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Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(15): e25291, 2021 Apr 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33847628

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There are no reports on global research status of gastroenterology and hepatology (GI). This study was conducted to reveal the current global research status and trends in GI. METHODS: Articles published during 2009 to 2018 in international GI journals were retrieved from the PubMed database. The top 20 countries by output were determined. The gross domestic product (GDP) of each country was also retrieved to figure out the correlation between outputs in GI and economy. The 5 highest-ranking countries were compared in the number of total articles, articles per capita, articles published in top journals, the accumulated impact factor (IF), and average IF. Total articles and articles per capita of the 5 countries were conducted time-trend analysis. The frequently-used terms in titles and abstracts of articles published in 2009 and 2018 were retrieved to conduct co-occurrence analysis to figure out the change of research highlights in GI. RESULTS: A total of 120,267 articles were included, of which 116,485 articles were from 20 highest-output countries. There was a positive correlation between output and GDP (r = 0.921, P < .001). The USA, Japan, China, Italy, and the UK were the 5 highest-ranking countries. The USA was the largest contributor with 26,215 articles, accounting for 17.4% of the total, but with no significant increasing trend (P = .122). Other 4 countries all showed increasing trends (all P < .001). For articles per capita, Italy ranked 1st among the 5 countries with 1591.0 articles per 10 million. The USA showed a decreasing trend (P = .026), other 4 countries all showed increasing trends (all P < .001). The UK had the highest average IF (6.685). For change of research highlights, it is more inclined to research of endoscopy, inflammatory bowel diseases, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. CONCLUSION: It is delightful that the global research output in GI field would be continuingly increased as the major highest-output countries showed increasing trends. However, the developing countries fell behind both in quantity and quality when compared with developed countries.


Asunto(s)
Bibliometría , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Gastroenterología/estadística & datos numéricos , Países Desarrollados/estadística & datos numéricos , Gastroenterología/clasificación , Humanos , Hepatopatías/terapia
3.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249280, 2021.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33793613

RESUMEN

International scientific collaborations have always been regarded as critical actions to address global pandemics, however, there was an obvious uncertainty between international collaboration and the COVID-19 control. We aim to combine digital data-based strategies to produce meaningful and advanced insights into the imbalance between COVID-19 and international collaboration, as well as reveal possible influencing factors, and ultimately enhance global collaboration. We conducted three retrospective cohort studies using respectively COVID-19 data from WHO, a complete dataset of scientific publications on coronavirus-related research from WoS, and daily data from Google Trends (GT). The results of geovisualization and spatiotemporal analysis revealed that the global COVID19 pandemic still remains serious. The global issue of imbalance between international collaborations and pandemic does exit, and the nations with good pandemic control had their own characteristics in above-mentioned correlation. Digital epidemiology provides, at least in part, evidence-based assessment and scientific advice to understand the imbalance between international collaborations and COVID-19. Our investigation demonstrates that transdisciplinary conversation through digital data-based strategies can help us fully understand the complex factors influencing the effectiveness of international scientific collaboration, thus facilitating the global response to COVID-19.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica , Manejo de Datos , Cooperación Internacional , Pandemias/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigación Biomédica/organización & administración , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Colaboración Intersectorial , Estudios Retrospectivos
4.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(4): e25379, 2021 04 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33735097

