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3.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1428, 2019 Nov 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31684914

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Dog ownership is suggested to improve mental well-being, although empirical evidence among community dog owners is limited. This study examined changes in human mental well-being following dog acquisition, including four measures: loneliness, positive and negative affect, and psychological distress. METHODS: We conducted an eight-month controlled study involving three groups (n = 71): 17 acquired a dog within 1 month of baseline (dog acquisition); 29 delayed dog acquisition until study completion (lagged control); and 25 had no intentions of acquiring a dog (community control). All participants completed the UCLA Loneliness Scale (possible scores 0-60), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and Kessler10 at baseline, three-months and eight-months. We used repeated measures ANCOVAs to analyse data with owner age and sex included as covariates. Post-hoc tests were performed for significant effects (p < 0.05). RESULTS: There was a statistically significant group by time interaction for loneliness (p = 0.03), with an estimated reduction of 8.41 units (95% CI -16.57, - 0.26) from baseline to three-months and 7.12 (95% CI -12.55, - 1.69) from baseline to eight-months in the dog acquisition group. The group by time interaction for positive affect was also significant (p = 0.03), although there was no change in the dog acquisition group. CONCLUSIONS: Companion dog acquisition may reduce loneliness among community dog owners. Our study provides useful direction for future larger trials on the effects of dog ownership on human mental well-being. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial was retrospectively registered on 5th July 2017 with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ( ACTRN12617000967381 ).


Asunto(s)
Salud Mental/estadística & datos numéricos , Propiedad/estadística & datos numéricos , Mascotas/psicología , Adulto , Afecto , Anciano , Animales , Australia , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Perros , Femenino , Humanos , Soledad , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad
4.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1420, 2019 Oct 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31666042

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Understanding levels of community readiness can result in prevention efforts that align with communities' ability and capacity for change and, therefore, be more effective and sustainable. Our study aimed to use baseline (pre-intervention) community readiness scores to assist with the development of obesity prevention strategies, and to assess changes in community readiness over time (pre/post- intervention), to provide evidence of intervention impact. METHOD: Our study was located in a rural and remote area of Victoria, Australia. Community readiness was part of a broader obesity prevention intervention designed to create healthier food and physical activity environments through the combination of systems thinking and collaborative community-led solutions. Interviews were conducted using the community readiness to change tool in 2016 (pre) and 2018 (post) with a community representative sample. Baseline data informed the development of community relevant strategies and the pre/post results formed part of the overall evaluation. RESULTS: The tool generated both quantitative and qualitative (quotes) data. A final readiness score was calculated that corresponded to one of the nine stages of readiness. Four of the five domains of the community readiness to change tool showed statistically significant improvements over time (p < 0.05): knowledge of effort, knowledge of issue, community climate, and leadership. The resources domain that did not improve pre/post intervention. CONCLUSION: Community readiness to change interviews, pre- and post- intervention, provided essential information related to the appropriate targeting and pitch of the prevention strategies, as well as providing an overall evaluation of the positive movement in the community's readiness to implement change.


Asunto(s)
Actitud , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Obesidad/prevención & control , Servicios Preventivos de Salud , Población Rural , Adulto , Dieta , Ejercicio , Humanos , Liderazgo , Victoria
5.
Glob Health Action ; 12(sup1): 1680067, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31679467

RESUMEN

Public engagement in health research has gained popularity because of its potential to co-create knowledge, generate dialogue, and ground research in the priorities and realities of the target groups. However, public engagement that achieves these objectives could still entail unforeseen negative consequences or a wasteful use of resources. Although the evaluation of public engagement has evolved in recent years, we lack consistent evaluation criteria for systematic and transparent assessments of success and failure. This article introduces standard evaluation criteria from the field of development aid evaluation (effectiveness, efficiency, impact, relevance, sustainability) to promote more systematic and comprehensive evaluation practice. I apply these criteria to the public engagement component of a recent research project into antimicrobial resistance, antibiotic use, and health behaviour in Thailand and Laos. Considering village-level engagement workshops, international exhibitions of photo narratives of traditional healing in northern Thailand, and social media communication, I demonstrate that activities that seem to achieve their objectives can still have problematic characteristics in other dimensions. I conclude that these five generic evaluation criteria can broaden our understanding of public engagement. Their more widespread use in evaluations can help build a more comprehensive and balanced evidence base, even if only a sample of public engagement projects and programmes can be evaluated systematically.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Biomédica/organización & administración , Investigación Biomédica/estadística & datos numéricos , Participación de la Comunidad/psicología , Participación de la Comunidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/organización & administración , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Salud Global , Adulto , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Femenino , Humanos , Laos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Tailandia
6.
Metas enferm ; 22(9): 5-14, nov. 2019. graf, tab
Artículo en Español | IBECS | ID: ibc-185037

