainees, a concise electronic case-based urology learning program (CBULP) was developed. Previous qualitative assessments suggested CBULP's potential efficacy/utility. Herein we assess CBULP more stringently by evaluating test performance before/after reviewing a CBULP curriculum covering core concepts in testicular cancer. METHODS: Eleven of 33 CBULP testicular cancer cases were strategically selected for this curriculum. A 26 question multiple-choice test was developed to assess fundamental knowledge about testis cancer tumor biology and evaluation/management. Pretest was administered to PGY4/PGY1 residents at 2 pilot urology-training programs, and medical students interested in Urology. Participants were given 4 weeks to review the curriculum and the test was then repeated. A control group (4 PGY1s) was administered the pretest and repeat test in an analogous manner without provision of the CBULP curriculum. RESULTS: Twenty individuals took the pretest (7 medical students, 8 PGY1s, and 5 PGY4s), and 17 (85%) took the post-test (5 medical students, 8 PGY1s, and 4 PGY4s,). As expected, PGY4s performed significantly better than the other 2 groups on the pre- and post-test. However, significant improvement in test performance was seen across all groups that utilized the CBULP curriculum (P <.02), with highest increase demonstrated by PGY1 residents (4.75 more questions correct, P = .002). The control arm did not demonstrate significant improvement (P = .20). CONCLUSION: Significant improvement in test performance was observed after completion of the CBULP testicular series. This study suggests that CBULP can be an efficacious and clinically useful educational resource for urologic residents and students interested in the field.


Asunto(s)
Curriculum , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Neoplasias Testiculares/diagnóstico , Urología/educación , Adulto , Competencia Clínica , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Evaluación Educacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Estudiantes de Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Neoplasias Testiculares/patología , Neoplasias Testiculares/terapia
2.
Med Educ Online ; 24(1): 1679945, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31640483

RESUMEN

Background: Ensuring that learners acquire diagnostic competence in a timely fashion is critical to providing high quality and safe patient care. Resident trainees typically gain experience by undertaking repetitive clinical encounters and receiving feedback from supervising faculty. By critically engaging with the diagnostic process, learners encapsulate medical knowledge into discrete memories that are able to be recollected and refined in subsequent clinical encounters. In the setting of exponentially increasing medical complexity and current duty hour limitations, the opportunities for successful practice in the clinical arena have become limited. Novel educational methods are needed to more efficiently bridge the gap from novice to expert diagnostician. Objective: Using a conceptual framework which incorporates deliberate practice, script theory, and learning curves, we developed an educational module prototype to coach novice learners to formulate organized knowledge (i.e. a repertoire of illness scripts) in an accelerated fashion thereby simulating the ideal experiential learning in a clinical rotation. Design: We developed the Diagnostic Expertise Acceleration Module (DEAM), a web-based module for learning illness scripts of diseases causing pediatric respiratory distress. For each case, the learner selects a diagnosis, receives structured feedback, and then creates an illness script with a subsequent expert script for comparison. Results: We validated the DEAM with seven experts, seven experienced learners and five novice learners. The module data generated meaningful learning curves of diagnostic accuracy. Case performance analysis and self-reported feedback demonstrated that the module improved a learner's ability to diagnose respiratory distress and create high-quality illness scripts. Conclusions: The DEAM allowed novice learners to engage in deliberate practice to diagnose clinical problems without a clinical encounter. The module generated learning curves to visually assess progress towards expertise. Learners acquired organized knowledge through formulation of a comprehensive list of illness scripts.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Conocimiento , Aprendizaje , Modelos Educacionales , Competencia Clínica , Humanos
3.
Int J Med Inform ; 131: 103945, 2019 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31561193

