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1.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(1): 145-150, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33323600

RESUMEN

Purpose: To analyze the impact of ophthalmic webinars on the resident's learning experience during the COVID-19 pandemic (CP). Methods: This cross-sectional nationwide study was carried out for 1 month during CP and included a total of 382 ophthalmic residents. A questionnaire was sent through various social media platforms. Results: Residents expressed a decline in their clinical exposure (74%; 220), thesis work (58%; 218), and acquisition of the knowledge and skills (42.5%; 161) during CP. Benefits of webinars as perceived by the residents included gain in additional knowledge (77%; 286), feedback on queries (56%; 209), access to multiple speakers (50%; 191), and topics (30%; 110). Nearly 75% (291) of residents endorsed webinars as good to the very good academic tool, and 54% (202) preferred to continue attending webinars in the post-CP phase. However, connectivity/download/data issues (54%; 200) followed by loss of personal touch (53%; 188), lengthy or irrelevant topic (37%; 134), and poor transmission quality (33%; 121) were major deterrents against the webinar. Conclusion: The current study generated overall mixed responses from the ophthalmic postgraduate residents in favor of webinars. In the present format, webinars bear enormous potentials to supplement the traditional learning tools by providing uninterrupted learning experiences. However, they are still limited by their pedagogical and technical issues.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Internet , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Aprendizaje , Oftalmología/educación , Pandemias , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudios Retrospectivos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
3.
J Surg Res ; 257: A1-A11, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32768197

RESUMEN

The issue of burnout among surgical trainees became evident during our work on the FIRST Trial. In studying the issue, we found that burnout symptoms occurred in a relatively large proportion of surgical trainees, and burnout was associated with significant risks of having thoughts of leaving the residency program or having suicidal thoughts. The SECOND Trial seeks to reduce trainee wellbeing and mistreatment by leveraging approaches used in healthcare quality performance improvement (e.g., comparative reports, toolkits, collaboration). Importantly, the epidemic of surgical trainee wellbeing issues have worsened (i.e., fanning the burnout fire) given our misconceptions about generational differences, our delayed adaptations to shifts in healthcare, and even some of our good intentions. However, there are several things we can do to improve the situation: (1) embrace the change that comes with each generation; (2) appreciate, respect, and enjoy our trainees; (3) teach residents constructively, leaving yelling and bullying behind; (4) embrace the concept of wellness for ourselves and each other; (5) provide meaningful feedback and mentorship; and (6) give each other the benefit of the doubt (e.g., principle of charity). Despite these issues, academic surgery remains the best job in the world, and the strength of our profession, leaders, and colleagues will see us through these challenges. The Association for Academic Surgery will help lead the way on these important issues.


Asunto(s)
Agotamiento Profesional/epidemiología , Cirujanos/educación , Cirujanos/psicología , Agotamiento Profesional/etiología , Agotamiento Profesional/prevención & control , Cirugía General/educación , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Internado y Residencia/tendencias , Sociedades Médicas , Cirujanos/tendencias , Enseñanza/psicología , Enseñanza/tendencias
4.
J Surg Res ; 257: 9-14, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32818789

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: General Surgery residencies use protected education time in various fashions in order to optimize content quality and yield for their learners. This knowledge is tested annually with the American Board for Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) exam and is used to evaluate several aspects of a resident. We hypothesized that using a jeopardy game in educational conference would encourage residents to engage in self-learning and improve ABSITE scores at a single institution. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single institution, during protected education conference, residents played an hour-long surgical jeopardy game every 7 wk to summarize high yield topics discussed during the previous 6 wk of didactic learning. A 5-point Likert survey was completed by general surgery residents to discern the utility of the game format for learning. The ABSITE category scores were also evaluated from the year before and the year after the game was implemented. RESULTS: Twenty-four general surgery residents took the survey with >80% agreeing that the jeopardy format was either a fun or an effective way to learn general surgery topics. Additionally, over 80% of residents thought the game format helped with retention of knowledge. ABSITE categories that had a jeopardy session improved from 65.9% to 70.4% correct (P = 0.0003). ABSITE categories that did not have dedicated jeopardy had a non-significant increase in scores (67.7%-69.9%, P = 0.1). CONCLUSIONS: Implementing surgical jeopardy as a component of educational conferences in general surgery resident training is correlated with improvement of ABSITE scores. Surgical jeopardy may be easily adopted and implemented to stimulate self-directed learning for residents.


