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1.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2024115, 2022 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34994682

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: As part of a quality improvement project, we developed and employed an observation checklist to measure patient-centered behaviors during daily rounds to assess the frequency of patient-centered behaviors among a patient-centered care (PCC) team and standard team (ST) rounds. PATIENTS AND METHODS: On four general medicine service (GMS) teaching teams at an urban academic medical center in which housestaff rotate, we utilized an observation checklist to assess the occurrence of eight behaviors on inpatient daily rounds. The checklist covered domains of patient-centered communication, etiquette-based behaviors, and shared decision-making. One GMS team is guided by a PCC curriculum that emphasizes patient-centered communication strategies, but not specifically behaviors during bedside rounds. RESULTS: Between August 2018 and May 2019 a trained observer completed 448 observations of patient rounding encounters using the checklist. Across all teams, 46.0% of the 8 behaviors were performed when possible, with more done on the PCC team (58.0%) than ST (42.0%), p < 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Performance of patient-centered behaviors during daily rounds was low overall. Despite having no specific instruction on daily rounds, patient-centered behaviors were more frequent among the teams which were part of a PCC curriculum. However, the frequency of observed behaviors was modest, suggesting that more explicit efforts to change rounding behaviors are needed. Our observational checklist may be a tool to assist in future interventions to improve patient-centered behaviors on daily rounds.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Rondas de Enseñanza , Centros Médicos Académicos , Humanos , Grupo de Atención al Paciente , Atención Dirigida al Paciente
2.
Can J Rural Med ; 27(1): 9-15, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34975111

RESUMEN

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to identify, through self-assessment, how comfortable rural emergency medicine (EM) physicians are in treating critically ill trauma patients, the resources available to treat such patients and their comfort with performing trauma procedures. Methods: An anonymous self-assessment survey was e-mailed to family physicians practising rural EM in Saskatchewan regarding training, hospital resources, demographics and self-reported comfort with rural trauma management. We included physicians who had provided EM care within the past year in Saskatchewan outside of the major trauma centres. Comfort was measured on a Likert scale. Results: One hundred thirteen physicians out of a total of 479 physicians contacted agreed to participate (23.6%). Thirty-nine percent (n = 31) of respondents were comfortable with paediatric trauma, and 46% (n = 37) were comfortable with vascular trauma. Nineteen percent (n = 15) were comfortable with pericardiocentesis and 25% (n = 19) were comfortable with cricothyroidotomy. In the past 12 months, 21% (n = 17) had performed paediatric endotracheal intubation, 1.3% (n = 1) had performed cricothyroidotomy, 28.8% (n = 23) had performed needle thoracentesis and 20% (n = 16) had performed central venous line access. Those who did their residency training outside of Canada were more comfortable with overall trauma care. Those who had taken emergency department echo were generally more comfortable with trauma procedures. Those who had current advanced trauma life support were more comfortable with less frequently encountered aspects of trauma care. Conclusions: This self-assessment helped us identify which aspects of rural trauma medicine are the most challenging for rural practitioners. It gave us an understanding of the procedures related to trauma medicine that are the most difficult, which critical resources are available and where training could be focused to benefit rural emergency physicians.


