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1.
AIDS Educ Prev ; 33(2): 103-119, 2021 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33821679

RESUMEN

HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) reduces HIV acquisition among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW). Existing evidence suggests that uptake and adherence are low among AGYW and that relationship factors such as gender-based violence (GBV) are important barriers. Through a community-based participatory research (CBPR) process, a youth advisory board (YAB), service providers (SP), and a study team developed the Tu'Washindi na PrEP intervention to support AGYW PrEP use in the context of GBV. The YAB also guided the formative research and interpretation of results. The authors pretested the intervention with SP, AGYW and their partners, and community change agents, and then developed guides for AGYW support clubs, community-based male sensitization sessions, and couples-based events that included formulation of story lines for dramatized PrEP negotiation and information dissemination skills. Stakeholder engagement led to an intervention responsive to AGYW's needs for PrEP support in the context of their relationships, which was evaluated through a 6-month pilot community randomized controlled trial.


Asunto(s)
Fármacos Anti-VIH/administración & dosificación , Violencia de Género/psicología , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/psicología , Profilaxis Pre-Exposición/métodos , Profilaxis Pre-Exposición/estadística & datos numéricos , Adolescente , Fármacos Anti-VIH/uso terapéutico , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Femenino , Infecciones por VIH/psicología , Humanos , Adulto Joven
2.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e048391, 2021 03 30.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33785495

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To assess medium-term organ impairment in symptomatic individuals following recovery from acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. DESIGN: Baseline findings from a prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Community-based individuals from two UK centres between 1 April and 14 September 2020. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals ≥18 years with persistent symptoms following recovery from acute SARS-CoV-2 infection and age-matched healthy controls. INTERVENTION: Assessment of symptoms by standardised questionnaires (EQ-5D-5L, Dyspnoea-12) and organ-specific metrics by biochemical assessment and quantitative MRI. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Severe post-COVID-19 syndrome defined as ongoing respiratory symptoms and/or moderate functional impairment in activities of daily living; single-organ and multiorgan impairment (heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas, spleen) by consensus definitions at baseline investigation. RESULTS: 201 individuals (mean age 45, range 21-71 years, 71% female, 88% white, 32% healthcare workers) completed the baseline assessment (median of 141 days following SARS-CoV-2 infection, IQR 110-162). The study population was at low risk of COVID-19 mortality (obesity 20%, hypertension 7%, type 2 diabetes 2%, heart disease 5%), with only 19% hospitalised with COVID-19. 42% of individuals had 10 or more symptoms and 60% had severe post-COVID-19 syndrome. Fatigue (98%), muscle aches (87%), breathlessness (88%) and headaches (83%) were most frequently reported. Mild organ impairment was present in the heart (26%), lungs (11%), kidneys (4%), liver (28%), pancreas (40%) and spleen (4%), with single-organ and multiorgan impairment in 70% and 29%, respectively. Hospitalisation was associated with older age (p=0.001), non-white ethnicity (p=0.016), increased liver volume (p<0.0001), pancreatic inflammation (p<0.01), and fat accumulation in the liver (p<0.05) and pancreas (p<0.01). Severe post-COVID-19 syndrome was associated with radiological evidence of cardiac damage (myocarditis) (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In individuals at low risk of COVID-19 mortality with ongoing symptoms, 70% have impairment in one or more organs 4 months after initial COVID-19 symptoms, with implications for healthcare and public health, which have assumed low risk in young people with no comorbidities. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04369807; Pre-results.


Asunto(s)
/complicaciones , Hospitalización/estadística & datos numéricos , Actividades Cotidianas , Adulto , Anciano , /fisiopatología , Estudios de Casos y Controles , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/complicaciones , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Estudios Prospectivos , Índice de Severidad de la Enfermedad
3.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 78, 2021 03 15.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33722263

