Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 64.933
Filtrar
1.
Multimedia | Recursos Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA-SMS-SP | ID: multimedia-13014

RESUMEN

Orientações da COREMU SMS SP como estratégia de comunicação efetiva nos programas de Residência em Saúde. 2º Congresso Mineiro de Enfermagem ( 2ª CMENF).


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia/legislación & jurisprudencia , COVID-19
2.
Multimedia | Recursos Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA-SMS-SP | ID: multimedia-13012

RESUMEN

Vídeo apresenta a residência multiprofissional, normas institucionais e traz orientações dos programas de residências, entre outras informações.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia
3.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 122(2): e202310172, abr. 2024. tab
Artículo en Inglés, Español | LILACS, BINACIS | ID: biblio-1551321

RESUMEN

Introducción. La insuficiencia respiratoria es la causa más común de paro cardíaco en pediatría; su reconocimiento y el manejo adecuado son cruciales. La simulación se utiliza para mejorar las habilidades médicas. El objetivo del trabajo fue determinar la proporción de residentes de pediatría que reconocieron un paro respiratorio (PR) pediátrico en un centro de simulación. Métodos. Se realizó un estudio observacional con 77 médicos residentes. Se utilizó un caso simulado de un paciente con dificultad respiratoria que progresa a PR. Resultados. De los 77 participantes, 48 reconocieron el paro respiratorio (62,3 %). El tiempo medio para reconocer el PR fue de 34,43 segundos. Conclusión. El 62,3 % de los participantes logró reconocer el paro respiratorio. Entre aquellos que lo identificaron, el tiempo promedio fue de 34,43 segundos. Se observaron graves deficiencias en algunas de las intervenciones esperadas.


Introduction. Respiratory failure is the most common cause of cardiac arrest in pediatrics. Recognizing and managing it adequately is critical. Simulation is used to improve medical skills. The objective of this study was to establish the proportion of pediatric residents who recognized a respiratory arrest in a child at a simulation center. Methods. This was an observational study in 77 residents. A simulation of a patient with respiratory distress that progressed to respiratory arrest was used. Results. Among the 77 participants, 48 recognized respiratory arrest (62.3%). The mean time to recognize respiratory arrest was 34.43 seconds. Conclusion. Respiratory arrest was recognized by 62.3% of participants. Among those who did so, the average time was 34.43 seconds. Severe failures were noted in some of the expected interventions.


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Insuficiencia Respiratoria/etiología , Insuficiencia Respiratoria/terapia , Paro Cardíaco/terapia , Internado y Residencia , Competencia Clínica , Manejo de la Vía Aérea
4.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 16(1): e1-e5, 2024 Mar 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38572863

RESUMEN

South Africa is undergoing a significant shift towards implementing enhanced workplace-based assessment methodologies across various specialist training programmes, including family medicine. This paradigm involves the evaluation of Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) through comprehensive portfolios of evidence, which a local and national clinical competency committee then assesses. The initial phase of this transformative journey entails the meticulous development of EPAs rooted in discrete units of work. Each EPA delineates the registrar's level of entrustment for autonomous practice, along with the specific supervision requirements. This concise report details the collaborative effort within the discipline of family medicine in South Africa, culminating in the consensus formation of 22 meticulously crafted EPAs for postgraduate family medicine training. The article intricately outlines the systematic structuring and rationale behind the EPAs, elucidating the iterative process employed in their development. Notably, this marks a groundbreaking milestone as the first comprehensive documentation of EPAs nationally for family medicine training in Africa.


Asunto(s)
Educación Basada en Competencias , Internado y Residencia , Humanos , Educación Basada en Competencias/métodos , Sudáfrica , Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria , Curriculum , Competencia Clínica
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 382, 2024 Apr 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38589833