Résumé Introduction: Cette étude avait pour but d'identifier, par l'entremise d'une auto-évaluation, l'aisance des urgentologues en milieu rural à traiter les patients polytraumatisés en état critique, les ressources disponibles pour traiter ces patients et l'aisance avec laquelle ils exécutent les interventions de traumatologie. Méthodes: Un questionnaire d'auto-évaluation anonyme a été envoyé par courriel aux médecins de famille qui pratiquent dans les services d'urgence ruraux de la Saskatchewan; le questionnaire portait sur la formation, les ressources hospitalières, les paramètres démographiques et l'aisance rapportée par les répondants quant à la prise en charge des traumatismes en milieu rural. Nous avons inclus les médecins qui avaient dispensé dans l'année écoulée des soins d'urgence à l'extérieur des grands centres de traumatologie en Saskatchewan. L'aisance était mesurée sur une échelle Likert. Résultats: Sur un total de 479 médecins contactés, 113 ont consenti à participer (23.6%). Trente-neuf pour cent (n = 31) des répondants étaient à l'aise avec les traumatismes pédiatriques et 46% (n = 37) avec les traumatismes vasculaires. Dix-neuf pour cent (n = 15) étaient à l'aise avec la ponction péricardique et 25% (n = 19) avec la cricothyroïdotomie. Dans les 12 mois écoulés, 21% (n = 17) avaient exécuté une intubation endotrachéale pédiatrique, 1.3% (n = 1) une cricothyroïdotomie, 28,8% (n = 23) une thoracentèse à l'aiguille et 20% (n = 16) un accès veineux central. Les médecins qui avaient reçu leur formation en résidence à l'extérieur du Canada étaient plus à l'aise avec les soins de traumatologie en général. Les médecins qui avaient suivi le cours d'échographie du département d'urgence étaient en général plus à l'aise avec les interventions de traumatologie. Les médecins qui avaient une certification advanced trauma life support étaient plus à l'aise avec les aspects moins fréquents des soins de traumatologie. Conclusions: Cette auto-évaluation nous a aidés à déterminer quels aspects de la médecine de traumatologie rurale sont les plus problématiques pour les praticiens en milieu rural. Elle nous a permis de comprendre quelles sont les interventions de traumatologie qui sont les plus difficiles, quelles ressources essentielles sont disponibles et sur quels aspects la formation doit se concentrer pour profiter aux urgentologues en milieu rural. Mots-clés: prise en charge des traumatismes en milieu rural, médecine de traumatologie rurale, Trauma, rural, médecine d'urgence.


Asunto(s)
Medicina de Emergencia , Internado y Residencia , Médicos , Niño , Humanos , Saskatchewan , Autoevaluación (Psicología)
3.
J Trauma Nurs ; 29(1): 29-33, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35007248

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Training for trauma procedures has been limited to infrequent courses with little data on longitudinal performance, and few address procedural and leadership skills with granular assessment. We implemented a novel training program that emphasized an assessment of trauma resuscitation and procedural skills. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine whether this program could demonstrate improvement in both skill sets in surgical trainees over time. METHODS: This was a prospective, observational study at a Level I trauma center between November 2018 and May 2019. A procedural skill and simulation program was implemented to train and evaluate postgraduate year (PGY) 1-5 residents. All residents participated in an initial course on procedures such as tube thoracostomy and vascular access, followed by a final evaluation. Skills were assessed by the Likert scale (1-5, 5 noting mastery). PGY 3s and above were additionally evaluated on resuscitation. A paired t test was performed on repeat learners. RESULTS: A total of 40 residents participated in the structured procedural skills and simulation program. Following completion of the program, PGY-2 scores increased from a Mdn [interquartile range, IQR] 3.0 [2.5-4.0] to 4.5 [4.2-4.5]. The PGY-3 scores increased from a Mdn [IQR] 3.95 [3.7-4.6] to 4.8 [4.6-5.0]. Eighteen residents underwent repeat simulation training, with Mdn [IQR] score increases in PGY 2s (3.7 [2.5-4.0] to end score 4.47 [4.0-4.5], p = .03) and PGY 3s (3.95 [3.7-4.6] to end score 4.81 [4.68-5.0], p = .04). Specific procedural and leadership skills also increased over time.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Entrenamiento Simulado , Competencia Clínica , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Liderazgo , Estudios Prospectivos
4.
Brain Nerve ; 74(1): 22-24, 2022 Jan.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34992165

RESUMEN

"Nontechnical skills," such as resilience, communication, management, information literacy, and educational capability, are required to be an the effective neurologist. Neurology residents should learn nontechnical skills in their residency programs.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Neurología , Competencia Clínica , Comunicación , Humanos
5.
Brain Nerve ; 74(1): 33-35, 2022 Jan.
Artículo en Japonés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34992168

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on neurology residency education and services in the United States. The responsibility of residents was shifted from traditional house staff to frontline providers in the face of the pandemic. As such, a dynamic and rapid transformation was required, involving the development of strong leadership and teamwork skills, while protecting patients and providers from infection and ensuring the quality of education and training. Because of the increased demand from inpatient care and the risk of potential exposure to the virus, a modified rotation schedule was implemented by removing residents from outpatient clinics and minimizing their role in inpatient services. In order to maintain social distances, didactic lectures were conducted only via online platforms, and outpatients were only provided telemedicine. Although the pandemic has taken some of the in-person educational opportunities from residents, innovative changes including video conferences and telemedicine will likely continue to be used as a useful mode of medical training for residents. Herein, the author reports the changes made to the neurology residency program in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the evolution of leadership roles during this unprecedented time.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Internado y Residencia , Neurología , Humanos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Estados Unidos
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 7, 2022 Jan 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980087