Asunto(s)
Juegos Recreacionales , Cirugía General/educación , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional , Humanos , Aprendizaje , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
5.
Orthop Clin North Am ; 52(1): 69-76, 2021 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33222986

RESUMEN

This article explores the current state of the residency match in 2020 with a focus on orthopedic surgery, analyzing the utility of current applicant screening methods in producing future generations of competent surgeons. Discussed are anticipated changes to the residency application process considering the COVID-19 pandemic and Step 1 becoming pass/fail in January 2022. Also explored are potential changes to improve the process for applicants and residency programs, such as identifying and using predictive factors of resident success in the applicant screening process, finding better ways to match applicants with programs, and increasing female and underrepresented minorities within orthopedics.


Asunto(s)
Infecciones por Coronavirus , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Procedimientos Ortopédicos/educación , Cirujanos Ortopédicos/educación , Pandemias , Selección de Personal/métodos , Neumonía Viral , Betacoronavirus , Competencia Clínica , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Criterios de Admisión Escolar , Estados Unidos
6.
Am J Med Genet A ; 185(1): 68-72, 2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33051968

RESUMEN

The national importance of telemedicine for safe and effective patient care has been highlighted by the current COVID-19 pandemic. Prior to the 2020 pandemic the Division of Genetics and Metabolism piloted a telemedicine program focused on initial and follow-up visits in the patients' home. The goals were to increase access to care, decrease missed work, improve scheduling, and avoid the transport and exposure of medically fragile patients. Visits were conducted by physician medical geneticists, genetic counselors, and biochemical dietitians, together and separately. This allowed the program to develop detailed standard operating procedures. At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, this pilot-program was deployed by the full team of 22 providers in one business day. Two physicians remained on-site for patients requiring in-person evaluations. This model optimized patient safety and workforce preservation while providing full access to patients during a pandemic. We provide initial data on visit numbers, types of diagnoses, and no-show rates. Experience in this implementation before and during the pandemic has confirmed the effectiveness and value of telemedicine for a highly complex medical population. This program is a model that can and will be continued well-beyond the current crisis.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Prestación de Atención de Salud/organización & administración , Endocrinología/organización & administración , Genética Médica/organización & administración , Modelos Organizacionales , Pandemias , Telemedicina/organización & administración , Adolescente , Adulto , Niño , Preescolar , Prestación de Atención de Salud/métodos , Prestación de Atención de Salud/normas , Endocrinología/educación , Femenino , Asesoramiento Genético/métodos , Asesoramiento Genético/organización & administración , Asesoramiento Genético/normas , Enfermedades Genéticas Congénitas/epidemiología , Enfermedades Genéticas Congénitas/terapia , Pruebas Genéticas/métodos , Pruebas Genéticas/normas , Genética Médica/educación , Humanos , Ciencia de la Implementación , Lactante , Recién Nacido , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Internado y Residencia/organización & administración , Internado y Residencia/normas , Masculino , Enfermedades Metabólicas/epidemiología , Enfermedades Metabólicas/terapia , Persona de Mediana Edad , Seguridad del Paciente , Proyectos Piloto , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Telemedicina/métodos , Adulto Joven
8.
Neurosurg Focus ; 49(6): E16, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33260120