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Racism contributes to health disparities and is a serious threat to public health. Teaching physicians about racism, how to address it in medical practice, and developing high quality and sustainable curricula are essential to combating racism. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to (1) describe the experience of racism and anti-racism teaching in residency programs, and elicit recommendations from key informants, and (2) use these data and formative research to develop recommendations for other residencies creating, implementing, and evaluating anti-racism curricula in their own programs. METHODS: From May to July 2023, 20 faculty and residents were recruited via convenience sampling for key informant interviews conducted via Microsoft Teams. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded. An initial list of themes was developed using theoretical frameworks, and then refined using a grounded-theory approach. A brief online optional anonymous demographic survey was sent to participants in August of 2023.  RESULTS: Eighty percent (20/25) of participants approached were interviewed. Seventy-five percent (15/20) answered a brief optional demographic survey. Seven themes emerged: (1) Racism in medicine is ubiquitous; (2) Anti-racism teaching in medicine varies widely; (3) Sustainability strategies should be multifaceted and include recruitment, resource allocation, and outcome measures; (4) Resources are widely available and accessible if one knows where to look; (5) Outcomes and metrics of success should include resident- faculty-, patient- community-, and system-focused outcomes; (6) Curricular strategies should be multilayered, longitudinal, and woven into the curriculum; and (7) Self-reflection and discomfort are necessary parts of the process.  CONCLUSIONS: This study is one of the first to qualitatively examine perspectives of key stakeholders invested in anti-racism teaching for residents. The Support - Pipeline - Outcomes - Community (SPOC) Model, that was developed using information collected during this study, can be used in the future as a guide for others working to design and implement sustainable and high quality anti-racism curricula for residents.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Estados Unidos , Humanos , Antiracismo , Curriculum , Docentes , Salud Pública
6.
Cutis ; 113(2): 56-59, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38593091

RESUMEN

The information considered important for the holistic review of residency applications has expanded beyond numerical and discrete data such as grades, test scores, publications, and awards. To conduct such a thorough review requires time and the processing of large amounts of information, which invites the development of new tools to streamline application review. Artificial intelligence (AI) solutions may increase the efficiency of the review process as well as enhance the opportunity to find applicants who may have been overlooked by a traditional review process. These tools also may help applicants find programs that fit their career aspirations, practice interview techniques, and refine their written applications. With the introduction of new technology comes the need to also monitor for potential pitfalls, which will become more critical when adoption begins to accelerate, highlighting the need to both embrace and consistently reassess the use of these innovations in the residency recruitment process.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Humanos , Inteligencia Artificial
7.
Cutis ; 113(2): E12-E13, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38593098

RESUMEN

Dermatology residents experience a variety of challenging clinical encounters in their work. There are multiple factors that can contribute to the clinical situation to make it challenging-not only for the resident but also for the patient. Thankfully, there are several strategies published in the medical literature that may be utilized to mediate conflict resolution and de-escalate tension in the dermatology clinic.


Asunto(s)
Dermatología , Internado y Residencia , Humanos , Dermatología/educación , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
8.
Am J Disaster Med ; 19(1): 5-13, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38597642

RESUMEN

The emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic produced an unprecedented strain on the United States medical system. Prior to the pandemic, there was an estimated 20,000 physician shortage. This has been further stressed by physicians falling ill and the increased acuity of the COVID-19 patients. Federal medical team availability was stretched to its capabilities with the large numbers of deployments. With such severe staffing shortages, creative ways of force expansion were undertaken. New Orleans, Louisiana, was one of the hardest hit areas early in the pandemic. As the case counts built, a call was put out for help. The Louisiana State University (LSU) system responded with a faculty-led resident strike team out of the LSU Health Shreveport Academic Medical Center. Residents and faculty alike volunteered, forming a multispecialty, attending-led medical strike team of approximately 10 physicians. Administrative aspects such as institution-specific credentialing, malpractice coverage, resident distribution, attending physician oversight, among other aspects were addressed, managed, and agreed upon between the LSU Health Shreveport and the New Orleans hospital institutions and leadership prior to deployment in April 2020. In New Orleans, the residents managed patients within the departments of emergency medicine, medical floor, and intensive care unit (ICU). The residents assigned to the medical floor became a new hospitalist service team. The diversity of specialties allowed the team to address patient care in a multidisciplinary manner, leading to comprehensive patient care plans and unhindered team dynamic and workflow. During the first week alone, the team admitted and cared for over 100 patients combined from the medical floor and ICU. In a disaster situation compounded by staff shortages, a resident strike team is a beneficial solution for force expansion. This article qualitatively reviews the first published incidence of a faculty-led multispecialty resident strike team being used as a force expander in a disaster.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Desastres , Internado y Residencia , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Centros Médicos Académicos , Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos , Docentes , COVID-19/epidemiología
9.
Am J Disaster Med ; 19(1): 53-58, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38597647