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is a noninvasive bedside tool with many pediatric applications but is not currently a formal part of pediatric training and practice. Formal surveys of general pediatricians regarding POCUS training are lacking. We aimed to quantify the baseline ultrasound experience and training needs of general pediatricians and pediatric residents across different practice settings. METHODS: In 2020, we sent an online survey to 485 current faculty, residents, and graduates from an urban pediatric academic medical center in Northern California. Pediatric subspecialists were excluded. Survey questions about baseline experience, comfort, and perceived usefulness of 20 common POCUS applications were developed by two POCUS experts using existing literature. Chi-squared analysis was used to compare residents versus attendings and to compare attendings practicing in inpatient versus outpatient versus mixed settings. RESULTS: Response rate was 20% (98/485). Compared to attendings (n = 73), residents (n = 25) endorsed more exposure to POCUS in medical school (32% vs 5%, p = 0.003) and residency (12% vs 5%, p = 0.003). Respondents endorsed low comfort with POCUS (mean 1.3 out of 5 on Likert scale). Of 20 procedural and diagnostic applications, respondents identified abscess drainage, bladder catheterization, soft tissue, neck, advanced abdominal, and constipation as most useful. Overall, 50% of pediatricians (and 70% of pediatric residents) responded that there were opportunities to use POCUS multiple times a week or more in their clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: There is an unmet demand for POCUS training among general pediatricians and trainees in our study. Although the majority of respondents were not POCUS users, our results could guide future efforts to study the role of POCUS in general pediatrics and develop pediatric curricula.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Sistemas de Atención de Punto , Niño , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Pediatras , Ultrasonografía
8.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 14, 2022 Jan 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980095

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Firearm injury and death are significant public health problems in the U.S. and physicians are uniquely situated to help prevent them. However, there is little formal training in medical education on identifying risk for firearm injury and discussing safe firearm practices with patients. This study assesses prior education, barriers to counseling, and needs for improved training on firearm safety counseling in medical education to inform the development of future education on clinical strategies for firearm injury prevention. METHOD: A 2018 survey administered to 218 residents and fellows at a large, academic medical center asked about medical training on firearm injury prevention, frequency of asking patients about firearm access, and perceived barriers. RESULTS: The most common barriers cited were not knowing what to do with patients' answers about access to firearms (72.1%), not having enough time (66.2%), not feeling comfortable identifying patients at-risk for firearm injury (49.2%), and not knowing how to ask patients about firearm access (48.6%). Prior education on firearm injury prevention was more strongly associated with asking than was personal exposure to firearms: 51.5% of respondents who had prior medical education reported asking compared with who had not received such education (31.8%, p=0.004). More than 90% of respondents were interested in further education about interventions, what questions to ask, and legal mechanisms to separate dangerous people from their firearms. CONCLUSIONS: Education on assessing risk for firearm-related harm and, when indicated, counseling on safe firearm practices may increase the likelihood clinicians practice this behavior, though additional barriers exist.


Asunto(s)
Armas de Fuego , Internado y Residencia , Heridas por Arma de Fuego , Consejo , Humanos , Seguridad , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Heridas por Arma de Fuego/epidemiología , Heridas por Arma de Fuego/prevención & control
10.
Pediatrics ; 149(1)2022 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34972222