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Electronic health information systems (HIS) are critical components of national health systems, and have been identified as a key element in the development and strengthening of health systems globally. Novel approaches are needed to effectively and efficiently train health care workers on the use of HIS. One such approach is the use of digital eLearning programs, either alone or blended with face-to-face learning activities. METHODS: We developed a novel blended eLearning course based on an in-person HIS training package previously developed by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We then conducted a pilot implementation of the eLearning course in Namibia and Tanzania. RESULTS: The blended eLearning pilot program enrolled 131 people, 72 (55%) from Namibia and 59 (45%) from Tanzania. The majority of enrollees were female (n = 88, 67%) and were nurses (n = 66, 50%). Of the 131 people who participated in the in-person orientation, 95 (73%) completed some or all of the eLearning modules. Across all three modules, the mean score on the post-test was significantly greater than on the pre-test (p < 0.001). When comparing results from previous in-person workshops and the blended eLearning course, we found that participants experienced strong learning gains in both, although learning gains were somewhat greater in the in-person course. Blended eLearning course participants reported good to very good satisfaction with the overall content of the course and with the eLearning modules (3.5 and 3.6 out of 5-point Likert scale). We estimate that the total cost per participant is 2.2-3.4 times greater for the in-person course (estimated cost USD $980) than for the blended eLearning course (estimated cost USD $287-$437). CONCLUSION: A blended eLearning course is an effective method with which to train healthcare workers in the basic features of HIS, and the cost is up to 3.4 times less expensive than for an in-person course with similar content.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Sistemas de Información en Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Personal de Salud/educación , Aprendizaje , Sistemas en Línea/estadística & datos numéricos , Recursos Humanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Namibia , Tanzanía
4.
Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw ; 22(9): 569-577, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31526296

RESUMEN

This study developed and evaluated an innovative six-session constructivist-based anti-cyberbullying e-course to raise Hong Kong college students' awareness of cyberbullying and increase their intention to help cyberbullied victims. A total of 144 undergraduate students (118 female students, 26 male students; Mage = 21.05, SD = 2.19) from a Hong Kong university were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 78) or control (n = 66) group. The intervention group participated in two 15-minute anti-cyberbullying online classes per week for 3 weeks. Participants in both groups completed five measures at the outset (T1) and end (T2, 5 weeks after the program): about their awareness of cyberbullying, likelihood, and intention to help victims, and self-efficacy to combat cyberbullying. At T1, there were no significant group differences on the five measures. Controlling for time spent on social networking sites, and previous involvement in cyberbullying, repeated-measures analyses of covariance revealed significant interaction effects for all five measures. Subsequent analyses indicated the intervention group had higher scores on the five measures than the control group. These findings show how the constructivist e-learning program promotes prosocial behavior and can reduce cyberbullying by challenging students' understanding of cyberaggression.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Ciberacoso/prevención & control , Internet , Estudiantes , Adulto , Femenino , Hong Kong , Humanos , Intención , Masculino , Estudiantes/psicología , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades , Adulto Joven
5.
Semin Vasc Surg ; 32(1-2): 48-67, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31540657

RESUMEN

The evolving demands of surgical training have led to the successful implementation of skills examinations in the areas of laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery. Currently, there is no similar formal skills assessment in vascular surgery, despite endovascular intervention replacing open surgery in treatment of many vascular conditions. The adoption of less invasive techniques to treat aneurysm and occlusive disease has resulted in new training paradigms and technical challenges for trainees. The duty hour restriction for trainees and declining numbers of complex open vascular interventions have added to the challenges of vascular surgery training. Simulation is a promising avenue for both skills training and assessment. The ability to evaluate the fundamental skills of trainees would be an important step to ensure a degree of uniformity in trainees' technical abilities. The role of simulation-based training in acquiring, testing, and refining these skills is still in its infancy in the vascular surgery training paradigm. This article aims to impart a deeper understanding of the conditions for developing and implementing the fundamentals of vascular and endovascular surgery, and to provide guidance regarding the role of simulation-based training in a rapidly evolving specialty. There are various forms of simulation available, including benchtop models, high-fidelity simulators, and virtual-reality simulators, and each requires a different method of proficiency assessment. Both open surgery and endovascular skills can be assessed and the application of successful implementation in academic vascular surgery training program is presented.