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has forced medical professionals throughout the world to adapt to the changing medical scenario. The objective of this survey was to assess the change in neurosurgical training in India following the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Between May 7, 2020, and May 16, 2020, a validated questionnaire was circulated among neurosurgical residents across India by social media, regarding changes in the department's functioning, patient interaction, surgical exposure, changes in academics, and fears and apprehensions associated with the pandemic. The responses were kept anonymous and were analyzed for changes during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to before the pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 118 residents from 29 neurosurgical training programs across 17 states/union territories of the country gave their responses to the survey questionnaire. The survey revealed that the surgical exposure of neurosurgical residents has drastically reduced since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, from an average of 39.86 surgeries performed/assisted per month (median 30) to 12.31 per month (median 10), representing a decrease of 67.50%. The number of academic sessions has fallen from a median of 5 per week to 2 per week. The survey uncovered the lack of universal guidelines and homogeneity regarding preoperative COVID-19 testing. The survey also reveals reluctance toward detailed patient examinations since the COVID-19 outbreak. The majority of respondents felt that the COVID-19 pandemic will hamper their operative and clinical skills. Fear of rescheduling or deferring of licensing examinations was significantly higher among those closest to the examination (p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: The adverse impact of the pandemic on neurosurgical training needs to be addressed. While ensuring the safety of the residents, institutes and neurosurgical societies/bodies must take it upon themselves to ensure that their residents continue to learn and develop neurosurgical skills during these difficult times.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Neurocirujanos/educación , Procedimientos Neuroquirúrgicos/educación , Procedimientos Neuroquirúrgicos/métodos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , /cirugía , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , India/epidemiología , Masculino
9.
Neurosurg Focus ; 49(6): E17, 2020 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33260121

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Neurosurgical education in the US has changed significantly as a consequence of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Institutional social distancing requirements have resulted in many neurosurgical programs utilizing video conferencing for educational activities. However, it is unclear how or if these practices should continue after the pandemic. The objective of this study was to characterize virtual education in neurosurgery and understand how it should be utilized after COVID-19. METHODS: A 24-question, 3-part online survey was administered anonymously to all 117 US neurosurgical residency programs from May 15, 2020, to June 15, 2020. Questions pertained to the current use of virtual conferencing, preferences over traditional conferences, and future inclinations. The Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly agree) was used. Comparisons were calculated using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Statistical significance was set at 0.05. RESULTS: One-hundred eight responses were recorded. Overall, 38 respondents (35.2%) were attendings and 70 (64.8%) were trainees. Forty-one respondents (38.0%) indicated attending 5-6 conferences per week and 70 (64.8%) attend national virtual conferences. When considering different conference types, there was no overall preference (scores < 3) for virtual conferences over traditional conferences. In regard to future use, respondents strongly agreed that they would continue the practice at some capacity after the pandemic (median score 5). Overall, respondents agreed that virtual conferences would partially replace traditional conferences (median score 4), whereas they strongly disagreed with the complete replacement of traditional conferences (median score 1). The most common choices for the partial replacement of tradition conferences were case conferences (59/108, 55%) and board preparation (64/108, 59%). Lastly, there was a significant difference in scores for continued use of virtual conferencing in those who attend nationally sponsored conferences (median score 5, n = 70) and those who do not (median score 4, n = 38; U = 1762.50, z = 2.97, r = 0.29, p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Virtual conferences will likely remain an integral part of neurosurgical education after the COVID-19 pandemic has abated. Across the country, residents and faculty report a preference for continued use of virtual conferencing, especially virtual case conferences and board preparation. Some traditional conferences may even be replaced with virtual conferences, in particular those that are more didactic. Furthermore, nationally sponsored virtual conferences have a positive effect on the preferences for continued use of virtual conferences.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación a Distancia/normas , Internado y Residencia/normas , Procedimientos Neuroquirúrgicos/educación , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Telecomunicaciones/normas , Adulto , Anciano , Educación a Distancia/métodos , Femenino , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Procedimientos Neuroquirúrgicos/métodos , Procedimientos Neuroquirúrgicos/normas
10.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 146(5): 1100-1102, 2020 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33136955