RESUMEN

A physician workforce that reflects the patient population is associated with improved patient outcomes and promotes health equity. Notwithstanding, racial and ethnic disparities persist within US medical schools, making some individuals underrepresented in medicine (URM). We sought to increase the percentage of URM residents who matched into our pediatric residency programs from a baseline of 5% to 35% to achieve demographic parity with our patients. We developed a multifaceted approach using multiple iterative tests of change, with the primary strategy being increased visibility of URM trainees and faculty to residency applicants. Strategies included applicant interviews with URM faculty, interview dinners with URM residents, visibility at academic conferences for URM trainees, development of targeted marketing materials, and a visiting student program supported by networking with URM residents. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of matched residents in the categorical pediatrics, child neurology, and medical genetics training programs who identified as URM. The percentage of URM residents increased to 16% (6 of 37) in 2018, 26% (11 of 43) in 2019, 19% (8 of 43) in 2020, and 21% (9 of 43) in 2021 (a four-year average of 22% URM residents; P = .0002). This progress toward a more representative residency program was met by challenges, such as pipeline concerns, the minority tax, and recruitment during a pandemic. We were able to implement small, low-resource strategies that had a large cumulative impact and could be implemented in other residency programs. Specific tactics and challenges encountered are discussed in this special article.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia/organización & administración , Grupos Minoritarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Pediatría/educación , Desarrollo de Programa , COVID-19/epidemiología , Equidad en Salud , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Pandemias , Pediatras/provisión & distribución , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
11.
J Pediatr Orthop B ; 31(1): e65-e68, 2022 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33315802

RESUMEN

Gait analysis in the pediatric and adult orthopedic patient populations can adjunct the diagnosis and treatment of a multitude of musculoskeletal conditions. Understanding of normal and abnormal gait biomechanics is an important aspect of orthopedic residency; yet, there is great variability in the time residency programs dedicate to gait analysis education. The purpose of this study was to investigate if formal gait analysis education during residency improves an orthopedic resident's understanding of normal and pathologic gait. Five residency programs consisting of 81 resident subjects were surveyed at the beginning of the 2016-2017 academic year. The residents were divided into those with formal gait analysis education (group A) and those without (group B). Each resident was sent an online survey with 11 questions from former orthopedic in-training exams (OITE) regarding gait pattern analysis. The average number of correct questions was compared between the two groups with Student's t-test. Fifty-three of the 81 surveys sent out were completed. There were 23 subjects in group A and 30 in group B. All five programs and all postgraduate years (PGYs) were represented (PGY1: 10, PGY2: 12, PGY3: 12, PGY4: 6, PGY5 12). The average score for all residents was 5.6 out of 11 correct (51%). The residents from group A averaged a significantly higher score (6.3) than group B (5.0) (P = 0.017). Understanding gait biomechanics is a critical skill for orthopedic surgeons, and residency training often lacks sufficient training in their curriculum. A good understanding of gait analysis allows orthopedic surgeons to analyze gait disturbances and develop patient-specific treatment plans in adult and pediatric populations. This study found improved knowledge of gait patterns amongst orthopedic residents with formal education. Even though the residents with formal education fared better than their counterparts, the overall percent correct was still low (51%). Evidence: Level 3: Prospective Cohort Study.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Adulto , Niño , Competencia Clínica , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Análisis de la Marcha , Humanos , Laboratorios , Estudios Prospectivos
12.
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol ; 51(1): 21-24, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33775505

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Equity, diversity, and inclusion in academic radiology are a work in progress and although the gender gap has decreased, there remains a paucity of studies examining female representation among radiology trainees over the past decade. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our undertaking was to evaluate gender parity in United States (US) and Canadian radiology residency programs and to suggest future directions to improve female representation MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of publicly available data on radiology residents from the US and Canada was performed from 2007to 2019. Data on diagnostic radiology residents was collected from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for the US and the Canadian Post M.D. Education Registry for Canada. Statistical tests including regression and ANOVA were used to study the gender proportions from 2007to 2019. RESULTS: There has been little progress in bridging the gender gap in the last 12 years. The proportion of female residents pursuing radiology has remained at an average of 26.74% (n = 1,238of 4,629) in US programs and 31.78% (n = 28 of88) in Canadian programs. The average change in the percentage of female residents was 0.0% per year (P = 0.0) for US programs and -2.9% per year (P = 0.3) for Canadian programs. DISCUSSION: Despite a higher proportion of females in North American medical schools, gender disparity persists among radiology residents. More research is needed to identify barriers limiting female representation and improve gender parity across North American radiology programs.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Radiología , Canadá , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina , Femenino , Humanos , Radiología/educación , Estudios Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos
15.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2005458, 2022 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34821207