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The importance of community involvement in the response against disease outbreaks has been well established. However, we lack insights into local communities' experiences in coping with the current COVID-19 pandemic. This study explored both the impact of, and response to, COVID-19 within the Orthodox Jewish communities of Antwerp (Belgium) during the first lockdown period (March 2020 - May 2020). METHODS: We conducted an explorative qualitative study using a participatory approach. First, we performed a community mapping to identify relevant stakeholders. Through the active involvement of a community advisory board and based on qualitative interviews with key-informants and community members, we elicited lived experiences, attitudes, and perceptions towards COVID-19. Interviews were conducted both face-to-face and using online web conferencing technology. Data were analyzed inductively according to the principles of thematic analysis. RESULTS: Government-issued outbreak control measures presented context-specific challenges to the Orthodox Jewish communities in Antwerp. They related mainly to the remote organization of religious life, and practicing physical distancing in socially and culturally strongly connected communities. Existing community resources were rapidly mobilized to adapt to the outbreak and to self-organize response initiatives within communities. The active involvement of community and religious leaders in risk communication proved to be of great importance to facilitate the coverage and uptake of pandemic control measures while protecting essential community values and traditions. Creating bottom-up and community-adapted communication strategies, including addressing language barriers and involving Rabbis in the dissemination of prevention messages, fostered a feeling of trust in government's response measures. However, unmet information and prevention needs were also identified, such as the need for inclusive communication by public authorities and the need to mitigate the negative effects of stigmatization. CONCLUSION: The experiences of Orthodox Jewish communities in Antwerp demonstrate a valuable example of a feasible community-centered approach to health emergencies. Increasing the engagement of communities in local decision-making and governance structures remains a key strategy to respond to unmet information and prevention needs.


Asunto(s)
/prevención & control , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/métodos , Participación de la Comunidad/psicología , Judíos/psicología , Confianza/psicología , Adulto , Anciano , Bélgica/epidemiología , Control de Enfermedades Transmisibles/legislación & jurisprudencia , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Investigación Cualitativa , Cuarentena/legislación & jurisprudencia
5.
Public Health Res Pract ; 31(1)2021 Mar 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33690789

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To consider the challenges of communicating COVID-19 directives to culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities in Australia, and present evidence-based solutions to influence policy and practice on promoting relevant health behaviours; to advance participatory research methodologies for health behaviour change. Type of program or service: We present a case study of a participatory research collaboration between CALD community leaders and health behaviour change scientists during the COVID-19 crisis. The goal was to better understand the role of community leaders in shaping health behaviours in their communities and how that role might be leveraged for better health outcomes. METHODS: This article is the culmination of a series of dialogues between CALD community and advocacy leaders, and health behaviour change scientists in July 2020. The academic authors recruited 12 prominent CALD community leaders, conducted five semi-structured dialogues with small groups, and worked with all participants to develop insights that were applicable to the many different CALD communities represented in the research collaboration. RESULTS: Three key findings emerged: 1) partnerships between CALD leaders, communities and government are critical for effective health communication; 2) shifting behaviour requires moving beyond disseminating information to designing tailored solutions; and 3) the diverse needs and circumstances of people and communities must be at the centre of health communication and behaviour change strategies. LESSONS LEARNT: The collaborative process we undertook in this study enabled us to identify key challenges experienced and solutions offered by CALD leaders in communicating health information throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Partnering with communities that are subject to health messaging can reduce inequalities in healthcare communication by enabling the development of strategies that help align human behaviour with the recommendations of health experts. This - along with sustained partnership and collaboration with CALD communities, understanding the cultural context, and the appropriate tailoring and delivery of communications - will ensure health-related messages are not lost in translation. The lessons provided in this paper are applicable not only to the current pandemic but also to post-pandemic social and economic recovery.


Asunto(s)
/epidemiología , Diversidad Cultural , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Comunicación en Salud/métodos , Lenguaje , Australia , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Información de Salud al Consumidor/métodos , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Características de la Residencia , Traducción
6.
Breastfeed Med ; 16(2): 156-164, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33591227