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Gender imbalances in academia have been evident historically and persist today. For the past 60 years, we have witnessed the increase of participation of women in biomedical disciplines, showing that the gender gap is shrinking. However, preliminary evidence suggests that women, including female researchers, are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of unequal distribution of childcare, elderly care, and other kinds of domestic and emotional labor. Sudden lockdowns and abrupt shifts in daily routines have had disproportionate consequences on their productivity, which is reflected by a sudden drop in research output in biomedical research, consequently affecting the number of female authors of scientific publications. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate adverse effect on the productivity of female researchers in the biomedical field in terms of authorship of scientific publications. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational bibliometric study. We investigated the proportion of male and female researchers who published scientific papers during the COVID-19 pandemic, using bibliometric data from biomedical preprint servers and selected Springer-Nature journals. We used the ordinary least squares regression model to estimate the expected proportions over time by correcting for temporal trends. We also used a set of statistical methods, such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and regression discontinuity design, to test the validity of the results. RESULTS: A total of 78,950 papers from the bioRxiv and medRxiv repositories and from 62 selected Springer-Nature journals by 346,354 unique authors were analyzed. The acquired data set consisted of papers that were published between January 1, 2019, and August 2, 2020. The proportion of female first authors publishing in the biomedical field during the pandemic dropped by 9.1%, on average, across disciplines (expected arithmetic mean yest=0.39; observed arithmetic mean y=0.35; standard error of the estimate, Sest=0.007; standard error of the observation, σx=0.004). The impact was particularly pronounced for papers related to COVID-19 research, where the proportion of female scientists in the first author position dropped by 28% (yest=0.39; y=0.28; Sest=0.007; σx=0.007). When looking at the last authors, the proportion of women dropped by 7.9%, on average (yest=0.25; y=0.23; Sest=0.005; σx=0.003), while the proportion of women writing about COVID-19 as the last author decreased by 18.8% (yest=0.25; y=0.21; Sest=0.005; σx=0.007). Further, by geocoding authors' affiliations, we showed that the gender disparities became even more apparent when disaggregated by country, up to 35% in some cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings document a decrease in the number of publications by female authors in the biomedical field during the global pandemic. This effect was particularly pronounced for papers related to COVID-19, indicating that women are producing fewer publications related to COVID-19 research. This sudden increase in the gender gap was persistent across the 10 countries with the highest number of researchers. These results should be used to inform the scientific community of this worrying trend in COVID-19 research and the disproportionate effect that the pandemic has had on female academics.


Asunto(s)
Autoria , Bibliometría , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Edición/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigadores/estadística & datos numéricos , Distribución por Sexo , /epidemiología , Eficiencia , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Estudios Retrospectivos , Factores Sexuales
5.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 203(6): e11-e24, 2021 03 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33719931

RESUMEN

Background: Central sleep apnea (CSA) is common among patients with heart failure and has been strongly linked to adverse outcomes. However, progress toward improving outcomes for such patients has been limited. The purpose of this official statement from the American Thoracic Society is to identify key areas to prioritize for future research regarding CSA in heart failure.Methods: An international multidisciplinary group with expertise in sleep medicine, pulmonary medicine, heart failure, clinical research, and health outcomes was convened. The group met at the American Thoracic Society 2019 International Conference to determine research priority areas. A statement summarizing the findings of the group was subsequently authored using input from all members.Results: The workgroup identified 11 specific research priorities in several key areas: 1) control of breathing and pathophysiology leading to CSA, 2) variability across individuals and over time, 3) techniques to examine CSA pathogenesis and outcomes, 4) impact of device and pharmacological treatment, and 5) implementing CSA treatment for all individualsConclusions: Advancing care for patients with CSA in the context of heart failure will require progress in the arenas of translational (basic through clinical), epidemiological, and patient-centered outcome research. Given the increasing prevalence of heart failure and its associated substantial burden to individuals, society, and the healthcare system, targeted research to improve knowledge of CSA pathogenesis and treatment is a priority.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigación Biomédica/tendencias , Insuficiencia Cardíaca , Proyectos de Investigación/tendencias , Apnea Central del Sueño , Sociedades Médicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Sociedades Médicas/tendencias , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Predicción , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Proyectos de Investigación/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos
7.
Int. j. med. surg. sci. (Print) ; 8(1): 1-13, mar. 2021. tab, graf
Artículo en Español | LILACS | ID: biblio-1151622