RESUMEN

The transition from being a medical student to a fully qualified registered doctor is a challenging time in the lives of intern doctors (IDs). Throughout those challenging times they face many challenges which significantly impact their professional lives as well as their transitional experience. This study aimed to identify the transitional challenges experienced by IDs in Vanuatu. This qualitative study was conducted using a phenomenological approach whereby data collection is done through semi-structured in-depth interviews. Ethical approval was obtained before the commencement of this study. Twenty-seven participants were IDs of Vila Central Hospital and Northern Provincial Hospital in Vanuatu who were either current IDs and had worked for more than 6 months or had completed internship within the past 2 years. The willing IDs were consented on paper before they participated in the interview. The interview data was then transcribed verbatim and interpreted thematically. The participating IDs in the study were between the ages of 27 and 36 years old. Twenty two were current interns while the remaining five had recently completed their internship and now working as registered doctors. Three subthemes were identified as challenges through thematic analysis in this study; intern's welfare not met; different medical training institution; and transitional shock. Those subthemes were later categorized. The study findings have identified that intern's welfare needs improvement along with diverse training medical schools, and the transitional internship encounters were significant challenges experienced by IDs. There is indeed a need for healthcare providers, medical leaders, and relevant stakeholders to recognize and address these challenges.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Médicos , Estudiantes de Medicina , Adulto , Humanos , Investigación Cualitativa , Vanuatu
16.
Otolaryngol Clin North Am ; 55(1): 171-181, 2022 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34823715

RESUMEN

The financial considerations of becoming a physician are often not fully understood or appreciated until after residency and fellowship training. Once training is complete, physicians face a combination of increased financial rewards mixed with significant, and seemingly overwhelming, financial responsibilities, often with limited financial knowledge or understanding. Appropriately managing debt obligations, living expenses, saving for retirement, children's education, and establishing financial safety nets through savings, investments, and insurance are critical. This article is a starting point to provide the new physician with an introduction into some of those financial considerations, to both encourage further learning and promote successful financial decisions.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Niño , Becas , Humanos , Renta
17.
Ann Plast Surg ; 88(1): 118-121, 2022 01 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34928245

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There are increasingly prevalent formal educational programs for physicians who seek to be better trained to advance their fields. Although higher education and advanced degrees are not necessarily linked to leadership, we hypothesize that leaders in plastic surgery commonly have dual degrees. We sought to evaluate the prevalence of and association between additional advanced degrees in academic plastic surgery and plastic surgery leadership. METHODS: Plastic surgery faculty from 96 academic training programs and all executive committee and board of directors' members from national, regional, and local plastic surgery societies were evaluated. Surgeons' institutional online profile pages, personal web pages, societal websites, and LinkedIn profiles were all evaluated for current/past leadership roles, as well as for advanced degree. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to determine if the presence of extra degrees increased their likelihood of leadership roles. RESULTS: A total of 1036 plastic surgeons were evaluated. Sixteen percent of academic faculty have a dual degree. Furthermore, 25.5% of plastic surgeons holding formal academic leadership roles have a dual degree (OR, 2.15; P = 0.043), as do 34.4% of those serving on the executive committee or board of directors in national plastic surgery societies (OR, 2.23; P = 0.026) and 29.2% of those serving in local/regional societal leadership roles (OR, 1.96; P = 0.043). Among all dual degrees, Masters in Business Administration has the highest association with leadership roles (OR, 3.45; P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Academic plastic surgeons with dual degrees are approximately twice as likely to hold a formal academic or societal leadership role. Additional studies are needed to determine if causative relationships exist.


Asunto(s)
Internado y Residencia , Cirujanos , Cirugía Plástica , Docentes Médicos , Humanos , Liderazgo , Cirugía Plástica/educación , Estados Unidos
19.
Curr Urol Rep ; 22(12): 61, 2021 Dec 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34913100