RESUMEN

Objetivo: identificar y conocer las políticas alimentarias elaboradas por las comunidades y ciudades autónomas en el territorio español. Método: se realizó una investigación documental. La población de estudio fueron las políticas alimentarias de las comunidades autónomas (CC.AA.), Ceuta y Melilla. Se incluyeron planes de salud y programas nutricionales (integrales o infanto-juveniles) publicados en las páginas web de las administraciones públicas regionales (periodo 2006-2018). Se efectuaron diferentes estrategias de búsqueda para identificar los planes y programas procedentes de administraciones públicas a través de las URL descritas. Se elaboró un checklist ad hoc en función del instrumento TREND para valorar la presencia de seis ítems: objetivos, población, descripción de acciones, método, evaluación de las acciones y difusión de los resultados. Resultados: se obtuvieron 38 planes y programas relacionados con las políticas alimentarias, correspondientes a las 17 CC.AA. y a la ciudad autónoma de Ceuta. El 47,4% (n= 18) fueron planes de salud, uno por CC.AA., incluida Ceuta; el 36,8% (n= 14) fueron programas nutricionales integrales y el 15,8% (n= 6) se trataba de programas de obesidad infanto-juvenil. Todos cumplían los cuatro primeros criterios valorados. Sin embargo, no estaban presentes los criterios cinco y seis en algunos programas. Conclusión: todas las CC.AA. tenían plan de salud y también la ciudad autónoma de Ceuta. Andalucía es la región que más políticas ha desarrollado para afrontar la obesidad como problema de salud. País Vasco, Aragón, Canarias, Castilla-La Mancha, Cataluña y Galicia también han elaborado varios programas para tratar este problema. El abordaje de la alimentación saludable y la obesidad en España es heterogéneo en el ámbito regional


Objective: to identify and understand the food policies conducted by the autonomous communities and cities in the Spanish territory. Method: a documentary research was conducted. The study population was the food policies by the autonomous communities (AACC), Ceuta and Melilla; it included the healthcare plans and nutrition programs (comprehensive or child and youth) published in the websites of regional authorities (period 2006-2018). Different search strategies were used to identify the plans and programs from public authorities through the URLs described. An ad hoc checklist was created based on the TREND tool to assess the presence of six items: objectives, population, description of actions, method, evaluation of actions, and dissemination of results. Results: thirty-eight (38) plans and programs associated with food policies were retrieved, corresponding to the 17 AACCs and the autonomous city of Ceuta; 47.4% (n=18) of these were healthcare plans, one per AACC, including Ceuta; 36.8% (n= 14) were comprehensive nutrition programs, and 15.8% (n= 6) were programs on child-youth obesity. All of them met the first four criteria assessed; however, criteria five and six were not present in some programs. Conclusion: all AACCs have healthcare plans, as well as the autonomous city of Ceuta. Andalusia is the region that has developed more policies to address obesity as a health problem. The Basque Country, Aragon, the Canary Islands, Castille-La Mancha, Catalonia and Galicia have also prepared some programs to deal with this problem. In Spain, healthy eating and obesity are addressed heterogeneously in the regional setting


Asunto(s)
Humanos , Dieta Saludable , Política Nutricional , Obesidad/prevención & control , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Enfermería en Salud Pública , Obesidad/epidemiología , Salud Global , Planificación en Salud/organización & administración
7.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31635327

RESUMEN

Social epidemiology has made critical contributions to understanding population health. However, translation of social epidemiology science into action remains a challenge, raising concerns about the impacts of the field beyond academia. With so much focus on issues related to social position, discrimination, racism, power, and privilege, there has been surprisingly little deliberation about the extent and value of social inclusion and equity within the field itself. Indeed, the challenge of translation/action might be more readily met through re-envisioning the role of the people within the research/practice enterprise-reimagining what "social" could, or even should, mean for the future of the field. A potential path forward rests at the nexus of social epidemiology, community-based participatory research (CBPR), and information and communication technology (ICT). Here, we draw from social epidemiology, CBPR, and ICT literatures to introduce A People's Social Epi-a multi-tiered framework for guiding social epidemiology in becoming more inclusive, equitable, and actionable for 21st century practice. In presenting this framework, we suggest the value of taking participatory, collaborative approaches anchored in CBPR and ICT principles and technological affordances-especially within the context of place-based and environmental research. We believe that such approaches present opportunities to create a social epidemiology that is of, with, and by the people-not simply about them. In this spirit, we suggest 10 ICT tools to "socialize" social epidemiology and outline 10 ways to move towards A People's Social Epi in practice.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Salud Poblacional , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud , Humanos , Racismo
8.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1388, 2019 Oct 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31660911