RESUMEN

Este trabajo tiene como objetivodescribir el perfil de la producción científica referente a anquiloglosia. Para ello fuerealizada una investigación por medio de la búsqueda de artículos científicos indexados en las bases de datos electrónicas LILACS y PUBMED. Para la revisión bibliométrica fueron considerados y tabulados los datos referidos al año de publicación, tipo de estudio y nivel de evidencia. Los datos fueron discutidos sobre la óptica cuantitativa y de valores representativos. Los primeros resultados permitieron analizar 651 estudios publicados. La mayor parte de las investigaciones sobre anquiloglosia encontradas correspondieron a estudios de tipo descriptivo y serie de casos (49,31%) seguido de relato de caso, investigación in vitro, en animales y revisión de literatura (24,27%), cohorte y casos-controles (11,98%), opinión de experto (11,68%), ensayo clínico randomizado (1,54%) y revisión sistemática (1,22%). Pocos estudios abordaron complicaciones durante o después de la realización de la cirugía para liberación del frenillo lingual. En conclusión, la producción científica sobre anquiloglosia ha mostrado un creciente aumento en los últimos 28 años, siendo publicados estudios con nivel de evidencia 1, 2 y 3, cuyo mayor enfoque fue realizado en la cirugía para la liberación del frenillo lingual.


This work aims to describe the profileof scientific production referring to ankyloglossia. For this an investigation was carried out by searching for scientific articles indexed in the electronic databases LILACS and PUBMED. For the bibliometric review, the data referring to the year of publication, type of study and level of evidence were examined and tabulated. The data were discussed on the quantitative and representative values optics. The first results allowed to analyzic 651 published studies were analyzed. Most of the research on tongue tie found correspond to descriptive studies and case series (49.31%), followed by case reports, in vitro research, in animals and literature review (24.27%), cohort and cases and controls (11.98%), specialist opinion (11.68%), randomized clinical trials (1.54%) and systematic reviews (1.22%). Few studies addressed complications during or after lingual frenulum release surgery. In conclusion Scientific production on ankyloglossia has shown an increasing increase in the last 28 years, with studies with evidence levels 1, 2 and 3 being published, whose main focus was the performance of surgery to release the lingual frenulum.


Asunto(s)
Bibliometría , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Anquiloglosia , Epidemiología Descriptiva
8.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(2): 185-190, 2021 03 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33690198

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak has been a global pandemic. Researchers have made great efforts to investigate SARS-CoV-2. However, there are few studies analyzing the general situation of SARS-CoV-2 research at global level. This study aimed to characterize global scientific efforts based on SARS-CoV-2 publications. METHODOLOGY: SARS-CoV-2 -related publications were retrieved using Web of Science. The number of publications, citation, country, journal, study topic, total confirmed cases, and total deaths were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 441 publications were identified. China contributed the largest number of publications (198, 44.90%), followed by USA (51, 11.56%), Italy (28, 6.35%), Germany (19, 4.31%), and South Korea (13, 2.95%). Upper-middle-income economies (51.70%) produced the most SARS-CoV-2 publications, followed by high-income (45.12%), lower-middle-income (2.95%), and low-income economies (0.23%). The research output had a significant correlations with total confirmed cases (r = 0.666, p = 0.000) and total deaths (r = 0.610, p = 0.000). China had the highest total citations (1947), followed by USA (204), and Germany (54). China also had the highest average citations (9.83), followed by Netherlands (5.80), and Canada (5.43). The most popular journals were Journal of Medical Virology, Eurosurveillance, and Emerging Microbes and Infections. The most discussed topic was the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: Scientific research on SARS-CoV-2 is from worldwide researchers' efforts, with some countries and journals having special contributions. The countries with more total confirmed cases and total deaths tend to have more research output in the field of SARS-CoV-2. China was the most prolific country, and had the highest quality of publications on SARS-CoV-2.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Publicaciones Seriadas/estadística & datos numéricos , Bibliometría , China , Países Desarrollados , Países en Desarrollo , Alemania , Humanos , Italia , República de Corea , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
12.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 11, 2021 Jan 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33419392