RESUMEN

Reduced work hours and funding have fueled an increase in simulation-based training for plastic and orthopedic surgery residency programs. Unfortunately, certain simulation training can fail to enhance surgical skills because of availability, cost, or low fidelity. There is a growing interest among training programs for a cost-effective surgical simulator to improve basic skills and muscle memory of residents. The authors developed a three-dimensionally-printed, malleable, and anatomically accurate hand surgery simulator from a computed tomographic scan of an adult male subject. The bone matrix was specifically designed to provide proprioceptive feedback to hone drilling skills used in fracture repair and arthrodesis. The silicone soft-tissue covering provides excellent malleability to dissect and perform fracture-reducing maneuvers. Three-dimensional printing of "fracture bridges" allows the design of on-demand polyfracture models so the trainee can practice multiple types and locations of repairs as skills progress. To summarize, the authors' hand simulator is an anatomical, low-cost, multiprocedure tool that can be used to improve the muscle memory and basic surgery skills of residents in training.


Asunto(s)
Mano/cirugía , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Modelos Anatómicos , Ortopedia/educación , Impresión Tridimensional , Entrenamiento Simulado , Cirugía Plástica/educación , Adulto , Humanos , Masculino
11.
J Pediatr Rehabil Med ; 13(3): 289-299, 2020.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33164964

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic hastened the need for graduate medical education (GME) innovation, resulting in the creation of multiple pediatric rehabilitation medicine (PRM) e-learning initiatives. There has been a paucity of data regarding trainee perceptions regarding quickly developed new methods of learning during the pandemic. This study explored PRM trainee perceptions of e-learning and effects of the pandemic on education. METHODS: Questionnaire study with data collected via REDCap. RESULTS: Greater than half of PRM trainees (56.6%, 30/53) responded. Most respondents reported that the virtual lectures series (79.3%), journal club (78.9%), and virtual arts initiatives (75.0%) were valuable to their education. Common benefits noted included access to subject experts, networking, lecture recording, and location flexibility. Common concerns included lack of protected time, virtual platform fatigue, and decreased engagement. Most respondents were not redeployed. Relative to before the pandemic, less satisfaction with clinical education (70.0%) and greater satisfaction with non-clinical education (60.0%) was reported. The majority of graduating trainees felt positively (83.3%) and 16.7% were neutral regarding confidence to graduate. CONCLUSION: Trainees perceived national e-learning as valuable to their education, especially due to the access to expert leaders around the nation. Future work should explore ways to overcome barriers and optimize benefits of GME and PRM e-learning.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Pandemias , Rehabilitación/educación , Niño , Humanos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
12.
Am Surg ; 86(11): 1501-1507, 2020 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33135424

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic presented a unique challenge for Medical systems worldwide. Initial response to the crisis situation for the pandemic closely mirrored plans for a mass casualty event. By leveraging resources including human and physical, and by dividing our surgeon workforce into micro teams we were able to create a flexible and responsive infrastructure to address the crisis as it unfolded. By adoption of virtual platforms and equal division of labor, surgical resident education was continued. Specific adjustments to the schedule and curriculum for medical students allowed them to continue their studies safely and on schedule. Our model serves as an example by which hospital systems of similar size may utilize principles of mass casualty preparedness to craft their own plan for a future contagion response strategy.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Curriculum/normas , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/normas , Cirugía General/educación , Guías como Asunto , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Pandemias , Humanos
16.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(10): e2022779, 2020 10 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33034642