RESUMEN

Background: Although breastfeeding is optimal infant nutrition, disparities in breastfeeding persist in the African American population. AMEN (Avondale Moms Empowered to Nurse) launched a Peer-to-Peer support group to increase breastfeeding initiation and duration in an under-resourced African American urban community with low breastfeeding rates. Materials and Methods: A Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR)-guided project was developed in partnership with a neighborhood church. Using modified Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) peer counseling materials, Avondale neighborhood breastfeeding moms were trained and designated Breastfeeding Champions. Community organizations and partnering agencies helped recruit local mothers. Support groups included childcare, transportation, refreshments, and incentives, plus stipends for Champions. A mixed-methods approach captured participation, feeding intention and practices, and program evaluation using electronic data capture. After adding another neighborhood with low breastfeeding rates, AMEN was modified to "All Moms Empowered to Nurse." Additional Champion moms were trained as Reaching Our Sisters Everywhere (ROSE) Community Transformers. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the group has met weekly by virtual platform. Results: Since May 2017, 67 AMEN support meetings have included 158 participants, with average attendance of 10 (range 5-19) per meeting. In addition to 8 Champions, 110 moms have attended, including 24% expecting mothers. Additional attendees include 13 family support persons, 23 guest speakers, and 12 from community outreach programs. Qualitative feedback from participants has been uniformly positive. Breastfeeding initiation rates have increased 12% in the initial neighborhood. Conclusions: Harnessing strength within the local community, Champion Breastfeeding Moms have successfully launched AMEN breastfeeding support groups in under-resourced African American urban neighborhoods, helping more mothers reach their breastfeeding goals.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/etnología , Lactancia Materna , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Madres/educación , Madres/psicología , Grupo Paritario , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Atención Posnatal , Protestantismo , Apoyo Social , Estados Unidos , Población Urbana , Poblaciones Vulnerables/etnología
7.
Am J Public Health ; 111(4): 658-662, 2021 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33600248

RESUMEN

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected underserved and minority populations in the United States. This is partially attributable to limited access to diagnostic testing from deeply rooted structural inequities precipitating higher infection and mortality rates. We describe the process of establishing a drive-through collection site by leveraging an academic-community partnership between a medical institution and a federally qualified health center in Minnesota. Over 10 weeks, 2006 COVID-19 tests were provided to a socioeconomically disadvantaged population of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income essential workers.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Disparidades en Atención de Salud/etnología , Proveedores de Redes de Seguridad , /mortalidad , Grupos de Población Continentales , Grupos Étnicos/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Área sin Atención Médica , Minnesota , Grupos Minoritarios/estadística & datos numéricos , Asociación entre el Sector Público-Privado , Factores Socioeconómicos
9.
AIDS Educ Prev ; 33(1): 16-32, 2021 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33617322

RESUMEN

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can reduce the risk of HIV infection by over 90% among those at high risk via sexual transmission. PrEP acceptance and adherence remains low among those at highest risk of HIV, including Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in the southern U.S. This community-based participatory research project explored Black MSM's experiences with PrEP in North Carolina through photovoice, a methodology using photography and discussion. Our findings highlighted challenges and opportunities with PrEP, including intersectional stigma, the need for improved patient-provider education, and the role of community-based organizations in closing patient-provider gaps. This work is a first step towards understanding the daily lives of Black MSM on PrEP in the Triangle Region of North Carolina, including barriers and facilitators to PrEP use. Implications for public health practice highlight the need for conducting community-level interventions, integrating PrEP into primary care, and normalizing PrEP through community conversations.


Asunto(s)
Afroamericanos/psicología , Infecciones por VIH/prevención & control , Homosexualidad Masculina/etnología , Profilaxis Pre-Exposición/métodos , Estigma Social , Adulto , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Infecciones por VIH/etnología , Equidad en Salud , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Homosexualidad Masculina/psicología , Humanos , Masculino , North Carolina , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud , Relaciones Profesional-Paciente , Investigación Cualitativa , Sexo Seguro
10.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 45(1): 34-38, 2021 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33522685

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To examine the supply of smoking cessation medicines to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers compared to non-Indigenous smokers across Australia. METHODS: We analysed the total number of smoking cessation prescriptions dispensed over three years through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) compared to those supplied nationally through the Closing the Gap (CTG) measure and also in the Northern Territory through the Remote Area Aboriginal Health Service (RAAHS) program. RESULTS: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers were supplied with fewer smoking cessation medicines per smoker under the CTG measure compared to non-Indigenous smokers under general PBS benefits. Supply of medicines though the RAAHS program complicated the use of CTG data where higher proportions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people live in remote areas and use of the CTG measure is lower. CONCLUSIONS: Fewer smoking cessation medicines are being prescribed and then dispensed to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers than to non-Indigenous smokers. Implications for public health: CTG and RAAHS data may be useful to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to improve the use of smoking cessation medicines by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers. However, there are limitations and current obstacles to accessing RAAHS data would need to be removed.