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The status of research and scientific outputs with regards to bacterial central nervous system (CNS) infection in southeast Asia (SEA) is unknown. This study aimed to analyze and compare bacterial CNS infection research output of SEA countries in terms of bibliometric indices. METHODS: The major electronic databases (MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase, CENTRAL, Clinicaltrials.gov and WPRIM) were searched for studies on bacterial CNS infection in SEA until August 31, 2020. Frequencies, percentages and Spearman's rho correlations were used. RESULTS: There was a total of 648 unique studies on bacterial CNS infection in SEA and it was 657 when double-counted (collaborative studies between SEA countries). Thailand (n=148, 22.5%) and Vietnam (n=142, 21.6%) had the highest number of publications. The most common type of research publication was the case report / case series (n=160, 24.7%). Tuberculous meningitis/tuberculoma (n=176, 26.7%) was the most common topic. This study showed that the %GDP for research and development (R&D) was associated with a higher number of research output. However, the GDP per capita was not associated with any of the bibliometric indices. The total number of neurologists was associated with all of the bibliometric analysis. CONCLUSION: Bacterial CNS infection research output in SEA countries was low in terms of quantity. The %GDP for R&D was associated with the number of research publications. The total number of neurologists was associated with all of the bibliometric indices.


Asunto(s)
Bibliometría , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Infecciones del Sistema Nervioso Central , Asia Sudoriental , Humanos
13.
Acad Med ; 96(4): 518-521, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33464738

RESUMEN

PROBLEM: Physician-scientists are individuals trained in both clinical practice and scientific research. Often, the goal of physician-scientist training is to address pressing questions in biomedical research. The established pathways to formally train such individuals are mainly MD-PhD programs and physician-scientist track residencies. Although graduates of these pathways are well equipped to be physician-scientists, numerous factors, including funding and length of training, discourage application to such programs and impede success rates. APPROACH: To address some of the pressing challenges in training and retaining burgeoning physician-scientists, New York University Grossman School of Medicine formed the Accelerated MD-PhD-Residency Pathway in 2016. This pathway builds on the previously established accelerated 3-year MD pathway to residency at the same institution. The Accelerated MD-PhD-Residency Pathway conditionally accepts MD-PhD trainees to a residency position at the same institution through the National Resident Matching Program. OUTCOMES: Since its inception, 2 students have joined the Accelerated MD-PhD-Residency Pathway, which provides protected research time in their chosen residency. The pathway reduces the time to earn an MD and PhD by 1 year and reduces the MD training phase to 3 years, reducing the cost and lowering socioeconomic barriers. Remaining at the same institution for residency allows for the growth of strong research collaborations and mentoring opportunities, which foster success. NEXT STEPS: The authors and institutional leaders plan to increase the number of trainees who are accepted into the Accelerated MD-PhD-Residency Pathway and track the success of these students through residency and into practice to determine if the pathway is meeting its goal of increasing the number of practicing physician-scientists. The authors hope this model can serve as an example to leaders at other institutions who may wish to adopt this pathway for the training of their MD-PhD students.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/educación , Investigación Biomédica/tendencias , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/normas , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/tendencias , Guías como Asunto , Internado y Residencia/normas , Internado y Residencia/tendencias , Adulto , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación de Postgrado en Medicina/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Predicción , Humanos , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Masculino , New York , Adulto Joven
14.
Acad Med ; 96(4): 486-489, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33496430