RESUMEN

Importance: Chest radiography is the most common diagnostic imaging examination performed in emergency departments (EDs). Augmenting clinicians with automated preliminary read assistants could help expedite their workflows, improve accuracy, and reduce the cost of care. Objective: To assess the performance of artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms in realistic radiology workflows by performing an objective comparative evaluation of the preliminary reads of anteroposterior (AP) frontal chest radiographs performed by an AI algorithm and radiology residents. Design, Setting, and Participants: This diagnostic study included a set of 72 findings assembled by clinical experts to constitute a full-fledged preliminary read of AP frontal chest radiographs. A novel deep learning architecture was designed for an AI algorithm to estimate the findings per image. The AI algorithm was trained using a multihospital training data set of 342 126 frontal chest radiographs captured in ED and urgent care settings. The training data were labeled from their associated reports. Image-based F1 score was chosen to optimize the operating point on the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve so as to minimize the number of missed findings and overcalls per image read. The performance of the model was compared with that of 5 radiology residents recruited from multiple institutions in the US in an objective study in which a separate data set of 1998 AP frontal chest radiographs was drawn from a hospital source representative of realistic preliminary reads in inpatient and ED settings. A triple consensus with adjudication process was used to derive the ground truth labels for the study data set. The performance of AI algorithm and radiology residents was assessed by comparing their reads with ground truth findings. All studies were conducted through a web-based clinical study application system. The triple consensus data set was collected between February and October 2018. The comparison study was preformed between January and October 2019. Data were analyzed from October to February 2020. After the first round of reviews, further analysis of the data was performed from March to July 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: The learning performance of the AI algorithm was judged using the conventional ROC curve and the area under the curve (AUC) during training and field testing on the study data set. For the AI algorithm and radiology residents, the individual finding label performance was measured using the conventional measures of label-based sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV). In addition, the agreement with the ground truth on the assignment of findings to images was measured using the pooled κ statistic. The preliminary read performance was recorded for AI algorithm and radiology residents using new measures of mean image-based sensitivity, specificity, and PPV designed for recording the fraction of misses and overcalls on a per image basis. The 1-sided analysis of variance test was used to compare the means of each group (AI algorithm vs radiology residents) using the F distribution, and the null hypothesis was that the groups would have similar means. Results: The trained AI algorithm achieved a mean AUC across labels of 0.807 (weighted mean AUC, 0.841) after training. On the study data set, which had a different prevalence distribution, the mean AUC achieved was 0.772 (weighted mean AUC, 0.865). The interrater agreement with ground truth finding labels for AI algorithm predictions had pooled κ value of 0.544, and the pooled κ for radiology residents was 0.585. For the preliminary read performance, the analysis of variance test was used to compare the distributions of AI algorithm and radiology residents' mean image-based sensitivity, PPV, and specificity. The mean image-based sensitivity for AI algorithm was 0.716 (95% CI, 0.704-0.729) and for radiology residents was 0.720 (95% CI, 0.709-0.732) (P = .66), while the PPV was 0.730 (95% CI, 0.718-0.742) for the AI algorithm and 0.682 (95% CI, 0.670-0.694) for the radiology residents (P < .001), and specificity was 0.980 (95% CI, 0.980-0.981) for the AI algorithm and 0.973 (95% CI, 0.971-0.974) for the radiology residents (P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that it is possible to build AI algorithms that reach and exceed the mean level of performance of third-year radiology residents for full-fledged preliminary read of AP frontal chest radiographs. This diagnostic study also found that while the more complex findings would still benefit from expert overreads, the performance of AI algorithms was associated with the amount of data available for training rather than the level of difficulty of interpretation of the finding. Integrating such AI systems in radiology workflows for preliminary interpretations has the potential to expedite existing radiology workflows and address resource scarcity while improving overall accuracy and reducing the cost of care.


Asunto(s)
Inteligencia Artificial/normas , Internado y Residencia/normas , Interpretación de Imagen Radiográfica Asistida por Computador/normas , Tórax/diagnóstico por imagen , Algoritmos , Área Bajo la Curva , Inteligencia Artificial/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Calidad de la Atención de Salud/normas , Calidad de la Atención de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Curva ROC , Interpretación de Imagen Radiográfica Asistida por Computador/métodos , Interpretación de Imagen Radiográfica Asistida por Computador/estadística & datos numéricos , Radiografía/instrumentación , Radiografía/métodos
17.
Obstet Gynecol ; 136(5): 987-994, 2020 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33030868