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: To better understand and promote public health, participatory research with Indigenous peoples represents recommended practice, worldwide. However, due to the different ways such research is referred to, described, and used, it is unclear what might (and might not) warrant the term when collaborating with Indigenous peoples. As such, this article expands conceptual understandings of participatory research with Indigenous peoples, across timelines and regions. METHOD: Following a systematic search of 29 academic databases in April 2018, a lexical analysis of the methods sections was conducted, which were sourced from 161 publications across 107 journals. RESULTS: The active involvement of Indigenous peoples in research that is expressly participatory is limited across all project phases. This might be because the ways in which Indigenous peoples were involved throughout were not reported - however, it might also be because Indigenous peoples were not involved in all project phases. Furthermore, descriptions differ by study location and publication timeframe - notably, studies in the region of the Americas chiefly refer to pandemics, surveyors, and art; and those published in the last two decades have given primacy to artifacts of interest. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this corpus of data suggest participatory research with Indigenous peoples is not always described across different project phases; furthermore, it differs according to study location and publication timeframe. This offers considerable opportunity to further this important research area via alternative methodologies that award primacy to Indigenous expertise and agency.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Humanos
9.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31581695

RESUMEN

Addressing health disparities and promoting health equity for Roma has been a challenge. The Roma are the largest disadvantaged ethnic minority population in Europe and have been the victims of deep social and economic injustices, institutional discrimination, and structural antigypsyism over many centuries. This has resulted in a much worse health status than their non-Roma counterparts. Current strategies based on ameliorative and top-down approaches to service delivery have resulted in paradoxical effects that solidify health disparities, since they do not effectively address the problems of vulnerable Roma groups. Following a health justice approach, we present a community-based participatory action research case study generated by a community and university partnership intended to address power imbalances and build collaboration among local stakeholders. This case study involved a group of health providers, Roma residents, researchers, Roma community organizations, and other stakeholders in the Poligono Sur, a neighborhood of Seville, Spain. The case study comprises four phases: (1) identifying Roma health assets, (2) empowering Roma community through sociopolitical awareness, (3) promoting alliances between Roma and community resources/institutions, and (4) building a common agenda for promoting Roma health justice. We highlighted best practices for developing processes to influence Roma health equity in local health policy agendas.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/métodos , Equidad en Salud , Política de Salud , Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Roma/psicología , Roma/estadística & datos numéricos , Justicia Social , Grupos Étnicos/psicología , Grupos Étnicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Humanos , Grupos Minoritarios/psicología , Grupos Minoritarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Estigma Social , España
10.
Med J Aust ; 211 Suppl 7: S3-S39, 2019 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31587276

RESUMEN

Project Synergy aims to test the potential of new and emerging technologies to enhance the quality of mental health care provided by traditional face-to-face services. Specifically, it seeks to ensure that consumers get the right care, first time (delivery of effective mental health care early in the course of illness). Using co-design with affected individuals, Project Synergy has built, implemented and evaluated an online platform to assist the assessment, feedback, management and monitoring of people with mental disorders. It also promotes the maintenance of wellbeing by collating health and social information from consumers, their supportive others and health professionals. This information is reported back openly to consumers and their service providers to promote genuine collaborative care. The online platform does not provide stand-alone medical or health advice, risk assessment, clinical diagnosis or treatment; instead, it supports users to decide what may be suitable care options. Using an iterative cycle of research and development, the first four studies of Project Synergy (2014-2016) involved the development of different types of online prototypes for young people (i) attending university; (ii) in three disadvantaged communities in New South Wales; (iii) at risk of suicide; and (iv) attending five headspace centres. These contributed valuable information concerning the co-design, build, user testing and evaluation of prototypes, as well as staff experiences during development and service quality improvements following implementation. Through ongoing research and development (2017-2020), these prototypes underpin one online platform that aims to support better multidimensional mental health outcomes for consumers; more efficient, effective and appropriate use of health professional knowledge and clinical skills; and quality improvements in mental health service delivery.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Reforma de la Atención de Salud , Internet , Servicios de Salud Mental , Adolescente , Australia , Conducta Cooperativa , Intervención Médica Temprana , Humanos , Nueva Gales del Sur , Calidad de la Atención de Salud , Participación de los Interesados , Adulto Joven
11.
J Youth Adolesc ; 48(12): 2418-2431, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31606828