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Residency training is a pivotal educational step on the road to becoming a urologist. It combines both clinical and surgical instruction with the goal of producing proficient and compassionate surgeons and clinicians. In this review, we employ a SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) to investigate the current state of urologic residency training. RECENT FINDINGS: Urology remains an attractive and competitive residency with varied and complex surgical and medical training. Areas for improvement include standardization of evaluation and feedback, improving resident wellness, and expanding the use of surgical simulation. Workforce issues such as the predicted urologist supply deficit and poor readiness to enter the business of medicine can be addressed at the residency level. Failure to attract and retain underrepresented minorities, increasing burden of student debt, and resident burnout are serious threats to our field. Using a SWOT analysis we identify key areas for expansion, underscore valuable strengths, and provide a working roadmap for improvement of these formative years.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Profesional , Internado y Residencia , Urología , Humanos , Urólogos , Urología/educación
20.
Rev. baiana saúde pública ; 45(Supl. Especial 2): 151-168, 2021/12/28.
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS | ID: biblio-1352347

RESUMEN

Aprimorar o serviço acadêmico da residência médica é fundamental para a credibilidade do ensino de uma instituição que tem credenciamento de programas para a formação de médicos especialistas. O objetivo deste trabalho é descrever a experiência dos últimos dois anos com a implementação de ações da secretaria acadêmica da Comissão de Residência Médica (Coreme) em um hospital público e promover novas reflexões e conhecimentos sobre a estrutura acadêmica do ensino na residência médica e suas dimensões técnicas, políticas, administrativas e éticas. Com o desenvolvimento organizativo da Coreme do Hospital Geral Roberto Santos (HGRS), foi possível aumentar a satisfação dos profissionais médicos residentes na instituição com a qualidade da formação. A adesão aos programas foi ampliada e a transferência, a desistência e a evasão dos residentes diminuíram, principalmente durante o período da pandemia da covid-19. Além disso, a interação e a integração entre os supervisores e preceptores dos programas melhorou, favorecendo a troca de informações e experiências e formando um grupo mais coeso em prol da qualidade da residência médica. A Coreme do HGRS, incluindo todos os seus representantes, incorpora incessantemente seu papel nas práticas educacionais promovidas na residência médica do Hospital Geral Roberto Santos a fim de fomentar iniciativas exitosas e inovadoras na instituição.


Improving medical residency academic service is essential for teaching credibility in institutions with accredited training programs for specialist physicians. This work aims to describe the past two-year experience of the academic secretariat of the Medical Residency Committee (COREME) in implementing actions aimed at promoting new reflections and knowledge about the academic structure of teaching in medical residency in a public hospital, considering its technical, political, administrative, and ethical dimensions. The organizational development of COREME in the Hospital Geral Roberto Santos (HGRS) improved satisfaction of medical professionals undertaking residency in the institution with training quality, increasing adherence to the programs while reducing transfer, withdrawal, and evasion ­ especially considering the COVID-19 pandemic period. Moreover, COREME improved interaction and integration among supervisors and preceptors, favoring the exchange of information and experiences and forming a more cohesive group in favor of the quality of medical residency. In the context of HGRS, COREME and all its representatives play a key role in the teaching promoted in medical residency, seeking to offer and incorporate innovative and successful teaching and research practices for improving teaching quality in the institution.


Mejorar el servicio académico de la residencia médica es fundamental para la credibilidad de la docencia en una institución que cuenta con programas acreditados para la formación de médicos especialistas. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir la experiencia de los últimos dos años sobre la implementación de acciones de la secretaría académica del Comité de Residencia Médica en un hospital público y promover nuevas reflexiones y conocimientos sobre la estructura académica de la docencia en la residencia médica, en sus dimensiones técnicas, políticas, administrativas y éticas. Con el desarrollo organizacional del Coreme del hospital HGRS, se logró promover una mejor satisfacción de los profesionales médicos residentes en la institución con la calidad de la capacitación, ampliando la adherencia a los programas, al tiempo que se redujo el traslado, retiro y evasión del residente, especialmente considerando el período de pandemia de Covid-19. Se mejoró la interacción e integración entre supervisores y preceptores del programa, favoreciendo el intercambio de información y experiencias, con un grupo más cohesionado a favor de la calidad de la residencia médica. El Coreme de HGRS, incluyendo todo lo que representa, incorpora su rol en las prácticas docentes impulsadas en la residencia médica del Hospital Geral Roberto Santos en una búsqueda incesante por promover, incorporar e innovar con prácticas docentes e investigadoras exitosas en beneficio de la calidad docente desarrollada en la institución.


Asunto(s)
Comité de Profesionales , Especialización , Enseñanza , COVID-19 , Internado y Residencia , Cuerpo Médico de Hospitales
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