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assess whether a pediatric and adolescent gynecology electronic learning (eLearning) module improves knowledge and clinical performance among obstetrics and gynecology residents. METHODS: We conducted a multi-institutional, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial across four university programs; three had pediatric and adolescent gynecology rotations, and two had pediatric and adolescent gynecology fellowship-trained faculty. Applying permutated block randomization, residents were randomized to no intervention or completion of a validated eLearning module on prepubertal bleeding. All residents subsequently completed a pediatric and adolescent gynecology-related knowledge assessment that queried understanding of prepubertal bleeding and an objective structured clinical examination that assessed history collection, performance of a prepubertal genital examination, vaginal culture, and vaginoscopy for a pediatric patient. Objective structured clinical examinations were videotaped and reviewed by two faculty, blinded to randomization group; interrater reliability score was 97%. We calculated descriptive frequencies and compared randomization groups using χ analyses and Fisher exact tests for categorical variables, and median tests for continuous variables; a value of P<.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: From July 2018 to June 2019, we invited 115 residents to participate; 97 (83%) completed both objective structured clinical examination and follow-up knowledge assessments. Most were female (91%) and the majority reported limited pediatric and adolescent gynecology didactic or clinical experience, with 36% reporting prior didactics on prepubertal vaginal bleeding and 33% reporting prior exposure to the prepubertal genital examination. Forty-five participants (46%) were randomized to the module and groups were similar across training levels. Residents assigned to the module scored significantly higher on the knowledge assessment (4/5 vs 2/5, P<.001) and objective structured clinical examination (13/16 vs 7/16, P<.001) and were more likely to avoid a speculum in the examination of a pediatric patient (95.6% vs 57.7%, P<.001). CONCLUSION: Our pediatric and adolescent gynecology eLearning module resulted in improved short-term resident knowledge and simulated clinical skills among obstetrics and gynecology residents. Applying this learning technique in other programs may help address deficiencies in pediatric and adolescent gynecology education and training.


Asunto(s)
Competencia Clínica/estadística & datos numéricos , Ginecología/educación , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Pediatría/educación , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Niño , Curriculum , Evaluación Educacional , Becas/métodos , Becas/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Ginecología/métodos , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Pediatría/métodos , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Método Simple Ciego
19.
Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc ; 28(10): 3087-3093, 2020 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32926255

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented an unprecedented challenge to the orthopedic residency training programs to adapt to a form of a web-based learning process and simulation-based training. This study focusses on the viewpoint of the orthopedic residents to the paradigm shift in clinical care as well as the academic activities. METHODS: An anonymous questionnaire was created in an online survey generator and was sent through e-mail to 227 orthopedic residents of seven tertiary care centres in North India. The questionnaire was divided into three sections, academic activity section, mental health section, and clinical activity section. There were a total of 44 single answer questions with answers according to the increasing difficulty at present situation compared to a previous time before the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 158 questionnaires were filled by 107 junior residents (67.7%) and 51 senior residents (32.3%). 49 residents (31%) were quarantined and three became positive for COVID-19. Although all of them knew about necessary precautions, personal protective equipment was difficult to avail at times. Increased difficulty in recruiting new patients for research (48.9%) and conducting prospective research (48.7%) was observed. The online-based learning process was reported to be easier (44.2%) by most of the residents. Routine clinical work in the operating room, out-patient department, and inpatient department was found to be difficult according to the majority of the residents along with the anxiety of contracting the infection. CONCLUSION: There are unique opportunities for improvement of residency programs during these times of uncertainty and the findings of this study can help the universities as well as program chairs to develop a robust program that can outlive this pandemic. The web-based learning process might prove to be useful and can be incorporated into the resident training program in the long term. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level V.


Asunto(s)
Betacoronavirus , Infecciones por Coronavirus/epidemiología , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/métodos , Internado y Residencia/métodos , Ortopedia/educación , Pandemias , Neumonía Viral/epidemiología , Entrenamiento Simulado , Adulto , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Proyectos Piloto , Estudios Prospectivos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
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