Asunto(s)
Certificación , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Internado y Residencia , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Cirujanos/educación , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Vasculares/educación , Certificación/normas , Competencia Clínica , Instrucción por Computador/normas , Curriculum , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/normas , Humanos , Curva de Aprendizaje , Entrenamiento Simulado/normas , Cirujanos/normas , Procedimientos Quirúrgicos Vasculares/normas
6.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 55(8)2019 Aug 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31387274

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience challenges with social interactions, a core feature of the disorder. Social skills therapy has been shown to be helpful. Over the past several years, computer-assisted and robot-assisted therapies have been infiltrating the social skills teaching environment. Rapid progress in the field of technology, especially in the robotics area, offers tremendous possibilities for innovation and treatment or even education for individuals with ASD. This paper's purpose is to drive awareness of these innovative interventions in order to support the social lives of children with ASD. The aims of the paper are identifying (1) the types of Information Technology platforms that are being evaluated in computer and robot-assisted therapies for children with ASD; (2) the various disciplines or professions studying and utilizing these computer and robot-assisted social skill therapies; (3) the outcomes being evaluated in each trial; and (4) if results demonstrate benefits to children with autism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PubMed, CINAHL, Science Direct, and Web of Science databases were searched for clinical trials published over the past five years. Search terms incorporated the subject intersection of autism, and computer or robot-assisted therapy. Results were mined for pediatric populations only and study designs establishing controlled comparisons. RESULTS: Eighteen unique international studies were identified that utilize robot interventions (11 studies) and serious computer game interventions (seven studies). Most demonstrated promising results in improving outcomes for children with ASD. Study implications reveal a rapidly evolving assistive technology for ASD social skills therapy. CONCLUSIONS: These interventions show considerable promise, but more effectiveness and cost effectiveness research of high quality should be carried out with larger numbers of children. Also, further studies are necessary to evaluate these technologies' effectiveness amongst adults with ASD and within unique subsets of the higher functioning autism population.


Asunto(s)
Trastorno del Espectro Autista/terapia , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Relaciones Interpersonales , Robótica/métodos , Trastorno del Espectro Autista/psicología , Instrucción por Computador/normas , Instrucción por Computador/tendencias , Función Ejecutiva , Humanos , Robótica/normas , Robótica/tendencias
7.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 408-413, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31408381

RESUMEN

Faculty dissatisfaction with diminishing levels of student engagement in lifestyle medicine sessions prompted this exploratory project that compared differences in students' substantive engagement in medical preclinical and clinical level lifestyle medicine sessions. The preclinical and clinical level sessions had the same learning objectives and learning tasks, properly aligned with that level of student learning, but were offered in different learning formats, either traditional classroom approaches or technology-enhanced approaches. At the preclinical level, we transferred a nonmandatory, face-to-face session to a nonmandatory, fully online session. At the clinical level, we introduced two novel technology tools. We utilized Zoom technologies, which afforded students the ability to access the session from anywhere, and employed Hickey's use of "promoting" student submissions as one method for increasing student-student interaction during the synchronous session. We used indicators of behavioral engagement of Henrie et al. (Henrie CR, Halverson LR, Graham CR. Comput Educ 90: 36-53, 2015) as the framework for determining applicable engagement behaviors, including attendance, assignment completion, interactions (responding/feedback/endorsements), and the quality of (and faculty satisfaction with) the face-to-face and/or online interactions. We expected to observe higher levels of engagement behaviors in the technology-enhanced approach and found that to be the case at both the preclinical and clinical levels, in both mandatory/nonmandatory and synchronous/asynchronous formats. However, it was the increase in both the level and substance of the students' interactions in the technology-enhanced sessions that provided surprising results. A review of the sessions with enhanced engagement highlight the role of student autonomy, a construct with strongly established associations to student motivation and engagement.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación Médica/métodos , Tecnología Educacional/métodos , Docentes Médicos/psicología , Satisfacción Personal , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Instrucción por Computador/tendencias , Educación Médica/tendencias , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Tecnología Educacional/tendencias , Humanos
8.
Glob Health Action ; 12(1): 1652022, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31411128