Asunto(s)
Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/estadística & datos numéricos , Servicios de Salud del Indígena/organización & administración , Fumadores/estadística & datos numéricos , Cese del Hábito de Fumar/estadística & datos numéricos , Fumar/efectos adversos , Adulto , Anciano , Australia/epidemiología , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Northern Territory/epidemiología , Grupo de Ascendencia Oceánica , Estudios Prospectivos , Fumadores/psicología , Fumar/epidemiología , Fumar/etnología , Cese del Hábito de Fumar/etnología
11.
BMJ Glob Health ; 5(Suppl 2)2021 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33436494

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Experiences of care and satisfaction are intrinsically linked, as user's experiences of care may directly impact satisfaction, or indirectly impact user's expectations and values. Both experiences of care and satisfaction are important to measure so that quality can be monitored and improved. Globally, women experience mistreatment during childbirth at facilities; however, there is limited evidence exploring the mistreatment and women's satisfaction with care during childbirth. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey within the WHO study 'How women are treated during facility-based childbirth' exploring the mistreatment of women during childbirth in Ghana, Guinea, Myanmar and Nigeria. Women's experiences of mistreatment and satisfaction with care during childbirth was explored. Multivariable logistic regression modelling was conducted to evaluate the association between mistreatment, women's overall satisfaction with the care they received, and whether they would recommend the facility to others. RESULTS: 2672 women were included in this analysis. Despite over one-third of women reporting experience of mistreatment (35.4%), overall satisfaction for services received and recommendation of the facility to others was high, 88.4% and 90%, respectively. Women who reported experiences of mistreatment were more likely to report lower satisfaction with care: women were more likely to be satisfied if they did not experience verbal abuse (adjusted OR (AOR) 4.52, 95% CI 3.50 to 5.85), or had short waiting times (AOR 5.12, 95% CI 3.94 to 6.65). Women who did not experience any physical or verbal abuse or discrimination were more likely to recommend the facility to others (AOR 3.89, 95% CI 2.98 to 5.06). CONCLUSION: Measuring both women's experiences and their satisfaction with care are critical to assess quality and provide actionable evidence for quality improvement. These measures can enable health systems to identify and respond to root causes contributing to measures of satisfaction.


Asunto(s)
Parto/psicología , Satisfacción Personal , Mujeres/psicología , Adulto , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Betacoronavirus , Niño , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Estudios Transversales , Parto Obstétrico , Femenino , Ghana , Guinea , Humanos , Masculino , Salud Materna , Mianmar , Nigeria , Pandemias , Embarazo , Calidad de la Atención de Salud
12.
Ambio ; 50(6): 1222-1236, 2021 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33454885

RESUMEN

This study examines the perspectives of Sami community members and university researchers regarding the ethical considerations for engagement in Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) with Sami communities in northern Finland. Key informant interviews were conducted with Sami people from Finland who were exposed to or participated in research in their communities as well as with researchers who have conducted research with the Sami in Finland across diverse topics. Five themes were identified: establishing trust, research preparation, research comprehension, research ethics, and inclusion in research. The differences in participant perspectives were compared based on their community versus researcher roles. Our findings emphasize the need for (1) strategies to develop and maintain trust between Sami communities and researchers; (2) methods to bridge concepts of bias projected onto Sami communities and researchers by the others' differing world views and beliefs about research; and (3) increased education in community-engaged methods for social and natural scientists working with Sami communities. This study supports the need for the development of formalized ethical protocols for conducting community-based engaged research with and for Sami people in Finland that ensure mutually beneficial research for all involved.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Principios Morales , Finlandia , Humanos
13.
Artículo en Alemán | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33403462