RESUMEN

LGBTQ youth are at greater risk for compromised health, yet large-scale health promotion programs for LGBTQ young people have been slow to develop. LGBTQ community-based organizations-which provide LGBTQ-focused support and services-have existed for decades, but have not been a focus of the LGBTQ youth health literature. The current study used a contemporary sample of LGBTQ youth (age 15-21; M = 18.81; n = 1045) to examine who participates in LGBTQ community-based organizations, and the association between participation and self-reported mental health and substance use. Youth who participated in LGBTQ community-based organizations were more likely to be assigned male at birth, transgender, youth of color, and accessing free-or-reduced lunch. Participation was associated with concurrent and longitudinal reports of mental health and substance use. LGBTQ community-based organizations may be an underutilized resource for promoting LGBTQ youth health.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Comunitaria/organización & administración , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Minorías Sexuales y de Género/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Femenino , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/organización & administración , Humanos , Masculino , Personas Transgénero/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto Joven
12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31614429

RESUMEN

Appalachian Kentucky reports some of the highest rates of respiratory illness in the United States, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. While smoking rates are high in the region, unexplained variation remains, and community-engaged research approaches are warranted to identify contributing factors. The Mountain Air Project's community advisory board recommended that investigators invite youth to provide their perspectives on possible contributing factors to respiratory illness, and we undertook an exploratory study to determine the utility of photovoice to elicit such perspectives with this population. While photovoice has been employed for other youth-focused health studies in Appalachia, to our knowledge, this work represents the region's first environmental study using photovoice among youth. Over eight weeks, ten participants (age 12-18) represented their perspectives through photographs and accompanying narratives. A brief thematic content analysis of the youth narratives that accompanied the photos revealed three primary themes of environmental determinants of respiratory illness. These themes included compromises community members make regarding respiratory health in order to secure a livelihood; tension between cultural legacies and respiratory health; and consequences of geographic forces. This study demonstrates the value of incorporating youth perspectives in environmental health research, and that photovoice was a valuable approach to elicit such perspectives.


Asunto(s)
Concienciación , Salud Ambiental , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Inteligencia , Infecciones del Sistema Respiratorio/epidemiología , Fumar/efectos adversos , Fumar/psicología , Adolescente , Niño , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Femenino , Humanos , Kentucky/epidemiología , Masculino
13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31569673

RESUMEN

This study describes a Pyrenean cross-cultural structure called Centre for the Promotion of Physical Activity and Health (CAPAS-City) that was created to promote physical activity (PA) in Huesca (Spain) and Tarbes (France). The main aim of this centre is to lead the way in the design, implementation, and evaluation of multilevel PA interventions to improve their efficacy and sustainability inside the city. CAPAS-City responds to the main challenges related to multilevel PA interventions, through six guiding principles: (1) promoting sustainability, (2) playing a leadership role, (3) promoting multisectoral partnerships, (4) using evidence-based strategies, (5) promoting integrated knowledge translation, and (6) using a participatory research approach. Five multilevel PA interventions were designed in both cities by CAPAS-City with these principles in mind. Through the example of the Annual MOT Test adapted to bikes, we also illustrate one practical application of the use of these principles, following the Social-Ecological approach, in which the main agents of influence are involved at different levels to encourage cycling. According to the promising results found in this study, CAPAS-City appears to be a structure that is able to respond to the main needs and challenges of multilevel interventions to increase PA levels in the whole population of both cities.