RESUMEN

Background: While setting international standards for midwifery education has attracted considerable global attention, the education and training of midwifery educators has been relatively neglected, particularly in low-resource settings where capacity building is crucial. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the expectations of midwifery educators in Bangladesh who took part in a blended web-based master's programme in SRHR and the extent to which these were realized after 12 months of part-time study. Methods: Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to collect data. A structured baseline questionnaire was distributed to all participants at the start of the first course (n = 30) and a second endpoint questionnaire was distributed after they (n = 29) had completed the core courses one year later. At the start of the first course, five focus group discussions (FGD) were held with the midwifery educators. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used for the analyses. Results: Midwifery educators who took part in the study identified expectations that can be grouped into three distinct areas. They hoped to become more familiar with technology, anticipated they would learn pedagogical and other skills that would enable them to better support their students' learning and thought they might acquire skills to empower their students as human beings. Participants reported they realized these ambitions, attributing the master's programme with helping them take responsibility for their own teaching and learning, showing them how to enhance their students' learning and how to foster reflective and critical thinking among them. Conclusions: Midwifery educators have taken part in a creative learning environment which has developed their engagement in teaching and learning. They have done this using a blended learning model which combines online learning with face-to-face contact. This model can be scaled up in low resource and remote settings.


Asunto(s)
Creación de Capacidad/métodos , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación de Postgrado en Enfermería/organización & administración , Docentes de Enfermería/educación , Internet/estadística & datos numéricos , Partería/educación , Teléfono Inteligente/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Bangladesh , Femenino , Grupos Focales , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Embarazo
9.
Can Assoc Radiol J ; 70(3): 320-326, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31300315

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: There is a lack of evidence for developing radiology mobile apps for medical students. This study identifies the characteristics which students perceive as most valuable to teaching radiology with mobile apps (m-learning). METHODS: An online anonymous survey was administered to second- to fourth-year medical students at a single institution. The survey, which was based on established theoretical framework, collected students' preferred content organization, content presentation, and delivery strategies. The Copeland method was used to rank student preferences and a 2-tailed t test was used to determine if student responses were related to their clinical experience, with statistical significance at P < .05. RESULTS: The response rate was 25.6% (163/635). For content organization, image interpretation (66.9%), imaging anatomy (61.3%), and common pathological conditions (50.3%) were selected as the most important. For content presentation, quizzes (49.1%) and case presentations (46.0%) were selected as the most useful. Students with clinical experience rated algorithms as more important (P < .01) and quizzes as less important (P = .03). For delivery strategies, ease of use (92.6%), navigation (90.8%), and gestural design (74.8%) were deemed the most applicable. CONCLUSION: This study documents medical students' preferences for m-learning in radiology. Although learner preferences are not the only feature to consider in the development of educational technology, these provide the initial framework for radiologists wishing to develop and incorporate mobile apps into their teaching.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/métodos , Educación de Pregrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Aplicaciones Móviles , Radiología/educación , Adolescente , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudiantes de Medicina , Adulto Joven
10.
Simul Healthc ; 14(4): 258-263, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31274828