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assess pediatric disaster medicine (PDM) instruction in emergency medicine (EM) residency programs and to identify barriers to integrating these skills into EM training. METHODS: National survey study of United States EM Residency Program Directors (PDs) and Assistant PDs during the 2021-2022 academic year. RESULTS: Of the 186 EM residency programs identified, a total of 24 responses were recorded with a response rate of 12.9 percent. Importance of training was rated 5.79 (standard deviation 2.51) using the Likert scale ranging from 1 to 10. Out of 24 programs, 17 (70.8 percent) do not have any PDM training as part of residency training. Live drill, simulation, and tabletop were identified as most effective methods to deliver PDM training with the Likert scale score of 4.78, 4.6, and 4.47, respectively. Senior trainees' level of -knowledge/skills with family reunification (Likert 2.09/5; chemical-biological-radiological-nuclear explosive 2.95/5) and mass casualty preparation of the emergency department (3.3/5) as assessed by the respondents. The main barrier to education included logistics, eg, space and costs (Likert 3.7/5), lack of didactic time (3.7/5), and limited faculty knowledge, skill, or experience (3.3/5). CONCLUSION: PDM training is lacking and requires standardization. This study highlights the opportunity for the creation of a model for EM resident education in PDM.


Asunto(s)
Medicina de Desastres , Medicina de Emergencia , Internado y Residencia , Incidentes con Víctimas en Masa , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Niño , Curriculum , Medicina de Emergencia/educación , Medicina de Desastres/educación , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
13.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 74(3): 489-493, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38591284

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To identify the predictable relationship and differences between perceived social support and psychological resilience among medical and surgical postgraduate residents. Methods: The analytical cross-sectional study was conducted from July to September 2021 at Dr Ruth K.M. Pfau Civil Hospital, Karachi, and comprised postgraduate medical and surgical residents of either gender. Data was collected using validated self-administered questionnaires. Data was analysed using SPSS 22. RESULTS: Of the 200 residents, 100(50%) were medical residents and 100(50%) were surgery residents. Besides, 161 (80.5%) were females and 39(19.5%) were males. The overall mean age was 27.57±2.13 years. Mean perceived social support score was 62.53±15.41 and mean score for psychological resilience was 70.40±13.73. Perceived social support was a significant predictor of resilience (p=0.0001). Medical residents scored significantly higher (p=0.034) on perceived social support compared to residents from surgery departments. Marital status, residency year, and birth order in the family significantly differed with reference to perceived social support and resilience (p<0.05). Conclusion: There was a favourable role of perceived social support in building resilience among postgraduate residents.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Resiliencia Psicológica , Masculino , Femenino , Humanos , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Apoyo Social , Hospitales , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
14.
Urogynecology (Phila) ; 30(4): 394-398, 2024 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38564624

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: In the field of obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN), the Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) administers an annual in-training examination to all OB/GYN residents as a formative educational tool for assessing medical knowledge and promoting self-improvement. Although the CREOG examination is not designed or intended for knowledge certification, many OB/GYN subspecialty fellowship programs request and use CREOG examination scores as a metric to evaluate fellowship candidates. Among the 57 gynecology-based urogynecology fellowship programs, 30 programs (53%) request CREOG examination scores to be submitted by candidates, as of March 2023. Although the use of CREOG examination scores as an evaluation metric may constitute a minor component within the fellowship match process, this practice fundamentally contradicts the intended purpose of the examination as an educational self-assessment. In addition, it introduces the potential for bias in fellowship recruitment, lacks psychometric validity in predicting specialty board examination failure, and shifts the CREOG examination from its original intention as low-stakes self-assessment into a high-stakes examination akin to a certification examination. For these reasons, we call upon the urogynecology community to prioritize the educational mission of the CREOG examination and reconsider the practice of requesting or using CREOG examination scores in the fellowship match progress.