RESUMEN

Support of the U.S. health professions investigator workforce is critically important to the continued advancement of health care nationally. Physician-investigators comprise one segment of this health professions investigator workforce, which also includes investigators in the nursing, pharmacy, and dentistry professions, and others. Among physician health professionals in particular, the term "physician-investigator" has been described as encompassing physicians engaged in research in various ways including "clinical researchers" (physicians with clinical duties who do clinical, patient-centered research), "clinician-scientists" (physicians with clinical roles who perform research in laboratories or using computational tools), and "physician-scientists" (physicians focused on research with little or no clinical activity). Broadly defined, physician-investigators are included in various groups of researchers described in several articles recently published in Academic Medicine; these articles provide details on a range of approaches, with supporting outcomes data, being taken to train, support, and retain physicians in the health professions investigator workforce. The authors of this commentary examine selected literature, including several articles in this issue among others, along with Association of American Medical Colleges data, to offer observations about programs that train physician-investigators. Evidence-informed single-program approaches for early-career researchers can sustain continued research interest and foster the career development of the emerging physician-investigator workforce. Collaborative multi-institutional approaches offer the benefit of multisite work to power outcomes studies and to increase generalizability beyond a specific institutional program. System-wide institutional approaches may be particularly critical in supporting physician-investigators across all career stages. Although the articles discussed in this commentary are largely (although not exclusively) focused on various initiatives and programs designed to develop and sustain the physician-investigator workforce, such initiatives and programs may have value in addressing shared challenges of developing, supporting, and retaining the broader investigator workforce across all health professions.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/tendencias , Selección de Profesión , Personal de Salud/educación , Médicos/provisión & distribución , Investigadores/educación , Investigadores/provisión & distribución , Recursos Humanos/tendencias , Adulto , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Predicción , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Médicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigadores/estadística & datos numéricos , Estados Unidos , Recursos Humanos/estadística & datos numéricos
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(2): e23540, 2021 Jan 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33466120

RESUMEN

ABSTRACT: The independent plastic surgery pathway recruits candidates with 5 years of surgical training who are typically more advanced in research than their integrated counterparts. Research productivity helps to discriminate between applicants. However, no studies exist detailing the academic attributes of matched independent plastic surgery candidates.We performed a cohort study of 161 independent plastic surgery fellows from accredited residency programs from the 2015 to 2017 application cycles. We performed a bibliometric analysis utilizing Scopus, PubMed, and Google Scholar to identify research output measures at the time of application.The cohort was predominantly men (66%) with a median of 3 articles and a H-index of 1 at the time of application. Interestingly, 16% of successful candidates had no published articles at the time of application, and this did not change significantly over time (P = .0740). Although the H-index remained stable (R 0.13, P = .1095), the number of published journal articles per candidate significantly decreased over 3 consecutive application cycles (R -0.16, P = .0484). Analysis of article types demonstrated a significant increase in basic science articles (R 0.18, P = .0366) and a concurrent decrease in editorial-type publications (R = -0.18, P = .0374).Despite the decline in publication volume of matched independent plastic surgery fellows, the quality of their research portfolio has remained constant. Matched applicants appear to be shifting focus from faster-to-publish articles to longer but higher impact projects. In selecting a training route, applicants must weigh the highly competitive integrated path against the dwindling number of independent positions.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Becas/estadística & datos numéricos , Internado y Residencia/estadística & datos numéricos , Publicaciones Periódicas como Asunto/estadística & datos numéricos , Cirugía Plástica/educación , Bibliometría , Investigación Biomédica/normas , Femenino , Médicos Graduados Extranjeros/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Factores de Tiempo
16.
Pediatr Neurol ; 116: 62-67, 2021 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33486423

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The past decades have seen a transformational shift in the understanding and treatment for neurological diseases affecting infants and children. These advances have been driven in part by the pediatric neurology physician-scientist workforce and its efforts. However, pediatric neurology research faces substantial challenges from internal and external forces including work-life balance demands, COVID-19 pandemic effects, and research funding. Understanding the impact of these challenges on the perceptions, planning, and careers of pediatric neurology physician-scientists is needed to guide the research mission. METHODS: Our objective was to survey the research challenges, goals, and priorities of pediatric neurologists. In 2020 we conducted a cross-sectional, 28-question survey emailed to 1,775 members of the Child Neurology Society. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-one individuals responded to the survey. Most respondents were grant investigators (52%) and conducted clinical research (69%). Research areas included epilepsy (23%), neurodevelopmental and autism (16%), neurocritical care and stroke (11%), neurogenetics and neurometabolics (9%), neonatal neurology (8%), and others. The most common funding source was the National Institutes of Health (37%). Shared major research concerns were funding, utilization of remote technology, overcoming disparities, natural history and multicenter studies, global neurology, and diversification of the research portfolio. Commitment to continuing and increasing research efforts was evident. CONCLUSIONS: Our survey demonstrates obstacles for physician-scientist researchers in pediatric neurology, but it also shows optimism about continued opportunity. Creative approaches to address challenges will benefit the research mission, maximize the current and future pool of researchers, and help improve the lives of children with neurological disorders.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Neurólogos/estadística & datos numéricos , Pediatras/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigadores/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudios Transversales , Humanos , Optimismo , Sociedades Médicas/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Recursos Humanos
17.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 21(1): 1, 2021 01 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33397292