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Immersive virtual reality (VR) simulation environments facilitate novel ways for users to visualize anatomy and quantify performance relative to expert users. The ability of software to provide positional feedback before a practitioner progresses with subsequent stages of examinations has broad implications for primary and allied healthcare professionals, particularly with respect to health and safety (eg, exposing to x-rays). The effect of training student-radiographers (radiology technicians), with a VR simulation environment was quantitatively assessed. METHODS: Year 1 radiography students (N = 76) were randomly split into 2 cohorts, each of which were trained at performing the same tasks relating to optimal hand positioning for projection x-ray imaging; group 1 was trained using the CETSOL VR Clinic software, whereas group 2 was trained using conventional simulated role-play in a real clinical environment. All participants completed an examination 3 weeks after training. The examination required both posterior-anterior and oblique hand x-ray positioning tasks to be performed on a real patient model. The analysis of images from the examination enabled quantification of the students' performance. The results were contextualized through a comparison with 4 expert radiographers. RESULTS: Students in group 1 performed on average 36% (P < 0.001) better in relation to digit separation, 11% (P ≤ 0.001) better in terms of palm flatness and 23% (P < 0.05) better in terms of central ray positioning onto the third metacarpal. CONCLUSION: A significant difference in patient positioning was evident between the groups; the VR clinic cohort demonstrated improved patient positioning outcomes. The observed improvement is attributed to the inherent task deconstruction and variety of visualization mechanisms available in immersive VR environments.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Tecnología Radiológica/educación , Realidad Virtual , Comunicación , Humanos , Posicionamiento del Paciente
11.
Eur J Oncol Nurs ; 41: 126-134, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31358245

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Parents have a desire and need for instructive support from healthcare professionals on how best to communicate a cancer diagnosis with their dependent children. Healthcare professionals lack confidence to initiate and facilitate parent-child communication, reporting the need for training. To address the evident gap, this paper outlines the planning, development and testing phases of an e-learning intervention, using a person-based approach. METHODS: The planning and development phases combined evidence from reviews of qualitative and quantitative literature, an expert group and data generated from primary research of two focus groups with frontline oncology professionals (n = 23) to develop the e-learning intervention prototype. An iterative approach was adopted with 14 'think aloud' interviews for prototype usability testing, resulting in continuous movement between data collection, analysis and modification of the e-learning intervention. RESULTS: Involving end-users throughout all phases of this process, optimised the intervention development. As a result, a communication framework on how healthcare professionals can initiate these conversations with parents was integrated, alongside role-play videos and original artwork by children expressing their views associated with parental cancer. During the testing phase, think-aloud interviews identified key navigational difficulties which were modified and resolved. Minor modifications were made to the content and 'look and feel' of screen pages. CONCLUSIONS: The systematic and iterative, person-based approach, yielded important and complementary insights to enhance acceptability of the e-learning intervention. Providing a detailed description of the foundations that underpinned the development of this e-learning intervention, promotes transparency in the planning and design process, therefore aids methodological rigour.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Personal de Salud/educación , Neoplasias/psicología , Relaciones Padres-Hijo , Padres/educación , Padres/psicología , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Adulto , Comunicación , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad
12.
Sensors (Basel) ; 19(14)2019 Jul 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31336686

RESUMEN

The constant innovation in new technologies and the increase in the use of computing devices in different areas of the society have contributed to a digital transformation in almost every sector. This digital transformation has also reached the world of education, making it possible for members of the educational community to adopt Learning Management Systems (LMS), where the digital contents replacing the traditional textbooks are exploited and managed. This article aims to study the relationship between the type of computing device from which students access the LMS and how affects their performance. To achieve this, the LMS accesses of students in a school comprising from elementary to bachelor's degree stages have been monitored by means of different computing devices acting as sensors to gather data such as the type of device and operating system used by the students.The main conclusion is that students who access the LMS improve significantly their performance and that the type of device and the operating system has an influence in the number of passed subjects. Moreover, a predictive model has been generated to predict the number of passed subjects according to these factors, showing promising results.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/instrumentación , Adolescente , Niño , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Instrucción por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Computadores , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Instituciones Académicas , Teléfono Inteligente , Estudiantes
13.
Sensors (Basel) ; 19(14)2019 Jul 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31337029