Asunto(s)
Ginecología , Internado y Residencia , Obstetricia , Becas , Ginecología/educación , Obstetricia/educación , Evaluación Educacional
15.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 375, 2024 Apr 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38580954

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The burnout rates among residents urge for adequate interventions to improve resilience and prevent burnout. Peer reflection, also called group intervision sessions, is a potentially successful intervention to increase the resilience of young doctors. We aimed to gain insight into the perceived added value of intervision sessions and the prerequisite conditions to achieve this, according to residents and intervisors. Our insights might be of help to those who think of implementing intervision sessions in their institution. METHODS: An explorative, qualitative study was performed using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with both residents (n = 8) and intervisors (n = 6) who participated in intervision sessions in a university medical center in the Netherlands. The topic list included the perceived added value of intervision sessions and factors contributing to that. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded using NVivo. Thematic analysis was subsequently performed. RESULTS: According to residents and intervisors, intervision sessions contributed to personal and professional identity development; improving collegiality; and preventing burn-out. Whether these added values were experienced, depended on: (1) choices made during preparation (intervisor choice, organizational prerequisites, group composition, workload); (2) conditions of the intervision sessions (safety, depth, role of intervisor, group dynamics, pre-existent development); and (3) the hospital climate. CONCLUSIONS: Intervision sessions are perceived to be of added value to the identity development of medical residents and to prevent becoming burned out. This article gives insight in conditions necessary to reach the added value of intervision sessions. Optimizing preparation, meeting prerequisite conditions, and establishing a stimulating hospital climate are regarded as key to achieve this.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Profesional , Internado y Residencia , Resiliencia Psicológica , Humanos , Investigación Cualitativa , Grupos Focales , Centros Médicos Académicos , Agotamiento Profesional/prevención & control
16.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 377, 2024 Apr 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38580978

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has left no one untouched. Resident trainees have been driven to reconsider virtually every component of their daily lives. The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Obstetrics and Gynecology (OBGYN) residency training and education. METHODS: A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted between 2/2022 and 5/2022. A survey was created and distributed to OBGYN residents. The survey queried the effects of the pandemic on OBGYN residents' procedure skills training and mental health. RESULTS: A total of 95 OBGYN residents across programs affiliated with each American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) district participated in the survey. Among them, just over half (n = 52, 55%) self-identified as under-represented minorities. A significant majority, 80% (n = 81), felt their gynecological training was inadequate, with 70% of fourth-year residents expressing a lack of confidence in their ability to independently practice gynecology after graduation. This lack of confidence among fourth-year residents suggests a notable disparity in readiness for independent gynecological practice, linked to meeting ACGME requirements before completing their residency (p = 0.013). Among the residents who reported a negative impact of the pandemic on their mental health (n = 76, 80%), about 40% (n = 31) had contemplated self-harm or knew a colleague who considered or attempted suicide (p < 0.001). This issue was especially pronounced in residents experiencing burnout (n = 44, 46%), as nearly half (n = 19, 43%) reported suicidal thoughts or knew someone in their program who had such thoughts or engaged in self-harm (p = 0.048). CONCLUSIONS: Residents expressed concerns about reduced hands-on gynecological training and doubts about their readiness for independent practice post-residency, highlighting the need for enhanced support through mentorship and revised training curriculums. Additionally, despite the availability of mental health resources to address pandemic-induced burnout, their underuse suggests a need for more accessible time for residents to use at their discretion and flexible training schedules that encourage mental health support resource utilization.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Ginecología , Internado y Residencia , Obstetricia , Femenino , Embarazo , Humanos , Pandemias , Estudios Transversales , Máscaras , Proyectos Piloto , COVID-19/epidemiología , Ginecología/educación , Obstetricia/educación , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
17.
J Frailty Aging ; 13(2): 189-192, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38616377

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Knowledge of frailty is essential for meeting the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies for US trainees. The UK General Medical Council requires that frailty be included in undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula. Trainees are expected to appropriately modify care plans and help make patient-centered decisions, while incorporating diagnostic uncertainty, such as frailty, in older adults. Little is known about current needs for frailty instruction in graduate medical education in the US and beyond. OBJECTIVE: We sought to capture faculty perceptions on how frailty should be defined and identified, and what aspects and level of detail should be taught to residents. DESIGN: The authors developed a 4-item short response questionnaire, and faculty had the option to respond via electronic survey or via semi-structured interviews. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: Respondents included 24 fellowship-trained geriatricians based at 6 different academic medical centers in a single urban metropolitan area. METHODS: An invitation to participate in either an electronic survey or semi-structured virtual interview was e-mailed to 30 geriatricians affiliated with an academic multi-campus Geriatric Medicine fellowship. Responses were transcribed and coded independently by two authors. RESULTS: Responses were received from 24 geriatricians via a combination of digital questionnaires (n=18) and semi-structured online interviews (n=6), for a response rate of 80%. Responses revealed significant diversity of opinion on how to define and identify frailty and how these concepts should be taught. CONCLUSIONS: As frailty is increasingly incorporated into clinical practice, consensus is needed on how to define and teach frailty to residents.