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, a large number of COVID-19-related papers have been published. However, concerns about the risk of expedited science have been raised. We aimed at reviewing and categorizing COVID-19-related medical research and to critically appraise peer-reviewed original articles. METHODS: The data sources were Pubmed, Cochrane COVID-19 register study, arXiv, medRxiv and bioRxiv, from 01/11/2019 to 01/05/2020. Peer-reviewed and preprints publications related to COVID-19 were included, written in English or Chinese. No limitations were placed on study design. Reviewers screened and categorized studies according to i) publication type, ii) country of publication, and iii) topics covered. Original articles were critically appraised using validated quality assessment tools. RESULTS: Among the 11,452 publications identified, 10,516 met the inclusion criteria, among which 7468 (71.0%) were peer-reviewed articles. Among these, 4190 publications (56.1%) did not include any data or analytics (comprising expert opinion pieces). Overall, the most represented topics were infectious disease (n = 2326, 22.1%), epidemiology (n = 1802, 17.1%), and global health (n = 1602, 15.2%). The top five publishing countries were China (25.8%), United States (22.3%), United Kingdom (8.8%), Italy (8.1%) and India (3.4%). The dynamic of publication showed that the exponential growth of COVID-19 peer-reviewed articles was mainly driven by publications without original data (mean 261.5 articles ± 51.1 per week) as compared with original articles (mean of 69.3 ± 22.3 articles per week). Original articles including patient data accounted for 713 (9.5%) of peer-reviewed studies. A total of 576 original articles (80.8%) showed intermediate to high risk of bias. Last, except for simulation studies that mainly used large-scale open data, the median number of patients enrolled was of 102 (IQR = 37-337). CONCLUSIONS: Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the majority of research is composed by publications without original data. Peer-reviewed original articles with data showed a high risk of bias and included a limited number of patients. Together, these findings underscore the urgent need to strike a balance between the velocity and quality of research, and to cautiously consider medical information and clinical applicability in a pressing, pandemic context. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: https://osf.io/5zjyx/.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , /prevención & control , Pandemias , /aislamiento & purificación , /virología , China/epidemiología , Humanos , India/epidemiología , Italia/epidemiología , Reino Unido/epidemiología , Estados Unidos/epidemiología
18.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 10(1): 10, 2021 01 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33436062

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Translating research into practice is a central priority within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap. The underlying aim of the NIH Roadmap is to accelerate the movement of scientific findings into practical health care provisions through translational research. MAIN TEXT: Despite the advances in health sciences, emerging infectious diseases have become more frequent in recent decades. Furthermore, emerging and reemerging pathogens have led to several global public health challenges. A question, and to an extent a concern, arises from this: Why our health care system is experiencing several challenges in encountering the coronavirus outbreak, despite the ever-growing advances in sciences, and the exponential rise in the number of published articles in the first quartile journals and even the ones among the top 1%? CONCLUSION: Two responses could be potentially provided to the above question: First, there seems to be a significant gap between our theoretical knowledge and practice. And second that many scholars and scientists publish papers only to have a longer list of publications, and therefore publishing is viewed as a personal objective, rather than for improving communities' public health.