RESUMEN

This study investigated to what extent multimodal data can be used to detect mistakes during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training. We complemented the Laerdal QCPR ResusciAnne manikin with the Multimodal Tutor for CPR, a multi-sensor system consisting of a Microsoft Kinect for tracking body position and a Myo armband for collecting electromyogram information. We collected multimodal data from 11 medical students, each of them performing two sessions of two-minute chest compressions (CCs). We gathered in total 5254 CCs that were all labelled according to five performance indicators, corresponding to common CPR training mistakes. Three out of five indicators, CC rate, CC depth and CC release, were assessed automatically by the ReusciAnne manikin. The remaining two, related to arms and body position, were annotated manually by the research team. We trained five neural networks for classifying each of the five indicators. The results of the experiment show that multimodal data can provide accurate mistake detection as compared to the ResusciAnne manikin baseline. We also show that the Multimodal Tutor for CPR can detect additional CPR training mistakes such as the correct use of arms and body weight. Thus far, these mistakes were identified only by human instructors. Finally, to investigate user feedback in the future implementations of the Multimodal Tutor for CPR, we conducted a questionnaire to collect valuable feedback aspects of CPR training.


Asunto(s)
Reanimación Cardiopulmonar/educación , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Peso Corporal , Reanimación Cardiopulmonar/métodos , Instrucción por Computador/instrumentación , Curaduría de Datos , Bases de Datos Factuales , Educación Médica/métodos , Diseño de Equipo , Humanos , Almacenamiento y Recuperación de la Información , Maniquíes , Postura , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Tórax
14.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 43(3): 300-305, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31246511

RESUMEN

Basic life support (BLS) knowledge is a necessity for nursing students, as they have to deal with cardiac arrest events during their professional career. Existing studies indicate poor BLS knowledge among health science students, including nursing students. Learning BLS requires an understanding of basic sciences, such as anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry, subjects perceived to be difficult, resulting in misconceptions. Hence, a multimedia-aided instruction on BLS, supplemented with cooperating learning groups, was developed to assist nursing students in gaining correct BLS knowledge. A pretest-posttest designed for single cooperating groups was employed to evaluate students' achievements. Sixty-five undergraduate nursing students took the pretest and posttest that consisted of 10 open-ended questions, each designed to evaluate an aspect of their BLS knowledge. The results show significantly more students (60 vs. 20%) answered more questions correctly on the posttest compared with the pretest (P value <0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Thus the multimedia-aided instruction package enhanced undergraduate nursing students' understanding of BLS and also assisted to generate a positive perception of multimedia-aided instructions, supplemented with a cooperating learning group.


Asunto(s)
Reanimación Cardiopulmonar/educación , Reanimación Cardiopulmonar/métodos , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Bachillerato en Enfermería/métodos , Multimedia , Estudiantes de Enfermería , Humanos
15.
J Fam Psychol ; 33(7): 764-774, 2019 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31204818

RESUMEN

Adolescents with externalizing behaviors are at risk for multiple social and health impairments that may persist into adulthood. Although empirically supported treatments are available for teenagers with severe externalizing behavior and their families, only a few parenting programs have been evaluated for adolescents with subclinical levels of behavior problems. In the present randomized controlled trial (N = 75), we examined the feasibility and efficacy of the Parent-Web, a new Internet-based parenting program for parents of teenagers. Participants reported high satisfaction with the program, 74% completed all five modules and dropout was only 14%. Generalized linear mixed models showed short-term (8 weeks) improvements in parent-reported teenager externalizing behaviors, family conflicts, and family warmth compared to a waitlist control condition. Receiving the Parent-Web was also associated with more improvements in parent-reported teenage emotional symptoms and peer problems, as well as parental stress and depression. No differences regarding parenting behaviors between the two groups were found. Those in the intervention group maintained their posttreatment gains on primary outcomes at the follow-up assessment, 6- to 9-months after the program. Although limited by relying solely on parent report, and by a relatively small sample size, we conclude that our study contributes some preliminary evidence for the utility of supporting parents of adolescents at risk of developing behavior problems through an Internet-based intervention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Conflicto Familiar/psicología , Internet , Responsabilidad Parental/psicología , Educación del Paciente como Asunto/métodos , Problema de Conducta/psicología , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Niño , Estudios de Factibilidad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Proyectos Piloto
16.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 181, 2019 Jun 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31159793