RESUMEN

Participatory Health Research is a unique research approach that needs unique funding conditions. In April 2020, the German journal Gesundheitswesen published an article that recommends reasonable measures for funding Participatory Health Research. Some of the aspects mentioned are illustrated in the present article with practical examples.Three examples of experiences are introduced to explain the manifold and different conditions for applying for funds for participatory research projects. Example 1 shows good cooperation between the applicant and funder, allowing participatory processes. The conditions for funding in example 2 - despite being focused on participatory involvement - did not allow effective participation. Example 3 deals with the personal, legitimate research interests of affected people, who are only partially reflected in the current funding landscape and hardly receive any funding.The experiences regarding the funding of participatory research are quite different. There are positive cases, however experiences in which applicants meet obstacles that hinder participative collaboration prevail. This particularly concerns the joint development of research tenders (issues, research questions, design) by all relevant stakeholders. Therefore, to effectively foster participatory health research, more calls for proposals are needed that are flexible, have prolonged application periods, allow multilevel funding, and are open to nonacademic stakeholders.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Alemania , Humanos
14.
Artículo en Alemán | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33404663

RESUMEN

The participatory research approach results in changes in roles and relationships for researchers and coresearchers compared to traditional research concepts. In the form of a workshop report, this article describes reflections and findings on the question of how roles are perceived and filled in participatory health research (PHR). Researchers and practitioners from two subprojects in the research consortium PartKommPlus evaluated their experiences from several years of cooperation and developed insights into which dynamics were important for the design of roles and what should be considered for a productive development of roles.Five important elements were identified: the significance of the scope for action resulting from the ties of the participants to their respective institutions; the change of roles and relationships over the course of the project time; the significance of trust for functioning cooperative relationships; the problem of information confidentiality for scientific exploitation; and the political character of the cooperation, which is based on the claim for change of participatory research and which presupposes shared basic attitudes and goals. Finally, the importance of joint reflection on role design, which contributes to the success or failure of participatory research cooperation and the quality of its results, is highlighted.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Alemania , Humanos
16.
Artículo en Alemán | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33399944

RESUMEN

The limited timeframes of participatory health research (PHR) studies make it difficult to achieve the desired specific social changes through the projects. This is particularly true for the promotion of health equity in municipal settings. This article examines how participatory quality development (PQE) approaches can complement PGF in order to implement participation as a quality criterion in health promotion and to contribute to the sustainability of research results.Based on the structure and course of two participatory research projects on integrated municipal health promotion, quality development processes with older people and parents of preschool children are described.Structural and process design contribute significantly to the transfer of research results into practice and beyond the end of the project. In their structure and by continuously involving local partners and stakeholders, projects must ensure that the principles of participatory quality development are implemented in processes from the very beginning.Participation as a quality criterion in health promotion is now well established. However, there is a deficit in the implementation of this claim. PGF and PQE consistently implement the criterion but place high demands on structure and process design. It is recommended that participation principles should be anchored in cooperation agreements in the municipal partnerships and supportive frameworks for participatory approaches should be continuously developed.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Promoción de la Salud , Anciano , Anciano de 80 o más Años , Preescolar , Alemania , Humanos
17.
Artículo en Alemán | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33403461

RESUMEN

Hamburg promotes the establishment and expansion of integrated municipal strategies in communities. For the consultation, we (the research community of the "Community Development of Health Strategies" project) developed a tool called Standortanalyse (Readiness for Establishing and Expanding Integrated Municipal Strategies of Health Promotion [RIMS]) using a participatory process. The tool design is based on the project's findings and follows the community readiness model. Standortanalyse is a location analysis that helps assess a community and is aimed at professionals. This article describes how translation into practice can be achieved. To that end, we present the findings of the Standortanalyse pilot phase in four districts of Hamburg from 2019 to 2020, which we accompanied with an evaluation.The Standortanalyse tool consists of a board, topic areas, question cards, and a workbook. The tool's central element is the analysis of the topic areas. The subject of our qualitative evaluation was acceptance of the consultations, suitability and handling of the tool itself, and needs for further development.The results have been broken down to consultation context, consultation approach, and effects. The central findings are: the tool promotes networking among professionals, contributes to structuring and transparency in the development of integrated municipal strategies in communities, closes knowledge gaps, and supports the processes. In practice, external process support is significant. In addition to the availability of the tool, it will be important to invest in consultant training and digital services in the future.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Promoción de la Salud , Alemania , Derivación y Consulta
18.
Acad Med ; 96(4): 558-567, 2021 04 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33332904