Asunto(s)
/virología , Publicaciones/estadística & datos numéricos , /fisiología , Investigación Biomédica/normas , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Políticas , Publicaciones/normas , Edición/normas , Edición/estadística & datos numéricos , /genética
19.
Acad Med ; 96(4): 490-494, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33332912

RESUMEN

There are increasing needs for physician-investigators to translate the rapid expansion of knowledge, technology/interventions, and big data into the clinical realm at a time of increasing age-related disabilities and communicable diseases. Yet, the number of physician-investigators has continued to decline, and only a small number of medical school graduates in the United States are actively engaged in research. This problem may be particularly pronounced in small- and medium-sized academic institutions due to more limited educational and mentoring infrastructure. Neither efforts by the federal government nor isolated institutional programs alone have been effective yet in solving this problem. This article describes an integrated institutional strategy undertaken at Penn State College of Medicine that is focused on developing and sustaining a physician-investigator workforce. Key elements of this strategy are new programs to close gaps in the professional life cycle of physician-investigators, dedicated senior leaders collaborating with an experienced and diverse advisory committee, and a data-driven approach to programmatic evaluation. In this article, the implementation of integrated institutional programs including Institutional Mock Review for evaluation of grant proposals before submission, physician-scientist faculty mentoring, and effort matching programs are described. Detailed tactics are offered for tailoring these programs to a particular institution's background to maximize both efficiency and sustainability. The overarching strategy includes engaging multidisciplinary faculty as mentors and mentees, partnering with both clinical and basic science departments, integrating new programs with established approaches, and cultivating an emerging generation of physician-investigators as near-peer mentors and future leaders. This approach may serve as a useful paradigm for building an environment to nurture junior physician-investigators at other mid-sized academic institutions and may also have value for larger institutions in which there is fragmentation of the efforts to sustain the research careers of physicians.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/tendencias , Selección de Profesión , Educación Médica/tendencias , Estudios Interdisciplinarios/tendencias , Tutoría/tendencias , Investigadores/educación , Investigación en Medicina Traslacional/educación , Adulto , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Educación Médica/estadística & datos numéricos , Femenino , Predicción , Humanos , Masculino , Tutoría/estadística & datos numéricos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Investigación en Medicina Traslacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigación en Medicina Traslacional/tendencias , Estados Unidos
20.
Acad Med ; 96(4): 576-584, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33369901

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Despite efforts to increase the representation of women in the national scientific workforce, results still lag. While women's representation in health-related sciences has increased substantially, women remain underrepresented in senior leadership roles. This study was conducted to elucidate influences at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, and societal levels that present as barriers to and facilitators for advancement in research careers for women, with the goal of promoting and retaining a more diverse leadership. METHOD: The authors conducted individual, 1-hour, in-depth, semistructured interviews with 15 female early stage investigators pursuing careers in health sciences research at a large minority-serving institution in Florida in 2018. Interview guides were designed by using a social ecological framework to understand the influence of multilevel systems. Employing a qualitative approach, drawing from a phenomenological orientation, 2 researchers independently coded transcripts and synthesized codes into broad themes. RESULTS: Barriers and facilitators were reported at all ecological levels explored. Illustrative quotations reflect the unequal distribution of familial responsibilities that compete with career advancement, family members' lack of understanding of the demands of a research career, the importance of female mentors, perceived differences in the roles and expectations of female and male faculty at institutions, and normative upheld values that influence early career progression. CONCLUSIONS: Achieving pervasive and sustained changes that move toward gender equity in research requires solutions that address multilevel, explicit and implicit influences on women's advancement in science. Suggestions include shifting familial and institutional norms, creating support systems for women with female mentors, and enforcing consistent policies regarding the roles and expectations of faculty. Findings shed light on the influence of gender on career progression by providing context for the experiences of women and underscore the importance of addressing pervasive societal and structural systems that maintain inequities hindering women's progress in the scientific workforce.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Movilidad Laboral , Docentes Médicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Equidad de Género , Grupos Minoritarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigadores/estadística & datos numéricos , Recursos Humanos/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Femenino , Florida , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad
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