Asunto(s)
Comparación Transcultural , Ejercicio , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Promoción de la Salud/organización & administración , Salud Urbana , Adolescente , Adulto , Niño , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia , Femenino , Estudios de Seguimiento , Francia , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Humanos , Liderazgo , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Desarrollo de Programa , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Medio Social , España , Participación de los Interesados , Investigación en Medicina Traslacional , Poblaciones Vulnerables , Adulto Joven
14.
AIDS Educ Prev ; 31(5): 433-451, 2019 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31550193

RESUMEN

This article describes the development of the Community Health clinic model for Agency in Relationships and Safer Microbicide Adherence intervention (CHARISMA), an intervention designed to address the ways in which gender norms and power differentials within relationships affect women's ability to safely and consistently use HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). CHARISMA development involved three main activities: (1) a literature review to identify appropriate evidence-based relationship dynamic scales and interventions; (2) the analysis of primary and secondary data collected from completed PrEP studies, surveys and cognitive interviews with PrEP-experienced and naïve women, and in-depth interviews with former vaginal ring trial participants and male partners; and (3) the conduct of workshops to test and refine key intervention activities prior to pilot testing. These steps are described along with the final clinic and community-based intervention, which was tested for feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness in Johannesburg, South Africa.


Asunto(s)
Antiinfecciosos/administración & dosificación , Asistencia Sanitaria Culturalmente Competente , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Violencia de Pareja/estadística & datos numéricos , Profilaxis Pre-Exposición , Parejas Sexuales/psicología , Administración Intravaginal , Adulto , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Femenino , Humanos , Violencia de Pareja/psicología , Masculino , Determinantes Sociales de la Salud , Sudáfrica , Cremas, Espumas y Geles Vaginales
15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31505766

RESUMEN

Extreme summertime heat is a significant public health threat that disproportionately impacts vulnerable urban populations. Research on health impacts of climate change (including increasing intensity, duration, and frequency of hot weather) is sometimes designed and implemented without the involvement of the communities being studied, i.e., "community-placed" not "community-based." We describe how the Heatwaves, Housing, and Health: Increasing Climate Resiliency in Detroit (HHH) partnership engaged relevant communities by integrating a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach into an existing, academic-designed research project through a steering committee of community and academic partners. Using a case study approach, we analyze program documentation, partnership evaluation questionnaires, and HHH steering committee meeting notes. We describe the CBPR process by which we successfully collected research data in Detroit during summer 2016, engaged in collaborative analysis of data, and shared results with Detroit residents. Evaluations of the partnership over 2 years show community involvement in research; enhanced capacities; success in securing new grant funding; and ways that CBPR strengthened the validity, relevance, and translation of research. Engaging communities as equal partners using CBPR, even after a study is underway, can strengthen research to understand and address the impacts of extreme heat on health and equity in urban communities.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/métodos , Equidad en Salud , Ciudades , Clima , Participación de la Comunidad , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Vivienda , Humanos , Michigan
16.
New Dir Child Adolesc Dev ; 2019(167): 117-131, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31507034

RESUMEN

This study provides an illustration of a research design complementary to randomized controlled trial to evaluate program effects, namely, participatory peer research (PPR). The PPR described in current study was carried out in a small sample (N = 10) of young adults with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and severe behavioral problems. During the PPR intervention, control and feedback to individuals is restored by training them to become participant-researchers, who collaborate in a small group of people with MID. Their research is aimed at the problems the young adults perceive and/or specific subjects of their interest. The study was designed as a multiple case study with an experimental and comparison group. Questionnaires and a semistructured interview were administered before and after the PPR project. Results of Reliable Change Index (RCI) analyses showed a decrease in self-serving cognitive distortions in the PPR group, but not in the comparison group. These results indicate that PPR helps to compensate for a lack of adequate feedback and control, and in turn may decrease distorted thinking and thereby possibly later challenging behavior.


Asunto(s)
Síntomas Conductuales/terapia , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Discapacidad Intelectual/terapia , Control Interno-Externo , Participación del Paciente , Proyectos de Investigación , Autoimagen , Adulto , Síntomas Conductuales/etiología , Humanos , Discapacidad Intelectual/complicaciones , Masculino , Grupo Paritario , Instituciones Residenciales , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad , Resultado del Tratamiento , Adulto Joven
17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31547171

RESUMEN

The Yurok Tribe partnered with the University of California Davis (UC Davis) Superfund Research Program to identify and address contaminants in the Klamath watershed that may be impairing human and ecosystem health. We draw on a community-based participatory research approach that begins with community concerns, includes shared duties across the research process, and collaborative interpretation of results. A primary challenge facing University and Tribal researchers on this project is the complexity of the relationship(s) between the identity and concentrations of contaminants and the diversity of illnesses plaguing community members. The framework of bi-directional learning includes Yurok-led river sampling, Yurok traditional ecological knowledge, University lab analysis, and collaborative interpretation of results. Yurok staff and community members share their unique exposure pathways, their knowledge of the landscape, their past scientific studies, and the history of landscape management, and University researchers use both specific and broad scope chemical screening techniques to attempt to identify contaminants and their sources. Both university and tribal knowledge are crucial to understanding the relationship between human and environmental health. This paper examines University and Tribal researchers' shared learning, progress, and challenges at the end of the second year of a five-year Superfund Research Program (SRP) grant to identify and remediate toxins in the lower Klamath River watershed. Our water quality research is framed within a larger question of how to best build university-Tribal collaboration to address contamination and associated human health impacts.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Monitoreo del Ambiente/métodos , Contaminantes Ambientales/análisis , Indios Norteamericanos/psicología , Prácticas Interdisciplinarias , California , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Salud Ambiental , Humanos
18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31500126