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The concept of e-Learning has been rapidly accepted as an important component of medical education and is especially adept at teaching clinical skills. However, their impact on learning, particularly in Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery (OHNS) medical school curriculum, has yet to be adequately explored. The aim of this pilot study is to develop interactive e-Learning resources and evaluate their impact in enhancing OHNS teaching in medical school. METHODS: This pilot study is a randomized controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of e-Learning resources in enhancing the current traditional lecture and tutorial-based teaching of OHNS in medical school. Nineteen final-year medical students from the University of Sydney were recruited for this study, who were randomly allocated into intervention group with additional e-Learning resources (Group A) and control group (Group B). Student knowledge was assessed through objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) with use of standardized forms for objective scoring. Assessors were blinded to student randomization status. A post-study questionnaire was distributed to assess student feedback on the e-Learning resources. RESULTS: Eight students were allocated to Group A and 11 students to Group B. Group A performed significantly better than Group B in the overall examination scores (78.50 ± 13.88 v. 55.82 ± 8.23; P = < 0.01). With the minimum pass mark of 65%, the majority of students in Group A was able to pass the OSCE assessments, while the majority of students in Group B failed (87.50% v. 9.10%; P = 0.01). The post-test questionnaire on the e-Learning resources showed very favorable feedback from the students' perspective. CONCLUSION: Results from our pilot study suggests that the use of interactive online e-Learning resources can be a valuable adjunct in supplementing OHNS teaching in medical school, as they are readily accessible and allow flexible on-demand learning. Future studies involving large numbers of medical students are needed to validate these results.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador , Otolaringología/educación , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Instrucción por Computador/normas , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Proyectos Piloto , Enseñanza
17.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 178, 2019 May 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31151456

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Study motivation and knowledge retention benefit from regular student self-assessments. Inclusion of certainty-based learning (CBL) in computer-assisted formative tests may further enhance this by enabling students to identify whether they are uninformed or misinformed regarding the topics tested, which may trigger future study actions including instructor consultation. METHODS: Using a cross-over study design involving two out of thirteen computer-assisted formative assessments (CAFAs) of a first-year cell biology course, we compared student-instructor interactions, student learning experiences and final exam scores between two (bio)medical science student cohorts who worked with different CBL-containing CAFAs. RESULTS: A total of 389 students participated in the study. After completion 159 (41%) filled in a questionnaire on their experience with CBL during supervised CAFAs. In the control group the median duration of student-instructor interactions was 90 s (range 60-140 s), and this increased with 20 s to 110 s (range 60-150 s) in the group working with a CBL-based CAFA. The number of interactions was similar in both groups (0.22 per student per hour, regardless of CBL inclusion). Forty percent of the students expected that CBL would positively influence their study behavior, and 23% also anticipated a positive effect on examination scores. Student examination scores, however, were not affected by CBL. Almost half of the students (43%) were in favor of CBL inclusion in future computer-assisted learning modules, whereas 33% did not see merit in including CBL in CAFAs. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporation of CBL in a single formative assessment led to a slight increase in student-instructor interaction times, but had effect neither on the number of student-instructor interactions nor on exam scores. CBL inclusion positively influenced student's appreciation of the coursework, presumably by helping students to evaluate their mastery level and identify misconceptions. A more extensive enrollment of CBL beyond an individual formative assessment, throughout a course or a curriculum, may possibly reveal positive effects on study efficacy.