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: This qualitative study examined fiscal and administrative (i.e., pre- and post-award grants process) barriers and facilitators to community-engaged research among stakeholders across 4 Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) institutions. METHOD: A purposive sample of 24 key informants from 3 stakeholder groups-community partners, academic researchers, and research administrators-from the CTSA institutions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Medical University of South Carolina, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and Yale University participated. Semistructured interviews were conducted in March-July 2018, including questions about perceived challenges and best practices in fiscal and administrative processes in community-engaged research. Transcribed interviews were independently reviewed and analyzed using the Rapid Assessment Process to facilitate key theme and quote identification. RESULTS: Community partners were predominantly Black, academic researchers and research administrators were predominantly White, and women made up two-thirds of the overall sample. Five key themes were identified: level of partnership equity, partnership collaboration and communication, institutional policies and procedures, level of familiarity with varying fiscal and administrative processes, and financial management expectations. No stakeholders reported best practices for the institutional policies and procedures theme. Cross-cutting challenges included communication gaps between stakeholder groups; lack of or limits in supporting community partners' fiscal capacity; and lack of collective awareness of each stakeholder group's processes, procedures, and needs. Cross-cutting best practices centered on shared decision making and early and timely communication between all stakeholder groups in both pre- and post-award processes. CONCLUSIONS: Findings highlight the importance of equitable processes, triangulated communication, transparency, and recognizing and respecting different financial management cultures within community-engaged research. This work can be a springboard used by CTSA institutions to build on available resources that facilitate co-learning and discussions between community partners, academic researchers, and research administrators on fiscal readiness and administrative processes for improved community-engaged research partnerships.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/economía , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/estadística & datos numéricos , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Financiación Gubernamental/economía , Investigación en Medicina Traslacional/economía , Investigación en Medicina Traslacional/estadística & datos numéricos , Universidades/estadística & datos numéricos , Adulto , Connecticut , Femenino , Financiación Gubernamental/estadística & datos numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , North Carolina , Investigación Cualitativa , South Carolina , Tennessee , Estados Unidos
19.
Artículo en Alemán | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33373015

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Participatory research methods are gaining interest. In applying these methods, there is often a lack of consideration for methodological issues. Furthermore, a unifying system for categorizing the various approaches does not exist. OBJECTIVES: Based on a scoping review, a categorization of participatory research methods to promote health equity was undertaken. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Included in the review are 44 publications in German and English retrieved from various databases (PubMed, PsycInfo, SocIndex, Livivo, Cochrane, Fachportal Pädagogik). Additional publications were identified by hand searching and using the snowball method. RESULTS: The methods are categorized by research phase and type of format used. The principles of multidimensionality and phase integration are central to the proposed system of categorization, resulting in a primary distinction between the methods used to facilitate the participatory research process versus methods used for participatory data collection and analysis. The majority of methods identified are used for data collection or reflexive processes. There are gaps in the German literature regarding methods for cooperative decision making, participatory data analysis, and the application of research results. CONCLUSION: The classification system provides an overview of available methods and the degree of participation they promote. The system draws attention to the spectrum of methods available, being useful for both teaching and research purposes.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Proyectos de Investigación , Recolección de Datos , Alemania
20.
Artículo en Alemán | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33373016

RESUMEN

In recent years, the academic world has been increasingly concerned with the social benefits of research and how they can be identified and demonstrated. Various discussions are being held on the impact of research, which are especially controversial in those countries where impact has become an important factor in the distribution of research funding. For participatory health research, a form of research that prioritises the engagement of those whose work or lives are the topic of the research, achieving social just impact outside the academic world is fundamental to its goal to reduce health inequalities.This article explores the questions of how research impact can be understood and collected and whether the impact of participatory health research can contribute to equal health opportunities. It addresses aspects of impact discussions in the United Kingdom and Germany exemplarily and presents the current state of the professional debate on the topic. Finally, it describes the drivers of participatory health research that can lead to a strengthening of equal health opportunities.The discussion of research impact allows for assessing and strengthening the sustainability and value of research, not only in the field of participatory health research. The diverse impacts of participatory health research have, however, the potential to reduce health inequalities and need to be recognised as such.


Asunto(s)
Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Alemania , Reino Unido
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