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Community and patient engagement in the healthcare system and biomedical research are prerequisites for eliminating health disparities. We conducted a "listening tour" to enhance our understanding of multilevel factors associated with community trust. METHODS: Using community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods, we conducted a phenomenological qualitative study. "Town-hall" style discussions were held at nine sites across an urban, Midwestern city. We recruited adults (N = 130) via community networks, social media, flyers, and word-of-mouth. Demographic assessments were self-administered and listening tour sessions were conducted by trained moderators. Themes were framed within the social ecological model (SEM; intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, community, and policy levels). RESULTS: Participants were mostly female (68%), African American (80%), had health coverage (97%) and were diagnosed with a chronic health condition (71%). The overarching theme was sociodemographic differences in distrust, such that African Americans and deaf/hearing impaired participants perceived disparities in healthcare, a lower quality of care, and skepticism about biomedical research, relative to Whites. CONCLUSIONS: The depth of distrust for healthcare providers, systems, and researchers in underserved communities remains strong and complex. Findings highlight the need to understand the lived experiences of community members, and how distrust is maintained. Multilevel interventions to increase trust and the accrual of underrepresented populations into clinical trials are needed.


Asunto(s)
Disparidades en Atención de Salud , Confianza , Población Urbana , Adulto , Afroamericanos , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Investigación Biomédica , Enfermedad Crónica , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/métodos , Grupo de Ascendencia Continental Europea , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Investigación Cualitativa , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
19.
BMC Res Notes ; 12(1): 616, 2019 Sep 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31547837

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To partner with and understand the health of Somali Bantu refugee women, small group sessions were designed and conducted using a community-based collaborative action research (CBCAR) approach. Health topics identified by this community were presented in 42 sessions with eleven women. Follow-up individual interviews with the women were used to ask questions about health experiences and plan for future health education. The objective of this qualitative study was to provide refugee women with knowledge to help them adjust to new health challenges in the United States, and to share personal narratives in a safe environment. RESULTS: The process of sharing health information with the women resulted in a collaborative exchange of culture and community. Individual interviews allowed women to voice their opinions outside of the influence of their community elders. CBCAR is an effective tool to involve refugee communities, and other populations small in number, in addressing their unique health challenges. Results from this study demonstrated that small group sessions and a CBCAR approach can be effective in sharing knowledge within small communities of refugee women. Findings from the study will assist in the future planning of health education programs for refugee women and their families in this community.


Asunto(s)
Asistencia Sanitaria Culturalmente Competente/métodos , Educación en Salud/ética , Refugiados/psicología , Adulto , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/métodos , Asistencia Sanitaria Culturalmente Competente/ética , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Kansas , Investigación Cualitativa , Somalia , Estados Unidos
20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31514327

RESUMEN

Community-based participatory research is a growing approach, but often includes higher levels of community engagement in the research design and data collection stages than in the data interpretation stage. Involving study participants in this stage could further knowledge justice, science that aligns with and supports social justice agendas. This article reports on two community-based participatory environmental health surveys conducted between 2015 and 2019 in an industrial region near Marseille, France, and focuses specifically on our approach of organizing focus groups to directly involve residents and community stakeholders in the analysis and interpretation process. We found that, in these focus groups, residents triangulated across many different sources of information-study findings, local knowledge, and different types of expert knowledge-to reach conclusions about the health of their community and make recommendations for what should be done to improve community health outcomes. We conclude that involving residents in the data analysis and interpretation stage can promote epistemic justice and lead to final reports that are more useful to community stakeholders and decision-makers.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Interpretación Estadística de Datos , Salud Ambiental , Grupos Focales , Asma/psicología , Toma de Decisiones , Francia , Humanos , Conocimiento , Neoplasias/psicología , Justicia Social , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
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