Asunto(s)
Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Estudiantes de Medicina/psicología , Adolescente , Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Estudios Cruzados , Femenino , Retroalimentación Formativa , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven
18.
Public Health ; 173: 50-57, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31254678

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore factors which mediated or moderated the effect of the Time2bHealthy online program for parents of preschool-aged children on body mass index (BMI) change. STUDY DESIGN: Mediation and moderation analyses of data from a two-arm parallel randomised controlled trial. METHODS: Randomisation was conducted after baseline measures. The intervention group received an 11-week online program, and the comparison group received emailed links to information from an evidence-based parenting website. Data on the primary outcome (child BMI), potential mediators (energy intake, fruit and vegetable intake, discretionary food intake, physical activity, screen-time, sleep, child feeding, parent self-efficacy or parent role-modelling) and potential moderators (child age, parent age, parent income, parent education or parent living situation) were collected at baseline, 3 months and 6 months. PROCESS macro for SPSS was used to analyse possible mediators and moderators on BMI outcomes. RESULTS: Despite significant food-related outcomes in the main analysis of this trial, no significant mediating or moderating effects were found for any hypothesised mediators or moderators. CONCLUSIONS: This study's null results could be explained by the high proportion of children in the healthy weight range, the study period not being long enough to detect change, the multicomponent nature of the intervention or the relatively small number of outcomes measured. Future childhood obesity interventions should continue to explore the effects of mediators and moderators on BMI and consider collecting data on a wide range of mediating and moderating factors to allow for comparison between studies to develop a better understanding of the factors contributing to successful interventions.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Estilo de Vida Saludable , Padres/educación , Obesidad Pediátrica/prevención & control , Obesidad Pediátrica/terapia , Índice de Masa Corporal , Peso Corporal , Preescolar , Dieta , Ejercicio Físico , Conducta Alimentaria , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Responsabilidad Parental , Conducta Sedentaria , Autoeficacia , Sueño/fisiología
19.
Thorac Surg Clin ; 29(3): 285-290, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31235297

RESUMEN

Education in all fields is vastly different today than it was 20 years ago. Constraints on time, access to clinical material and the speed of change mandate new more efficient approaches to education. Today, the Internet is a powerful tool that students and educators use to supplement or replace traditional learning. This technique, referred to as E-learning, can deliver a broad array of solutions that enhance knowledge and performance. We review some of the current applications of E-learning in cardiothoracic surgery and suggest some future applications that may further enhance the efficiency of cardiothoracic surgical education.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Aprendizaje , Cirugía Torácica/educación , Humanos , Internet
20.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 160, 2019 May 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31113441

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Social network analysis (SNA) might have an unexplored value in the study of interactions in technology-enhanced learning at large and in online (Problem Based Learning) PBL in particular. Using SNA to study students' positions in information exchange networks, communicational activities, and interactions, we can broaden our understanding of the process of PBL, evaluate the significance of each participant role and learn how interactions can affect academic performance. The aim of this study was to study how SNA visual and mathematical analysis can be sued to investigate online PBL, furthermore, to see if students' position and interaction parameters are associated with better performance. METHODS: This study involved 135 students and 15 teachers in 15 PBL groups in the course of "growth and development" at Qassim University. The course uses blended PBL as the teaching method. All interaction data were extracted from the learning management system, analyzed with SNA visual and mathematical techniques on the individual student and group level, centrality measures were calculated, and participants' roles were mapped. Correlation among variables was performed using the non-parametric Spearman rank correlation test. RESULTS: The course had 2620 online interactions, mostly from students to students (89%), students to teacher interactions were 4.9%, and teacher to student interactions were 6.15%. Results have shown that SNA visual analysis can precisely map each PBL group and the level of activity within the group as well as outline the interactions among group participants, identify the isolated and the active students (leaders and facilitators) and evaluate the role of the tutor. Statistical analysis has shown that students' level of activity (outdegree rs(133) = 0.27, p = 0.01), interaction with tutors (rs (133) = 0.22, p = 0.02) are positively correlated with academic performance. CONCLUSIONS: Social network analysis is a practical method that can reliably monitor the interactions in an online PBL environment. Using SNA could reveal important information about the course, the group, and individual students. The insights generated by SNA may be useful in the context of learning analytics to help monitor students' activity.


Asunto(s)
Instrucción por Computador/métodos , Educación Médica/métodos , Aprendizaje , Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas/métodos , Red Social , Estudiantes de Medicina , Rendimiento Académico , Humanos , Modelos Teóricos
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