Asunto(s)
Fragilidad , Geriatría , Internado y Residencia , Humanos , Anciano , Evaluación de Necesidades , Fragilidad/diagnóstico , Docentes
18.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0301502, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38603669

RESUMEN

Duty hour regulations (DHRs) were enforced in 2017 in Korea to prevent the detrimental effects of excessively prolonged working hours among medical residents. We investigated the adoption of and implications of the new DHRs among medical residents and faculty members. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 medical residents and 9 faculty members across general surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics-gynecology, and pediatrics departments at Chonnam National University Hospital. Based on the constructivist grounded theory, we developed themes from the data by concurrent coding and analysis with theoretical sampling until data saturation. In addition, respondent validation was used to ensure accuracy, and all authors remained reflexive throughout the study to improve validity. The methods of DHRs adoption among residents and faculty members included the following 4 themes: DHRs improved work schedule, residents have more time to learn on their own, clinical departments have come to distribute work, organization members have strived to improve patient safety. Residents have undertaken initial steps towards creating a balance between personal life and work. Teamwork and shift within the same team are the transitions that minimize discontinuity of patient care considering patient safety. Teaching hospitals, including faculty members, should ensure that residents' work and education are balanced with appropriate clinical experience and competency-based training.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Carga de Trabajo , Niño , Humanos , Admisión y Programación de Personal , Docentes Médicos , República de Corea
19.
Clinics (Sao Paulo) ; 79: 100351, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38574574

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the rate of surgical complications is higher during the first semester of the General Surgery residency in the largest hospital complex in Latin America. During this period, students are expected to have less experience in carrying out procedures. METHODS: During a period of two years, all General Surgery resident doctors at the Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo, made a notification of all the procedures they performed (n = 14.063), containing information such as name of the procedure, date, who participated, complications, among others. These data were analyzed with the purpose of evaluating the variation in the rate of complications throughout the year. RESULTS: There was a 52 % increase in the rate of complications in the first academic semester when compared to the second semester. This phenomenon was observed in resident doctors in the first and second years of residency. Furthermore, it was observed that second-year residents remain with high rates of complications, in some procedures, for a longer time than first-year residents. Furthermore, the first three months (March, April and May) seem to have the highest complication rates of the entire year. CONCLUSION: The impact of these complications can affect several health services and the increase in surgical complications in the first half of the year must be monitored by institutions, in order to control this phenomenon.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Medicina , Humanos , Competencia Clínica
20.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0301636, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38593142

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Burnout is a work-related syndrome that can affect physicians' performance. Empathy is one of the clinical competencies in whose formation many factors play a role. Empathy and burnout are important topics of research in medical sciences, and both are related to the communication between the patient and the physician. This study investigated the relationship between occupational burnout and empathy among medical residents. METHOD: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 297 medical residents in Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences from January to March 2021. The data collection tools were the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The reliability of the instruments was measured by calculating Cronbach's alpha. Data were analyzed by SPSS-18, using the Pearson correlation test and linear regression models. RESULTS: The average age of the study population was 33.06 ±4.7 years, with more than half being females (57.6%) and married (51.9%). The residents' mean scores of empathy and overall burnout were 102.87 out of 140 and 55.90 out of 132, respectively. The burnout scores showed an inverse correlation with the overall empathy scores (r = -0.123, P = 0.035), and the score of standing in the patient's shoes (r = -0.165, P = 0.004). Linear regression test was used to detect which dimension of empathy was a better predictor for the reduction of burnout scores. Results showed that the best predictor was standing in the patient's shoes (P = 0.014). CONCLUSION: The findings showed a negative association between empathy and burnout among medical residents, which suggests the need for adjustment of the existing burnout management at the institutional level. Therefore, residents should be supported by managers to reduce burnout and improve their empathic behavior.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Profesional , Internado y Residencia , Pruebas Psicológicas , Autoinforme , Femenino , Humanos , Adulto , Masculino , Empatía , Estudios Transversales , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
SELECCIÓN DE REFERENCIAS
DETALLE DE LA BÚSQUEDA
...